Review: 2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO - More Travel & More Adjustability

Oct 2, 2020 at 19:38
by Mike Kazimer  
Specialized's latest version of the Stumpjumper EVO has undergone a number of revisions for 2021, receiving more travel, more adjustability, and more internal storage than ever before.

It now has 150mm of rear wheel travel, a 160mm fork, and 29” wheels (the previous model had 140mm of travel paired with a 150mm fork, and was available with 27.5" or 29" wheels). There's no longer a dedicated 27.5" version, but there is an aftermarket mullet-link option for riders that want to take the mixed wheel size route.

There are five complete models in the lineup, with prices starting at $4,099 for the Expert Comp, which has a full Shimano SLX drivetrain and brakes, a Fox 36 Rhythm Fork, and a DPX2 Performance shock.

Stumpjumper EVO Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon frame
• Travel: 150mm (r) / 160mm fork
• 63 - 65.5-degree head angle
• 438mm or 443mm chainstays (size S4)
• Weight: 30 lb / 13.6 kg (S4 w/o pedals)
• Sizes: S1 - S6
• Price: $4,099 - $9,899 USD
• Frame only: $2,999 USD
specialized.com


I've been spending time on the extra-fancy S-Works version, which retails for $9,899 USD. That hefty price tag gets you SRAM's wireless, electronic AXS drivetrain and dropper post, Code RSC brakes, Roval Traverse SL carbon wheels, and a Fox 36 Factory fork with a DPX2 Factory shock.



bigquotesEven though it's possible to make the Stumpjumper EVO nearly as slack a Demo, it still feels like a highly capable do-it-all machine out on the trail. Mike Kazimer




2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

Construction and Features

The new Stumpjumper EVO's carbon frame has a similar silhouette to its predecessor, with the single-sided Sidearm front triangle design, but the new frame is lighter and can hold more snacks and tools in the downtube. The claimed weight for an S4 frame is 2750 grams (6.1 pounds), including the shock.

As far as the SWAT snack compartment goes, its storage capacity has been increased by 15%, and there's now an included 22oz bladder that perfectly matches the shape of the frame. A spring loaded multi-tool still sits in the steerer tube, along with a chain tool and a quick link.

2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Extra storage room means you can carry more gummy bears, or use the 22-oz bladder to bring your fluid of choice.

All of the little frame details are taken care of – there's hassle-free internal cable routing, plenty of chainslap and down tube protection, a threaded bottom bracket, and short 34.9mm seat tube lengths that make it possible to run longer travel dropper posts.

2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
There's plenty of chain slap protection, and a little flap to keep rocks from getting pinched between the swingarm and front triangle.
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Geometry adjustments no longer take place at the shock mount - that's moved to the chainstays.


Stumpjumper EVO 2021

Geometry & Sizing

It felt like Specialized was testing the waters for the last couple years with the previous generation of the Stumpjumper EVO. It first debuted as an aluminum frame in 2018, and even when the carbon frame was eventually released there were only two sizes available. That's no longer the case – Specialized has gone all in with the newest version, offering a total of six sizes, from S1 – S6. That gives a reach range of 408 to 528mm in the stock setting.

The new version is incredibly adjustable, thanks to an included headset insert that allows for 1-degree of head angle adjustment in either direction. There's also a chip on the chainstays that allows for another .5-degree of head angle change that's accompanied by a 7mm bottom bracket adjustment. That means it's possible to set the bike up with an extra-slack 63-degree head angle, or to steepen the head angle to a more conservative 65.5-degrees, all in a matter of minutes.

Going over all six possible configurations would put even the most number-obsessed rider to sleep, so let's start by focusing on how the bike arrives, in the middle / high position. That gives the size S4 a 475mm reach, 64.5-degree head angle, 438mm chainstays, and 76.9-degree seat tube angle.

Overall, the reach numbers are modern without going too crazy, but riders looking for something even longer could easily size up without running into fit-related issues. The largest two sizes, S5 and S6, get longer chainstays to help accommodate the taller riders that will be riding them.


2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Flip chips in the chainstays allow for .5-degree head angle change, 7mm bottom bracket height change, and 5mm chainstay length alteration.
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
The included headset cup makes it possible to slacken or steepen the head angle by 1-degree.



2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

Suspension Design

There were rumors floating around the the new Stumpjumper would look like a mini-Enduro, complete with a 6-bar suspension layout, but those turned out to be unfounded. Specialized did alter the Stumpjumper EVO's kinematics to more closely match those of the Enduro, though, which gives the bike a more progressive leverage curve, and a more rearward axle path at the beginning of its travel.

That new leverage curve should help make running a coil shock possible without needing to bump up a spring rate or two, and it should leave room in an air shock for riders to add or subtract volume spacers to fine tune the suspension feel.

Stumpjumper EVO 2021

Specifications
Price $9899
Travel 150mm
Rear Shock FOX Float DPX2 Factory
Fork Fox Float 36 Factory, 160mm
Cassette SRAM XX1 12-speed
Crankarms SRAM X01 Eagle
Chainguide MRP
Rear Derailleur SRAM Eagle AXS
Chain SRAM XX1
Shifter Pods SRAM Eagle AXS
Handlebar Roval Traverse SL Carbon, 30mm rise
Stem Deity Copperhead
Grips Deity Knuckle Duster
Brakes SRAM Code RSC
Wheelset Roval Traverse SL Carbon
Tires Butcher T9 / Eliminator T7 2.3"
Seat Specialized Bridge, Ti rails
Seatpost RockShox AXS Reverb, 30.9



2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review








Test Bike Setup

Getting the Stumpjumper EVO set up was a straightforward affair. I ran 182 psi in the DPX2 shock, which put me just under 30% sag. I stuck with the .6 inch volume spacer which worked for the majority of the rides I went on, but I'd likely bump up to a .8 if I was planning on doing some bike park laps, or frequenting even rougher trails with bigger hits. Up front, I inflated the Fox 36 to 84 psi, with one volume spacer installed.

I trimmed the handlebars to my preferred 780mm width, and after a couple rides swapped the 50mm Deity stem out for a 40mm stem. I typically run a 40mm stem on all the bikes I ride / test in order to maintain a familiar cockpit setup.

I started out with the bike in the stock configuration, and by the end of the test period I'd tried 4 out of the 6 possible geometry settings – I'll go over my findings in the ride impressions section.


Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 38
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer

Testing took place in and around Bellingham, Washington. Conditions for the two month test period were on the drier side of things, with a few wet days in the mix.


2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

Climbing

The Stumpjumper EVO's geometry adjustments allow for a high level of customization. After some experimentation, my preferred all-round setting ended up being neural / low. That gave the bike a 64-degree head angle, 42mm of bottom bracket drop, and 443mm chainstays. Those numbers would have been radical just a few years ago, but we're seeing more and more bikes in this travel bracket released with similar head angles - the Transition Sentinel and Norco Sight are two examples that come to mind.

Now, 64-degrees isn't that far off from what you'll find on a DH bike, but thankfully the Stumpy EVO climbs much, much better than a downhill sled. That relatively light weight helps, and while the Horst Link suspension layout may not be quite as snappy as some of the dual-link designs out there, the latest version has a good amount of support for those out of the saddle sprints. Traction takes priority over an extra-firm, super efficient feeling ride, which helps keep that rear wheel from spinning out on those slippery, tricky root-filled climbs.

Pedal strikes are a little more common in that lower geometry setting, but I ended up sticking with it because of the cornering benefits. Plus, most of the climbs where I live are more rooty than rocky – there's a little more give when you hit a pedal on a stump compared to running into a solid chunk of granite.

I did spend some time with the bike in the slackest and lowest setting, but found that it felt too slack on mellower terrain for my liking. It gave the bike a lazy feel, and took away some of the easy handling that I enjoyed in the middle / low setting. Changing the head angle doesn't take that long, though, and I could imagine regularly switching it up for trips to steeper shuttle zones or a lift-served bike park.


2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

Descending

Even though it's possible to make the Stumpjumper EVO nearly as slack a Demo, it still feels like a highly capable, do-it-all machine out on the trail. The reach is modern without being crazy long, which makes it an easy bike to dip into corners and wriggle through tight sections. The extra travel and progression compared to the previous version are welcome changes, and help ensure that there's a little extra in reserve for bigger hits.

It still doesn't have the bottomless feel of the Enduro, but there's plenty of grip, and even in loose, marbley conditions the rear wheel managed to find traction. "Effortless" is the adjective that comes to mind when trying to sum up the Stumpy's handling in one word. No matter if I was on a steep, chunky descent, or on a smoother, jump filled line, I never felt like I was fighting the bike to get it to behave the way I wanted. I even chose it for my longest ride of the summer, a 55-mile, 11,000 vertical foot technical adventure, and it passed that test with flying colors.

As I mentioned, I spend most of the test period with the headset in the middle setting paired with the lower bottom bracket position. For me, that struck a nice balance between climbing, cornering, descending performance. The low and slack position is exactly that, and it works great for those extra steep, straight down the fall line trails. Even in that setting the bike isn't wildly long, which helps keep it maneuverable – there was never a sense that I'd somehow ended up on a runaway freight train.


2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review



2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
specialized enduro 2020

How does it compare?

When the last version of the Stumpjumper EVO came out, it didn't take long before riders started putting longer stroke shocks on it to increase the amount of rear travel. With the new version, that step's already taken care of, and realistically if riders want even more travel they should consider the Enduro instead.

Compared to the same size Enduro, the Stumpjumper EVO has a more energetic feel, especially at slower speeds. Part of that is likely to do with the difference in reach numbers, and the other part has to do with the suspension layout and shock spec.

If I was planning on doing some racing, hitting up the bike park, and regularly ended up on rough, semi-sketchy lines I'd go with the Enduro. The Stumpjumper EVO could still easily be raced, or brought to the bike park, but it has more of an all-mountain feel – it's a little more pedaling oriented, with a lighter, less ground-hugging feel. Overall, it's like choosing between a monster truck or a rally car – it all comes down to what type of riding you'll be doing the most.


2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review

Technical Report

Butcher / Eliminator Tires: Specialized has been on the hunt for the right rubber formula and casing construction for their tires for years, and it seems like they're heading in the right direction with the new T9 compound on the Butcher. It's sticky without turning to a chewed up eraser nubbin after a few days, and even though the hot patch says 2.3” it inflates to 2.4”, which worked very well.

The Eliminator was easy to get along with in the dry, but I'd swap it out for something meatier and grippier if conditions were wet and muddy.

SRAM AXS Reverb post: Nobody actually needs a wireless electronic dropper post, but the AXS Reverb does work extremely well. My only complaint is that the longest version at the moment has 170mm of drop – I would have preferred to see a 200mm post on this bike.

SRAM AXS Eagle derailleur: The AXS derailleur shifted perfectly every single time, and I even managed to remember to occasionally charge the battery. I do have one request, one that applies to all of SRAM's derailleurs: I wish the clutch tension was higher. The amount of resistance to cage movement on the AXS derailleur is noticeably less than what you'll find with a Shimano derailleur, which makes it easier for the chain to slap up and down and make a racket.

2021 Fox 36:These days, classifying a bike by its fork seems like an easy way to figure out its intended purpose. The 36 used to be the burliest single crown option in Fox's lineup, but now that the 38 exists it's turned into an excellent option for trail / all-mountain bikes. It's a smooth operator, and there's something extremely satisfying about letting out any air that's gotten trapped in the lowers with the little bleed valves on each leg.

2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review


Pros

+ Wide range of effective adjustments that can quickly transform how the bike feels.
+ Light weight, allows for burly components to be installed without turning it into a tank
+ Well sorted frame - clever, useful features.

Cons

- The price of this one is going to be a con for most people, but keep in mind that there are other more affordable models that are still well spec'd
- It could use an even longer travel dropper, but there's not an AXS post longer than 170mm.



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe 2021 Stumpjumper EVO is a refined, adjustable, and more than anything, versatile bike. Specialized call it the 'ultimate trail bike', and while that phrase would normally set off my marketing hyperbole detector, in this case it's a very accurate description. Mike Kazimer








375 Comments

  • 292 4
 I always hate liking specialized, I would much rather support and like a smaller company, but lately, they have been cranking out some incredible machines! Its a love-hate relationship but I gotta hand it to them.
  • 142 1
 the headset 1º cup change is a solid move
  • 82 2
 @mtbmaniatv: as long as its solid and doesn't creak.
  • 63 3
 I totally understand why people hate the big red S. Mostly because they’re a legal bully and a big brand. But their bikes just WORK. I’ve had like 4 or 5 now and every time i try another brand, i find my way back to Spesh, they fit better than Trek, and the suspension feels supportive...
  • 40 3
 Came here to say this. Always enjoyed hating on the Spesh... from their crappy house-brand components in the 90's, capture of the Horst link patent, proprietary standards, failure-prone Stumpy upper links, and design-for-dentist engineering. But they created the Enduro, and have been making some pretty appealing bikes lately. Internal conflict....
  • 32 63
flag BenTheSwabian (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 The last Stumpjumper wasn't exactly amazing though. Bad value for money, dated geometry, BB was too low and the linkage was criticized for having barely any progression and bottoming out too quickly. And if I'm not mistaken, this model has that same frame.
  • 34 31
 @dynamatt: But apparently they don't just work? Have seen lots of people online, complaining about cracked frames on their new Enduros.
  • 21 6
 Yeah, they've been knocking it out with every release it seems. Generally speaking, I think Trek and Specialized pumping out killer bikes is a good thing. It makes everyone else step their game up or get left behind.
  • 10 1
 @BenTheSwabian: no, look at the top tube, it's completely straight compared to the old one which had a sort of junction at the side strut.
  • 22 4
 @BenTheSwabian: Perhaps but their warranty is incredible. No BS and done fast. The last time I cracked a frame it was right before they released an updated model. They gave me the option to wait a few weeks for the new one instead of giving me old stock.
  • 30 2
 Respect their engineering, hate their business practices (IP bullies, 'concept' stores with little choice, the way they treat their dealers like a piece of meat instead of partners)
  • 12 2
 @BenTheSwabian: had an alloy Evo for a while, was disappointed not only because of the rear suspension performance (bad progression, very low anti squat) but also the thing creaked no end, the bearings got shock quickly and the shock bolts were made of butter
  • 20 7
 It is funny how a lot of comments don't like Specialized, but in the Pinkbike poll it was the most-owned bike. Specialized makes good stuff. I'm just not big fan of their proprietary shock mounts. I want more options in shock choice.
  • 35 0
 @tacklingdummy, thankfully this one doesn't take a proprietary shock - you should be able to fit most 210 x 55mm shocks on there.
  • 10 1
 @mikekazimer: You are right. I retract my statement. From the pictures it does show standard shock. Thanks for the pointing out my mistake.
  • 9 1
 Let's hope they still destroy shocks, otherwise there will be nothing to complain about Wink
  • 19 10
 @lkubica: Have no fear with the high leverage ratio they and still running a yoke mount it will continue to shred shocks apart for sure with a heavy rifer at the helm. Funny that they never seam to mention this bike is will have active suspension if you are a twig like kazimer but if you weigh over 180 you should probably be looking elsewhere. I am surprised with all the information out there it is not discussed more that high leverage bikes are better for lightweight people and low leverage ratio bikes are usually better for heavier ones. With that all said this does look like a very sick bike for most riders.
  • 16 2
 @mixmastamikal: Another fun thing that gets brushed over all the time are the implications of shock stroke. By using a 55 mm stroke shock for a 150 mm bike and wanting it to progressive the initial leverage ratios are inherently higher. The only thing that will maintain the same amount of progression and lower leverage ratios across the board is a longer stroke shock. Ideally heavier riders would be able to use a 60/65 mm stroke on a bike in the 150 mm range and a 70/75 mm stroke on a bike in the 170 mm range.
  • 3 0
 @tacklingdummy: proprietary shocks are long gone
  • 2 2
 Ugh, geez. This again.
  • 4 3
 The status is an amazing bike and the price is as good as dtc. I love the bike.
  • 5 0
 @Purpledragonslayer: The Status would be good in carbon. Looks like Cannondale Habit with better numbers and mullet wheel size.
  • 5 1
 I ride a 2019 stump evo (evo-ed to 160mm front) and 2021 epic Evo. I'm happy.
  • 4 2
 @fracasnoxteam: if you ever get bored of it, you can put a 210x55 shock on your stumpy and have basically this exact new bike! I rode a 2020 stumpy with a 160 fork and 210x55 shock and it was amazing. Zero issues with tire rub or anything.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: you mentioned using the 0.86 spacer for bike park but it’s not recommended per FOX website.

So how does it handle big drop with 0.6 spacer ?

Reference: www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=568
  • 3 1
 @ironxcross: what about the reach?, the 2018-2020 stumpy was living in 2014 from a reach pov
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: I think he was referring to the Evo model, which was pretty much up to date reach wise
  • 3 1
 @Arierep: he evo-ed the evo?
Ohh..my bad then. Sorry.
  • 5 5
 @tacklingdummy: carbon can piss off
  • 2 1
 @mtbmaniatv: Who wouldn’t want this if it was trouble free?? It’s brilliant!
  • 5 5
 @dynamatt: I feel like the 'legal bully' stems from, yea that one shitty time they sued a bike shop for being called Sworks? or Roubaix, something...that one sucked....but anything else was just protecting their IP, which is not a bad thing. Seems like its been pretty quiet for a while...Trek has done as many legal showdowns with people-remember Dave Weagle?
  • 2 0
 @dynamatt: right on. I’m not a brand loyalist but for me, their bikes just feel right and they’re hyper-available at most LBSs so getting in a test ride or demo is easy. I wish there were more options to test some of the smaller brands—in particular the direct order ones.
  • 15 5
 @eugenux: What about it? I'm 6'1 I rode a large with a 45mm stem and it felt great, and not noticeably different than the large Hightower I owned around the same time. PB armchair engineers have become way too obsessed with the reach figures if you ask me. The 2018-2020 stumpy is one of the best and fastest trails bikes ever produced, if you're gonna pass on riding it because of some amount of millimeters discussed on the internet then that's your loss.

I can guarantee that if the internet hadn't made a stink about reach figures nobody would ever know or care about it. Back in the day when you went to a shop to learn about bikes and talked to the shop guys/gals did they ever once mention petty shit like that? Nope. But poor Mike K. is tasked with splitting hairs between 200 different nearly identical bikes each year.
  • 7 0
 I was on the specialized hate band wagon...then I bought an Enduro. X01, carbon wheels, ohlins suspension. Monster truck is an understatement. I love this thing. More often than not I choose it over my gambler.
  • 3 1
 @ironxcross: not really just some theoretical number..going from 435 to 460(upsizing the same model), then going back to my M size on another bike with 455mm reach. No more OTBs from me since going larger on the reach derpartment and also much more comfy on having/riding my "handlebars to my chest". It is amazing what 20mm extra can do. Soo.., sorry, but this is not from my armchair ideeas but, my experience riding my bikes in the last two years.
  • 3 0
 @dynamatt: From one who raced professional DH and DS for them all through the late 80's into 1999, they are an incredible company, i also worked in the R&D dept for many years, and let me tell you, ALL shitball moves against other companies, brands, naming, blah blah blah, comes directly from one guy, Mike Sinyard! The people that dedicate their lives basically to the brand are one in a million, its to bad Mike has caused so much hate on the brand, single handed. I still support and ride their bikes because they are some of the very best on the planet, but the inner rulings of the company are actually nutty, all great ideas, and bad can be over ruled/determined by one guy..... go figure...... Ride On!!!!!
  • 2 0
 @ironxcross: No way to get bored ;-)
  • 4 0
 @eugenux: Yes, most of evo owner evo-ed the evo. It already looked like a prototype, so why not.
  • 3 4
 @ironxcross: That's the kind of BS people say who never actually tried a long and slack bike (aka Norco Sight or Commencal Meta TR29 levels of long and slack). If this kinda stuff doesn't matter and is a fad that nobody cares about, as you claim, then why aren't you riding a bike from 2001?
  • 3 0
 @ironxcross: No, back in the day they talked about your inseam and seat tube length and then rummaged through a box of stems to find one that fit you better.
  • 1 0
 @mtbmaniatv: This. Been running a Cane Creek Angleset on my 66 deg Ripmo V1 now on my AF. Playing with the different head angles is fun and when you get to the 63.5-65 range it seems more like personal preference.
  • 2 0
 @dynamatt: The resale is garbage - this coming from a Spec convert....
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: how do you compare this bike to the Transition Sentinel (although they now come with the latest 2021 Fox X2 shock, rather than the one you tested and had issues with)? On paper they both seem very similar.
  • 5 1
 @BenTheSwabian: Well I currently ride a 2020 Enduro... but ya one of these days I'll get around to trying a long and slack bike to see what the hype is about.
  • 1 2
 @ironxcross: need to sling your leg over a Geometron G1, storia shock on the back is a cut above everything else.
  • 2 1
 @sir-hc: I'm sure they're good fun, but don't get me started on the coil bandwagon either. Air spring technology has come so far in the last 10 years that I really don't think coils have any place on a trail bike. DH/freeride still for sure.
  • 2 1
 @ironxcross: let me guess, you read that in the last super duper 2021 air shock release article?
  • 4 0
 @ironxcross: Throw an EXT shock on your Enduro and get back to me on that.
  • 2 2
 @ironxcross: air shocks still wallow like crazy on fsr bikes
  • 3 0
 @Purpledragonslayer: Actually, you internet morons, I've had two FSR bikes in the last 6 months and I rode 100+ miles on each with Ohlins coils on them (trying several spring rates) before swapping for an X2. And no it's not since 2021, air shocks have been superior since the release of the Float X2. I've tried using other air shocks and other coils and every single bike I've had since the X2 came out I've ended up putting one on and every single time all I think is "dammit, wish I did that sooner".

Anyone who thinks the X2 is "dead" or "wallows" hasn't taken the time to figure out shock tuning. You have tremendous control over compression, rebound, and progression so the ONLY reason it would wallow or have any unfavorable characteristics would be because it isn't tuned to your liking.

There's a reason air is still on majority of EWS bikes. And the fact that even some world cup DH racers run air shocks is a testament that they're beyond good enough for any non-pro's trail bike.

Gah, I believe I specifically asked you to not get me started.
  • 2 1
 @ironxcross: I have a factory float X2 and absolutely hate it. I even had a shockwhiz hooked up to get the settings bang on and it still wallows and bottoms out. 25% sag, maxed out volume spacers and compression almost full closed I can bottom it out on drops and really gnarly rock gardens. Sent it to fox to get it serviced to see if there was anything wrong with it and they said it's fine. I'm not the only one, many people have had a similar experience to me. No I'm not a heavy rider either. 150 lbs. What works for you doesn't work for everyone.
  • 2 1
 @ThunderChunk: that's the first time I've heard of an x2 to behave in such a manner. I had mine tuned a little but still, not something incredibly different than the base set-up and iy was miles better than the current super deluxe ultimate I have on my bike. Best (air)shock I ever had.
As for our frirnd here, mr @ironxcross, who thinks all of us are morons..., I'd suggest him to try the ext. My friend, who has it on his bike, has never been more satisfied by a shock and he had them all(well, most of them), coil and air and he feels the ext is totally different than any other shock, making his bike floating/flying on the downs.
  • 1 2
 @BenTheSwabian: you are mistaken.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: I believe the suspension design has a big part to play in how certain shocks perform. The X2 is very linear, almost like a coil. I think I would benefit from a more progressive shock. My settings aren't even close to the base settings in order to have a rideable bike.

What didn't you like about the super deluxe ultimate? I'm considering a new bike and it comes with either a fox factory build with a dhx2 or rockshox with a super deluxe ultimate. I'm undecided.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: I find it to be less nuanced than the x2. It is supportive (I have 1 volume spacer in it) but, somehow, after 4 years on X2, it seems..well..less. What I feel is that I know less about what is happ beneath my wheels. As a shock, it works great..it does the job well..but there are less info that get to me. To put simpler, it feels more like a blunt instrument. It took all of 15 minutes to set-it-up and only played with 2-3 clicks of compression in 6 months. By comparison, the x2 needed days of adjusting (spacers, psi, hsc, etc), usually only arriving at a preffered set-up while spending 3+ days at a bike-park.

Or maybe it is all just in my mind. Smile ))))
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: I'm sorry but it's just simply not set up correctly if at 150lbs you are having trouble with bottoming out. I'm not denying you're clearly having a bad experience with it, but you can't possibly tell me that it is the X2's fault when there are heavier riders running the same shock on the EWS and even DH world cup without issues... assuming it's the right base tune for your bike.

Sag % is just a starting point for your air pressure, if you're having these problems you definitely need to keep bumping the pressure up until it rides better. The key to making the X2 fun is having enough air pressure that you do NOT go deep enough into the travel to hit the HSR circuit unless it's a big hit. Put that thing at 15% sag, make sure your LSR is set closer to open than closed so it's nice and quick, and your bike will feel very different. Then you can find a middle ground where you really like it.

And I don't deny this EXT shock is probably good stuff, but if it is so good it's not because it's a coil it's because they made a good damper.
  • 1 0
 @ironxcross: I believe it's my suspension design that doesn't work well with the X2. My LSR is at 21 clicks so almost full open. The rebound is actually great, I don't feel any chatter and it plows through tech no problem. The problem is with the compression. If I add any more clicks it feels too harsh.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: Wait is this on a stumpy, enduro, or other bike? If you're on something else then ya I'm not sure, I've only used the X2 on stumpy (but with a 55mm stroke), enduro, and Ibis HD4. Very possible there are other bikes where it is not great.

You say more compression makes it harsh, have you tried more air pressure as well same problem I assume? Compression dampers can only make nuanced changes to how it feels, they aren't going to defend against bottom outs at all. It sounds like you need to get your air pressure high enough to not bottom out, then open up the compression dampening until it's not too harsh. But totally possible it's your suspension design if you're on a different bike, I thought we were bickering about FSR bikes specifically.
  • 2 0
 Just Specialized fits perfect for me. Maybe they know my sizes Smile
  • 57 2
 Think they knocked it out of the park with this new iteration. It's a bike that can cater to pretty much any rider and it's very very well thought out through and through, gotta give them props and I can't wait to ride one. Something worth mentioning is that these are pretty much available at shops right now, no more waiting for company's next batches of bikes to arrive.
  • 9 1
 True. Im happy with my normal Stumpjumper but they took it to the next level.

The frame is extremely light and good adjustability + sizing.

They are going to sell a lot.
  • 26 56
flag blowmyfuse (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:29) (Below Threshold)
 Can cater to any rider except those of us who don't want their front wheel to be that huge.

Bikes are supposed to be fun. Give me my fun front wheel.
Keep singletrack...single. Beer
  • 5 43
flag cowboyray (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 It’s good but should come with a duel crown
  • 8 1
 IMHO the most the most important part - available now!
  • 22 11
 Agreed. This bike in a 27.5 would be great. Don’t want a 29er. @blowmyfuse:
  • 11 0
 @ricochetrabbit: I get the mullet bike thing, I'm a short arse and hate buzzing my bum but having to have to bring two spare tyres of different sizes on trips is a pita.. What's wrong with a small front tyre/wheel for non racers?!?
  • 8 1
 @blitz66: just overfork, also there are plenty of bikes available with 27.5 size;
I would not be worries about wheel size at all;

I would say the whole package - what it matter, there are bikes with 25,7 that are not playfull and vice versa plenty of 29 that are playful and feels small;

the only disadvantage of modern geometry and wheels that bike racks are not getting bigger
  • 7 0
 @blowmyfuse: I agree (for once!) with the demand for more wheels options, like the old Evo. Luckily, the article states that Specialized sells a rear link that allows the use of a 27.5" rear wheel. Combine this with a longer travel front fork (170mm or 180mm) with a 27.5" front wheel, and it becomes a 27.5" Evo, but with more front travel whilst retaining the published geometry, which is super cool!

Very practical and intelligent approach from Specialized. Switching to 29" wheels whilst offering 27.5"options. Plus, the adjustable frame geometry pieces work well with this sort of convertibility. Cheers to Specialized for thinking of all wheel sizes and geometry settings!

Beer
  • 5 0
 @ricochetrabbit: You can run the mullet link rear & put a fork spacer under the head tube for 27" front, easy.
  • 3 0
 @zyoungson: yeah, what this guy said.
Early in the video, it says - run the correct inserts and this bike can be ridden 27/27
  • 2 0
 @blitz66: Hey just an FYI a 29er tube will work in a 20" wheel. I only carry a 29in tubes for myself (29er), my wife (27.5), Son #1 (24") and son #2 (20"). You just poke the tube back in through itself with your finger and then install. I saw Matt Jones or some other pro guy talk about that. Certainly fine for just getting out of the woods.
  • 1 1
 @Svinyard: It's called the "Recycled condom" trick.

Legend has it the method was developed on the outskirts of Saigon in the late 60's.
Yet to be affirmed/denied via Snopes
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: I use that trick! Don't think it works for tyres though! I always bring a spare tyre on trips so I don't get stung with bike park/trail centre prices for a maxxis minion I could have got at home for half the price!
  • 3 0
 @nickmalysh: Except they’re not. Are they so new that the stock hasn’t updated online or have they already sold out everywhere? Or could they not make enough.
  • 47 1
 Everyone thought this bike was too far out when it was released a few years ago. Even Specialized was nervous only releasing a low end aluminum version in two sizes. Fast forward to this release and although they made it more adjustable, they really didn't change much from the previous version. While people will have the option to make the geometry more traditional, in reality the majority of riders will end up exactly where the early adopters landed. 64 HA/ 445ish CS, 440 BB, more progressive suspension (Cascade link added to the previous design). People like to dump on Specialized, but in reality they are the most progressive of the big manufacturers and really listen to what riders want.
  • 6 0
 They've done a good job here, I love it and the ability to swing the HTA in such big swaths is what we need for geo tuning...nothing this .5 degree nonsense. I'd love to see them care about the kids scene a bit tho. They are so far behind its not even funny. Norco basically made this same/similar Geo for kids a year ago with custom Manitou kids suspension etc and killed it. Spesh and the rest of the big guys need to step up.
  • 5 0
 I test rode the original alloy version and it was a revelation for me. I wound up on a Transition Patrol with similar geo but more travel and a better price. It has totally changed my riding. I'm not a huge fan of carbon frames, but this one is looking tempting for the next bike.
  • 2 3
 " in reality they are the most progressive of the big manufacturers and really listen to what riders want."

Never mind issues like... the enduro from a few years ago were released as the latest/greatest only to be re released 6 months later in an attempt to fix kinematic issues.
  • 10 6
 @Eatsdirt: and other companies would have ignored it for 3 years because they didn't want to remake the molds. Every company has issues and Specialized have been very heavy handed protecting their IP. Faulting them for taking on the costs associated with making a mid cycle change IMO is misplaced. How many times has Giant or SC thrown out carbon molds 12 months after release?

These are the places I see Specialized pushing the market forward and moving things from background trends (Pole, Geometron, etc as examples) to mainstream. Going from memory so some of these are probably off but;

First major with a long travel 29 - 2015 Enduro
SWAT - 2017 SJ
First major to offer progressive geometry - 2017 SJ Evo
First major with multi adjustable geometry - 2021 SJ Evo

There are smaller companies that have done some of these things for a long time, but taking the risk to do it at scale is a completely different proposition.
  • 5 5
 @salespunk: Your post tastes like Kool Aid, but I'm sure these new bikes ride just fine in the grand scheme of things.
  • 2 0
 @salespunk: first enduro 29 was 2013 FYI, also spesh has taken a while to get on board with modern (proper) geo en large. And there have been plenty of other brands recently to offer geo adjust & adjustable stays, I think scott had 27/29 adjustment in 2018 before mullet bikes were really a thing.
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: Do they really need to step up, or should you go & buy a norco/ commencal?
  • 2 1
 @salespunk:

Scott voltage FR had adjustable geometry via angle set cups, different settings in the shock linkage and adjustable dropouts. It's not a new concept.
  • 2 0
 @zyoungson: That's a great statement. Add YT to that group now too and Rocky Mountain. We have 2 commencals, 2 spawns and bmx bikes as well. That's what we are doing (like you recommend)...BUT...the masses just walk into the LBS where they bought their own sick bike. And then they by hot garbage like Spesh Riprocks with 3in tires, horrid geometry and coil forks...because they can sit their kid on it. Same for most of the other big brands. Then those bikes turn into used bikes and kids have a bunch of bikes that are so far below average that it sucks. They can make cheap bikes (Scott Scale rigid is decent) but they need to have great geometry and offer an airfork model with hydro brakes...and never do Plus tires again. It's getting better but geez how hard is it to make a freaking kids bike when you are as big as those guys are??? The more competition we have the better the bikes will be.
  • 1 0
 @Eatsdirt:

You should ask Salespunk how many different brands of bikes he’s ridden. You might be surprised that he has all the flavors of kool aid...
I know he used to be into the Santa Cruz Nomad, but that was only after trying out an Ibis Mojo HD first, etc...
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: depth of knowledge and an opinion is kool aid apparently. We’re talking about toys here lol
  • 1 0
 @SeanC1: thanks for the clarification on Scott. I was not stating that it was a new concept, I was stating that Specialized was the first of the big manufacturers to combine them all on a single bike. Sounds like I was incorrect.
  • 1 1
 @zyoungson: I was not stating that Specialized was the first to offer adjustable geo or that it was a new concept. I was stating that they were the first among the big brands (Giant, Specialized, Santa Cruz, etc) to combine several of the adjustments into one bike. I was corrected below that Scott did this previously.

I would still posit that they are pushing the mainstream market further than what Scott did since the SJ is a mainstay of their line and not a niche bike like the Voltage FR.
  • 40 2
 The swat storage, especially with the liquid bladder, is the most innovative thing on this bike. So cool. More manufacturers should take note.
  • 4 51
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:49) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah so cool, you get super light frame and then stuff it up with water and other crap, awesome Big Grin
  • 26 1
 @epideme: better than taping it to your frame or riding without it
  • 3 54
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:02) (Below Threshold)
 @Upduro: I prefer to carry those extra 3+ kilos in my backpack, than on my bike, where it effects the ride quality...
  • 16 0
 @epideme: Well I mean that stuff would have to go somewhere on a heavy frame too
  • 25 2
 @epideme: You actually get better ride quality with more weight on frame.
  • 2 31
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:12) (Below Threshold)
 @unusual-bread: hahaha okay Big Grin Yeah maybe on downhill it sits little better... With that logic, why the manufacturers are not making heavier bikes then?
  • 42 1
 @epideme: The stat I have read (in several places) is that weight carried on your body effects you as much as 3x times the weight carried on your bike. Because of how you have to use muscle energy to support that weight on your back, vs letting the bike do the job. Makes sense to me - you don't see many cycle tourists carrying backpacks.
  • 18 1
 @epideme: sarcasm? Low on the frame is the best place for storage as it improves center of gravity and sprung/unsprung mass ratio.
  • 4 44
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:46) (Below Threshold)
 @nouseforaname: Well maybe if you are some feeble roadie, I don't notice my backpack at all, plus it works as protection during crashes. But that's personal preference I guess.

And really I would not compare myself to some useless tour bikers Big Grin Of course they strap all their stuff to the bike, because they just pedal straight on roads and carry ton of stuff with them, of course you not gonna go trail riding with 30kg+ backpack...
  • 6 42
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:50) (Below Threshold)
 @ytu45: Alright Big Grin Stick an anvil to your bb, if it works for you, I don't care... I'd say that straping 3kg+ backpack to my 90kg body will effect my riding less than strapping the same weight to my 14kg bike... And there is no difference to sprung/unsrung mass between strapping it to your body or to the bike, because your body is on the bike, so it is sprung mass either way...
  • 20 0
 I question whether the people hating on the frame storage even ride. I love riding without a pack. With the frame bladder and a bottle I could ride this 15+ miles with no pack at all. On paper this bike looks sick. They remedied a lot of the issues with the last generation Evo. That combined with the frame storage gives this bike a leg up on the competition. Haters gonna hate.
  • 12 1
 @epideme: Are you familiar with the concept of a lever? Ignoring your ignorance of concepts like "center of mass of a system" and the like, a quick google search for 4th grade physics on levers will help illustrate why carrying weight low in a frame is a significant advantage for mountain bikers. Assuming you want your suspension to perform well, you want to change directions as easily as possible, you want to reduce likelihood of OTB crashes, you want to reduce muscle fatigue (weight on your back impacts how hard you work where you connect with the bike), then I can tell you confidently that you are wholly incorrect. Want evidence: every enduro racer in history carries additional weight as low as possible.
  • 4 1
 Also important to point out that we often use sprung/unsprung mass incorrectly on pinkbike. That said, the concept remains: mass carried at the end of suspension levers of the system (rims, tires, cassettes are good examples) are technically "unsprung" mass, at least in the way this is discussed within automotive applications. That said, we talk about optimizing this weight because these things move in relation to the "sprung mass" which is effectively the center-of-mass of the system. Regardless, performance is improved by lowering "unsprung mass" - adding more weight (on your back) at the end of a leveraged system (your arms/legs as they connect to the bike) is a big time detriment to performance.
  • 3 25
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 12:19) (Below Threshold)
 @WalrusRider: No I don't ride bikes at all, I only read all the stats and graphs about how to be faster and then talk about it a lot, like most of the bikers today Big Grin
Then on the trail I am usually leaving all the smart people talking about tokens, clicks, unsprung mass, center of gravity far behind me...
  • 3 24
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 12:24) (Below Threshold)
 @KJP1230: Again I weight 90kg+ so straping my 3-4kg backpack to me is not really gonna effect my leverage all that much and it will effect my riding less than strapping the weight to my bike, especially on uphills.

Racers do a lot of things differently from hobby riders. And yes your point of strapping everything as low as possible is valid for going Downhill! But if you go up, you'll have to drag heavier bike up. And yes I saw lot of knobs with bananas strapped to their frame, so what Big Grin
  • 5 22
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 12:27) (Below Threshold)
 @KJP1230: Yeah everybody cares so much about unsprung mass, and then they stuff their tires with heavy inserts Big Grin Makes sense.

I don't know since when MTB bikers turned into whiny roadies?

Wanna be faster, shave your legs and gets some spandex too! Big Grin
  • 18 0
 @epideme: Again, you are incorrect. Moving 3kg of weight from very near the center-of-mass (low in the frame) to your back (about as far from the center-of-mass as possible, aside from your head) will make a big difference. Additionally, adding weight to your body means your muscles have to work harder than they would if the weight is in the frame. Look man, you're free to do what you want. I can only speak as an aggressive rider who 2 years ago switched from backpack to frame/hip pack. The difference was HUGE and noticeable on my very first ride. SWAT is a great solution to a very real problem.
  • 4 23
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 13:17) (Below Threshold)
 @KJP1230: : Man whatever floats your boat, I get your point. I understand what do you mean by lowering your center of mass. But then on the other hand, with the backpack, as I move on the bike my center of mass shitfts and can be also beneficial in some situations ie. steep downhils moving your weight over the back wheel, counter balancing while cornering etc.
I am also pretty aggressive rider and tried couple rides without the backpack and only difference I've notice was the bad feeling in the back of my head, because there was nothing protecting my back...
And we are only talking about downhill, but going up, you have to use more power to motor up the heavier bike, no doubt...
And honestly if you are NOT a pro race chasing every tenth, it makes NO DIFFERENCE AT ALL!

I am not hating on Swat as it's pretty smart, but just pointing out that everybody is possessed by the weight nowadays and then straps kilos of ballast to the bike...
  • 4 0
 @epideme: brilliant
  • 9 1
 @epideme: a light pack weighs about 600g. A SWAT door adds 250g or so. So carrying on the bike is the lighter solution. I can't believe I have to say this, but you have to carry it up the hill whether it's strapped to you or the bike, but on the bike it weighs less. Putting it on the bike improves suspension performance because it adds to the inertia of the bike, which allows the wheels to absorb bumps with less force transmitted to the rider. If you move that inertia to your body, your arms and legs have to do extra work as those forces get transmitted through the system. Plus lower cog is better. Plus packs look shit. Literally no drawback to carrying as much as possible on the bike.
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider: I dont like the suspension setup and the overall weight compared to some other setups.
Still one of the best bikes out there I'm sure, specially the expert model. I don't know if I'd think of it as "leg up", more of a different options and that's a great one option.
  • 3 13
flag epideme (Oct 6, 2020 at 14:42) (Below Threshold)
 @FatSanch: Recently I just watch a video with a pro DH World Cup mechanic and this guy even replaced the aluminum crank bolts for plastic ones, just to save a little weight maybe you can go tell him that he doesn't know what is he doing, because it doesn't matter how heavy your bike is....
If the weight wasn't a issue why nobody is racing steel frames, but carbon?
Fanny packs look shit I agree on that...
And it's difference if you carry the weight on your body while pedaling up, compared to carrying it on your bike, can't believe I have to say that. Try to push your bike up as it is and then strap a water bottle to it and try it again...
  • 7 1
 @epideme: This may shock you, but Pros ride and wear what companies want them to sell. Very few companies are actually free from this effect. For an example look at Mojo Racings skin suit testing back in the day - clearly faster. But not what the 'brands' wanted as the image of DH racing. So we got rules about how baggy clothing had to be to be - rules that are constantly shaved as riders get clothing custom fit to just skirt the edge of legality.
  • 1 4
 @nouseforaname: Oh I don't doubt that spandex would make you slightly faster around some dh tracks, but also I don't doubt the fact that if the companies wanted to start selling skin tight DH/Enduro jerseys they would, and the people after seeing few cool commercials with some pro riders, and reading few praising articles on PB would be more the happy to buy some DH spandex suit...
Just look how much tighter the jerseys got over years, the XL nowadays would be Medium 10years ago...
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: I'm not sure either of you are fully correct. Your assumption that the centre of mass is low on the frame is only correct with respect to the bike itself. This may be a better assumption in cars (which you reference as an example), but with a bike the rider adds a lot of weight to the system which migrates the whole body centre of mass of the system closer to their torso.

I don't think it's generally helpful to think of it as a whole system anyways. It is probably better to think of the body and bike as independent systems for this problem. I think the advantage of carrying weight on the frame, as you mentioned, is that the body doesn't have to support the mass. Which is correct. But also, if you look at the research, adding such little weight relative to your overall body mass changes your metabolic rate so little that you would likely not even be able to measure it. However, this is just during standing with the weight, I think FatSanch has a good point here. This effect will become larger as your body accelerates while riding.

This is where I think the other guy may actually have a point (although for the wrong reasons). In terms of a metabolic penalty for moving weight attached to your body, having it closer to your BODY's center of mass (which is around the lower 1/3rd of your back) will significantly reduce its impact on you. So in this sense, locating weight so far away from your body's center of mass (locating it in the frame), will cause your body to exert more energy to manipulate it, compared to having it on your back.Then again, how much do you need to manipulate your bike while riding? And how much of that energy forms the greater amount of energy being spent? So many questions, so few answers.

Long story short, I think if you are pedaling and not manipulating the bike, best to locate weight on the frame. If you are manipulating your bike constantly, I can't conclusively say, but I would suspect it may be a toss up.
  • 3 0
 @coast2coast-4: Nope - for overall performance of the system (cornering, for example) the center-of-mass of the system will be a moving point that is a combination of mass distribution for the rider + the bike + the gear. The goal is going to be to centralize this point between the tires and as low as possible (in general). By moving any weight lower in the system and closer to the center, you are effectively lowering and concentrating this center-of-mass.

There is a reason bike manufacturers fight like hell to get bottom brackets as low as possible, balanced against pedal strikes. Adding 3 kg of weight up high in the system negates many many millimeters of BB drop (as an example).

Also, the force of weight on the rider (as it relates to muscle endurance) will be a function of how far that extra mass is from the connection points in the lever (your hands and feet, for example). For evidence, go to a gym and try to hold a 15 lb dumbell straight out to the side at full arms length - it will get difficult quickly. Then try to support the same weight by balancing it on your elbow, instead of in your hand - much much easier. This is the same reason why (as a general rule) people with long arms have a much harder time producing maximum bench pressing - longer levers multiply the force of the mass.

There is no reason why having weight higher/further from the center of mass would be good in 99% of mountain biking. It would provide a de-localization of instant center of mass during dynamic movements, and at best would create more force that needs to be countered by the muscles of the rider to maintain bike performance - it will also have an outsized influence over the behavior of suspension, as a function of distance from the center of mass.
  • 4 0
 @coast2coast-4: Further evidence: dropping moving weight from rims/tires has a larger impact on power efficiency and pedaling performance (as well as bike handling due to lower gyroscopic force) than dropping the same amount weight from a cassette. The reason is because the tire/rim are at the outside of the lever (in this case the rotational radius from the hub) than does the cassette. Want to try it for yourself? Try swapping from a GX cassette to an XO1 cassette - you'll drop about 100 grams. See if you can feel the difference (you probably cannot). Now try the same ride with the XO1 cassette (- 100 grams), and put a CushCore in your tire (+100grams). Same amount of rotational mass added to the same wheel - but you will definitely notice the CushCore weight right away.

There isn't really a whole lot of debate here. These are pretty basic physics principles. To suggest that carrying weight up high on your back wouldn't negatively impact performance in a dynamic system like mountain biking is crazy. If there were ANY advantage to that, professional riders who are focused on descending times would place weights on their bodies. They don't. They seek to shed grams all together and carry as much of this weight as low as they can, while also trying to centralize this weight, moving their center-of-mass to the ideal position between the wheels.
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: Hey, I get the concept of 'lever arms', I don't understand where in my argument you thought I misunderstood the concept. I think you are still mistaking where the actual COM is tho... I'm arguing that with respect to your body, it is at your back. Your lifting weights argument is kinda proving my point then with respect to moving a weight located on your back instead of a distance away from your body...

For cornering, sure having weight low sounds like a good idea. I don't know the concepts well on that point. But I do know body energetics, and I'm speaking to your point about how much 'energy' would be required to carry weight, independent of bike handling in corners.
  • 3 0
 @coast2coast-4: If I add 3 kg of weight to my frame, that weight is applied as force directly from the frame to the ground (through the frame itself, and out through the tires.) If I add that weight to my back, that same weight will reach the ground through the tires, but now it will also travel through my muscles (arms, legs, etc.) as these are the connection points between the body and frame. Considering most mountain bikers are not constantly jumping their bikes, and probably spend 99.999% of the time with their tires touching the dirt, it is going to be a benefit to shortcut where the weight sits and where the force must travel to to the ground to counter balance this weight.

How long do you suppose in a given 1 hour ride you are spending going downhill? Lets call it 20 minutes. If I told you that you were going to go outside and do a combination of exercises that mimic riding a mountain bike downhill for 20 minutes, would you rather wear a 3kg weight vest, or not? Do you think there would be a difference in total performance between two identical athletes who perform these exercises for 20 minutes?
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: Yeah, but where I disagree in your example is that one athlete is not carrying 'nothing'. They also have a 3kg weight at a distance away from their body. Sure, it rests on the ground when they are not moving. But every time they accelerate, they have to accelerate that weight at distance far away from the COM.
  • 3 0
 @coast2coast-4: if we assume that most non-slope style mountain bikers are focused on performance with their wheels mostly touching the ground, then you need to presume that all forces that will impact the ride are going to result from what is happening with the rider + gear + bike, and the tires (the contact point with the ground where force is applied and realized). The more you can lower the center-of-mass of the entire system, the better the tires will perform at creating consistent and predictable output in the form of cornering, maneuvering, etc. The goal should be to get as much mass of the system as close to center, and as low as possible to optimize performance. Period.

Because the ONLY points where the ground meets the system is the tires, you HAVE to consider the entire system (bike, rider, gear), and the center-of-mass of the entire system, as relating to these contact points. Therefore, it is obvious that getting as much weight as low as possible will create less dynamic change in this center of mass, and will work to effectively lower the center of mass. Weight further from this "instant center" point of the entire system, and especially weight that is both further and HIGHER than the instant center will have a disproportionate and negative effect.

I'm not sure why you are even arguing about this. Can you name one example of a dynamic sport where the goal isn't to optimize and consolidate the center of mass? Jui-jitsu, traditional wrestling, rally car racing, Formula 1 racing, GT racing, power lifting (low bar vs. high bar squat), Enduro mountain bike racing, DH mountain bike racing, MMA grappling, - gymnastics, free style skiing/snowboarding (all of which you see that moving arms/legs/equipment toward a consolidated center-of-mass increases stability and dynamism as a function of lower leveraged inertia), ski/snowboard racing (do racers race in a high or a low-as-possible position? The examples are literally endless.

Again, this is basic physics. Moving mass off your body will decrease muscle strain - especially weight that is higher off the contact points. Moving mass from high and leveraged to low and centered is an improvement for mountain biking (see: every comment ever on riding in attack position, centering oneself on the bike, frame design with low BB, etc.)
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: By extension, do you think we should carry weight stacked on our foot when we walk? It spends ~60% of the walking cycle on the ground. So you get to carry that weight for 'free' when it is on the ground....
  • 2 0
 @coast2coast-4: Final simple example: is descending better with your seat up, or with your seat in a dropped position? It's obviously better with the seat dropped. Why? Because now you are free to move your body into "attack position" which seeks to create more balance between front and back tire (centering), and your hips and torso are free to move lower in the system (lower center of mass).
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: Yeah man, I agree with some of your points. But I feel like you are not understanding the point I'm trying to make, but that's fine. It's hard to communicate stuff like this over typing on the internet.
  • 3 0
 @coast2coast-4: I understand the point you are trying to make, 100%. You just are not correct. Your basic argument started as: "If I weight 90kg, and the bike weights 14kg, then adding 3kg to my 90kg is much less of a change than adding 3kg to my bike." And I am saying that is not true because of the way bikes work.

The ONLY points where you and the bike are able to input forces to achieve your objectives are the tires. The ONLY points where you can input forces to affect the tires is the pedals and handle bars. Therefore, EVERYTHING above the tires' contact point is the system that is being moved. EVERYTHING above the handlebars/pedals requires additional force to support - you are not pulling the bike down the hill, you are RIDING the bike down the hill.

Based on all the examples of sports above, it is pretty clear to see that low center-of-mass, as well as consolidated or concentrated center-of-mass, as well as centralized (between contact points) center-of-mass is ideal. Again: there is a reason bikes are moving to more centralized rider position (chain stays matching reach numbers, for example), with as-low-as-possible bottom brackets. It is also the reason we have ultra-low standover, 200mm dropper posts, and why we ride downhill in the "attack position" of weight-centered, knees bent, hips hinged, back flat, chest low, elbows out. It's the reason why reviewers describe good descending bikes as "I felt like I was riding IN the bike, not on top of the bike". Hell, its the reason why an MTB coach will tell you to "lean the bike underneath your body to steer it" rather than tipping your body away from the bike (this tip is effective because it creates consistency for locating the center-of-mass low and between the wheels!)

C'mon man - its plain obvious. Do you see any amateur or professional racers in descending bike disciplines who choose to carry supplies on their backs if they have a choice in the matter? You dont!
  • 3 0
 @coast2coast-4: Stick with me here: Imagine the simplest possible mental model. Imagine we are at the top of a 4% decline that goes straight down a paved road for 60 miles. Now imagine that I say to you that you are to get on your bike, stand up (no sitting, that is not how we descend on mountain bikes) and you are going to ride straight down the hill for as long as your muscles can support you. If I now tell you that you have to carry 5 kg while you do the challenge, would you rather me strap that weight to your back, or to the frame?

Now imagine the same challenge (60 miles, constant grade, downhill on smooth pavement, you have to be standing), and I tell you that at random times throughout the challenge you will need to make quick maneuvers to avoid hitting obstacles in the path. Where would you choose to carry the weight?

Do you see my point? In either case, its obvious that putting the extra mass on the bike is better. The same is true in mountain bike EXCEPT in cases where you are literally pulling the bike up and over something. Does this happen in biking, sure! Do we spend maybe a total of a couple of seconds doing this vs. minutes or hours of descending and inputing force into the tires in an average ride - also yes. I'm not sure how much more I can say to explain it: mountain biking is a bit easier to do when you are not carrying weight high on your back. Hell - even fanny packs are making a roaring comeback as people try to get the weight lower - they sure as hell are not more comfortable than back packs.
  • 5 0
 I've been a pack wearer basically since the very first Camelbak in like 1989. Past few years rode with the EVOC FR Enduro. Amazing pack. Then, this year, decided to create the lightest weight kit I could and stash it in my SWAT box. Got a bottle mount. Got a Raceface Flank Core as I want the spine protection. Dang, it makes a MASSIVE difference for me. I really did think all the things you do. And now I know better, at least for myself. On epic rides while traveling, I'll still use the pack, mostly for the water capacity. But when I can avoid it, I will. In case you're interested, this is the kit I put together. Super lightweight and covers a lot of situations: www.pinkbike.com/photo/19095935 A bit over 300gr Less without the Lifestraw.
  • 40 3
 The big S killed it. Not much you can hate about this bike (on paper at least)
  • 5 9
flag hamncheez (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:52) (Below Threshold)
 The only critique I can come up with is the rear shock is still yoke-driven. It puts premature wear on the shock. I know S isn't the only offender, and the 90 degree eyelet is miles better than the bolt on they used to do, but still an issue.
  • 7 1
 @hamncheez: This new linkage is spaced much wider apart and should help greatly reduce those side loads
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: How so, there is a bolt at the shock mount allowing flex as opposed to the old ones where the shock was bolted directly to the yoke
  • 1 0
 @zyoungson: The shock is still fixed at the other end; when the rear end flexes, the seat stays both rotate laterally (doesn't affect the shock because of the 90 degree mount) plus moves laterally- sideways. This still stresses the shock body more than a traditional mount, esp. a well designed rocker driven mount.
  • 37 7
 Take all my money.
  • 12 6
 for the down voters - this is a positive comment. lol.
  • 8 6
 @MikeyMT: Don’t worry about it. Downvoted are most likely a result of SDS, or Specialized Derangement Syndrome. Runs rampant on this site.
  • 10 1
 "Take all my money."

that's exactly what they are doing Big Grin
  • 25 1
 Damn, gotta give it to the Spesh MTB team recently. I wanna hate but they geo and builds recently have been pretty amazing. Under $5K for a XO1/GX build with Grip2! That Expert build is quite impressive.
  • 10 0
 The Comp build it an amazing value as well. Full SLX and some quality Fox suspension. It's a no brainer at only $1100 more than the frame only.
  • 26 3
 Man specialized is knocking it out of the park. From the epic evo, to the new Enduro, to this, every bike they've released in the last couple years is on point.
  • 6 5
 Enduro just needs the steeper seat tube(77-78 at proper extension)...as all bikes need.
  • 1 4
 So prior to the latest Stumjumper, the old enduro was the Enduro bike to have.

Then the Stumjumper comes out and now its slacker than the Enduro to the point where the Specialized riders are racing that over the The Enduro

Then the SJ Evo comes out, and is DH focused super enduro bike. If you wanted to ride trails, you are recommended the regular SJ

Now that the 2020 Enduro is out, which is the DH focused super enduro bike, the SJ Evo is the "ultimate trail bike".

So whats in store for 2021? Is the Enduro going to be the trail bike, and they are going to release a new super long enduro similar to Grim Donut/Nicolai/Pole/Privateer 161, and that is going to be the flaship DH super enduro bike?

I personally hate these stupid iterations on geo. Just make the bike have the correct geo the first time around, and then spend your research money doing all the ebike stuff since apparently thats where the money is at these days.
  • 1 0
 @phops: nice to have options. Sj evo looks to be the better laguna beach tool....until the enduro gets a steeper seat tube. Climbing in Laguna is just gnar...esp on a Rads ride.
  • 22 0
 Mike. Any initial thoughts on sight vs sentinel vs stumpy?
Given current landscape all options I need to order ahead of time and though similar on paper imagine there are a few differences.
  • 10 0
 Would love to see a write up vs the Sentinel
  • 3 0
 On the same boat here!
  • 3 0
 same here...have a frame on order and they sound similar on paper.
@mikekazimer can you please comment?
  • 2 0
 or vs sb130/150
  • 1 0
 Like always, great review Mike.
Stumpy Evo in slack/high geometry which is probably what I'd use in Squamish is almost identical to the Sentinel's geo. Looks like the updated suspension kinematics also are very close with both companies increasing progressivity with a similar leverage ratio curve. Probably the closest bikes on the market right now. Would be great to hear a real-world comparison @mikekazimer
  • 25 7
 Honestly, I’m not even mad. This looks sick! The headset is cool and even if the price isn’t for everyone I’d take this over an sb150 every day of the week!
  • 2 0
 Ya I wish my 2013 Enduro 29er allowed for an angleset back in the day....
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: now you can, 9 point 8 makes a integrated headset angleset. check it out on their site. Could save an older bike from obsolescence.
  • 1 0
 @thelittle: Really? Interesting....
  • 1 0
 @thelittle: unfortunately the 9.8 angleset doesn't work with a specialized headset
  • 5 2
 I always figured the Stumpy was more on par with the SB130 rather than SB150, and the EVO vs 130 Lunch Ride numbers match up fairly closely (adjustability of this bike aside).

I'd still rather the Yeti though :-)
  • 3 0
 @Artnshel: Really? I installed one on my 2018 Stumpy a month ago. Works amazing and changed the HA from 66.5 to 64.5.
  • 1 0
 @jrfields: the top cup is a millimeter off in my 2019 levo.
  • 16 2
 They are going to sell a lot
  • 17 3
 Tried to find something I didn't like. Failed. Nice whip.
  • 11 1
 6.1lbs with shock is extremely light for a heavy duty trail bike in 2020. All the other brands are going heavier and heavier (except Scott & Trek) to keep warranties down and cut costs in carbon layup design. 6.1lbs with shock is about the weight of a XC race bike frame from other manufactures. There are a few XC frames lighter, but not all of them! Good on Specialized for adding value here. The frame is one of the only places to keep weight down in a modern bike since everyone is pretty much riding the same part specs these days.
  • 2 2
 The hightower2 released 1.5 year ago is 6.0lbs with shock in size L.

Trail bikes definitely gained weight since 2016-2017 but "extremely light", no, that's not true.

Specialized XC frames are quite light, their trail frame is average weight.
  • 3 1
 From what manufacturer is an xc race frame 6 lbs? Many brands like Specialized, Orbea, and Scott have xc frames well under 4 lbs.

Not knocking the Stumpjumper evo tho, 6.1 lbs is pretty good for a bike in this category.
  • 5 0
 @p1nkbike @Mr-monterey I'd like to see some sort of verification that the Hightower 2 is 6.0lbs with shock. I have data in the spreadsheet that it's listed at 6.8lbs with shock. Trail bikes: Trek Fuel EX '21: 6.9, Niner Rip 9 RDO: 6.8, Hightower 6.8, SB130 6.9lbs, Sentinel 6.8lbs, Evil Offering: 7.2, Forbidden Druid: 7.5, Trek Slash '21: 7.0, SB150 7.1, Norco Sight '20: 7.5+, Ibis Ripmo: 6.7, Over Following 6.9. So, yea, it's extremely light at 6.1 for a 150/160 frame that's fully capable to race an Enduro. Even a half pound is a lot of weight difference in a frame in 2020.

Regarding it being as light as some XC race bikes. I knew I should have clarified that better. I was meaning to say XC race bikes from a couple years ago. The 2017 Epic for instance was pushing 6lbs. You are correct, the lightest of the lightest XC bikes right now are under 5. The Scott, the Orbea, etc. However I should say that many of the current 'xc' or lighter trail bikes (100-120mm) from many brands are at or above 6lbs for the frame. Something like a Kona Hei Hei comes to mind, Trek Top Fuel, etc. Bikes that definitely shouldn't be ridden in the park like this new EVO could be.
  • 1 0
 @btjenki: Sorry that the Hightower 1 (at 6lbs w/ shock.. well 5.88 )
  • 1 0
 @btjenki:
Yeah, the stumpy Evo seems quite light.

Btw, the new Swirls Epic Evo frame is only 3.65 lbs with shock and hardware. Orbea Oiz OMR 3.83 lbs with shock and hardware. Scott Spark HMX 3.96 lbs... these frames are pretty dang light.

flowmountainbike.com/post-all/on-test-2021-orbea-oiz-m-team/#:~:text=Orbea's%20claimed%20frame%20weight%20for,frame%20including%20the%20rear%20shock.

This article has a nice collection of xc frame weights.
  • 1 0
 @btjenki:
As far as I know, the lightest trail bike frame out there is the Scott Genius, which weighs only 5 lbs with shock and hardware. Pretty crazy for a 150mm travel bike.
  • 1 0
 @btjenki: What size frames are you using as reference for these weight numbers and what are your sources? Asking, one spreadsheet guy to another ;~>
  • 2 0
 @Veloscente: The S Works and Orbea are in medium. The S Works includes shock and hardware. The Orbea includes shock, but I'm not sure about hardware--I misspoke on my previous post. The Scott Genius is in large. I am not sure about the others.
  • 3 0
 @p1nkbike Yea, so you're confirming you're talking about the older Hightower (not current) that was lighter? (before the past couple years where brands are throwing more and more carbon into these frames) Because the new one in CC construction is pushing 7lbs.

@Mr-Monterey Yes, there are some very lightweight XC frames out there now! But I maintain that the majority of XC bikes and XC race bikes that the average racer has out there now (bikes built 2014-201Cool are not under 5.0lbs, most probably not much below 5.5. Current Giant Trance: 5.4lbs, SB100 5.5lbs, Trek Top Fuel 5.5lbs. The current Santa Cruz Blur, Intense Sniper SL, Scott Spark, Specialized Epic are all under 4lbs for sure.

@Veloscente I've used a number of sources. Product launches, forums, sites like www.bikologi.com/builder and sometimes even manufactures sites. Always important to try to verify with two sources. And confirm if manufactuers are including the shock (the number one way they skew weights!)
  • 2 0
 @btjenki: Yes the hightower 1 w/ rockshox deluxe shock is officially at 5.88lbs (CC). I weighted my medium HT1 CC at slightly lower than this (5.7lbs), i suspect theres always a bit of variability at least with SC, or that they weight a L by default.

i weighted the HT2 C large at around 7lbs with super deluxe (which also seems slightly lower than spec). AFAIK the CC isn't much ligher (forums say 280gr lighter), but I have not had one to verify. I consider the HT2 on the slightly heavier side.
  • 1 0
 Its great,... till you lay down the frame, make a crack in it and then you are offered great crash replacement 2000 frame. After spending 6 grand on bike. Yeah nah for me,..

But im talking the “old” 9M carbon, which disappeared from their line up,... so maybe the 11M is better!

Anyways, as big S is out of 27,5” wheels, im done with then regardless,... till 32” will flood the market!
  • 13 3
 I live in an area where you simply do not need more than 130mm of travel, but having a 150mm bike would be awesome for trips to the mountains. This may be the solution. Fun in the big stuff, yet ride able around home.
  • 14 1
 Not going to lie, I was expecting the S-Works to be more expensive.
  • 1 2
 $10k- special have a very special shock.
  • 2 0
 Me too! I actually thought, "Wow, pretty cheap!" Brain-washing complete!
  • 3 1
 They charge $10k, then downgrade the cranks on an XX1 build: not only is it stupid expensive, it cuts stupid corners that insult consumer intelligence! Specialized have forever worn the crown of premium-price-for-cut-rate-spec. They *almost* resisted the impulse on this bike, e.g. w/ Deity stem & grips instead of mediocre, margin-padding, house-brand stuff, but then they just couldn't help themselves w/ the crank downgrade.
  • 4 0
 @Veloscente: weren't x01 cranks a bit stronger than xx1? I can't remember for sure, but I think in the press release they said xx1 stuff is more xc oriented, and if you look at ews sponsored athletes that might be true since they're all using x01 instead xx1 there. On a component like cranks I think it makes sense. And yes, it's not cheap
  • 13 4
 Bring an aluminum version and I will reconsider getting a Banshee Titan. Thanks.
  • 3 0
 2nd aluminium version buyer right here! Didnt brough a 2020 Stumpy evo alum because they didnt have stock in europe.
  • 1 0
 @LuccsPB: and also I will stop calling them Speiseeis.
  • 8 1
 Agreed! Aluminum vs carbon just doesn't provide the value for me personally, I'm only interested in aluminum bikes at this point in my financial life.
  • 1 5
flag S1mmo (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:10) (Below Threshold)
 The Status is the same bike in Aluminium.. go buy one from Brink
  • 2 0
 @S1mmo: different bikes
  • 1 0
 @LuccsPB: vivis en Arg?
  • 1 0
 @sanarau: Si sr! seguime en instagram. "lucaspbertoli"
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: You are a different bike
  • 1 0
 Salty, huh
  • 7 1
 this is damm good package, 4k SLX build - super awesome value also given the warranty coverage and dealership availability across the globe -> Sold!

Was planning to get Commencal tr29, however this announcement just make sense
  • 2 0
 The rear hub has decent engagement too! Much better than the "house brand" or DT Swiss 370's lots of bikes in the price range have.
  • 5 0
 Agreed! I've been waiting for a bike like this. Especially since I'm 6'5" and they have an S6 size! So excited!
  • 6 0
 Man. The lines between models across all brands are blurring a ton.
Realistically this bike is perfect for at least 90% of us over the Enduro. I love to tinker with settings too so the scales my tip in the Stumpy's favor when I finally ditch my '17 Enduro.
  • 7 0
 @mikekazimer where is the full Specialized Status reviews? Not all of us want to spend 4-9k on a bike when Specialized not so secretly comes out with perfect bike for 90% of us at 2.5k?
  • 2 0
 Specialized still has a marketing embargo in North America. The bike isn't listed in their website
  • 6 0
 the release of the Status is one of the strangest things Ive seen. Everyone knows it exist, it is for sale all over the place but somehow still under embargo/not released
  • 2 1
 @blkmrktrider156:

Why is an American company not selling this bike inAmerica?
  • 1 0
 Bike is sold in America I have one and it rips. It’s just weird how pinkbike won’t do a full review @SeanC1:
  • 1 0
 @trollhunter:
Awesome! I see that it's not advertised on the Spesh website, but you can still buy one here? Good to know. How's it ride? Can you give us a little more review??
  • 1 0
 @trollhunter, there's one on the way.
  • 6 0
 I'm currently riding latest enduro and I'm super happy but if anyone ask me if I wanted to exchange it for this thing I would definetly do it right now. This bike looks perfect to me, even for racing.
  • 5 0
 So excited to see an actual frame weight quoted in a review. And even more excited how light that is - trend for the last few years has been to make frames heavier and more burly every year and I have felt like maybe it swung too far.. I assume they know what they're doing and we won't hear about breakage problems - Spesh knows people are going to send this bike hard despite the trail moniker.
  • 5 0
 Fork $4k you get the S Works frame and a complete bike with Shimano and Fox. What am I missing here!?!?
Nuts awesome.

www.specialized.com/us/en/stumpjumper-evo-comp/p/175271?color=300732-175271&searchText=96321-5101
  • 2 0
 That's a ton of money, but could tempt me to move from other options. Common sense parts specs and not the 'I got a SRAM package deal' so we make 150% margin.
  • 1 0
 @downcountry: $4k certainly IS a lot of money! But, it's all relative. You get a frame they usually charge $3,500+/- for plus an entire bike build with good parts. That's a rippin' deal.
  • 1 0
 @jeremiahwas: Good point. I'd never buy the frame-only...I would love to know what the profit is on them. Buy the comp or expert and sell off the parts and you'll end up in a really good place.
  • 7 3
 People hate on Specialized but in what world does smaller development teams mean you get better bike. Yes Specialized can be slow to the game, but when it comes to frame manufacturing and carbon/alloy processing they are almost un matched. I look at bikes like the Norco sight which have great numbers but the technology is the actual material of the frame is not as good. In the end you can’t really go wrong with any bike.
  • 1 7
flag Mondbiker (Oct 6, 2020 at 9:58) (Below Threshold)
 "but in what world does smaller development teams mean you get better bike.Yes Specialized can be slow to the game, but when it comes to frame manufacturing and carbon/alloy processing they are almost un matched" Ever heard of Unno? Antidote? Nicolai?
  • 8 0
 @Mondbiker: Sure they make nice hand crafted carbon, but they don’t do the field/pro testing that specialized puts their bikes through. Most companies don’t have the resources to go as deep as specialized does.
  • 1 9
flag Mondbiker (Oct 6, 2020 at 10:56) (Below Threshold)
 @mtbraxden: yet they are the one creating the better quality bikes? Specialised is making mass produced bikes and selling them for prices higher than real boutique stuff that is produced in 1/10000 scale. Are they good? well, after years and year of making mediocre stuff their last few models are actually decent, still their enduros have issues with cracking, SJ evo was known to have subpar kinematics etc. Only thing that is really better than anyone else is offering these days is their storage system. Too bad it makes every bike look like a ebike but you can´t have it all.
  • 7 0
 @Mondbiker: I’ve found better reliability with Specialized they have a lifetime warranty on their frames and are really easy to work with. I don’t much care for magical carbon from the top of a volcano that has unicorn piss on it and has been crafted by a leprechaun for six months. That ends up snapping because they didn’t put enough carbon in the down tube then when you try to warranty it they say tough luck we only made 50 bikes.
  • 1 2
 @mtbraxden: where are those snapped pissed on bikes? I haven´t seen any, Specialised though...I didn´t even have to search for it.
  • 7 2
 This review is nice and all but the launch video has to be one of the best there is, Specialized marketing department at its best
  • 6 0
 S6 sizing finally. Somebody in management must have met their first tall person.
  • 2 0
 Yes! Now I can replace my XXL 2018 Stumpy.
  • 5 0
 Glad to see they spec'd SLX, rather than NX/SX on the Comp! And name brand hubs with reasonable engagement rather than the janky stuff of years passed.
  • 5 0
 Never wear a pack again? Fixed all the things I dislike about my current Evo? Sold!
  • 6 0
 Dam Mike is 38? I hope I look like that at 38, shit
  • 15 0
 Ha, thanks. I decided to stop aging a few years ago - so far it seems to be working out.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: I'm 36, is it still ok to stop aging or is it too late?
  • 8 0
 @fracasnoxteam: How do you guys feel about being a 36 or 38?

I was tossing it up but decided to be a Zeb instead.
  • 2 0
 @EnduRowan: I am already zeb equipped
  • 3 0
 These geometry numbers arent far off my Supreme SX which I have happily been climbing on for 3 years but when I bought it people were like NOPE NOT POSSIBLE TO CLIMB ON SIR. *angry otter meme*
  • 4 0
 Question on this and other bikes that have different chainstay lengths on different sizes: doesn't that affect the travel? Wouldn't there be more travel with longer stays?
  • 2 0
 Nope, they move the bottom bracket further forward relative to the rest triangle so they don't need different tooling for the rear ends on each size.
  • 2 0
 Sold my 19' Stumpy because I wanted more travel and a bit more modern geo but I've really missed how that bike rode. This thing sounds like it fixed everything I didnt like in the older Stumpy and added a lot more that I like! To bad it doesnt come in alloy (yet). I think I'm sold
  • 2 1
 How do you feel it compares to something like the cascade link on the previous Stumpy EVO? From a lot of what I've read from those who have experimented with over forking to 160 or 170 and 55mm stroke shocks, the bike loses some of it's cornering ability (which is amazing in stock form).
  • 5 0
 For the non evo stumpies is 27.5 going to be an option still?
  • 5 4
 Can't wait to try this one out. I've been demoing the new Enduro Expert for the past week and the bike sends on downhill. But on uphills it bogs like a pig... Been riding the Megatower for a while and that bikes on fully open shock bogs as much as the Enduro on fully locked... Would like to feel how the FSR on the stumpjumper compares...
  • 3 0
 Hta alone doesn't determine how much you'll struggle to keep the front wheel down. A steep enough sta will keep enough weight on the front wheel when seated to avoid the dreaded lift.
  • 2 0
 Oops, wrong comment.
  • 1 1
 I guess that all the dislikes are from Spesh lovers who never rode anything else... I had FSR Enduro, now I have VPP Bronson and I've never looked back...
  • 1 0
 I generally build my bikes from frame only...that way I can keep transfering my bit over and just get the frame. However frame prices are steep....think it's better to buy a whole bike and swap out bits....what do other people do...just interested to know cheers
  • 1 0
 Can anyone explain how there are 6 total geo charts? Two positions up front and two positions out back. 2x2=4.
Or are there three positions in the headset cup?
EDIT: I figured it out. The headset adjust is an extra cup that comes with the bike. so it comes at neutral and you can make it -1 or +1 with the cup.
  • 2 1
 Wow, can't say anything negative about Specialized without getting downvoted. Everyone is ready to spend $4k-$10k on this bike and in 3-4 years they will redesign and come out with the next "ultimate trail bike" and there will be negative things to say about this bike then.
  • 4 0
 I mean... Isn't that how engineering advancement and product development works? It's not like first mountain bikes ever built could have been like this.
  • 1 0
 Still got my 2011 26" Stumpjumper FSR EVO - Full XTR and dropper post. Swapped the crappy 32" forks for FOX float 36" and lowered the travel from 160mm to 140mm so it does not damage the bike. Its a super bike. Very interested to see how it compares with the latest version....
  • 1 0
 THANK YOU Specialized for making a S6 frame that is appropriately sized for tall guys!! I'm 6'7" and can appreciate longer chainstays that grow with frame sizes and a steeper seat tube angle to prevent me from hanging over the rear hub. I think I just found my next bike.
  • 1 0
 bro idk when I did the math the evo pro is 650$ underpriced so good but the expert enduro 2021 is 1000$ over priced. I was looking forward to riding the enduro but seeing as the evo is pretty close and just has way better specs and features for the price im thinking of getting and evo now.
  • 14 14
 I still think their sizing is dumb. I don’t see what the problem is with xs, s, m, l, xl. I get that some people like to size up or size down but those people know what they like and wouldn’t be confused by traditional size descriptions anyway. People that know less about bikes or are not used to Specialized sizing don’t know what the S1 or S2 is. It is fixing a problem that never existed.
  • 1 0
 Or ask lbs. They switched to S from traditional size because it was different from what used to be. That's what they said 2 years ago.
  • 1 2
 @fracasnoxteam: yeah I imagine the lbs is just as perplexed as I am. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: It's not hard to figure out. At the end of the day, they're all just different ways to essentially say the same thing. Who cares if it's called Large, S4, 18", 58cm etc. (although I admit it is a bit gimmicky).
  • 1 0
 @leon-forfar: yeah it is not hard to figure out by any means. Might be a bit of a tough one for people with more money than sense which is why I think it is dumb for Specialized to make this switch as those folks are a decent percentage of their customers. Not saying their bikes aren’t great though. You are right though, for most serious bikers the sizing scheme is irrelevant, I just go straight to the geo chart anyway.
  • 10 10
 I'm disappointed with the update, was thinking they'd do the same as Santa Cruz and carry the Demo layout over to the Enduro then the Stumpy. The Enduro with 140-150mm rear in a lighter weight package would have been a home run I think, this seems Meh, I'm sure its a fine bike, but not anything anyone is going to get excited over.
  • 2 0
 I heard information from a reputable industry source that an enduro style linkage trail bike is still in the works. I'd wait for that one.
  • 2 0
 I wonder if the downvotes are Specialized employees or Pinkbike sales people hoping to not upset their advertisers, probably both. Not sure I said anything too controversial, actually it was quite positive towards the Enduro and Demo designs.
  • 2 0
 @Caddz: I agree. I own the new enduro and its best bike ive ever had. I think a smaller travel version would be amazing.
  • 4 0
 528 reach for all the 7 footers out there
  • 2 1
 I put a 210x55 shock and 160 fork on my 2020 Stumpy... glad to see they realized that's how the bike should've been built from the beginning. Certainly not a ground breaking release, but should be a real fun bike.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer does it have a full three tabs for a real chain guide and bash? I have the 2019 version, great bike, but have to rig it to run a full guide.
  • 2 0
 Very interested in the slx version of the evo compared with the ripmo deore. Both are priced similar and seem to be aimed at similar riding styles.
  • 1 0
 Yeah adding this to my list for cross shopping with the ripmo. My 2013 Remedy is getting a little long in the tooth.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer In terms of overall performance suspension design wise, would you say this or ripmo?
  • 1 0
 In terms of what?
  • 2 0
 I think a fair amount of this relates to what its being used for. If its super, steep and gnarly...Ibis's DWLink isn't entirely tuned for that on the Ripmo...tho hell Pivot's DWLink won Hardline didn't it??

The nice thing about the Ripmo is that its still awesome going downhill and more fun, poppy than "couch". That's great for a do-it-all AllMtn bike. It'll be similar enough to this Evo in a sense (tho not the Enduro obviously). NOW, the uphill is where its not even close tho...the Ripmo freaking pedals like Black Magic. You have to ride it (even in parking lot) to understand. This is why the Ripmo is a special bike, you still get decent travel and 160mm fork. So in DH performance its similar to other bikes enough tho a touch less gnarly in suspension and geo...but the uphill is vastly superior. So for a do-it-all aggro trail bike, its incredibly hard to beat...especially the V2. I don't own one btw but my buddies do and I steal it from time to time. I'd never buy the Evo over the Ripmo. Enduro yes, for big runs...but for a do-everything, Ripmo all the way. This is why the Ripmo has won bike of the year at Enduro Mag a few times for the Trail bike category.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Thanks man! This is the kind of feedback I was looking for!!!
  • 3 1
 I made a film about the new Stumpy Evo if anyone is interested in my teammate Julie's perspective: youtu.be/ECzYnwycSw8
  • 1 0
 Nice pant
  • 1 1
 My non-EVO Stumpy would be super jealous if I didn't already upgrade it to a Float Factory 36 160 and DPX2 Factory. S3 is pretty close to the old Large, though if I lived nearer to a bike park or really long steep descents I could see how the the headset cups would be nice (read: more slacker = more better, sometimes). And luckily I'm at the bottom of the size range, so with an almost-hilted 170mm dropper, I can easily get the effective seat tube sorted by moving the saddle forward on the rails, because that new seat tube angle definitely gives it some sizing flexibility in the right direction.

Nice EVOlution from Spesh on this one.

Now to find out if the SWAT bladder and/or SWAT bags will fit in a 2018-2020 27.5 Stumpy frame...
  • 5 1
 Welcome back, Enduro 29!
  • 1 0
 C'est pas faux
  • 1 2
 My only complaint about the 2020 27.5 Evo I just built is the frame based integrated headset. Specialized top headset cup isn't quite standard. It's about 1 mm too deep. You have to shim the crap out of it to get a non-FSA provide bearing set to work. The good news it the frame only order came with bearings so unless you're and idiot like me, just use those that were provided. Other than that, super slack and super fun bike. Not enough changes for an upgrade yet but good work S. Keep it up. Maybe when my wife is ready to upgrade her bike Wink
  • 2 3
 I'm not sure about this new generation of extremely slack trail bikes, do people still have trail rides that include uphill and/or flat singletrack? I have a 160mm bike (2018 Banshee Rune V2) with a 64.5 HTA, and it's about all I can do to get the front wheel to behave on uphill switchbacks. Technical flats and climbs just plain aren't fun, I darn near have my chest on the handlebars to keep weight on the front wheel and not feel like I'm falling off the back. I've gone back to my 2014 Kona Process 111 for everything except the days I pay for a lift ticket. Am I a wimp, or is this just the price to pay for a bike that screams on the descents?
  • 2 0
 Having longer chainstays reaaaallly helps to keep that front end down. I got the cascade link for my Hightower and the extra 5mm made a noticeable difference on technical climbs
  • 3 0
 Hta alone doesn't determine how much you'll struggle to keep the front wheel down. A steep enough sta will keep enough weight on the front wheel when seated to avoid the dreaded lift.
  • 1 0
 I don't see mentioned anywhere what the angle adjustments do to the seat angle and by extend to it's climbing capability.
What's the seat angle at 65.5° head angle?
  • 3 0
 In the high / steep setting the seat angle is 76.6-degrees on an S4, and 76.9-degrees on an S3.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: wait, so the seat angle gets slacker the steeper the head tube is?
  • 2 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner: yes, isn´t it obvious? It´s not a flip chip, it´s headset you are adjusting
  • 3 0
 Specialized's site now has a geo tool you can play with to see what the changes do to the overall setup
  • 1 0
 Curious to know if any of the geo settings land the bike at the top if its class in its category or if all of them are pretty damn good but not perfect.
  • 1 0
 I'm glad they are improving their tired compound. Butcher Is a nice thread (yeah, I know what it looks like) but the gripton was still not grippy enough for me.
  • 3 0
 I'd be interested if it was available in 27.5/27.5. Don't want a 29er
  • 3 0
 Another fantastic review Mike.
  • 3 0
 Too bad their yokes will still destroy shocks.
  • 1 0
 I'm very skeptical of Horst link's ability to climb and pedal efficiently. Perhaps these will be put to the test in a more detailed review.
  • 3 1
 Even if I were willing to give my money to spesh, not sure I could get over how ugly it is.
  • 2 1
 I don't undersant why they keep doing an asymetric frame, that part the merges seat tube with top tube does not do anything structurally, just fashion, extra weight
  • 1 0
 Does the 2021 have 3 ISCG tabs or only 2 like the previous version? Putting a bashgaurd on voids the warranty, and with a BB that low, a bashgaurd is necessary.
  • 1 0
 Any word on if that headset will fit the previous model stumpy? Looks like a good solution
  • 2 0
 It won't unfortunately
  • 1 0
 @blkmrktrider156:

this was my question as well - how do you know it wont fit the previous version?
  • 1 0
 @Spidersanta: the headtube has been completely changed in the new version to accommodate the adjustable cups. You just won't be able to fit them in the previous version.
  • 1 0
 @blkmrktrider156:

BUMMER!!

thanks for the info
  • 1 0
 First time I've seen Fujifilm being used for product shoots. I'm not sure I like the bokeh on that 50-140mm...
  • 2 0
 Anyone know if I can get a X2 air on that frame?
  • 3 0
 You can.
  • 2 0
 Sramware over the rainbow...
  • 1 0
 Please let us know whether the angle adjustment headset cup begins to squeak after a few months of hard riding
  • 4 0
 It's been good so far - there's a rubber o-ring around the perimeter of that cup that should help. I'll update this if any issues come up.
  • 1 0
 Aftermarket mullet link...mmmmm. @CascadeComponents I'm gonna assume this is you!
  • 3 0
 No its available directly through specialized
  • 2 0
 There is even a coil mullet version. Damn! Knocking it out of the park!
  • 2 0
 Dang they are not messing around with the sizes
  • 3 1
 Also, the 30"+ standover in a medium is a little disappointing.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer how s4 size relates to L size for orther brands such as commencal tr29?
  • 1 0
 Nice looking bike, but touting rearward axle path is a little disingenuous when that's all used up in sag.
  • 1 1
 i hate the finish on the frame. Maybe it looks better in real life, but on here it just looks rough and badly "invisi-frame'd"
  • 2 0
 I wish they made an aluminum Enduro again
  • 1 0
 Can we see a pic sagged with crank arm at 90 degrees? Just curios about ground clearance.
  • 1 0
 Thought it was a new levo when I saw the pic. The levo must be due a geometry update like this.
  • 1 0
 Stumpy EVO Expert = 4900 USD/6500 CAD. In Canada it retails for 7300 CAD????
  • 1 0
 What's the over-under on that headset cup being available/compatible with my '16 Stumpy?!?!
  • 1 0
 do they sell the mullet as a frame....? not interested in the LTD sworks mullet...full bike
  • 3 4
 Reading through the setup: ' Up front, I inflated the Fox 32 to 84 psi, with one volume spacer installed.' Daaang, Fox is really pushing their XC stuff.
  • 4 3
 Aussies and Brits excluded from good rear brake routing yet again.
  • 4 1
 Yes! So annoying
  • 2 1
 No trying the mullet. So 2020.
  • 1 0
 So is this in the Enduro whatever category of the field test or trail??
  • 2 2
 I havn't owned a Spec FS bike since my 2018 Stump Jumper... but this is aweful tempting....
  • 1 1
 They updated the tires..,now the hot patch looks like they are Forte tires.
  • 1 0
 Unrelated to performance but I think the frame looks amazing!
  • 2 0
 Max tire size?
  • 2 0
 I'm hoping a 2.6" will fit.
  • 1 1
 Love PinkBike. Thanks guys. All these new bikes but NOTHING in stock. LOL. I know. Covid 19
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Is there a frame only option for 2021?
  • 1 0
 the lbs here has one
  • 1 0
 @mjlee2003: Don't think it's offered frame only in the UK sadly.
  • 1 0
 Great review, thanks @mikekazimer
  • 1 1
 These seem like a crazy good value for carbon frames. I did not expect that from Specialized of all companies.
  • 2 1
 YT needs to add all this adjustability to their Jeffsy and sell it for 6K
  • 1 0
 Yes, yes, yes. But what of a review for the new Trance Advanced X Pro?
  • 1 0
 yall just upset it doesn't look like a session, even if you squint hard
  • 1 0
 It would be nice if they made it a mullet bike stock.
  • 3 4
 Whats the cost on the aftermarket link? Same price of like the Cascade Components link?
  • 1 0
 Frame only?
  • 1 0
 Do want.
  • 2 4
 @mikekazimer Can shave a few grams by cutting off that weird asymmetric shock brace?
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