Review: The 2023 Yeti SB120 is a Comfortable Trail Cruiser

Nov 8, 2022 at 12:30
by Mike Kazimer  
The SB120 is a brand new entry into Yeti's lineup, a short-travel trail bike that's billed as 'definition ready'. In other words, you can call it whatever you want, just as long as the name's fitting for a 29” wheeled bike with 120mm of travel and a 130mm fork. Upduro? All-country? The world is your oyster.

Like the rest of Yeti's lineup, the SB120 is only available with a carbon frame, either the Turq or the C version. The stiffness is said to be the same between the two, but the Turq frames are lighter, and have a new version of Yeti's Switch Infinity assembly with improved bearings, seals, and hardware.
SB120 T3 Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 120mm / 130mm fork
• Turq & C carbon frames
• 66.5º head angle (low)
• 76.5º seat tube angle
• 439mm chainstays (size L)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL
• Weight: 29.5 lb / 13.4 kg (size L)
• Price: $9,600 USD
yeticycles.com

There are three Turq models and two C models, and all of them are on the higher end of the price scale. Prices start at $6,300 and go up to $12,100 USD. The frame alone is priced at $4,300 USD.

I tested the T3 model, which retails for $9,600 USD. For that price you get a Fox 34 Factory Grip2 fork and DPS shock, SRAM AXS drivetrain (a XX1 derailleur, X01 cassette, and GX chain), SRAM G2 RSC brakes, Fox Transfer dropper post, and DT Swiss XM 1700 aluminum wheels.



bigquotesThere's no hanging up at the beginning of the stroke or any harshness at the end; instead, the bike feels silky smooth through the entirety of its travel. Mike Kazimer





Frame Details

The SB120's carbon frame shape makes it clear that it's a Yeti, even from a distance. The amount of ground clearance in front of the bottom bracket has been improved compared to previous models in Yeti's lineup, and there's now a dual density downtube protector to ward off any potential damaging rock strikes.

According to Yeti, a medium T-series frame with shock weighs in at 3,021 grams. For comparison, an S4 Stumpjumper frame weighs 2,420 grams, and an Ibis Ripley frame weighs approximately 2,700 grams.

All of the cartridge bearings are pressed into the linkage instead of into the swingarm or front triangle, and use a floating collet design. Cable routing is fully internal through tubes inside the frame, with bolt-on covers at the entry and exit points to eliminate rattling.

The bearings are now pressed into the linkages instead of into the swingarm.
Well designed chainslap protection keeps the SB120 very quiet.

Not to bury the lede here, but after years of using a pressfit BB92 bottom bracket, Yeti has gone with threaded bottom brackets for their latest bikes. Rather than gluing the aluminum bottom bracket shell into the frame, Yeti co-molds it into the carbon layup to create an even stronger bond.

Other details include a universal derailleur hanger, generous (and effective) chainslap protection, and ISCG 05 tabs. There's also room for longer travel dropper posts, and the complete bike are spec'd accordingly – size small frames receive a 150mm dropper, mediums get a 175mm, and the large through XXL frames all have posts with 200mm of drop.



Geometry

The SB120's geometry isn't all that radical, which is a little surprising considering that the the SB130 and SB150 were at the forefront of the longer reach, steeper seat angle, and slacker head angle movement when they debuted back in 2018. Granted, there's a limit to everything, and it's certainly possible to go too far, creating a bike that's more singlemindedly focused than necessary.

A 66.5-degree head angle, 76.5-degree seat angle, and a 475mm reach for a size large are all fairly contemporary numbers for a modern trail bike. If anything, the head angle is a touch steeper than what we've seen lately from other companies.

The chainstay length increases by 2mm between sizes, a measure that Yeti says helps to ensure that the rear center length is proportionally correct across the range.


Suspension Design

There were rumors that the 6-bar suspension design found on Yeti's e-bike would make its way to their non-motorized machines, but that hasn't happened, at least not yet. Instead, the SB120 uses the latest version of Yeti's Switch Infinity suspension system, which uses a slider mounted on two Kashima coated rails to manipulate the bike's axle path. External grease ports on the mechanism allow the bushings and seals to be lubricated, a procedure that Yeti and Fox recommend performing after every 40 hours of riding.

The SB120 has an 11% leverage ratio change as it goes through its 120mm of travel. Yeti adjusts the leverage rate depending on a bike's travel – a big enduro bike like the SB160 will see higher speeds and larger impacts, so it gets a little more ramp up with a 17% progression rate.


Specifications
Price $9600
Rear Shock Fox Factory Float DPS
Fork Fox Factory 34 Grip2
Headset Cane Creek 40
Cassette SRAM X01 Eagle, 10-52
Crankarms SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon DUB 30t
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1 Eagle AXS
Chain SRAM GX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM Eagle AXS
Handlebar Yeti Carbon
Stem Burgtec Enduro MK3, 50mm
Grips ODI Elite Pro
Brakes SRAM G2 RSC
Wheelset DT Swiss XM1700
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5" / 2.3" Aggressor
Seat WTB Silverado
Seatpost Fox Transfer













Test Bike Setup

The SB120 comes with a 50mm stem and Yeti's own 20mm rise carbon bar. After a few rides in the stock configuration, I swapped out those components for a 40mm stem and a 30mm rise bar to improve the fit for my 5'11” height.

175 psi in the Fox DPS shock put me at 13mm, or 29% sag. I've spent a considerable amount of time with Fox's 34 Grip2 fork, so I already had a good base setting to begin with. My final settings were: 87 psi, HSC: 5, LSC: 12, LSR: 8, and HSR: 5

I first rode the SB120 in its Colorado stomping grounds, and then continued testing in Bellingham, Washington, where conditions started off unseasonably dry and dusty before becoming extra wet and muddy once the rains returned.



Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer


Climbing

The SB120's rear suspension offers a great blend of support and traction while climbing. There's a small amount of movement while pedaling on smoother ground, but even when I was mashing hard, purposely pedaling squares, it never sunk too deep into its travel.

It falls on the softer side of the spectrum when it comes to the overall suspension feel – even in the middle compression setting, the position I used the most, it doesn't feel like it wants to jump off the starting line the same way that a bike like the new Trek Top Fuel does. It's not mushy or wallowy, it's simply a little more muted. The means there's a ton of traction, which came in handy when working my way up muddy climbs filled with slippery roots.

“Comfortable” is the adjective that kept coming to mind when I was out cruising around on the SB120. It doesn't have the overeager, straining at the reins feel of a lighter, more XC-focused bike; instead, it feels like it's meant for putting in big days, rides with hours and hours of saddle time. It'd be a very adept high-country companion, which isn't surprising considering Yeti's Colorado roots.

The SB120's 29.5 lb pound weight is worth a mention, especially since we're talking about a $9,600 bike with 120mm of travel and a Fox 34. Sure, the aluminum DT Swiss XM1700 wheels aren't the lightest, and neither is the Minion / Aggressor tire combo, but this is an extremely competitive category, and there are multiple examples of complete bikes with similar travel amounts that are significantly lighter – Rocky Mountain's Element for example. The Element 90 is priced similarly to the SB120, and weighs in at 25 pounds (11.3 kg). On the flip side, the 120's weight is comparable to a Santa Cruz Tallboy. I realize that the Element is billed as an XC bike, and the Tallboy is a trail bike, but they both have 120mm of rear travel, a 130mm fork, and fairly similar geometry.

I'll put it this way – if you're looking for something that's skewed towards the fast and light side of the trail spectrum, the SB120 probably isn't it. It's more of a good-natured all-rounder, a bike that can handle a bit of everything, as long as things don't get too steep and gnarly.



Descending

There's less room to hide a strange leverage curve or odd shock tune on a bike with 120mm of travel. In this case, Yeti's engineers and suspension technicians don't need to worry about hiding anything – the SB120 does an outstanding job of managing its travel. There's no hanging up at the beginning of the stroke or any harshness at the end; instead, the bike feels silky smooth through the entirety of its travel.

The SB120 felt most at home on moderately steep, twisty, technical trails. Isolating frame stiffness from the myriad of other factors at play isn't easy, but I can say the the SB120 definitely isn't uncomfortable or jarring. It has a 'carvy' nature to it; I never felt like I was fighting against it to get around a tight turn, or getting knocked around in chunky, rocky sections of trail.

It's on steeper terrain and at higher speeds that the SB120's limits start to appear. It took a more conscious effort to keep my weight centered compared to a bike like the Norco Optic, or the Santa Cruz Tallboy, bikes with head angles that are a full degree slacker. That's not to say that you can't ride steep trails on the SB120 – you absolutely can – it's just that its handling is a little pointier than those other options.

The SB120 also jumps impressively well. That might not be a characteristic that's high on the list for riders shopping for a short travel trail bike, but considering the number of flow trails popping up everywhere it's worth mentioning.

The SB120 is fairly neutral when it comes to bunnyhopping over small obstacles, but put a bigger lip in front of it and it's a very smooth, extremely fun bike to get airborne with. The DPS shock did a great job of handling the return to earth, delivering as close to a bottomless feel as you can get on a bike in this travel bracket. There's just enough progression to avoid going through the travel too quickly, while also making it possible to use all the travel when necessary.



Who's it for?

Personally, I wish the SB120 had gone one of two ways. Option one, give it a slacker head angle and embrace the aggressive trail category. That would make it feel more surefooted in the steeps, and broaden the scope of terrain where it excels. Yes, 66.5-degrees used to be a common figure on enduro bikes not all that long ago – it's just that the SB120's competitors with slacker head angles feel more at home at higher speeds and steeper trails.

Option two would have been to make it lighter, embracing the slightly steeper geo in favor of making it a trail rocket. Downcounty may be a dumb name, but there's something to be said about a light bike that makes you want to pedal your face off and doesn't feel too sketchy on the descents.

In isolation, the SB120 is a great bike. It's smooth, comfortable, very quiet, and really doesn't do anything wrong. It's when you start comparing it to other recently-launched bikes that it loses a little bit of its luster. It's still good, it's just that it's so well rounded it doesn't really have trait to truly elevate it above the rest, and it's expensive to boot.

Realistically, that's more of an issue for me, the picky reviewer. For most riders, in most places, the SB120 is going to be a great option – I could see it being a good choice for East Coast riders and their slow speed tech, or Colorado riders and their sometimes swoopy, sometimes chunky high alpine rides.


Yeti SB120
Santa Cruz Tallboy 5
Santa Cruz Tallboy


How Does It Compare?

The new Tallboy is a close contemporary to the SB120. Both bikes are only available in carbon, they both have 120mm of rear travel with a 130mm fork, and neither one is cheap. On the topic of price, a Tallboy frame retails for $3,999 USD, and a SB120 frame is even more at $4,300 USD. Needless to say, I'd look elsewhere if you're looking for a value-priced option – the YT Izzo would be a good place to start.

As far as frame fit and finish goes, both bikes have the little details taken care of – internal cable routing done right, threaded bottom brackets, internal snack storage.. Actually, scratch that – only the Santa Cruz has a secret compartment. I'm going to need to dock the SB120 a point here because of how convenient in-frame storage is – once you're used to having it's hard to go back.

As far as ride characteristics go, the fit between the two is quite similar – it's really the 1-degree head angle difference that sets them apart when it comes to geometry. That gives the Tallboy the edge when it comes to steep terrain – it has an aura of solidity to it that's not quite there with the SB120. The Tallboy is more confident at high speeds, and feels like it rewards an aggressive rider. The SB120 can handle the same terrain, but it doesn't come alive the same way the Tallboy does when it's pushed hard.

As far as suspension performance goes, the SB120 is a little more forgiving than the Tallboy, with slightly better small bump sensitivity and compliance, although both bikes do a lot with just 120mm of travel.


Going with a shorter stem and higher rise bars helped improve the SB120's fit, at least for me.
Different pads and thicker rotors can help increase the G2 brakes' performance.

Technical Report

SRAM G2 brakes: I've never been blown away by performance of SRAM's G2 brakes. They work, but not as well as the more powerful Codes that aren't that much heavier. However, there are ways to make them feel better. The first is installing metallic brake pads, a highly recommended option for riders in wet climates. The next step is to switch to the thicker HS2 rotors. With those steps done the brakes feel much better, and can more easily handle wet rides and sustained braking.

Maxxis Minion DHF / Aggressor tires: This tire combo works well for areas with harder packed trails, but it's not going to be the best option once it gets wet. Tires aren't cheap either; I think a DHR II would have been a better option, or even a Forekaster in the rear.

The sound of silence: The SB120 is very, very quiet thanks to the lack of any cable rattle and the extensive chainslap protection. There's even a ribbed protector on the underside of the chainstay, a spot that's often overlooked. I can't stand noisy bikes, so it was a treat to have such a silent ride right out of the box.

Fox 34 Grip 2: There's not much to say about the 34 Grip 2 that hasn't been said already – there's a reason it won a Pinkbike award last year. It packs a lot of performance in a short travel package, with plenty of adjustability and a reasonable weight.





Pros

+ Excellent suspension performance, great traction
+ Very quiet - no chain noise or cable rattle
+ Comfortable + versatile, as long as things don't get too wild

Cons

- Trail bike weight with downcountry geometry
- Prices start at $6,300 USD.




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesYeti may not have wanted to slap a label on the SB120, and I can see why. It's not an enduro bike that's been miniaturized, nor is it a beefed up XC machine. Instead, it's a tool (or toy) for those rides that go up, down, and all-around. The short travel trail category is hotly contested these days - there are lots of very good options, this bike included, which means that it takes more than ever to truly stand out.

At the end of the day, it's all about figuring out where your priorities lie. The SB120 isn't going to be for the rider looking for the most aggressive bike out there, or the lightest for that matter. However, the overall ride quality is excellent, making the SB120 a great option for big days of riding where comfort takes priority over seeing how far you can push your descending limits.
Mike Kazimer







466 Comments

  • 489 20
 Crikey...it's even the colour of some peoples teeth. No wonder dentist's love this brand.....
  • 247 28
 you don't have to say 'some people,' you can just say british.
  • 651 2
 Yeti should have a swat box and name it the cavity
  • 25 3
 I was thinking it was prosthetic limb colored.
  • 9 1
 Goldmine yellow?
  • 14 1
 @adrennan: go ahead and trademark this.
  • 74 2
 is there a cycling forum for dentists where they mock peasants i wonder
  • 2 2
 hahaha
  • 14 1
 ha ha, i mainly came here for the comments
  • 19 11
 @LuvAZ: blimy m8 me teefs is yellow innit!
  • 37 8
 @LuvAZ: 18% of Americans cant read.
  • 9 8
 I'm a dentist and don't give AF about Yeti's. I mean, I think finding the cryptid would be cool, but that's about it.
  • 6 2
 @LuvAZ: well, the ones that have teeth.
  • 27 2
 @hellbelly: we've caught one lads, get the landing net. #Ebike
  • 3 0
 @klerric: same, here for the comments
  • 13 0
 @LuvAZ: And when the frame gets bent out of shape, it'll look even more look like our teeth.
  • 11 0
 Does anybody have any insight as to how the company and their employees views the dentist jokes? I wonder if they ever would be a good sport about it and name some component after Dentistry or like the above poster, wrote the cavity
  • 3 0
 @PHX77: Like the Cannondale Scalpel?
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: rubber fist
  • 14 1
 In Germany, consultants have an even worse reputation than dentists in terms of moral standards and income-performance ratio. Maybe we should connect this professional group with yeti for a change. by the way, my dentist is an angel.
  • 4 0
 Colorado Custard
  • 41 1
 I vote realtors. Stereotypes include flashy, smarmy, shallow bros with a knack for buying overpriced cars and other junk. Probably would go well on the back of a new A4 with a “Dave sells Denver” decal
  • 10 0
 @kcy4130: That might be a fitting description, because it costs an arm and a leg...
  • 12 22
flag vinay (Nov 15, 2022 at 13:50) (Below Threshold)
 Would be pretty shocking, wouldn't it? If there would be a Pinkbike article on a Yeti bike and there wouldn't be a dentist joke, let alone the top comment. Luckily, the Pinkbike comment section is as predictable as always. No shockers here, snooze on.
  • 2 0
 @Fix-the-Spade:
I can’t stop LOL’ing over that comment!!
  • 2 1
 @adrennan: Comment Gold.
  • 2 1
 @blinglespeed: A4 come on a good realiter would at least have an rs6 avant.
  • 1 0
 @PHX77: hopefully they view the dentists jokes in the mirror on the way to the bank.
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: laughed hard! Thank you for making my day sir.
  • 8 19
flag cpobanz (Nov 15, 2022 at 17:56) (Below Threshold)
 I'm a dentist, these comments are tiresome. As far as the bike is concerned, I'll stick with my transition spur. This new Yeti is too heavy.
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: Their office is for that.
  • 1 1
 @adrennan: lol I legit love that comment
  • 1 2
 @hellbelly: under-appreciated comment
  • 1 1
 @adrennan: gold, I'd be surprised if they didn't name it that when it gets one.
  • 2 1
 @hellbelly: That yeti shade is about a 4M1?
  • 1 0
 m just a lowly engineer what is the bike i should ride
  • 1 0
 @LuvAZ: because Americans teeth fell out? Or is that just down south
  • 1 0
 @koelschejung: consultants you say? Sounds like something to get into... I need a new bike
  • 8 1
 @SillyTorque: Everyone is a consultant in the Pinkbike comment section. You need advice, I'll give you advice. You don't need advice, I'll still give you advice regardless.
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: an Orange from 2014
  • 4 1
 @LuvAZ: why are you Americans all so vain about your tombstone teeth?
  • 7 0
 @Hairyteabags: have you seen how much shit they eat? They have to keep em in extra super good condition
  • 4 10
flag carters75 (Nov 16, 2022 at 7:36) (Below Threshold)
 @Skaiwawker: You act like Brits aren't fat or something. At least our food tastes good.
  • 2 0
 @koelschejung: Same in America. Consultants use yogababble and canned cliches that are like fortune cookies and horoscopes: they can apply to everyone and everything depending on how you say it or hear it. Whatever it takes to make the "connection" which in turn made them money.
I dated a consultant. It was nonstop pretty words with a lot of grey area, and gaslighting.
But "a consultant's bike" doesn't have the same zing as dentist's bike.
  • 4 0
 @blinglespeed: Realtors: unlock a door, have the 3 pieces of paper readily found online, and have access to MLS. Make sure to compliment them on the leased car and using words like "wheelhouse".
  • 1 5
flag carters75 (Nov 16, 2022 at 9:25) (Below Threshold)
 @Skaiwawker: You should run your mouth in person and not just on the internet. You might lose your last tea stained tooth.
  • 2 0
 @carters75: tbf Mc Donald's does taste ok
  • 5 0
 @carters75: is so hard he pedals an #Ebike
  • 1 0
 Shoot. I'm soooo late here to make this same comment, apparently...
  • 1 0
 @carters75: It really doesn't
  • 2 1
 @yeticycles with all these DH teams taking a break in 2023 maybe its time for the a new Yeti Downhill team riding the SB-DH ?
Then make a limited number in team colours as you have done in the past and watch them fly out the door.
  • 2 0
 If 120mm weighs over 30lbs I guess a DH bike would be ~45 ish.
  • 5 2
 @bikewriter: consultant here. I get you. Actually wanted to get myself a bumper sticker saying 'management consultants save lives' but with irony being dead and all, decided it was a bad idea.
  • 2 0
 in the UK we call this hearing aid beige
  • 197 4
 So it's heavy, doesn't pedal that great and has a steep head angle making it not that great of a descender. This should sell heavily on the Front Range.
  • 51 0
 For real. This bike has all of the qualities that I'd hope to see in a $3k-$4k aluminum bike (including the weight). It would be a pretty ideal bike to recommend to new riders if the cost was roughly half of what it is.

Assuming shops preordered these, I expect there to be significant discounts by mid summer next year. The C1 would be worth considering for ~25% off.
  • 11 0
 @DaneL: i was pleasantly surprised by propain pricing. Top of the line build for 5k. Worth it
  • 25 2
 I was very excited to see this bike, and had fully anticipated selling the 130 and forking over the difference for the 120................not a chance in hell now. no way am i paying that much money for a heavy ass bike. I'll take a stumpy instead.
  • 21 4
 Yeah I see nothing to recommend this over say a Spur. Spur is lighter, has more aggressive geometry, non-kludgy suspension, costs less... what non-dentist demo does this bike appeal to?
  • 29 0
 @ace9: just built up a nice Stumpy with a pike. Weighs 25.5lbs with pedals.
  • 25 0
 @DaneL: The update to the Marin Rift Zone that launched yesterday is basically this bike, but affordable and with better geometry. Once Marin launches the carbon version, it should eat Yeti's lunch... especially as we're entering a recession.
  • 3 0
 @OnTheRivet: with plenty of space to add weight in the frame... frankly, the price is the killer. 130 is a heavy trail bike, but it rips, and was priced right back when introduced. Now, this is legitimate price gouging. I think they've built room into that price for discounts, say, one year down the trail
  • 3 0
 @ace9: I don't think this bike is meant to be a replacement for the SB130, though. I guess it'll be an SB135 or something.
  • 5 0
 @OnTheRivet: I build a stumpy with a pike and xt groupset, some light component here and there and this is 12.5 kg!!
  • 9 6
 I don't think the head angle is that big a deal but the weight is probably a big deal to the weight weenies that buy such bikes and I can understand why they would cry very lightweight tears.
  • 19 0
 Its a 120mm frame. If its going to be heavy might as well ride a 150-160mm frame.
  • 14 1
 I’ve said goodbye to Yeti after having the warranty denied over a cracked top tube that failed when landing (!) a jump on an SB150. Lame. Those things are supposed to survive Richie Rude. $1200 later for a front triangle crash replacement.
  • 1 1
 @KennyWatson: no i don't think so either, but the geo fits my terrain better than the 130 bike (I absolutely love my 130). 130 was my do it all but now i have a spec enduro, so looking for that not-quite-xc trail bike to fill the 130 shoes
  • 5 11
flag weebleswobbles (Nov 15, 2022 at 15:33) (Below Threshold)
 @drlancefreeride: yea anything that can survive the world's faster doper should do well under any other rider
  • 3 0
 @drlancefreeride: did you look into repair? It probably would have cost half as much and saved some landfill space.
  • 2 0
 @ace9: seems like a 10mm shorter fork air spring, 10-20psi more in the shock and some light wheels/fast rolling tires would get you most of the way there without buying a new bike.
  • 5 0
 @ace9: 30% off their base model at $6300 = $4,846, which still isn't a good deal.

The market will decide next year ... maybe they have a wealthy base of customers that will keep overpaying.
  • 3 0
 @drlancefreeride: I have always wondered how those bikes hold up to Richie Rude. One thing to consider is that he is on their factory team therefore if his frame brakes, he likely gets a new one and nobody is the wiser.
  • 1 0
 @KennyWatson: there’s something coming
  • 4 0
 @islandforlife: My thoughts exactly. Would be interesting to read a head to head comparison between the two. My prediction: Marin rides 95% as good, weighs 2lbs more and costs less than half as the Yeti.
  • 1 2
 @JSW07: No dog in this fight, but no pro rider would ride a bike prone to frame breakages imo.
Yetis are surely solid, where else does that frame weight come from?

Now manufacturing defects or just a massive huck to flat break frames, but no one predicts those. Though if I ran a race team, I'd surely do an ultrasound check of the race frames if that was feasible.
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: my carbon road bike is currently in for frame repairs - the chain sucked and damaged the chain stay. Dude was very talkative, showing me all his work. Had one road bike with a snapped top tube, built a mould for a replacement section, and bonded that section in, wrapping head tube to seat tube to get the strength back. Beautifully filled and painted, so you'd never know. Not sure I'd trust the carbon fork repairs he did though - literally snapped in half and rebuilt. Think I'd pay the extra for a new pair, rather than risk losing all my front teeth in one go!
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: for my bike I swapped the flip chip to 66.5 and one ride in realized I wouldn’t have bought the bike without the 66 setting. It’s a direct competitor to this 120.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I've repaired my carbon CX bike twice. I had a Ultegra crank snap and it gouged the chainstay, and the bike got knocked over somewhere and the downtube just below the head tube got damaged. Both repairs were done with West System and UD/bi-axial layering with carbon veil under and over. Since the frame can't be easily vacuumed bagged, I used peel-ply, breather cloth and then plastic wrap over and compressed it with multiple wraps of electrical tape applied very tightly. This kept the resin from being too heavily wetted and I never noticed any air bubbles/porosity when sanding prior to paint.
Honestly, if I could have gotten the color a little closer, you probably couldn't tell. Since repair the bike has had several season of riding and no issues as of yet.
  • 3 0
 @JSW07: I've heard rumors here that they have to replace his rear triangle after every race
  • 1 0
 but the marketing team is stoked bro
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: good move. I’m over the wet noodle Fox 34. A stumpy with a 140 pike could possibly be the most well rounded trail bike out there.
  • 1 0
 @peterman1234: Fox 34 has too much flex - I'm unfamiliar and have only ridden the Pike 140mm.
  • 1 0
 I read "comfortable trail cruiser" and immediately thought "has a good personality." Ouch.
  • 135 4
 $10k for a GX chain and a G2 brakes. GTFO as Ari would say. What a joke.

My local shop had the SB115 on sale for 40% off over the weekend and they still weren’t selling. And it had according to Yeti the more desired PF bottom bracket.

This company as well as others have lost their minds on this latest spec group.
  • 55 1
 $10k for aluminum wheels is what gets me. Bike would've felt a lot more lively with nearly a pound lighter carbon wheelset and should have it at this price point and the intended type of trails.
  • 69 0
 It's truly absurd that even on a bike that is nearly $10,000 they decided to cheap out on the chain of all things. Seriously, how much of a profit hit were they really going to take by changing to an X01 or XX1 chain? Maybe a few dollars? Yet, someone at Yeti HQ told the cost-cutting department to truly send it.

The brakes are not much better, but this is some true penny-pinching action.
  • 63 0
 For $1400 less you can get a lighter, similar spec carbon stumpy with carbon wheels, more travel, and better geo. It even comes in yeti turquoise, no one will ever know
  • 9 1
 @nickfranko: At least is has the XO1 cassette. On similarly priced Pivot "XO1" builds it has the GX cassette, which weighs considerably more and negates the weight benefit that SRAM has over Shimano.

The chain thing was a surprise, but I don't think it makes much difference. The brakes are in line with the travel, but it's still so heavy even with them.
  • 7 0
 @arrowheadrush: any half witted dentist will spot the difference
  • 1 3
 Makes better sense to buy C1 and upgrade to factory suspension
  • 20 6
 so glad to see all these PF companies going back to threaded. I ruled out buying a yeti for years because of the PF. Now i can rule them out for building heavy expensive bikes instead.
  • 23 0
 Most of the bike industry became greedy AF because they think everything sells at every stupid price. Bad news for them: the Covid bubble is over, warehouses are full and people are not buying as many bikes as the past 2 years.
Just wait and see.
  • 24 0
 @arrowheadrush: it's absurd to think that Specialized is a bargain compared to this bike, but sadly it's true...
  • 6 0
 @arrowheadrush: but but look how much it costs! It must be better.
  • 1 0
 What’s your local shop? I’ve been seeing the 115 prices plummet but would want an XL.
  • 1 0
 and theyre so arrogant that they won't sell you a frameset either.
  • 1 3
 @scamp123: Indeed, no more PF bottom brackets for me either. I had to warranty a Norco optic carbon frame because the bearing wore the frame BB insert out of round. Unsure what happened to cause failure but threaded seems far superior.
  • 2 2
 @arrowheadrush: it's not always about "what you get" in terms of spec though...sometimes we are just brand loyal or just like how a particular brands bikes ride and then sometimes its about aesthetics and then there are multiple other reasons why one might pay "dentist money" for a bike.
I can say for myself, just because the new Marin Rift Zone is "better" in many ways, I do not have the same regard for Marin as I do Yeti therefore my experience on each bike will be completely unique regardless of spec and geo.
  • 1 0
 @pierrethenot: to be honest if you are not pointing to sworks model Specialized has always good price, including some discount from dealers...
  • 1 0
 @TucsonDon: with the chains, it's not about the weight, or the bling, it's the hardening - GX chains last so much less time than the fancier chains that it's cheaper in the long run spending the extra. Of course, depends where you ride and how often...
  • 3 3
 @njcbps: you rode a broken bottom bracket around inside a cheap plastic frame and it’s somehow the bottom bracket’s fault the frame failed? The bearing had seized inside your bottom bracket and instead of spinning as it should it drilled your frame out. You’re an idiot mate, people like you should be banned from commenting in public.
  • 2 0
 @TucsonDon: But it has the shit X1 crank seen on $4000.00 bikes
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Carbon frame (C2 Optic), not plastic. No signs of failure until I noticed play in the cranks, and took it apart to assess at that point.

Keep the personal attacks to yourself too.
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: To be fair, the X1 crank is totally fine. It's carbon and significantly lighter than the GX crank. Not many $4k bikes are getting X1 cranks. X01 would obviously be preferable given the price, but there's not a big difference between the two (40g).
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: haha, laughing my ass off... "Yeti HQ told the cost-cutting department to truly send it"

You're 100% right, that was some Saturday Sends worth stuff right there.
  • 2 1
 @TucsonDon: not just alloy wheels...cheap alloy wheels
  • 121 0
 Let me abbreviate this review: “meh”
  • 50 0
 most expensive & heavy?
  • 12 3
 Matches the frame colour... this is like all those beige, specced to the gills, Lexus SUV's slowly rolling around their gated communities...
  • 5 0
 @islandforlife: this bike will suit them perfectly
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: yes and while they are at the park lot trying bunny hop (but not to much to avoid any pain to their neck) their wives are doing big drop on the bed inside gated communities.
  • 86 10
 I’ll take the Marin featured yesterday for 1/10th of the cost thanks! Maybe I’ll buy two marins just in case and still have 80% of my money left.
  • 93 5
 Math is hard.
  • 60 13
 @maestroman21: Jeff Bezos could literally give every person on the earth 1 million dollar and still be a billionaire. It isn't that complicated bro.
  • 25 16
 @nskerb: Im not sure if you were making a joke or not, but the math on that is Jeff B could give everyone on earth 15 dollars and then he would be broke.
  • 19 1
 @nskerb: math IS hard, isn't it?
  • 7 0
 @nskerb: sorry, downvoted you before I realized you’re joking…right?
  • 13 1
 @dpars63: I'm guessing he's alluding to the absurd post that was shared on social media a couple of years ago.
  • 3 2
 @nickfranko: Yeah, i kind of thought that. The challenge I have without being in a room next to everyone on this thread is that I don't know if everyone is joking. I have met people who actually think Bezos and Musk could somehow make the whole world millionaires, and no matter how hard I've tried to help them, they cant do the simple division.
  • 34 4
 @dpars63: he has $34billion. There are 34 billion on earth. So each person could get a billion. Math is easy fir most of us!!
  • 3 28
flag hellbelly (Nov 15, 2022 at 10:58) (Below Threshold)
 @MutleyAdams: The projected population of this planet as I type this on 11/15/22 is 8 billion. Mr Bezos' wealth also as of today is $124.1 billion. If he gave every person on the planet a billion dollars he'd still have $116.1 billion. Mr. Musk would have $193 billion left in the same scenario. I'm not holding my breath waiting for any checks from him nor anyone else.
  • 6 0
 I always tell people " I have a quiver of cheap(ish) bikes. It was either one Santa Cruz quiver-killer, or an actual quiver from less expensive brands."
  • 14 0
 @hellbelly: I truly, for the sake of humanity hope you are joking......but that is in fact $1 per person you calculated. you were off by 99.99999%...
  • 10 5
 @maestroman21: I am joking, but I'd still be psyched with that dollar.
  • 2 3
 @MutleyAdams: There are ~8 billion people on Earth, not 34. Jeff Bezos' net worth is $124 billion.
  • 1 0
 @MutleyAdams: yup, this checks out
  • 1 3
 @MutleyAdams: Your wrong but it was honestly a typo. You meant to say he has 34 billion billion.
But yeah like I said, its honestly not that hard bro.
  • 1 1
 @maestroman21: not these days...theyll pass anyone a long as you write about how you came to wrong#.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: literally reached out to buy a Marin today
  • 2 5
 @hellbelly: math man, I’ll make it simple. 100 people each have a dollar.. that’s 100 dollars. 8 billion people each have a dollar… that’s 8 billion dollars. Bazos and Musk give all their money to people equally… it’s only a few dollars each.
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: not bad way to go
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: actually he could only give everyone about $15 but I’ll take it
  • 1 0
 @nskerb:

Are we referring to a US billion or the historic UK billion?
  • 1 0
 @dpars63: This is irrelevant as you can't pay with the USD in most places. You need to integrate the conversion rate in your math. Surely he also has to pay some kind of math when he gives money away. I think best would be if he sells the veggies through Amazon and gives everyone a discount code on their first order.
  • 1 0
 @Pinemtn: and why do I care
  • 2 0
 There are three types of people on this planet. Those who can count and those who can't.
  • 1 0
 @lessy: this seems like an actual joe Biden quote.
  • 80 14
 I feel like Yeti is Britney Spears of the cycling industry - once upon a time was super hot, super talented and the star of the show but now is an absolute train wreck. And as with most train wrecks, you can't help but watch and cringe. Damn shame.
  • 64 2
 And most would jump at the opportunity to ride, just to say they did
  • 6 1
 Yeah it's sort of a shame... switch infinity is still really good, but it's not the best of the best anymore. And it's heavy and expensive and wtf on the head tube angle. People freak out about the sb115 not being slack enough, and they still miss the mark.
  • 10 3
 I have a 165 and feel embarrassed to be seen riding it. I feel like the company has lost the plot!! I guess they just see themselves catering to a different crowd
  • 14 2
 I have no interest in buying this bike, but I'm going to say that this comment section isn't indicative of how Yeti is doing. I think they're doing just fine.
  • 9 0
 #freeyeti
  • 34 10
 @deez-nucks: Quit drinking the PB Kool Aid. 66.5 HA is plenty slack for a bike with this little travel. MAYBE 10% of people who buy a $10k DC bike are out there trying to shred the gnar like these industry guys who don't buy the bikes they ride.

I know more people who reduced fork travel on their Ripley, or Tallboy because "it doesn't pedal that great, for a short travel bike."
  • 2 2
 @jollyXroger: underated comment
  • 6 0
 @Glory831Guy: I’ll admit you lost me on “reducing fork travel”. But to your main point, I remember in 2017 renting a Stumpjumper with a 67.5-degree head angle for a week and Moab and thinking “wow, slacked out bikes can handle any kind of chunk you throw at it”.
  • 3 0
 @Glory831Guy: I guess we know different people… I’m not trying be anything extreme. I generally agree with pinkbike opinions but I’m not just restating their opinions. I loved my 5010 with 68/67.5 head tube angle, loved the Hightower with 67 more… but now I’m riding a ripley AF with a 140 fork and it’s way faster and way more fun than the previous bike with less travel.
  • 3 0
 @deez-nucks: That's whatsup, do your thing man. Just saying, people always rag on Pivot, and Yeti for their head angles. Realistically though, with the prices they charge, they're not gonna have a bunch of young-buck rippers on their bikes.
  • 3 0
 DC? Douche canoe?
  • 2 0
 If you see someone on a Yeti now, you think, hmmm you're not particularly clever with your money are you, and good luck with the warranty.
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: Agree, spent all weekend passing guys going downhill in the Pisgah Swank race on a bike with more travel and same HTA. Embrace your lack of skill and forget the number....
  • 64 0
 Who remembers when the full carbon YT Izzo was released as a COMPLETE BIKE for $3000 USD just a few years ago?

Ah the good old days.
  • 45 0
 @mikekazimer any chance of PB writing a piece on whether the bike industry is really frog boiling us or if these price rises are justified? It feels like we're being fleeced!

How about charting the price of the same spec of a few different bikes at different price points over the last 7 years (say SC Nomad, YT Jeffsey, Stumpjumper say) and comparing the cost increases to inflation and talking about other factors that have driven prices up (pandemic etc.) and whether those conditions still exist (e.g. how much is a shipping container now, is it back down to pre pandemic prices?).
  • 12 0
 I snapped up one of them. It also weighs about 4lbs less than the Yeti and came with the uber bling DT Swiss Spline 1200 wheels. It seemed like a lot of money at the time but has proved to be extremely good buying.
  • 1 0
 @Woody25: GMBN did a video on it a couple of weeks ago and it actually came out pretty reasonable compared to 10 years ago.
  • 2 0
 Base spec is on sale right now for $3300. Good spec (performance elite suspension and GX) is $4000.
  • 18 1
 @Woody25: Quick internet numbers but here you go:
a 2011 Santa Cruz Blur Carbon XO Build was $6133 USD.
a 2021 Santa Cruz Blur Carbon XO1 Build was $7149 USD.
Using an inflation calculator the 2011 bike would be $7388 USD.
So in this case the bike got $239 cheaper!
  • 9 0
 @Woody25:
2019 Hightower X01 - 6799
2020 Hightower X01 - 7099
2021 Hightower X01 - 7849
2022 Hightower X01 - 8799

Inflation from June 2019 to June 2022 would have the price up to $7,865.21, but that's overly simplistic because you would actually need to calculate the inflation of each component going into the bike. How much more is a set of Maxxis tires? An X01 Cassette? And unless you expect the manufacturer to take a haircut on their margin, then the costs compound quickly. If SRAM was charging them 100 for a groupset and they take a 10% cut, that puts the cost at $110. If SRAM ups it to $150 that 10% cut raises it to $165.

Same logic follows along the way for the retailer. If Santa Cruz had to raise prices from $4500 to $5000, that 40% dealer margin means it's not a $500 price increase, but a $700 increase.

Not to mention the wage increases of all of the California-based workers.
  • 1 0
 @jlauteam1: sure but buying power is way down.(you know, $ after essentials)
  • 6 0
 Instead of fixating on price why not talk about the numbers. 120 travel, 66.5 HTA, 76.5 STA. Yay Yeti releases the bike nobody asked for or wanted. Pretty sad what’s happened to this company. Ritchie Rude blah blah blah. Let’s be honest, he’d be top ten riding a shopping cart. Yeti has lost its way.
  • 2 0
 @rockandride6: Not to mention a 5x rise in shipping costs, cardboard costs, maxxis tires went up in price, ALL raw materials went up; alum, steel, ti, asian labor costs....endless price increase. No ones margins have gone up I can tell ya that.
  • 1 0
 @yakimonti: And yet I just paid $2700.00 usd retail for a nice carbon stumpjumper frame with a bunch of really cool attention to detail parts and accesories
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: and you can easily find that frame built up as complete for $4500 1 year old. Be smart out there
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: Specialized over-ordered and are stuck with excessive amounts of inventory, so for sure you can find some great deals out there.

FWIW, my point was not that all bikes SHOULD cost what they cost, but the idea that bike companies are fleecing us is a bit uninformed.
  • 1 0
 @rockandride6: That's my point really, it can feel like $9k for a bike is the bike companies fleecing us (witness the endless "my Braaapper only cost $9k and it has 4 cylinders etc. etc. comments), but digging into whether that is really the case could make for an interesting piece.

PS I'm not sure the logic about calculating the inflation of each component leading should lead to an above inflation price increase necessarily holds true - if every part of the bike, plus the labour to assemble it has been subject to compound of inflation of say 10%, then if my math serves me right I think I'd expect the total cost of the bike to go up by 10%? Same would go for the margin.

PPS: It's also mildly interesting that the price of the HighTower has jumped in the last couple of years, whereas the Blur in @jlauteam1 's post seems to have not had those same big jumps.
  • 2 0
 @Woody25:

But inflation is not equal to increased costs. In periods of high inflation, most manufacturers need to take a loss in profit (% wise) to remain price-competitive. Inflation may be at 10%, but increased COGS might be 15%. For the sake of simplicity, if we throw out some round numbers for cost:

Frame (Materials, labor, shipping): 300 > 400 - $100 price increase
Groupset: 300 > 350 - $50 price increase
Suspension: 300 > 350 - $50 price increase
Wheels: 300 > 350 - $50 price increase

That gives us $250 in increased costs to the manufacturer to build a bike, taking the cost from $1,200 to $1,450. However, if the manufacturer still needs their 10% margin to cover employees, shipping, etc. then what they sell to dealers at is not $1,320, but $1,595. If the manufacturer tried to simply keep up with the pace of inflation, they would charge $1,452, taking their margin down to a whopping $2.

I think...my brain hurts. So yes, someone smarter should do an article about this. Haha
  • 38 1
 As a previous 115 owner, I can't understand who this bike is now for?

It weights as much as my Arrival, but the same travel (10mm more in front) as my BC40. Why would anyone buy this at 10K? If you want down country at 10K there are dozens of better and lighter builds, if you want trail, there are tons more capable builds with 140/150 at the same or less weight and price.

And that color? Has yeti just phoned it in on the new CB120?
  • 28 0
 You, sir, have a sweet stable of bikes.
  • 11 0
 I'm confused too. This just seems like a lower travel version of the SB130, which as the popular Lunch Ride variation demonstrated, was actually preferred with a bit more travel. Yeti looks like they've run into the same problem as Santa Cruz: their suspension design is great, but a bit heavy. It's easy to hide in longer-travel categories, but starts to become uncompetitive in lower travel segments. SC introduced the flex pivot Blur to compensate. Yeti instead just moved the bike away from 100mm towards 120mm over 1.5 frame iterations (for those that don't remember, the SB115 was just the SB100 with a different shock and possibly linkage to get an extra 15mm).
  • 8 0
 @MTBrent: Whenever I see an Arrival in the wild I can't help but edge closer and stare lol.
  • 17 0
 I mean to me it seems pretty obvious who it is for. It is for the Suburban dad in the McMansion with a Tesla or Porsche SUV who wants comfortably mountain bike with name recognition for his once a week ride.
  • 3 1
 Because now people with the new SB160 can also buy the short travel version, you wouldn't understand, it's a Yeti thing... lol.
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: Well, I've had a few and my favorite by far was my ARC, so I guess I am not your typical YETI guy.
  • 1 0
 That's what I'm laughing about too. This weighs as much as my SC Megatower with a 36 fork and Exo casing tires, which is obviously a way more capable bike (and was around $7k). My Spur weighs 5 lbs less, has more aggressive geo, and was also close to half the cost of this.

This bike is such an "all arounder" that it is truly terrible at everything.
  • 42 1
 Almost 30lbs for a 120mm bike. Ok Yeti.
  • 25 1
 If it was a 130/140 I think people would take it, but a 120mm bike has no reason to be over 28lbs.
  • 12 1
 @adamszymkowicz: just wait until the new SB140 weighs 32-33 lbs.
  • 9 0
 @adamszymkowicz: Especially for $10k.
  • 2 0
 @stevemokan: I'm really curious to see where it comes out. The current SB130 is about 31 with a respectable build. I can't see it getting heavier. I think they just ran out of room to reduce weight with the chunky SI suspension design.
  • 9 0
 Remember back in 2015 when Santa Cruz Nomad builds were 25-27 lbs? Now you can get a high-end 120mm travel bike that weighs 30 lbs. Kind of a head scratcher.
  • 3 1
 @bronco5: one hopes that weight has gone into durability. Giving Yeti the benefit of the doubt, perhaps this is their attempt to shed their reputation as being a bit unreliable.
  • 3 0
 One might say they are out to lunch...
  • 1 0
 I built my rift zone carbon (albeit I bought the frame used on PB) with carbon wheels, "downcountry" tires, xt cassette, and a few other lighter weight durable components to a little over 28lbs without pedals all for under $3300. If I ever wanted to pay 10k for a short travel bike, it better be like 22lbs or make me a magically better rider.
  • 1 1
 @stevemokan: Weirdly enough, I think 32lbs isn't terrible for a trail bike. My Stumpy Evo weighs about that, granted it's an S5, and I run aluminum wheels and meaty tires. I know that about 10 years ago it was more common to see trail bikes in the 26-27lbs range, but those were significantly more susceptible to frame failure than todays. It's just that those 32 lb trail bikes aren't supposed to be able to be a race bike as well. I think the "downcountry" label is super misleading in that people think it's supposed to be a downhill-focused xc bike, when really it's supposed to be an xc bike you can ride all day anywhere (within reason) and still strap on a race plate from time to time, but not be a dedicated race rocket.
  • 1 1
 @bronco5: Remember how those bikes' frames failed all the time? Ten years ago manufacturers thought that the benefit of carbon was lighter weights, but what they're realizing now is that it's the vibration-dampening and stiffness that are the true benefits.
  • 33 1
 US made Ibis Exie frame $4500.

US made BC40 frame is $4000 and can be had with just rear shock (no headset or fork) according to the pleasantly nice and quick replying customer service (all of which are not found at Yeti come warranty time) at Allied. And you have multiple paint options at no cost.

Not exactly apples to apples in terms of intended use, true, but I know dentists have above average reading comprehension.

In the car world the SB120 is a heavy bloated crossover with a CVT, 50HP less and costing 30% more.
  • 15 0
 For the same weight and travel you could get a US made Trail Pistol, decide you don't like heavy 120mm bikes, and build it up as a longer travel bike and still spend less than this.
  • 3 0
 @Genewich: Or, you can build the Trail Pistol with a Sid and carbon wheels right from the GG site, and have a 120mm bike that weighs 26.3lbs and costs $7210. Move up to a 130mm Pike Ultimate for another $20, and you have a decent fork and still have a bike that only weights 27.3lbs.

AND GG has frame colors now. Heck of a good option, now that you mention it.
  • 27 0
 I had high hopes for this bike. I started telling my 429, maybe we should see less of each other. It's not you, it's me. You're a fantastic bike and do everything well and I have no reason to want another bike, I just have a problem. Now, after this disappointing release of what sounds to be a pretty average/overpriced bike, I have to go back to my 429 and beg for forgiveness. I just didn't realize what we had and shouldn't have taken it for granted.
  • 25 0
 This is another example of an "aim for the middle and miss the target" sort of a bike. I'd disagree with Kaz's statement about it feeling at home on the East Coast simply because there are better bikes on both ends of the spectrum (lighter or more travel) that do everything better. Combined with the ludicrous price tag, I really can't see anyone buying one of these for anything other than a conversation piece.
  • 6 0
 I'm on the east coast and have for a while complained about modern geo being for out west and this bike still isn't for me.
  • 27 1
 I Stopped reading at 9600$.
No this can't be a normal price for a MTB, we should not let it become usual
  • 6 0
 If it makes you feel any better, the Rocky Altitude Carbon 90 is now 13,500 CAD before tax : |
  • 3 4
 @bikebanjo: It doesn't. At least Yetis don't crack when someone whispers the word "rock" near them.
  • 4 0
 @adamszymkowicz: This is true, Yeti's crack well before someone gets round to whispering "rock"
  • 1 0
 @bikebanjo: no it doesn’t Smile I will look at them and think of how many beers I can drink with the money I saved choosing an alloy Spire instead
  • 1 0
 @Daaaaaaaan: Their weakness is when someone whispers "mud."
  • 22 0
 I know this is negative Nancy, but I really don’t see how Yeti would/will survive an economic down turn. Meh bikes with crazy prices, is not a winning combo.
  • 8 1
 They will survive. Your average banker/dentist/whatever wants the "best MTB", which for at least some of them will mean a Yeti. 10, 12k? less than their country club membership. They dont care.
Its the normal people in the middle, who might be tightening their belts and making a bike last another year.
  • 4 1
 @sunringlerider: Cavities don’t care about economic downturns. The market will still be there for people to floss their fancy yetis, on kashima coated Kuat racks, on the back of their Range Rovers (limited edition, no peasant trash).
  • 2 0
 Yeah. They are aspirational items for the casual enthusiast. Once a company gets to that point, they will survive economic downturns no problem.
  • 7 0
 No these are the brands that do survive. You either have to go crazy high end/high price, even for no reason, but establish your brand as premium and "worth it" (Yeti, Santa Cruz), there is always a market for that.

Or you go affordable and practical... it's interesting... in two days we've seen drops from two brands on exactly the opposite of the spectrum. Marin's updated aluminum Rip Zone and Yeti's SB120.

Both these brands will be fine. It's all the ones in the middle that will struggle... because what are you selling if you're not very high end and seen as "worth it" or affordable and seen as "getting a good bike for a good price".
  • 3 1
 @islandforlife: as crazy as it is I am sure you are correct. Considering that Yeti and SC are both made over seas, as well as many lower priced options, I just can’t wrap my head around ever buying one.
  • 2 1
 @sunringlerider: Yep, all you need to do is demo them and you quickly realize they're just the same (if not worse in certain situations) both Yeti and Santa Cruz are than many bikes sold for thousands of dollars less. You truly are paying for the brand with these bikes.
  • 5 2
 @islandforlife: This is actually true, I just went from a 2021 Carbon Santa Cruz to a 2021 Aluminum Trek after back to back rides on both. I bought the Trek off my friend because he wanted to go with more travel.
The differences are so minimal at best given similar travel and geometry.
I get that some people like the look or some of the 'features' of fancier bikes no disrespect there. Just as far as the actual riding goes it's really not a big deal. I would also argue the 1 degree of headtube angle is pretty trivial. Lots of bikes have that amount in flip chip change, it's not like it makes a new bike!
  • 17 0
 Interesting to see Yeti exiting Marathon racing with a 30# "downcountry bike" completely after exiting:
-Cross Country (RIP ASR)
-Short Track (130mm Hardtail with iscg lol)
-Gravel (RIP OPEN x Yeti)
-Road (RIP Project Road)
-BMX (RIP SuperX)
-Downhill (RIP 303DH)
-Free Ride (no crankworks/Rampage since???)
-and everything but EWS racing (yay Richie Rude!)

Am I missing something here from a company that says "Racing is in our DNA"?
  • 5 0
 Wasn’t reed bogs in a yeti at rampage this year and didn’t he place 4th?
  • 3 0
 @skijosh: fair point, while it is not "racing" I was just trying to grasp at disciplines where Yeti was pushing the envelope or being competitive, and came up with nothing.
  • 5 0
 But the new SB160-E is all about "racing", so there's that.
  • 2 0
 Saddening moreso than interesting to me, but I agree. I'm holding onto my ARC Carbon as it's gotten me on the podium more than any bike I've had, but I'm sad there's not a good squishy XC bike to pair it with.
  • 18 1
 Dam yeti is smoking for a $4300 frame. A grand more than the Revel Ranger, out of their minds
  • 20 2
 also -1 star for Yeti's awful website
  • 14 0
 Seriously, only Norco has a worse website. Just show me a clean geo table and stop trying to sell me a lifestyle.
  • 15 0
 I once thought my GG Trail Pistol was heavy. Thanks Yeti for making me feel good about spending less than half the amount and being nearly the same weight, as well as being manufactured right down the road from your office.
  • 5 0
 That’s a pretty mind-boggling logic bomb right there. I know yeti is trying the recoup their engineering costs and they have proprietary equipment like the pivots and slider thingy. But to your point, GG has USA made frames right down the street from yeti for way less money.
  • 13 0
 Yeti: "We lost our title of "worst value bike" to Rocky Mountain over the last 2 years. We want our title back. Let's introduce the SB120 at a shockingly eye-watering price point."

Rocky: "We'll just release our 2023MY's with another 5-10% price increase with no change in spec...we can't let Yeti own the crown for "worst value bike" "
  • 3 2
 It's not an apples to apples comparison, but the Element C50 is $1000usd less than the SB120 C1 build. So I can hardly describe Rocky Mountain bikes as being "worst value". Value is subjective though so any conversation on that topic is a waste of time, but I'm confident that our MY23 pricing is as competitive as it can be given the costs we needed to consider leading up the MY23 pricing releases.

If I were a customer that likes what Yeti does as whole, I would buy that SB120 without concern about the sticker price because I would have determined the value is there. Customers that worry about derailleur spec and hyper-specific, singular details, are the ones that have different value metrics and complain about pricing.
  • 3 2
 @kperras: Of all the overpriced bikes out there, Rocky Mountain truly baffles me the most. At least Yeti used to be at the top of the pack for a while there years back and although I can't see the value personally, at least I understand the motivation for some to still look at Yeti, no matter how misguided I may find it. And same for Santa Cruz, even if overpriced, I do kind of see where the appeal may come from. But unless I missed an important history lesson, Rocky Mountain is just... such a whatever bike.

Fortunately, there are still manufacturers making exciting bikes that have not drank this ridiculous kool-aid and I hope they won't. As a consumer, I take this price gouging practice personally and would not buy any bikes from manufacturers who do this even if they come to their senses later on and build some amazing bikes. I'd rather give my money to someone who treats their customers as something other than the next wallet to pillage.
  • 3 0
 @grotesquesque: did you happen to see who won the EWS Overall this year?
  • 2 0
 @grotesquesque: Yeah I bet you jerk off to Santa Cruz and Ibis like every other trendy mofo. Working in a shop that carries RM, I've never seen so many stoked customers on their bikes, especially the new element. Not to mention one of the better bike brands to service.
  • 1 0
 @hi-dr-nick: Lol, not even close. Now, don't get me wrong, I'm not saying RM is a shit bike, not at all. If the owners are happy, that's awesome and it's their money to spend after all. I'm saying that the realistic price for RM, SC, Yeti, Pivot and the crowd of give-me-a-break price-taggers is about half the asking price. But I, me personally, still wouldn't give that much for a bike.

And fortunately, I don't have to. There are still manufacturers who offer fantastic top-spec bikes for less than that. I was lucky and managed to buy my dream bike for $3500 just before this lunacy took off. A year in and for the first time ever, I haven't found a single component that I'm itching to replace before it breaks or wears out, or wishing for different geometry here or there. By the time I'm in the market again, I hope things will have settled again. But that's a potential problem for another time.
  • 13 0
 Love how all USA and Canada flag people complain how the bike is expensive. You earn so much money per year. In Slovakia, average tax free income is ~12 000€ per year. You have no idea how wealthy you guys are and yet complain. For some of my friends is hard to spend 1400€ on Canyon alloy frame HT, because they cannot afford it. Anyway, 10k$ SB120 and those alloy wheels, heavy, bad pedalling bike? When you have Ripley, Spur, Element? Not interested, even I would be from big earn country...
  • 3 0
 True, but you get delicious dumplings and pierogis for a lot less than we pay at Trader Joe's. It all evens out.
  • 5 0
 @bikewriter: And I pay $8,000 per year for healthcare for my "family" of 3, which I never seem to use. And my shitty slow internet is $60 per month.... and, and, and....

There's a lot of wealth in America.... most of it ain't in your average person's hands.
  • 15 5
 The geometry is much closer to a carbon Ripley than Tallboy. Personally I'd never buy a 65° HTA with only 120 mm rear travel. I think it's a mismatch, this makes more sense. Snappy handling but more comforable and fun than a full on XC. If you ride stuff where 66° feels steep, I think you also feel happier on a 140+ bike. But that's maybe just me and where I live.
  • 10 0
 Have you ridden a 120 mm rear suspension bike with a 65HTA? There are almost no downsides. They are great.
  • 4 0
 @deez-nucks: I actually have! Yes, and the downside is the climbing and steering where I think a bike like this needs to excel. With climbing I mean on a trail with actual roots and rocks, not a fireroad. But if your climb is a road and have crazy steep flowtrails I'm sure a 65° 120mm Fox DPS bike sounds fun. It's nothing for whre I live. Not trying to promote this bike, it's seems heavy and very expensive. But many are complaining that every bike in the world has too steep HTA, and I don't think every bike is better with 63° HTA. I totallty agree longer travel trail bikes are though, and STA's could become even steeper across most bikes, but that's another question.
  • 1 0
 @Hakkapelitta: I felt that way about my bike when I first rode it. But you can adjust to the longer wheelbase going uphill. And once you do it’s only slightly harder to ride the same stuff. Once you get used to a slacker bike and then try to go backwards it feels a lot less stable. There’s a reason most short and mid travel trail bikes have settled around 65 degrees
  • 3 0
 @deez-nucks: If we are talking 120 mm bikes, new Ripley is still 66.5°, this is 66.5°. Then you have the Canadian brands and Santa Cruz that went for even slacker (and some inbetweens). But they are not as resposive and as good climbers. It's a give and take. Yeti already has the SB130 that is slacker, but still pretty good climber (but also on the heavy side?). I think the numbers are very thought through. I think SB120 makes sense, as does Norco Optic, each for it's use.
  • 13 0
 Yeah I'll keep my SB 4.5c
  • 2 0
 Same! I've had mine for years and don't see myself switching to anything else anytime soon.
  • 1 0
 @vantpach: Yeah it really is a great bike. I don't ride my a ton anymore, most of my riding is XC but when I get back on it, I'm like damn this bike is awesome.
  • 2 0
 @vantpach: rode my 4.5 for a couple of seasons in the sea-to-sky, took it to NZ too, etc. and it was great fun to whip around but swapped for a 130LR and I was blown away at how capable/versatile it was by comparison. Not as light, but still a wicked climber and much more stable at speed and in the steeps/chunk. Can't ignore the 160mm up front as a factor, but the 130LR is easily the most capable all-rounder I've ever thrown a leg over.
  • 1 0
 I've been itching to either upgrade drive train and wheels on my sb45c but the transition spur has been a thorn in that plan. That front end is so light and fun, ah. Was surprised to see this review pop up and intrigued what the new bike would be, but it's the same sb45c but heavier? Kind of disappointing. Also given that this shirt travel bike is the old switch infinity, does it mean they are walking away from the perpendicular arrangement?
  • 2 0
 @Xirj: the sixfinity set up was designed for the e-bike, they couldn’t fit the normal switch link in the frame because of the motor. It was never intended to be used on their other bikes.
  • 9 0
 I agree the geo is a bit...odd. The weight is on the high side but does not have the geo to back it up on steep and chunky terrain. Was hoping this would be a killer bike but the numbers do not seem to suggest that. Looking forward to demoing one.
  • 8 0
 Yea it has the geo of a modern XC bike but the weight of an all mountain bike.

And you can’t run an angleset to correct the geo..
  • 9 0
 I really wish they would have embraced the "fast" with this bike. If this had a 120mm fork, and weighed 5 pounds less, it could be a ripping XC race bike. The geometry is in line with the latest batch of modern XC race bikes, but the weight most definitely is not.

It's undergunned for the "trail" category, but doesn't leave room in their lineup for a XC raceable bike.
  • 10 1
 I think we can just say it's a bad design with no clear purpose.
  • 11 0
 Full carbon Izzo core 4 with fox factory suspension and dt xmc1501 carbon wheels with 240 hubs that weighs 27lbs - $5k right now
  • 1 0
 Yep. I bought that exact bike and it is great! 27.5 lbs as I measured. I had to put a minion dhf 2.5 on it (versus the older Forekaster up fron that it came with), so the weight went up a little along with a slower rolling speed. That said, I can go down almost any trail in my area of the Bay Area. It is great for all day riding or other things. The YT Izzo is also slacker. I'm not sure if the carbon is the same quality but the Carbon rims have been great. I have hit square edges and there are no issues.

Caveat: I went from a Hightower C 2020 with a Lyric Ultimate on it, so I wasn't sure how it was going to go with a lighter bike but it has been fine. I don't do many enduro rides these days Smile
  • 11 0
 So you CAN still get a Ripley with a head badge.
  • 13 0
 Apparently the head badge weighs about 3 lbs.
  • 9 0
 @TucsonDon: 3 lbs. and $3k
  • 6 0
 I guess I need to be educated on the size specific chainstays and front/rear center ratios per size. Growing the chainstays 2mm per size seems like an interesting choice... I can't imagine that 2mm increases is optimum per size. Maybe it's a limitation of the pivots/frame layout?

For example... this bike has the following FC/RC ratios.
XS = 1.59, S = 1.65, M = 1.73, L = 1.77, XL = 1.83, XXL = 1.87

So... is there something going on with the COG and/or rider position of a taller rider where the fc/rc should be vastly different for those riders? Yeti isn't the only one with these sorts of spreads for a trail bike. For example, the tallboy runs from 1.65 (xs) to 1.91 (xxl).
  • 3 0
 I suspect it’s what they can manage by moving the chain stay attachment points in the front triangle so they don’t have to make different sized stays
  • 6 0
 2023 Rocky Element C90, full XTR, Fox Factory bounce, carbon wheels/cranks/etc, ~25lbs = $9250USD
2023 Yeti SB120, SRAM mixed bag, Fox Factory bounce, aluminum wheels, 29.5lbs = $9600USD

Do Yeti's R&D team live in a concrete block bunker with no wifi?
  • 2 0
 You forgot the paint. The paint is VERY expensive. The pigment comes from the very plentiful, but miniscule amounts of dried tears, harvested in the lobbies of dental offices - painfully scraped off the desk from where Janet in accounts receivable serves her victims with notice of their newly acquired financial meltdown paperwork.
  • 7 0
 frame silhouette looks good.. its a good looking bike. Weight- too heavy. Cost- ridiculous spec for $10k... alloy wheels- come on! No in-frame storage- big miss.
  • 6 0
 The lack of in-frame storage is actually quite significant. So many companies are offering this feature throughout their line up, and it is so excellent to offload all your spare gear into the frame. I see this as a major con to an extremely expensive bike.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: didn't really think much about this until having it, ranks up they with having a proper bottle mount for things I must have now.
  • 3 0
 @OnTheRivet: Completely agree - I don't think about it unless reminded. Meanwhile, my bike frame currently has tube, tire lever, patch kit, CO2 inflator + cartridge, and room for more! Kinda nice to have these things tucked away in the frame and forgotten about.
  • 7 1
 How does 10mm more travel add 5lbs more weight than a BC40 or Epic Evo? Even accounting for the heavy wheel / tire spec, this bike needs a diet...
  • 2 0
 This the price for kashima coated switch infinity rails, kashima weight almost as much as gold, and if you have a heavy bike, it better had something goldish Wink
  • 15 1
 It's like they looked at the Epic Evo and the Stumpjumper and combined both bikes' drawbacks with none of their greatnesses.
  • 4 3
 Overly complicated suspension system.
  • 4 0
 "Option two would have been to make it lighter, embracing the slightly steeper geo in favor of making it a trail rocket."

That SB 100 frame I just got for $1,450 with a 1.6 degree angleset is looking more like a good move. Guess I'll see if all those Switch Infinity nightmares are true tho...
  • 5 3
 They aren't unless you ride in the wet all the time. Just grease the sliders as recommended and you'll get years out of it. My 2019 SB130 is still going strong and the sliders look and feel as good as new.
  • 2 0
 @big-red: good to hear! I was referring specifically to a few notorious problems the SB 100 had as it was a different SI layout. Yeti pushed out 3 iterations of fixes early on. What's cool tho is I called Yeti before I bought the frame second hand and they offered to send me the latest iteration free.
  • 3 0
 @Nwilkes: good luck with it, I had all 3 “fixes” on my SB100 and the stupid switch bolts would still come loose, Yeti eventually replaced the frame under warranty and I sold it. The SB100 was the least reliable bike I ever owned, it’s the reason I passed on the SB115 when it came out.
  • 6 0
 Everyone here giving out about Yeti prices, wait till you see new Transition prices lol
I got quoted €4,750 for a carbon patrol frame! The future sure looks bright ...
  • 6 1
 This horse has been beaten senseless, but... $9600 Yeti with $50 Cane Creek 40 headset. What's next, FSA Orbit or an Acros headset?
At least put a Cane Creek 110 or Wolftooth.
  • 1 0
 Is Wolftooth any good? I'm curious if I should be replacing my CC40 builds with the WT equal.
  • 4 0
 Gotta say, the Switch Infinity gets hard to justify the complexity/more wear items when you get down to this travel. It's all-out pointless once you're below 120. It just doesn't do enough to merit the $$ and weight.
  • 1 0
 Tend to agree. This is essentially a single-pivot, where by the pivot location moves very, very slightly. I wonder what the absolute vertical travel is of the switch infinity pivot throughout the stroke? A few mm?
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: These are things that Yeti will not say, but when I service one last I left the shork off and cycled it thru its travel. It was VERY VERY little and no doubt negligible on the trail.
  • 1 0
 @5poundplumbbob: Undoubtedly it has some effect on the anti-rise and anti-squat vs. a single pivot. I saw a video dissecting the SB150 suspension platform, and the technical reviewer mentioned specifically that the SB150 enjoys decidedly less anti-squat in the final 30% of travel, which will offer an improvement on pedal kickback near the end of the stroke.

Switch Infinity seems like the best possible single pivot design - but I'm also confident that other designs simply offer more.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Understood.. but really.. How much are you really worried about anti squat or anti rise if your plowing into the remaining 30% of travel.? Hell a little pedal kickpack may help from completely bottoming out everything...
  • 1 0
 @5poundplumbbob: The particular suspension reviewer I saw said that the falling anti-squat is exactly what is valuable as this lead to significantly less pedal kickback deeper in the suspension travel.

Again, I am not a huge fan of Switch Infinity. I had an SB150 and sold it after 10 months. That said, it does seem to be a better solution than a true single pivot.
  • 16 9
 No headset cable routing. Take my money.
  • 5 0
 So, it is heavy just like the tallboy and the following, is it at least as fun as the evil?
it'd easily become a bit useless otherwise
  • 3 0
 When I saw the Yeti jumped well I thought "oh, could be a challenger to the Following?". Then I saw the frame was $550 more than the Evil and was like, uh nope.
  • 6 3
 lets compare this to the spectral 125. factory float x and 36, 64 head angle, code rsc with metallic pads stock , GX AXS, carbon wheels from DT with 240s, their carbon bar, X1 carbon cranks. Its not light but has a very stiff frame, climbs well, descends better, has a great spec. done and done.
  • 2 1
 and thats why people need to not be buying this overpriced stuff. - if these brands want to have that pricing model that seems them struggle then hey... let them.
  • 8 0
 or the Transition Spur. AXS Spur is lighter, more capable, better geo and has carbon wheels for less $$$
  • 1 0
 Granted, that bike weighs 3lbs more.
  • 3 2
 @adamszymkowicz: I assume your talking about the 125? i can assure you the spectral platform both 125/150 ride Lighter than their weight suggest.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: That wasn't my point. Also, that bike is designed for a very different riding experience then the SB120. The Spectral's design and build make sense for what it is as a short travel enduro bike. And yeah, it rides lighter than it weighs, but it's not trying to be an xc bike or a downcountry bike or whatever.
  • 1 1
 @adamszymkowicz: OK fair but maybe should make that point the first time rather than me coming along assuming lol.
  • 3 0
 3,000 g frame!? Yikes. I'm not a weight weenie but with the same tires why wouldn't you reach for the SB130, it'll be just as fast and 95% as supportive. I feel like they screwed the pooch in dropping the SB100, that bike was massively popular and well received and the SB115 and now this are sort of meh...
  • 1 0
 We can only assume a 29er 140 is coming next.
Can you imagine if they did a lighter weight 100?! Wouldn't that be something...
  • 1 0
 Isn't a 29er 140 just a LR130? @ksilvey10: are you hinting a SB100 2.0 is on the way...?
  • 1 0
 @briceps: i have no idea. But i would assume the 130/130lr will be replaced by a 140 to keep the 20mm increments. As far as the 100 goes, who knows? I wouldn't be able to afford it, but it seems to me they keep trying to make every bike into the same bike. This new bike doesn't make a lot of sense to me
  • 2 0
 Consider also that this frame does not have in-frame storage like so many competitors, and the weight looks even worse.
  • 2 0
 @briceps: well this didn't take long to come true
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: I mean the stumpy (both evo and normal versions) have in-frame and are still pretty class leading as far as weight goes so that wouldn't even be a great excuse.
  • 6 1
 $9600 for alloy wheels? No. Just no. There's something wrong when Specialized is beating you on value.... and I own an SB130 (got it used).
  • 5 1
 I looked at Yeti and Santa Cruz. Bought a YT Izzo for half the price. Best decision I made, with the money I saved i got carbon wheelset, bars, and stem. It is a size XXL and weight less than 29 pounds.
  • 1 0
 Bought a core 4 used... I am so happy i did.
  • 1 0
 Bought a core 3 last year. Absolute blast of a bike. Only thing I want to swap is the 34 to a pike.
  • 4 0
 The color is fitting for a bike which is, in effect, a big bowl of melted vanilla ice cream.

Yeti is simultaneously raising prices AND saving money on R&D with their latest crop of bikes - tweaking designs from 2018.
  • 1 0
 Tooth color...for dentists of course .
  • 4 0
 I know people like to make the dentist joke but most people know which group is buying these bikes. Its a culture of showing off $$$ they have taken to cycling and its reflected in these prices.
  • 3 0
 The dentist(self employed/successful corpos/retirees) crowd are on ebikes in California now-past 3 years.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer I really agree with your comment on the G2 brakes. I had them on a 22 Element with regular pads and 200/180 normal SRAM rotors, but when I swapped the brakes to my Canfield Tilt, I also moved to metallic pads & 200/200 SRAM HS2 rotors and the difference was astounding. For reference, the Element weighed in at 27.3lbs and the Tilt is pushes 33.6lbs but the brakes feel way stronger on the Tilt.
  • 5 0
 Transition Spur.
120mm
25lbs in top of the line trim
$7200
and comes in Deep Sea Green. Let's call it Turquoise for arguments sake.

I'll take the Transition please.
  • 3 0
 I feel like this review is purposely stepping around many of the elephants in the room.
For instance, the Revel Rascal which is 1000 USD less money and, while a 130mm rear travel bike, is an extremely efficient pedaling bike and can get on the gas downhill as well. Or... a used SB130? I also feel like no one knows the Devinci Django exists (no one reviews it?), which is an awesome 120mm bike. I could go on but why?... I think many of us are thinking the same thing.
  • 1 0
 I owned a Django for a year. The Rascal is a much better bike overall on the ups and downs. Except it's a bit creakier. I believe many SB130/LR owners are no longer planning to sell theirs unless by some miracle of marketing the SB140 comes in at a price and weight that doesn't light up the comment section.
  • 1 0
 I have a 22 Django. Awesome bike and nearly half the price as this Yeti. I think I paid $5500 for it.
  • 1 0
 Yeah… I think the simpler conundrum is previous gen SB vs new gen SB. Yeti set the market with the previous gen SB bikes… this gen looks to be virtually equivalent to those (10mm more rear travel, and a threaded BB), but significant price increases.

It’s going to be a hard sell comparing a SB130/SB140 or SB150/SB160. Great condition previous gen frames are half the price now!
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: A few weeks ago on PB classifieds was a brand new 130LR frame with Float X, asking $2400-ish. But the horror stories of Yeti customer service and warranty to not-original owner kept me away.
Buying a USED Yeti? Horrible idea unless price so low you factor paying full pop for Switch repair.
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: yeah I had a Devinci Troy, which I loved (and sold like an idiot, but i did make like 2k on the sale... but wasn't worth it in hindsight). The Troy was a magic bike for me and doesn't get enough good press, IMO. Rode the Django for a ride or two, which just felt like a llighter and less burly Troy to me but with the same general dynamics. Went from the Troy to a Ripmo and didn't get along with the Ripmo... for me, the Troy was better in every area except pedaling efficiency... but I preferred climbing on the Troy because it was so comfortable on long or steep climbs (steeper seat tube angle and longer chain stays)... better traction on tech climbing too.

I am riding a Rascal right now with a 150mm Lyrik up front. I seriously climb almost as fast on my Rascal as I do on my 29+ Why Cycles Wayward (which is a super fun hardtail, btw). Rascal downhill far exceeds my capability... I know several folks who Enduro and light DH on a Rascal with a Fox36 or Lyrik. Used to have a SB5.5 which I has zero problems with but was an older geo bike... hated climbing steep stuff on it but the SB5.5 was really fun every where else. But again, IMO, the Troy was better than the SB5.5 everywhere (I owned those two bikes at the same time).

I feel like any 120mm DC/trail bike that comes out has to justify its price/performance against the Ripley, Spur, Rascal, and Trail 429 (plus a few others I'm probably missing).
  • 1 0
 @laytonbaker: I demo'd a Ripmo two years ago and hated it. It was one ride. Last month spent a few days on a Ripmo V2. Loved it, bought the frame. Oh, I know what your Why HT is, one of my dream frames!
So many options for so many different trails and riding styles. Simply a case of trying and not getting raked over the coals $$.
  • 2 0
 @bikewriter: Yeah I expected to really like the Ripmo V2 but didn't... sold the bike. But I bought a L and maybe should have tried a XL... oh well.

I saved up for a long time for the Wayward V2 frame and built it up as I could afford it; I love it. It is the bike I ride the most.
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: Nah...Iv owned 3 previous gen Yetis. As mentioned, many times here, the frames are built heavy and durable. No worries there. If a frame is going to have a problem with a manufacturing defect, it will show its head sooner rather than later. The SI isnt some mystery device... Its two sliding shafts and pivot bearing. If they are lubed once or twice a year, they will last longer than you own the bike... plus a new SI can be bought separate if needed... 30-minute job.
  • 3 0
 The Switch Infinity is a hard sell at this travel and less. Yeti should take a play from Specialized and ditch it on short travel like they did with the Horst link. It just doesn't actually do enough with minimal wheel travel to justify the money/weight/etc.
  • 3 0
 Pick your favorite 120 rear 130ish front frame and build for $7500 USD with control tires. Now compare performance value. I'll toss Spur, Tallboy, and Ripley in to start. Assume it's your only bike, you ride like a mere mortal and ride a variety of trails.
  • 6 0
 Meh so many better pother options
  • 4 0
 Yea I would take a Spur or Element over this
  • 5 1
 I planned on the SB115 getting a update and was going to be my next bike. Not now. Nothing about this bike besides how sexy it looks is appealing.
  • 4 0
 Hmmm... these 20mm increments yeti loves so much makes me think they could make a lighter, fun short-travel bike and call it the SB100!
  • 4 0
 Love to see a Spur comparison. The Spur blew me away on it's capability for a 120/120mm bike......GX model was around 28lbs stock for a size large also.
  • 6 7
 Had the spur for 3 months and sold it. Know another guy had it less time and sold it. Pedaling platform on spur is hot garbage. Anytime you smashed on pedals there was definite pedal robbing squish. Try a DW link bike then let me know how well the spur is
  • 3 2
 @pills1975: Mine climbs great at 27%, running a CC DB Air IL, which improves climbing traction over the SIDLuxe. Any comparable DW bikes (e.g. Ripley) are pretty sketchy descenders on steeps.
  • 4 1
 The Spur is ~4lbs lighter than this bike, more aggressive geo, and close to half the price...
  • 4 0
 @pills1975:
Thats a set up problem then, no such issue on the one I’ve ridden
  • 5 0
 @pills1975: As a long time singlespeed smasher and owner of 8 different DW bikes over the years i find my Spur to be an excellent peddler.
  • 5 0
 @pills1975: Have a buddy that built up a Spur....and the guy is not only a shredder, but also worked in shops for a long time. He's in love with it.
  • 1 0
 @tgent: when a Spur is almost 1/2 the price you have got to know you're wayyy out to lunch(ride) --> see what i did there?
  • 1 0
 Yeah! I commented to a buddy that the Yeti got the Spur treatment...but Kaz didn't mention the bike...what's up wit dat?
  • 5 5
 @tgent: Guys, stop comparing a SB120 to simple, single pivot bikes which only take 120 mm forks, that is not apples to apples. And on the head angle, 66.5 is perfectly appropriate for this category of bikes, just like the Ripley. Additionally, the SB 120 can handle forks up to 150 mm, so if you want a slacker, more descending oriented bike, you can have that as well.
120 mm single pivots like the Spur, Allied, Epic Evo, etc, have way less rear suspension performance than what one gets with SI. To get decent pedaling with single pivots you have to add so much compression and/or air pressure that the suspension performance is compromised, and rides like less travel. With a good multilink design like DW or SI, you can run the suspension set up so it really works for you up and down. and all of those bikes take only a 120 mm fork, it is a different bike category.
Now, compare the Yeti with the bikes it competes with: Ripley, Tallboy, Trail 429, and it does pretty well, looks better than Ripley or Tall Boy, but is a bit on the heavy side-hopefully that weight makes it really reliable. And the expense, well, no one forces you to purchase it. It is called inflation: new models is the one time when bike manufacturers can raise prices and bike companies have been struggling a bit with the increased cost of goods, so when new models are introduced, expect prices to go up-it is inevitable.
But comparing the SB120 to single pivot flex stay, lightweight down country/XC bikes is silly.
YT are interesting bikes, unfortunately they do not seem to sell frame only, which means they are a no go for me, I prefer to spec my own parts selection.
  • 4 0
 @barrowsRtsQ9f: Lol someone is drinking the koolaid. Like 80% of what you said is incorrect in terms of suspension performance. More pivots and bull shit doesn't equal "better" performance.

Compare it to whatever you want. I have the same gripes with the Ripley, Tallboy, and Trail 429, they're heavy, expensive, and will get roasted by a good downcountry bike both up and down.
  • 2 2
 @tgent: no koolaid here, I actually ride the bikes.
  • 2 0
 Serious inquiry, what's the deal with Yetis and why are they so expensive? Is the switch infinity thing so groundbreaking that it justifies the price? Is there anything else they do that makes them better than any other brand? Or have they just positioned themselves as a boutique player and charge so much because they can?
  • 9 0
 The short answer is that Yeti's are priced based on what consumers will pay, not on the value that they provide.

I owned a Yeti SB150, and found it to be perfectly "fine" and adequate. I did not love it - so I sold it after >12 months. I replaced it with a custom built Specialized Enduro which is leaps better in every way, except that the Yeti was a slightly better climber (and I do mean *slightly*).
  • 1 0
 Maybe they are paying Richie seven figures...
  • 2 0
 Man, pitchforks are coming out for the Yeti brand. Are folks feeling too disenfranchised due to pricing?
I will agree this SB120 is a whole lotta meh; a bitt still-born. Seems like it is outgunned by the SB130 of the current/prior generation. Let's see if the SB140 is another fumble.
  • 2 0
 I used to really like Yeti and had a few of them over the years and i am not a dentist. Last bike was an SB100 but i felt that was flexy and over complicated after trying other bikes in the category. After getting faster times up hill and down on a 30lbs occam compared to my 26lbs SB100 i decided it was time to move on. Now on a Ripmo and really happy with the performance.

I would like to see them do a 100/120 xc light weight version with no switch. I think that would sell quite well.
  • 1 0
 Seems like the ASR-C was pretty popular at the time, an update would be awesome but not sure what would make it standout from the current crop of similar bikes like the Blur, Epic Evo, Signal Peak, etc besides an extra $2k....
  • 8 3
 Yeti sure did its thing being boring again.
  • 3 0
 Funny they went back to how they built their suspension with the collets and all bearings in the dogbone on the sb55 and sb45.
  • 4 2
 " ... it doesn't really have trait to truly elevate it above the rest, and it's expensive to boot", sounds like a perfect bike for boring wealthy middle class people? Especially when it's also comfortable? Like lawyers? Wink
  • 8 3
 Pregnancy is a beautiful thing. But not on a bike.
  • 7 3
 Nearly 30 lbs for an ugly 120 travel bike that cost almost 10 grand and comes with aluminum wheels. Kiss my rear YETI.
  • 1 0
 That fancy downtube protector completely missed the vulnerable corners of that quite square downtube. I've dinged frames that are more rounder right there with rocks kicked up by the front wheel (NOT impacting stationary things), I would be scared for this frame's life riding sticky tires in any place with loose rocks.
  • 3 0
 In this bracket, this seems like an inferior Spur competitor. Suspension performance is good, “entry level” build is decent, but meh. And I like Yetis.
  • 1 0
 I'd never buy this because of the frame weight to travel ratio, but I do love that it has size-specific chainstay lengths. Still don't understand why anyone makes a bike for a 130 fork when a Fox 34 feels great and weighs the same at 140 (ok, perhaps the longer spring is negligibly heavier, but still.) I ride a stumpjumper because it was designed for a 140 fork and frame weight for performance is great.
  • 2 0
 Waiting for this bike quite a while, thinking it would be something spectacular. The Cannondale Scalpel SE2 or an Orbea OIZ TR, YT Jeffsy seems like a lot more value for money.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer - any comments on the rear tire clearance on this bike, or the new SB160 that you’ve heard? My current gripes with the SB130 is that it’s not possible to run a 2.5. Was hoping that would be fixed up this go ‘round along with the addition of a lunch box.
  • 5 0
 I really liked the review, thanks! Smile
  • 4 0
 You're welcome!
  • 1 0
 Reading this I wonder if yeti have lost their way a bit. This is probably looked at through a pair of rose tinted shades but probably the best yeti I had was the yeti ASR5 c. Light weight, simple suspension design with 125mm at the rear which was happy running a wide variety of sag. I stuck a 140mm fork on the front and it was happy doing everything from xc to full on UK enduros, many of which were run on DH tracks at the time.
  • 1 0
 Yeti's really losing it this year. I have an sb115 that I really enjoy too and I was wondering what they'd do to keep up with all the other short travel trail bikes. This looks like a downgrade from the 115 too me and it already had stiff competition.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer curious if you get too accustomed to riding super long wheelbase enduro bikes, and when you ride something like this, the wheelbase feels too short and sketchy? I'm finding my big bike becomes my benchmark and I can't help but scoff how much my little bike feels like a tinker-toy compared.
  • 7 0
 No, I wouldn’t say that’s the case. I’m constantly switching between different test bikes, so it doesn’t usually take me too long to adapt to a shorter or longer travel bike’s handling.

I don’t just ride long enduro bikes either - last year I spent a lot of time on a Transition Spur. I’ve got a soft spot for short travel bikes that punch above their weight.

As fun as big enduro bikes are, I’d much rather have something fast and light for those long, technical XC-ish rides.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: This bike should be (significantly) lighter, as you said. The 120 - 130mm category is where I'm at due to climbing 1000 - 2000m in any ride I do ... if I had this bike, I'd constantly be regretting the extra baggage on the way up for no benefit on the way down.
  • 1 0
 Love my SB100. Have been looking forward to this launch for awhile in hopes that it added a 2nd bottle cage and a storage hole in the downtube while keeping it light and sporty. Hopefully there's an ASR revivial to fight the Epic Evo/Blur TR in the works?
  • 5 0
 Still saving for a Yeti cooler.
  • 2 0
 This is a bike you'll want to protect from day one, get your kit here Yeti SB120 Tailored Protection Kit
  • 6 3
 How is this frame $4300 but the SB160 frame is over a $1000 more? Whatever they are smoking over there, I want some.
  • 11 3
 The SB160 frame is $5,000. Part of that is due to the different shocks - a DPS vs a Float X2.
  • 10 1
 It’s $700 more. The float X2 shock cost significantly more and the frame probably uses a whole lot more carbon.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: Hmm, sure I read 5500 somewhere. Clearly, I am smoking the right stuff after all. Yay!
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Yo Mike, first thing I noticed on this was the yellow letter Maxxis tires (I skipped right down to comments) but what's the deal with that? Did you guys swap tires out for the test or what? Does yeti not produce enough bikes to buy large batch white letter tires? My mind is in a bottle.
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: I just picked up a new bike and it came with the yellow Maxxis letters not the white. I was surprised. Maybe there was a shortage? Came with an Assegai on the front and a DHRII on the rear.
  • 1 0
 @brookscurran: it’s does at retail but does it at oem assuming yeti buy enough to qualify
  • 4 0
 I'd swap on a 140mm Pike and take it everywhere.
  • 4 0
 Sign me up for the twerk model
  • 4 0
 So it's like 3 years, 3 pounds, and $3k behind a Ripley?
  • 3 0
 I think you'll find the new term you're looking for is cross-hill. Accurately applied here.
  • 2 0
 Not only did you mention the frame weight, you mentioned 2 other competitor frame weights as well. So excited that PB is giving us this information when they have it.
  • 2 1
 Absolutely zero chance I’m spending $10k for a 30lb bike with 120mm travel. At that price, it needs a) be significantly lighter or b) have significantly more travel, or c) some favorable combination of a and b.
  • 4 3
 While it's definitely way overpriced, it's refreshing to see a bike released that doesn't have ridiculous grim donut like geometry. Not surprising the average pinkbike fans don't like it.
  • 4 0
 Amazing photography!
  • 2 0
 Thanks, @ericmickelson did a great job.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: There are folks who want to know how this bike handled El Diablo... Wink
  • 3 0
 Why would anyone buy an expensive heavy uninspiring bike?
  • 3 0
 $9,600 and a GX chain... sweet
  • 1 0
 honestly, yeits are kinda boring looking they all look the same and ride similar. yeti should change up the components up a little bit and make the paint job more intresting.
  • 3 1
 120mm carbon kona hei hei is a lot less and weighs much less for way less $$
  • 5 0
 You can replace "Kona Hei Hei" with half a dozen other bikes on the market, and your statement remains true.
  • 1 0
 trail bike weight for down country ride...more pushin for the cushion...it's only giving me a soft wood or soody to be exact, so I don't know I think pass on this one.
  • 2 0
 kudos for admitting the weight. and rather droll title. whats the upside to this thing? i mean really?
  • 2 0
 bike weighs 2.5 lbs more than a trek top fuel, cant take a piggy back shock and pedals WORSE?! this is a massive miss. wow
  • 1 0
 Dang a custom Ripley af is within a pound, better geo and around $4000. I’m not a dentist but I did dress up like one on Halloween.
  • 1 0
 My guess is that the SB130 will turn into the SB140 with the option to convert to Mullet which will eliminate the SB140 from the line up.
  • 3 0
 These ride photos are phenomenal
  • 1 1
 looks like some brands are actually lowering prices: www.sazbike.de/hersteller/rose-bikes-senkt-preise-deutlich-2812795.html
sorry for the german, google translate will help you if needed
  • 3 1
 Yeti product manager: "Ok so get this, it is basically a Tallboy but worse at descending"
  • 1 0
 Just throw light wheels and tires on the thing and it’ll be DC enough for most people to feel zippy compared to their enduro sleds.
  • 4 3
 9K and I have to change the rotors and pads... re=diculous..... also no Shimano
  • 2 0
 Would you take deore for 9k?
  • 8 6
 Companies like Yeti and Evil can stuff it. It’s a status symbol. FART.
  • 3 7
flag jpmccrash (Nov 15, 2022 at 10:13) (Below Threshold)
 Please do not group Evil and Yeti into the same box. Evil makes bikes that are really fun to ride. If it's cost you are mad about, blame the entire industry.
  • 3 4
 @gonzocycle: there are PLENTY of other brands that will provide you with the same quality or “really fun to ride” characteristics as an Evil for much much cheaper. So yes, I’ll continue to blame the brand.
  • 2 1
 I care about this new YETI about as much as I do the new electric Hummer, which is very little.
  • 2 0
 From now on, all bikes are priced at £100 per millimetre of travel.
  • 3 1
 Moral of the review: Just buy the Transition Spur
  • 1 2
 Owwww this is a cut above the SB115 ... but I cant wait for the Sb125 thats where the real changes are to be seen ..... Looks like the cost of fillings will be going up.
  • 1 0
 you just need to add a 9point8 angle-headset, they should include it with the bike
  • 3 0
 Excellent review Kaz.
  • 1 1
 Concerning weight, geo, travel, and price..if you had the choice between an Element, Spur, Stumpy, Optic, Ranger, Ripley, Following, etc and this...why would you choose this
  • 6 5
 I wanna know what people who buys these bikes do for a living?
  • 16 1
 onlyfans probably
  • 8 1
 @NicolaZesty314: lol gotta start selling feet pics on the internet too lmao
  • 5 0
 Vital just released a demographic report. I want to say the average household income was like $120k and the average bike value was around$5.3k. So.... most bike riders are solidly middle/upper middle class.
  • 8 0
 @corposello: To be fair it's pretty easy to be a 120k household. At least on the west coast. If you can pass a pee test and manage to wake up when your alarm goes off there are people willing to fork over over $60k/year no questions asked. 2 income household and boom there you are.

I cannot comment on what the rest of the county is like though. So I may be skewed.
  • 2 0
 @nskerb: Not so common in the Midwest, but you don't need nearly the money to have the same lifestyle and an even bigger house on a few acres
  • 3 0
 Plenty of blue collar folks, not dentists, contrary to the Pinkbike comment section belief. Lots are established people in their 30s and 40s. Many of the guys I used to ride with were automotive technicians. Most rode full custom builds. Build good relationships with a smaller quality LBS. They know this stuff is pricey, the good ones will try to help, especially if you can pay cash.
  • 5 0
 A guy in my riding group just picked up a new Yeti, his wife rides a Santa Cruz and they both have Borealis fat bikes. He has a tree service company and works really hard!
  • 6 0
 @nskerb: bro my wife and I make well over 120k a year and I’m still trying to figure out how they can afford this
  • 3 0
 @Theysayivebeentheone: Hey I never said that was or wasn't a lot of money lol! Just commenting that it is pretty easy to pull down that much money in a 2 income household.

I was pretty fresh out of college and living with a girl, we probably made 110ish and it didn't feel like a ton of money at all.
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: sure but costs have gone up so much that $120k household is working class.
  • 1 1
 Retired and/or self employed or corp life.
Hopefully many can and will buy em...but it's not a good deal vs 2 year old same.
  • 2 3
 @nskerb: $ 190 + a year and their ain't no way I'm spendin Husqvarna money on a stupid F*ckin pedal bike. The whole mountain bike world are thebiggest bunch of A-holes yet evolved on this planet.
  • 3 1
 @WeenoT: I get what you’re saying. But I’ve been around some horse people that want to make me suck start a shotgun.

They are probably about equal in terms of being shitty people as guys on 11k dollar bikes, but they seem a lot worse because they $80k trucks, $100k trailers, dumb horses, and wear stupid ass hats.
  • 4 1
 @JDub713: that relationship with your LBS is the key. I haven’t paid anywhere near retail in a long time, even built a SB140 for my wife during the pandemic and still got steep discounts.
  • 1 0
 Really digging the colour, although it looks like it could use a cleaning
  • 1 0
 Bike reviews in 2022: just pick the head badge you like.
  • 2 4
 Guys, there's literally a "34" printed on the side of the fork, yet you list it as a 32 in the specs. You even go on to call it a 34 later in the review! Does anyone proofread your articles anymore?
  • 2 0
 Bring back the SB100!
  • 1 0
 Yeti jumped the shark.
  • 1 0
 FRO version...with a weight commensurate with the travel.
  • 2 1
 So many reasons here to keep riding my trusty and paid for Following MB
  • 1 1
 Oh hi, I'm looking for an expensive beige bike- what do you have available?
  • 1 0
 That trail and a XXL?! Sold.
  • 2 1
 Get it for 5k in less than a year at Worldwide leftover sale
  • 1 0
 'High country' new category incoming
  • 3 2
 $10k and Al wheelset. What a joke.
  • 1 2
 Yep, $5-700 for this wheelset. Comical.
  • 1 0
 Stay posted for the SB 140 release next week!
  • 2 0
 SB128.9, because SRAM.
  • 1 0
 I've been hoping they would use the sixfity ebike suspension on new bikes
  • 1 0
 if "up-duro" becomes a thing I will lose it
  • 1 0
 Yeti is still the 2004 575 to me.
  • 2 1
 Why so cheap? A bike like this should definitely cost much more.
  • 1 0
 how many marin's can i get for one yeti?
  • 1 0
 Yeti’s were cool before Myles and misse got busted
  • 1 0
 How much a long term review is it ?
  • 1 0
 Does this mean Yeti will finally sell me the 115 link?
  • 1 1
 Definition ready.... Root canal-able
  • 2 3
 Needs to be a brighter white to be the appropriate ex-XC racer dentist bike
  • 5 5
 140mm fork + -1 degree angleset. Sorted.
  • 5 0
 I agree. I might not even bother with the headset, the 140mm fork will put it at a very sensible 66° head angle and raise that low(er than prior) BB a smidge.

Lotta hate here. I won't buy Yeti because they manufacture in a communist country with sketchy human rights, but they don't make junk and it looks like a good bike, price aside. I don't buy completes, the frame weight (mostly sprung) being a pound heavier than average doesn't bother me. It's got reasonable geo, lots of sizes, size specific rear ends, not too long seat tubes and good insertion lengths (unlike the XC bikes everyone keeps comparing). I'd buy one of these if they built it in Colorado, maybe even Taiwan. Light wheelset, fast rolling tires, I bet it'd be a great bike.
  • 1 0
 That would do it. But you shouldn't have to.
  • 1 0
 Maybe that will be the LR?
  • 3 5
 @jdejace:
Calling out something rubbish is not hate. Criticism is not hate. Not agreeing with something clearly wrong is not hate. Hate is the most misused word in recent years, people like to use it to add a negative/unfair meaning when someone does not agree.

Buying a frame made in a communist country is bad, but buying it from a country with almost no workers rights, unliveable off minimum wage, no universal health care, inbuilt racism, morons running with guns and really dodgy, "let's try to kill most natives and steal their land" history is good? Duuuuude, get off your high horse
  • 5 1
 @gooral: the top comment is a dentist joke FFS. Yeah, real sophisticated criticism from the comment section as usual. Please forgive my misuse of the English language. No hate here. No siree.

Regarding country of origin - I am not a chauvinist, the US is far from perfect but it is where I live and I would indeed like to support developing skilled jobs here that don't pay minimum wage and provide health care benefits. I am quite happy to support industry in my Canadian neighbors and in Europe where my family is from as well. But not China or Vietnam. You do you. I'll keep trotting along on my horse, riding my heavy Guerilla Gravity and Nicolai not caring what the frames weigh.
  • 1 0
 XXX-C
  • 1 1
 A $10,000 bike with 10,000 creaks.
  • 1 2
 Because I just paid a few grands to my dentist for root canal and implants…..
  • 1 0
 Nice, Comfort country.
  • 1 2
 $10k, ok fine. 1lb lighter than my $9k 160mm enduro bike, super lame paint job, wal mart wheelset. Unforgivable.
  • 2 2
 Put a coil on it
  • 2 2
 Cool SB5
  • 1 1
 Swing and a miss...
  • 1 2
 If dentists only learned how to build a bike they would be saving $7000
  • 4 6
 ANOTHER TRASH YETI WITH OVER AND UNDERSTROKED OLD FRAME DESIGNS
  • 1 1
 bro amen
  • 3 1
 Another? And what makes it "old"? Does a frame design have to be "new" to be relevant?
  • 1 0
 @JSW07: sb115
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