Review: ANVL Tilt Flat Pedals

Feb 13, 2019 at 19:38
by Mike Kazimer  
ANVL Tilt pedal review

When it comes to flat pedals, these days there are more options on the market than ever. Whether that has to do with a certain speedy Australian is tough to say, but in any case, there are choices galore. The Tilt is ANVL Components' latest entry into the fray, and while the model name may be familiar, the pedal has been significantly revised compared to the previous edition.

Version 3.0 uses a machined aluminum body that measures 105 x 105mm, with a scooped out center portion to help provide extra comfort and grip. ANVL Components is an offshoot of Transition Bikes, so it's not surprising that this feature has its own fancy acronym; ARC, which stands for Arched Radius Concavity. In other words, the pedals are slightly concave from front to back as well as from side to side. 10 pins are threaded into each side, and stand a shin-scraping 5.5mm high.
ANVL Tilt V3 Details
• 10 pins on each side
• Platform dimensions: 105 x 105mm
• 17mm thick
• Aluminum platform, chromoly spindle
• Internals: two sealed bearings, one bushing
• Colors: grey, orange, black, blue
• Weight: 410 grams
• MSRP: $100 USD
www.transitionbikes.com

Take a look inside the pedal's 6061 aluminum body and you'll find two sealed cartridge bearings and a bushing, which rotate on a chromoly spindle. Along with the basic black version pictured here, the Tilt pedals are available in orange, grey, and blue to meet all your color-coordinating needs. MSRP: $100 USD.


ANVL Tilt pedal review
The pedals are 17mm thick, with 2mm of concave in the center.
ANVL Tilt pedal review
The 105x105mm platform underneath a size 11 shoe.

ANVL Tilt pedal review
The tall pins provide loads of traction, although it'd be nice if they weren't all top loading.


Performance

The Tilt pedals earn extremely high marks for the level of grip they provide – the concave shape combined with those tall pins kept my feet securely into place no matter how rough the trail. I prefer my pedals to have as much grip as possible, but I can envision riders who want to be able to re-position their feet a little more easily removing a few of the pins.

The pedal platform isn't the absolute widest, but the dimensions provided plenty of support for my size 11 feet, and the lack of an inboard bearing bulge opens up more foot placement options compared to some of the ultra-thin pedals out there.

On the topic of pins, that's really my only gripe with the design of the Tilt – they all thread in from the top, which means that replacing them when they're damaged or worn down will likely involve a set of vice grips. That's not the end of the world, but it is a downside of the design when compared to a pedal like the DMR Vault, or the Kona Wah Wah II pictured below. That being said, after three months of riding I still haven't broken or completely mangled any pins. The bearings are spinning smoothly, even after multiple extra-muddy rides that were followed by a thorough hose down. In addition, there was plenty of grease on the spindles when I pulled the pedals apart to take a look.


ANVL Tilt pedal review
ANVL Tilt vs. Kona Wah Wah II


How Do They Compare?

ANVL and Kona are both based in the Pacific Northwest, but they're taken two different routes when it comes to flat pedal design. The Tilt pedals are slightly more conservative; they're relatively thin and wide, but they don't push the boundaries of either dimension. The Wah Wah II's do push things close to the limit, with one of the widest platforms out there at 120 x 118mm, and a height of only 12mm at the thinnest point.

On the trail, the difference is noticeable, but I didn't have trouble adapting to either shape. For overall grip the Tilt pedals take the win, thanks to the taller and slightly thicker pins; they create a more locked in feel than the Wah Wahs. That extra security is great for DH riding and extra-muddy days when the last thing you want to do is slip a pedal. However, for all-day trail riding comfort the even wider dimensions of the Wah Wah pedals are the way to go, particularly if you have big feet.

I've been riding the Wah Wahs longer than the Tilt, so it's not as easy to compare durability, although I did find that the large inboard bearing on the Wah Wahs needed a rebuild quicker than I'd expected. The Tilt's bearings are more protected from the elements, and so far are holding up very well.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesANVL hit the mark with the new Tilt pedals – they have a good shape, tons of traction, and a competitive price. Mike Kazimer








68 Comments

  • + 86
 it doesn't matter from which side i look at this pedal, my brain always tells me it has anal written on it.
  • + 99
 That's OK. All I see in yours is climax.
  • + 6
 @silentbutdeadly: good point!
  • + 9
 youve spread it to me
  • + 2
 Thanks to you, that's all I can see too.
  • + 4
 Great, now I have an ANAL stem.
  • + 6
 @silentbutdeadly: I'd upvote you but you're currently at 69 likes
  • + 2
 Ride fast, eat a**
  • + 1
 These pedals are the shit!
  • + 40
 top loading pins are better because you dont have to wind a damaged one back thru the pedal body and wreck the thread.
  • + 1
 Good point
  • + 2
 Just about to come down here and mention that. Not sure why there is no much love for bottom loading pins, one of those things that in theory they are great, but in the real world it fails miserably.
  • + 9
 What they should do is drill a through hole the size of the hex driver, then load them from the top but accessed by the bottom. That way the set screw can still bottom out on a shoulder, the hex is protected, and you can still protect the threads. I'm sure someone's already done that, if not, please send my standard royalty of 25% of all future pedal sales to me.
  • + 1
 @bentplate: this man is a genius!
  • + 11
 I haven't had any issues with damaging threads, but if the pin was super mangled I'd likely cut it off close to the pedal body before removing the rest. Another benefit of the bottom loading design is that you can fine-tune the pin height with washers - I like being able to have taller pins on the outside and shorter ones in the middle of the pedal.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: me too. DMR Vaults come with a spare load of shorter pins so you can mix and match. Wish all flats came with different length spares.
  • + 2
 You'd never get the chance to wind anything through anything, because theres no chance of getting a hex into a mangled pin head in the first place. Likewise when the pin gets ground down to almost nothing, what do you grip, even with vice-grips?
  • + 1
 @bentplate: that is a very good idea. glad I thought of it! =)
  • + 1
 @bentplate: I believe the hope pedals do that
  • + 1
 @bentplate: Twenty6 made pedals that do exactly this. I am currently riding on them. The part that actually goes into your shoe is also spiked so that it grips much better.
  • + 3
 or have the pins thread into removable inserts so no threads to damage on the pedal and have them be removable from both sides... oh wait.. www.squidworx.bike shameless plug!
  • + 1
 @redrider522 and @jojotherider1977 : I was fairly confident that my solution after 30 seconds of thinking about it had already been done before. Sounds like everyone should ride those so we can end the "thread from the top or bottom" discussion that always happens.Big Grin
  • + 1
 @redrider522: I think they closed up shop though. Too bad. Awesome(ly expensive) pedals.
  • + 1
 *edit - multiple posts
  • + 1
 @jojotherider1977: He did. I am friends with him and live in the same town. He is still a machinist but stopped making bike parts for commercial sale.
  • + 1
 I'm not really bothered by the head getting messed up, the problem is that I've had top loaded pins rip out, completely destroying the threads. I haven't seen a bottom loaded pin do that. The extra support of the head against the back of the pedal seems to make a big difference.
  • + 7
 Well, threaded in from the top and removing them with vice grips beats threaded in from the bottom and being unable to be replaced when they bend. At least, not without power tools.
  • + 7
 Enjoy trying to remove damaged pins without messing up the treads on the wah wah.. Top loading and vice grips sound like a drawback but in reality work way better than other options..
  • + 8
 You just have to do it rigth, specialized boomslangs are threaded through, but have only a couple of threads, the rest of the pin is slimmer. if you bend one you can remove them without a problem. the pins also have an intentional breakingpoint. if they are bent so badly that they wont fit through u just break them and remove the rest. i recently bougth a ht mag pedal on sale - toploading and there is even paint in the threadholes what a joke.
  • + 3
 In my long experience on this site I have read "good luck replacing pins on this one" for pretty much every pedal out there. Someone, somewhere has damaged a pin on every system and some couldn't fix it. Some of those people have Pinkbike account and comment. Of all pins I have tried these offer me the best grip on 5.10s. I screw them in so they stick out no more than 3mm and they are amazeballs. If you damage the pin and can't use allen key anymore, just file adjacent faces and unscrew them with pliers. Now look at the Kona pedals - if you bend the pin enough then... "good luck with replacing it without damaging the threads" Hope pins seem like a great idea, except grip on them is crap. Boomslangs - oh great! I only need 5h surgery after they go through my calv or shin like Burt Lancaster in The Crimson Pirate.

There is no escape from the pain - each breath, each heart beat is a stress for the body. so chillax.
  • + 3
 One other advantage the Tilt has over the Wah Wah and several other models of thin pedals, they are Carbon crank compatible - meaning you can use them with the rubber boot without modding or completely scrapping them altogether. Sadly modding the boot doesn't last long, it usually tears off after a while and not using one isn't an option. Someone should really make a boot that's compatible with these bulge bearing pedals. I'm looking at your OneUp since you like to create cool stuff and your Alu pedals suffer from this affliction.
  • + 3
 One extra pedal washer does the trick usually...
  • + 1
 @hangdogr: yup, running 2 pedal washers on my aluminum oneup pedals bolted to carbon XO cranks with boots and no issues.
  • + 2
 In the case of pedals bigger really is better. I have a pair of Crankbrothers Stamps and with them I get far fewer foot cramps. Would really like to know where to buy a pair of Wah Wah's for my hardtail.
  • + 1
 I bought these ANVL pedals after talking to the guys at Transition and test riding some of their bike equipped the the ANVL's at Outerbike in Bentonville, AR last fall.
I went from the OG Kona Wah Wah's to these ANVL's on my Cube Stereo 140TM.
The ANVL's stick like glue to my 5/10s. They are a large pedal however once I got used to pedal position I rarely catch pedals on rocks etc.
My only suggestion would be taking a few pins out, depending on your riding style.
Totally recommend these ANVL pedals. Do yourself and your bike a solid by getting a pair.
  • + 4
 Look pretty close to my DMR Vaults - but with less pins / less alf-shin carnage
  • + 5
 Very similar for sure. I’ve tried many a flat pedal. DMR Vaults are the only pedals I don’t slip off from. Shin pads are a must though to avoid shin jerky
  • + 2
 @MaN-oF-STeEL: especially the brendog ones..
  • + 2
 @MaN-oF-STeEL: what about deity t mac
  • + 1
 ..and probably less grip than your Vaults too Wink
  • + 1
 No reverse-entry pins, no care.
For those saying the threads get damaged when removed, plenty of reverse-entry pedals (and pins) have a slimmer pin section to make this a non-issue. The significant advantage to the reverse-entry design is that bending loads on the pin (during impacts) is spread across the pedal by the head of the bolt, thus stopping the pin becoming angled in the pedal and damaging the threads permanently. When you only have a grubscrew as a pin, there is no bolt head to provide a bracing reaction force to impacts, so - particularly with longer grubscrews like these ones (and resultant higher leverage) - it's very easy to destroy the pin hole. It's also far more likely that you'll need to replace a pin in the first place due to this lack of bracing/support on the underside. There are plenty of pedals with superior design for this price.
  • + 3
 Dmr vaults are a better pedal that you can find online for less money. Wear shin pads though
  • + 4
 all i wanna know is are they better then my vaults
  • + 4
 I ride Vaults, but rented a Transition recently for a few days that had these pedals on them. I really liked them. They seem a little smaller than the vault at first but the pin placement and concavity make up for it. I felt they had the same grip but were less likely to hit stuff. I think I’m getting these for my next pedals, although the Tenet service program is tempting...
  • + 4
 Nothing is better than your Vaults - or mine, or anybody else´s. Vaults for the win, these appear to be a blatant .......
  • + 2
 Should've compared to them to the Vaults...let's choose this random ass Kona pedal instead though!!
  • + 1
 ahh Tranny... those occasional cross dressers are a hoot.

still voted the best Tranny home made video just sorta thrown together www.pinkbike.com/video/251667
  • + 2
 105 x 105 is the magic number
  • + 4
 ...100$ is less magic !!
  • + 0
 115x115 ftw
  • + 1
 Shape looks great. Nice work! Pins and grip look pretty extreme though. I'd def be removing pins for trail riding.
  • - 2
 Wlep now I know witch pedal I will buy, the Kona . Look how your shoe will scrubbing the cank arms. Small grips and small pedals for smaller people. I only 5,11 and I need bigger platforms . Almost all do small platforms, even the XL from some manufacturers are small in reality. Same thing on grip department...
  • + 1
 You know what they say about big pedals...
  • + 1
 @diegosk: Well that's why I have the downvote right? Some can't stand it Smile
  • + 1
 The best part is these are made to work with your new balance 503's.
  • + 2
 Crampons FTW
  • + 0
 First comment was written by a 12 year old child and a bunch of children like his comment .
  • + 1
 Glad im not the only idiot who saw "ANAL" pedals
  • + 1
 ANAL pedals is what everyone is begging for.
  • + 0
 Look a lot like Bontrager Line Pro flats...
  • + 1
 butt jokes
  • - 3
 Unpopular opinion: Flat pedals are pretty much all the same. Pick one and they'll ride like all the rest. Well, besides those carbon ones..
  • + 1
 Agreed.

More unpopular opinion: Xpedo Spry all the time. I run them on all of my bikes (endurbru, DH, DJ), have never broken, bent, or damaged one (yet), and could buy between 2 to 4 pairs for the price of most flat sets on the market even if I did
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