Review: e*thirteen's Updated LG1R Carbon Cranks

Apr 8, 2019 at 17:00
by Mike Kazimer  
e13 LG1R


e*thirteen's carbon crank collection has been updated for 2019, with a slight change to the naming scheme, and more significant changes to the cranks themselves. The LG1R cranks are the toughest option in the lineup, and are designed to be able to handle the punishment doled out by EWS and World Cup DH racers.

The crank arms still have the oversized, slightly boxy look of the previous version, but the profile has been slimmed down a bit near the spindle for better heel clearance. That change didn't reduce the crank's stiffness – in fact, the cranks are claimed to be 10% stiffer than the previous version.
LG1R Crank Details
• Intended use: enduro / DH
• Carbon fiber arms, aluminum spindle
• Weight: 500 grams (with 32-tooth direct mount ring)
• Lengths: 160/165/170mm (83mm BB), 165/170/175mm (73mm BB)
• Five year warranty
• MSRP: $399 (cranks only)
www.bythehive.com

The fixed spindle has been moved to the non-drive side, which is meant to make chainring installation and adjustment a little bit easier. There's also no need to use a different chainring depending on whether a bike has Boost or non-Boost spacing. Instead, a 3mm spacer is used to put the chainring in the right position. e*thirteen's unique triangular-shaped spindle / crankarm interface remains, and there's a self-extracting crankbolt on the driveside to make removal as easy as possible.

Additional crank length options have been added into the mix - there's now a 160mm version of the LG1R for use with 83mm bottom bracket shell widths, which will be good news for DH riders searching for a little more ground clearance.

With crank boots and a 32-tooth chainring, the 170mm LG1R crankset featured here weighs in at a very respectable 500 grams, which makes it one of the lightest DH-oriented cranksets on the market. The cranks alone retail for $399, with the BB and chainring sold separately.


e13 LG1R
The same chainring can be used for Boost and non-Boost spacing - simply switch the orientation of the spacers.
e13 LG1R
The cranks have a 30mm spindle, with e*thirteen's triangular 'P3 Connect' interface.


Installation

Installation was straightforward, thanks in part to the e*thirteen's handy chart that makes it easy to figure out how the chainring should be oriented. Once it's spaced correctly, the ring is secured in place using the same tool that's required to install e*thirteen's threaded bottom bracket. That tool is proprietary to e*thirteen, but it's also included with the cranks.

The one small complaint I have about getting the cranks set up has to do with the plastic preload adjuster. It can be hard to get a good grip on it due to the rather low height of the ridges around the perimeter - it'd be much easier to turn if those were a little bit taller.



e13 LG1R
The cranks have a boxy, overbuilt look, but they weigh in at only 500 grams with a 32-tooth chainring.
e13 LG1R
The bottom bracket and direct mount chainring both use the same tool, which is included with the cranks.



Performance

Cranks aren't the most exactly the most exciting component to review – if they're performing properly you shouldn't have to think about them, no matter if you're hucking a big drop or laying down the watts on a stout climb. That was the case with the LG1R cranks – they're stiff and solid underfoot, and all of the hard landings and root smashing they underwent during the test period didn't cause any problems.

I did notice that the e*thirteen chainring felt a little more 'grindy' in sloppy conditions than the SRAM Eagle ring I'd had on before – the interaction between the chain and chainring didn't feel as smooth when things got really mucky. In less grim conditions there weren't any issues, and overall the LG1R cranks have held up to the elements very well - the bottom bracket has survived all of the mud puddle dunkings I've subjected it to.

It's a little detail, but I'm a fan of the way the LG1R's protective sticker covers almost the entire crank arm, which helps keep it from snagging on a shoe and beginning to peel off. The crank arm boots also have a design that's slightly different than the norm, with extra material around the perimeter to keep the crank ends safe from hard impacts with rocks or other trail obstacles. After all, if you're shelling out the cash for a set of fancy carbon cranks, you might as well keep them looking good for as long as possible.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesCarbon cranks aren't for everyone, and even though they can take some serious abuse they're probably not the best option for perennial rock smashers, or penny pinchers for that matter. All the same, the LG1R cranks offer a considerable weight savings over aluminum in a stiff and strong package. Mike Kazimer








125 Comments

  • + 83
 Proprietary tools included unless you buy a yt or similar with said cranks and no tool included non at the distributor or non on line and no reply from e13s customer service.
  • + 32
 I'd just like to say that I've also experienced poor customer service from E13 and avoid buying E13 branded equipment nowadays because of this...
  • + 5
 @KxPop: a little 2nd hand experience to add another opinion; i have read several ppl over in the YT forum say that e13 customer service is really good.. However, there's even more people there saying that their products don't last very long so i'm not sure what to make of it altogether.
  • + 16
 I’ve had excellent customer service from e13 and highly recommend them
  • + 10
 @KxPop: I had great customer service from them. I purchased a TRS+ 9-46 cassette last year. The higher gearing cogset had issues shifting due to incorrect machining and they sent me a TRS Race cassette immediately. All they asked was what the batch number was so they can track down faulty ones. I'm patiently waiting for a 12 speed 9-50 cassette from them.
  • + 9
 @b00sh00: I think i might be a regional thing. since @KxPop resides in Aussieland, the support might not be as good as in the US.
  • + 7
 I reached E13 customer service based in Germany (covering whole EU I believe) several times in last two years and I have experienced perfect service even for older products. But yeah, their products dont last long.
  • + 5
 My YT came equipped with a bunch of e13 parts. Almost all of them have given me trouble and I've replaced them all. That being said e13 customer service has been great and has quickly got back to me on some of my issue and has sent me replacement parts without much hassle.
  • - 1
 So true.
  • + 5
 @madxface: If their products don't last long, how can they get old?
  • + 9
 I've dealt with e13's customer service a few times and it's always been hassle free with quick responses. Very impressed.
  • + 6
 @jbutland: opposite experience for me. Their wheels, tires and cranks have been hassle free for me and my buddies. They have come a long way the past few years IMO. New 5 year warranty on the cranks is impressive too. Longer than RF or SRAM.
  • + 2
 E13 should have just stuck to making chain guides...
  • + 4
 @wowbagger: I've had a few issues with nearly all of the ethirteen components on my YT Tues. When they work they're brilliant. I think the fabrication process is less than it should be, however, ethriteen customer service has been literally amazing. I hesitate to tell you just how much they'll do to get you back on your bike. Still stunning to think about. Hats off to ethirteen customer service!
  • + 21
 Hey Guys - If you are ever having trouble with support thru any of our global distributors, you can always contact us directly at either support@bythehive.com or support.eu@bythehive.com and we will get you taken care of. we try to reply within 24 hours, if not sooner.

The interface we use for chainring lockring and BB is a 46mm or (1 3/4") 12-point socket. You can often find those at your local hardware or auto parts store but the tool we sell is likely less expensive than a socket that size. We have had some smaller OEM customers in the past decide to include the tool with the bike, but most do not. Including the tool is an option for OEMs.

@hairy1976 - Il send you a PM to figure out why you didn't get a reply. I can check our zendesk system for what happened there.
  • + 5
 Add my name to the great customer service from those guys. I also think the parts are darn good, especially the wheels and tires. I really cannot believe the abuse these carbon rims have held up to, I used to go through about 3 sets of aluminum rims a year, and its been 2 years on one set of carbons, so now they have paid for themselves.
  • - 1
 @wowbagger: e13 customer service is ok but if you ask too many questions they get mad at you. but their products in the past had some design issues. for cranks use sram or raceface. for rear cassettes use sram. for hubs use chrisking. see there is always a better alternative.
  • + 4
 e13 has been fantastic customer service in the very rare instance or two of having an issue with a product of theirs.
  • + 2
 Gotta say, I had a fantastic response from ethirteen when I broke one of their pedals. I even admitted it was due to a crash and they still helped me out.
  • + 2
 E13 has good customer service and is very responsive to customer questions.

I've come to the realization that at least 50% of the time the top comment on pinkbike article's are misguided if not completely wrong. But they are sensationalist so they get the clicks. Be smarter pinkbikers.
  • + 1
 @Etek: they can get old...if you do not ride them. That was my case Smile
  • + 22
 Would like to do a blind study to see if riders can even tell what material their cranks are. Tape them up between runs and have people ride the same bike with cranks A, B, C and report their suspicions.
  • + 21
 Of course they can't tell the difference. However, for some people (e.g. XC racers) saving grams on each component of the bike still makes sense (crank, wheels, tires, bars, pedals, saddle, etc). These savings can add up to 2 kg, and the difference between an 11 kg bike or a 9 kg bike is definitely noticeable.
  • + 10
 @cvoc: sure, for racers it may make sense because they're fighting for tenths of seconds.
But if you're riding for fun it doesn't make any sense unless you get fun out of having the most expensive equipment (which some people do and it's perfectly fine too)
  • + 0
 You can tell the difference between a cheap set of alloy cranks and a quality set by how they feel, and am personally not a fan of carbon cranks but they definitely do feel stiffer and have a different ride quality over ally.
  • + 5
 @cvoc: This.
@wowbagger: I definitely have more fun on a light bike than on a heavy one.
  • + 7
 Bro, didn't you get the memo? They are like way more compliant like crabon bars. Wait, or were they stuff and harsh like crabon rimz... I get so confused. Crabon enviro bad, Aloominum recycle yay. Shred gnar etc.
  • + 1
 I remember when I was a kid riding BMX bikes, and I got my first set of 3-piece cranks. I was very excited, but when I put them on, I couldn’t feel the difference between them and the 1-piece crank I replaced. And yet, the idea of a forged, 1-piece crank today seems absurd, even though some of the aftermarket offerings back then were pretty solid.
  • + 2
 My GX 11 speed alloy cranks make the rear of my bike feel loose. They don't deflect to the point of hitting anything, yet, but I do keep an eye on it. I can flex the non-ds arm with my hands.

My X01 11 speed are solid as a rock. Over 2,500 miles on a hardtail with me at 200+ pounds almost the entire time. No flex I can feel during riding and none by hand either.
  • + 1
 @qreative-bicycle: obviously it's a major difference whether i'm pedaling a 16kg bike or a 13kg bike and moreso for rotational masses or those high up on the bike but whether the cranks weigh 500g or 600g most if not all of us won't notice.
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: I agree %100. I had Sixc cranks on my last bike and thought nothing of it. The new bike I decided to save money and got some XT cranks. Holy shit what a difference in stiffness that was immediately apparent. I thought something was loose but eventually got used to it like a bent pedal. I won't be buying carbon cranks again until they stop blowing up but I will say the Ewings are making more and more sense to me.
  • + 2
 @Tmackstab: try the RF Turbines. Nice and stiff.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: I will be next time. Those seem to tick most of the boxes.
  • + 1
 The tape would f with the feel, so impossible to tell
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: Are you sure it's the cranks and not a difference in stiffness in the BB region in your new frame? A frame is a lot more likely to flex than a crankarm
  • + 2
 Breaking cranks is my forte (with proper use too). I wish there were higher quality steel ones. Is there anybody who understands? Why don't the Rampage guys break their cranks?
  • + 1
 Some people put a lot of torque through their cranks. I have gone from SLX, XT, Saint to Sixc and could feel the difference in stiffness. Whilst the expense of carbon cranks ain't great I would see rather run them on all my bikes rather than aluminium. Had no issues hor hassles with them...ever
  • + 7
 The new crank is always 10% stiffer.

Always.
  • + 1
 @qreative-bicycle: I find the opposite. Heavy bikes tend to be WAY more fun that super light ones. And I do love to pedal.
  • + 1
 @SithBike: Profile, and you can get shorter lengths and wider axles for MTBs. Titanium components can also keep the weight down.

There is a reason so many BMX racers use Shimano DXRs or cranks like Profiles, with torque you can feel the arms twist if they arent stiff.
Ride with someone who has twisted and snapped crankarms, however it is definitely a different pedalling style.
  • + 1
 Profile breaks...the arms are much thinner than the older versions@Tmackstab:
  • + 2
 @Tmackstab: managed to break a set of rf aeffect cranks a few weeks ago, have gone to rf atlas and there absolutely is a difference. you can feel what is happening thru the bb area of the bike where the old cranks by comparison felt vague and bendy. Possibly not an issue for smaller people but being on the heavier side it definately makes a difference.
  • + 1
 @SithBike: they're usually all running brand new bikes for rampage
  • + 1
 @TheR: man, I could feel the difference after my 1 piece cranks would bend from a few jumps. Non-parallel cranks are the worst, no matter what material they are made from.
  • + 1
 @BeKwik: Yeah, I was smaller and lighter back then.
  • + 13
 Me: "You don't need to read this. You're not interested in carbon cranks, much less $400 carbon cranks. And what's a review about cranks going to say anyway?"

Me: Gets to work. Reads review of carbon cranks.
  • + 10
 Still staggers me that people put carbon cranks on a mountain bike. Give me durable metal over weight any time!
  • + 14
 Some people like to stare at thier bike at the trail head instead of riding
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: some people also like to stare at their unbridgeable bike at the bottom of the trail. With a snapped carbon crank. Been there. Never again. Ever.
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: meh.... unrideable
  • + 3
 I have carbon XO1 and XX1 eagle cranks on my two bikes. The XOs are on my enduro bike, and have been absolutely hammered, smashed on rocks, and abused. I weigh 200 pounds too, and they have performed flawlessly. I bought my XX1 cranks used because some guy chipped them on a crash and was worried, so I got them very cheap. They have also held up excellent, despite being put on an aggressive hardtail. Lots of force being put on them with no rear suspension, and the ultra low BB constantly puts them in harms way. I weighed them electronically, and they were 405 grams. Nothing metal is that light. Neither of these have boots on them, and I've done 0 maintenance on the BBs. They just work.
  • + 1
 When you have to heft your bike onto a roof rack or up into a tall pick up after a hard ride, you’ll appreciate a lighter bike.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: You're a lucky one then. The luck may run out soon though! Lol
  • + 1
 @Matt76: I would love to see the warranty/replacement rates of all the different bike companies, but I'm guessing those are closely guarded secrets.
  • + 4
 i have a sneaking suspicion that carbon cranks are just so people can say 'my cranks are carbon'.
  • + 2
 Wait. Durable metal? You are talking about aluminum? Ha! Every set of aluminum cranks (except Saint) I have had has bent. I have never had a problem with carbon.
  • + 1
 @Someoldfart: heavy kettlebell cleans. thank me later.
  • + 3
 Cranks are also the last place I would pay for carbon on a bike. No point in spending a bunch of money to reduce weight where it matters the least. Carbon rims on the other hand seem justifiable for people who can afford them.
  • + 1
 @bikrguy930: In the 25 years Ive been mountainbiking Ive never bent or broke a set of metal cranks.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: True. What infuriates me is when a carbon product breaks there is always an excuse or reason. It was the 'wrong type of riding' or 'wrong usage' or 'it was the rocks fault'. Its never the fact that its made of carbon and because of that it failed. Raceface came out with a carbon crank a few years ago and claimed 'Its lighter, stronger, stiffer, better' yet they only warranted it for 3 years and their metal ones had lifetime warranty. I questioned them on this and just got a load of excuses.
  • + 1
 @Matt76: you’re obviously not trying hard enough.
  • + 1
 @BeKwik: Lol clearly not!
  • + 6
 Which provider of generic, lowest possible bid, OEM parts do you trust more; Race Face or e13?

Feel like if I was buying a bike with full XTR I would rather see Next cranks than these as the replacement for the vaporware XTR cranks.
  • + 7
 Disagree. Search up Next crank issues. I’ve seen more broken Next than any other crank. My carbon e13 have been solid for over a year now. Great product for me!
  • - 3
 Anyone who runs carbon cranks: 1) has more money than sense 2) is under 170 lbs and is easy on gear or 3) is an xc racer weight weenie. I've got nothing against any of those three, but it ain't me.

I've got a fundamental problem with these flyweight reviewers on stuff like carbon cranks. They're known far and wide by bigger riders who go hard to fail way too often.

Carbon cranks: never again. Wrong material for the application since bonding in aluminum inserts is problematic.
  • + 2
 @JustinVP: I think it has more to do with how hard you are on gear and the quality of the build. I have 3+years on a set of X01 carbon cranks and I am 230lbs without gear.
  • + 0
 @JustinVP: I'm consistently running out of money, 195lbs, and you couldn't pay me to enter a XC race.... but I've ridden carbon cranks since the first gen of XX1 came out ages ago. Cutting weight and gaining stiffness on one of the most critical parts between your feet and the ground is just common sense if you're looking to improve the efficiency of your bike. More efficient bike means you get to do more riding, whether you're a fit XC weenie riding 50 miles or a tubby endur-bro pedaling to the top of your shuttle ride.

Can't comment on e*thirteen cranks, but sram carbon cranks are bombproof and as long as you buy the correct version for your riding they are not going to break.
  • + 1
 Meh. I have a buddy on his 3rd set of Next cranks who is not an agressive rider. 2 of the LBS i frequent said they no longer will sell the Next because so many come back for warranty and RF support is difficult at best.
  • + 2
 Haha I touched a nerve. Riding vanity parts is fine, even fun, and I've done it. Just own it.

@ironxcross: We're more like tubby bros (I'd call us amigos, we're more fun than "bros") riding 20 miles and lots of vert to our next DH segment here in Cascadia.

@mtbman1980 You're probably right. I'm totally convinced those hard on gear should steer clear of carbon cranks. In my circle of riding I can't think of one brand of carbon crank that hasn't broken (usually unbonded, but some XX1 stuff has sheared off) on someone. We're lucky to have lots of big, rowdy trails right in our backyards here in the PNW.

Think of it this way: saving 125 grams over some ultra-reliable Turbines is dropping your total weight 0.1%. For $200.

Aside from wheels, a lighter than average bike just makes you happy when putting your bike on the car. All my friends with super fancy bikes readily admit this. Nothing wrong with that.
  • + 1
 @JustinVP: if purchasing again I would probably not go with carbon cranks these where just a good deal at the time and I have been waiting for an issue to crop up and they just keep going....
  • + 5
 These things fall apart like a wet biscuit in tea. Snapped two now both under borderline grandma rid conditions. Thought it was my big fat skilless arse until my half man mate snapped two as well (sorry Andy Wink ). Call it bad luck.. i call it not fit for purpose. Hail the aluminium crank!!
  • + 4
 I've got 2 sets of those cranks and absolutely love mines! I've broken a few crank arms in the past around the pedal attachment and those haven't moved at all. Never had any issues with customer service either like some say, hope things improve for unhappy people, there is good people behind the brand.
  • + 3
 I have experience with an e13 crank, a chainguide, a hub and a cogset.
The crank’s bottom bracket fails after a year usage, the chaingude’s opening mechanism broke, a rear hub’s aluminum flange separated from the carbon hub shell, the cogset makes noise due to weak xd lock mechanism. I have bought these parts with bikes, but I will not buy anything from this company.
  • + 3
 If you would have contacted the customer service or the shop where you bought it you would have gotten a new chainguide for free!
  • + 6
 This crank came with my new bike. I changed the chain ring. The manual said to torque the chain ring locking nut to a certain spec. Yet, the proprietary tool does not attach to a ratchet style torque wrench. I called customer service and they said, “you’re right. Oops. Well, just tighten it really tight with a crescent wrench.” So much for precision.
  • + 2
 @Flowinger86: still would not buy it. If you destroyed you stuff and can't ride for how long because they need to look first at it and then send you that stuff? I see some rims right in front of me blowing up into bits. Man I would be pissed if I could not ride for week's. Even if it is only one week...
  • + 1
 Dropper post is just as bad. They didn't assemble mine properly and left it up to me to diagnose, fix and test it for them. Too bad as it actually works below freezing temps, but I won't buy another one. That reminds me, it needs another cleaning. Damn thing can't survive one wet ride...
  • + 1
 @Aengis: The torque procedure is detailed in the instructions for the crank. Proper torque is achieved by tightening 90 degrees after first lockring contact on the ring (This technique is often used outside the bike industry as well).

You can find that info on our tech page here:
support.bythehive.com/hc/en-us/articles/208906446--How-to-install-and-remove-TRS-crank-spiders-and-integrated-rings

That said, with the new cranks where the spindle is on the NDS, you easily can use a torque wrench and 46mm 12pt Socket to achieve the 30NM torque also.
  • + 2
 real world feedback. Stopped using ethirteen alluminum cranks because the preload kept coming loose and wearing out only after 3 months. once the preload comes loose the crank arm starts coming off the spindle really fast like in the same day. I also noticed that the P3 connect interface comes loose naturally so you always have to tighten the crank arm once a month. However, it looks like they are using a better preload design for these carbon cranks. Stopped buying all ethirteen stuff because i just had too many issues. like the cassette creaking, carbon hubs following apart from the center alluminum piece, cranks preload is junk.
  • + 2
 AVOID.. broke two pairs 2017 and 2018 model at Killington. One on a pedal strike at the top of scarecrow..Literally just starting off and going about 6mph..broke cranks like butter....E13 customer support was EPIC though. They sent me a pair of aluminum due to the 2018 models not avail yet. got them before the next weekend....a week later they sent me the new 2018 models... kept the aluminum ones on bike till end of year... 2018-took off aluminum...NIGHTMARE!.. the tool stripped the threads out..so had to cut them off with a hacksaw..Started last year with the carbon installed... massive chip/crack from a rock that kicked up on one of the fire roads halfway through season.. NO more for me... Installed Raceface ATLAS.. case closed. Haad an issue with their cassette also...Not a fan of their componets.
  • + 6
 You can have light, strong and cheap. Pick two.
  • - 7
flag Cammyd14 (Apr 11, 2019 at 2:46) (Below Threshold)
 Unoriginal comment is unoriginal
  • + 10
 @Cammyd14: it ain't less true because it's aged. It's called a classic comment.
  • + 1
 @Cammyd14: Yet it's true.
  • + 1
 The E13 cranksets I installed many moons ago have been trouble free and still spin like new despite zero maintenance. I was stoked to have another set on my new ride. I will be running their wheels as well this season, curious how they hold up
  • + 4
 I'll take a good set of Saint cranks any day.
  • + 1
 I have had really great experiences with E13 USA. These guys always give me reply's with in 24 hours and are willing to send out replacements if things are out of spec. They stand behind their product and I appreciate that!
  • + 0
 My friend have a carbon wheels and carbon cranks on YT Tues, cranks lasts 3 days and starts cracking around pedal axle (no rocks hitted!) and wheels lasts 7 days until one fist sized rock on the landing of small jump, so its expensive AF and lasts few days? I saw it on my own eyes... So sorry E13, U R now in category with CrackBrothers etc...
But on the other hand, he had good experience with customer care...
  • + 1
 Shovel Components have Chainring offset for almost a year out, and its good way to see other companies picking it up.
shovelcomponents.com/product/addict-oval-chainring
  • + 2
 Big guys like 180mm cranks. Please e13, consider us in the mix. Shimano is our only option.
  • + 3
 Shimano SLX cranks all day, err day! Stiff, cheap, easy to replace!
  • + 1
 e13 is not the same as e13 before, most products are consumables compared to their old products which lasted extremely long !
  • + 1
 I could buy only one thing from this company- CHAIN GUIDE and nothing else. YT Industries should give up on them seriously.
  • + 1
 Why? Just because of a bad YT customer service it doesn't say that the e13 costumer service is bad at all.
  • + 1
 Their tires rock too.
  • + 1
 I wounder if they had to pay Sandvik Coromant to license their Capto interface...
  • + 1
 Most of the people I know with carbon cranks are slow, fat, and have money to burn.
  • + 1
 I have always loved the look of these. Big and beefy! You know they can handle what ever gets thrown their way!!!
  • + 1
 Do the BBs still give up after a few rides? I have not used e13 since my shop friends and I all warrantied BBs after 3 rides
  • + 1
 Nope. Have buddies on a few of these cranks and BB’s still solid after a year.
  • - 1
 Did they fix the problem of there cranks snapping yet. I personally would never trust there carbon cranks ever again Race Face SixC cranks for the win if your going with carbon cranks.
  • + 4
 I had the opposite experience. Multiple broken Next cranks. Total garbage. Have had some E13 carbon on my bike for a year with no Issues. E13 for the win.
  • + 1
 @covekid: I could see the Next cranks not holding up if your doing any type of aggressive riding. Ass those are not SixC DH cranks.
  • + 2
 @weaselssubie: SixC are just as bad. RF products are generally very good, but the insert delamination issue is hard to ignore. While I liked them I had both my SixC crank arms fail, one with a normal pedal insert delamination, the other with a crack almost through the entire width of the crank due to play in the insert. My e*thirteen TRSr's have been fine so far, which is good because the crank boots have taken some punishment.
  • + 1
 Triangular interface... Tell me square taper isn't coming back.
  • + 0
 Are these still one-bike cranks or can you actually remove them now without having to cut the spindle?
  • + 1
 Hacksaw not included!
  • - 3
 Carbon may not be the best option for rock strikes but it still saves weight and doesn't bend under load.
There's nothing out there in titanium for DH and at decent pricetag yet. I'm still waiting for a sub 500g Ti crankset for ~500 bucks...
  • + 19
 Will take durability over weight any day.
  • + 2
 I hear the fast guys put weights on their cranks to balance them and lower their center of gravity
  • - 7
flag qreative-bicycle (Apr 11, 2019 at 0:53) (Below Threshold)
 @Ktron: You meant 'Will take price over durability any day'?
Titanium is far more durable than aluminium, and it can be lighter as bonus.
  • + 14
 @qreative-bicycle: BB area is the place where cutting weight makes least sense. Considering EEwings cost 1000$, it's plain ridiculous to spend 850$ more than necessary. Even if you got some XC version at 500g. Then you speak of DH, just get GX and be done with it. Also alu cranks bending under load? Really? At the risk of appearing rude, how fat are you?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: A friend bent one E-thirteen crank hitting the pedal at low position, he's 80kg and not riding at pro level. He got a free replacement from E-thirteen while Canyon wouldn't hear anything tho. It's one case from many others seen over the years.
I've striked my pedals many times and my carbon cranks are not bending.

I do ride the SixC on both DH & street/park bikes and will never go back to aluminum. Imo any gramms I can get rid of makes the bike feel more playful, more active and you fight less against your bike.

You must assume they are customers willing to get a steel frame with alloy components, while some others go carbon for the weight, that's a choice.
Here the subject I pointed was using titanium, the most reliable and possibly the lightest material for cranksets but no DH option yet... I may be interested in it if the msrp has 3 numbers.
  • + 2
 @qreative-bicycle: You feel every gramm? Go to the gym so beeing a weight weenie becomes obsolete
  • + 1
 @qreative-bicycle:

Carbon doesn’t really bend. It’s either in shape or it breaks. It can flex some though
  • - 1
 @NotNamed: 75kg for 1.83m ain't fat Smile
You feel every gramm when you remove them everywhere. 100+50+250+... and you got few KG digits off your ride.
  • - 2
 @qreative-bicycle: except SixC cranks (just like Sram X01 DH) suffer from pedal insert getting loose, I have personally seen 2 cases of such thing. Never seen a bent one, that is true. Carbon doesn't bend, it delaminateds. Then it is very rare that people bend alu cranks. And counting grams on a DH bike is indeed an exercise in futility
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yeah had the RF carbonara cranks , get f*cked up inserts after a month ... No way I would pick carbnara cranks again.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: nah don't have to be fat. I had a buddy bend a New descendent 6k crank arm over shooting a drop. He's about 190lbs
  • + 7
 @Serpentras: I’d pick carbonara cranks, just for the eggs and bacon.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns: nothing is static, everything has flex, no matter the weight or else it would snap instantly. and no risk you are one rude kona
  • + 2
 @wakiisapuddinghead: yes, even diamonds have certain degree of flex.
  • + 1
 @TheBearDen: He didn’t say bend when crashing, he said bend under load and that can man anything and sadly often means pedalling efficiency. As I stated above opting for carbon cranks for durability is a lunacy.

I have personally seen two SixC cranks with loose inserts. Don’t know how many Srams and Next SL. At least 10 total. Internet is full of pics of wastes carbon cranks. How many bent alu cranks? I won’t lie if I say 3 total. And there are a few folks around here who say they wasted saints and then ride for years on SixC. Yeah right. Get out more, hang out with more people then.

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