Review: Hope Union TC Pedals

Jul 20, 2022 at 10:49
by Mike Kazimer  
Hope Union TC pedal review


Hope stepped into the clipless pedal world last year with three new models, the Union RC, TC, and GC. Those initials indicate the intended usage, which corresponds to the platform size. The Race Clip is for the XC crowd, the Trail Clip reviewed here is the all-rounder, and the Gravity Clip is for riders looking for as much of a platform underfoot as possible.

The usable portion of the TC's platform measures 92 x 70mm, similar dimensions to those of Shimano's trail pedals. There are four removable pins on each side, and Hope supplies small washers to fine tune the height. I ended up leaving the pins out of the front holes, and then adjusted the rear pins so that they just barely contacted the bottom of my shoes for a little extra retention.
Union TC Details

• 4 replaceable pins on each side
• Includes two different cleat options
• Adjustable release tension
• Chromoly axle (titanium upgrade available)
• Internals: 3 cartridge bearings + bushing
• 6 color choices
• Weight: 445 grams
• Price:$190 USD
• More info: hopetech.com

The stainless steel clip-in mechanism is spring-loaded on both sides, rather than having a fixed toe bar. According to Hope, this was done to reduce the force needed to clip in, and to make it easier to enter the pedals from different angles. The retention is adjustable with an Allen key, and the pedals come with two different stainless steel cleats that offer either 4 or 5 degrees of float that correspond with either a 12- or 13-degree release angle. Keep in mind that those cleats are proprietary to these pedals – only Hope's own cleats will work. The shoes also come with shims to ensure that the cleats and pedals work with different shoe sole dimensions.

Hope Union TC pedal review

ENTRY & EXIT

Getting in and out of the Unions is extremely smooth and intuitive – in fact, I'd say they're a touch easier to get into compared to Shimano's pedals. The entry motion is similar, but the spring-loaded toe bar makes it possible to get in with more of a straight down motion rather than entering toe first (that works too). There's a slightly 'springy' feel when getting in and out compared to Shimano's pedal that results in more of a 'snap' when entering, compared to the 'click' that accompanies stepping into a Shimano pedal.

When it comes to overall retention range, that's almost identical to Shimano's pedals. I put a Hope pedal on one crank and a Shimano on the other and maxed the tension out on both for comparison. The amount of resistance felt very similar, although the pins on the Hope pedals do make it possible to increase the effort needed to disengage even further.

Personally, I don't like using pins for that purpose – relying on metal digging into rubber isn't a very elegant solution for adjusting retention. Still, that option is available, and even without the pins the Union TC's offer a very usable range of adjustment. I ran the pedals in the middle of the range, which worked well for my riding style - I didn't have any unwanted releases or trouble getting out.

Hope Union TC pedal review

CLEATS

I mentioned earlier that the Union TC pedals come with two sets of cleats, marked 4 or 5 to indicate how much float they provide. I tried both cleats and ended up preferring the 5 version, which requires slightly more release effort and has 5-degrees of float versus the 4 provided by the other set. The difference between the two isn't that drastic - it's there, but it's more subtle than substantial. Realistically, I think it'd make more sense if Hope scrapped the 4-degree cleats and just included two sets of the 5-degree, or only included one set and dropped the retail price accordingly.

DURABILITY

The Union TC pedals are well sealed, and there wasn't any water ingress or corrosion to be seen when I pulled them apart - all of the dirt was concentrated around the dust seal, where it should be. The three small cartridge bearings and bushing are all still running smoothly after three months of regular usage, and there's no side-to-side play at all. That doesn't really constitute a true long-term test, but the conditions were pretty grim for a good portion of the time these pedals were used, and they fared very well.

Disassembling the pedals is as simple as using a 6mm hex to unthread the end cap and then using a socket to get to the 8mm nut that threads onto the end of the axle. Out of the box, the pedals do have a little more resistance to rotation compared to some other pedals. It's not anything that's noticeable while pedaling, and they have become easier to spin with more use.

Hope Union TC pedal review

PRICE & WEIGHT

The Union TC's are priced at $190 USD and weigh 445 grams. For comparison, Shimano's XTR Trail pedals are the same price, and weigh 386 grams. A set of Crankbrothers Mallet E pedals weigh 427 grams and are $170 USD. And for one more option, Time's Speciale 8 pedals are 396 grams and $150. For even more pedal weights and prices, this round-up is a handy reference.






Pros

+ Very smooth entry and exit
+ Well sealed against the elements
+ Effective adjustments with pins and spring tension


Cons

- Pricey, especially if you're calculating cost per gram
- Proprietary cleats (but they do come with two sets)




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesHope decided to do things their way rather than simply knocking out an SPD-clone, and I'd say those efforts paid off. The Union TC pedals function extremely well, with an entry that requires minimal effort, and a smooth, predictable release. Yes, the proprietary cleat will be a point of contention for some, but the pedals do come with a second set that can be used as spares – the difference in feel between the two options is fairly minimal. They're also available in six different colors, and have adjustable pins that aren't just for show.  Mike Kazimer








120 Comments

  • 158 9
 All the performance of Shimano, just heavier with special cleats. WIN!
  • 29 2
 Or compare them to XT Trail pedals where you have those same wins + higher price....
  • 26 4
 shimanos platform is non existent pure metal on metal float
  • 10 28
flag salespunk (Jul 21, 2022 at 10:01) (Below Threshold)
 Question is whether the Hope axles will still be straight after a month of use. I bend my Shimano axles almost instantly, but have just learned to live with it.
  • 8 1
 Proprietary cleats?.... Bold move, Cotton. /s
  • 25 1
 @salespunk: maybe you have a dodgy pedal insert (if carbon cranks) or a loose crank arm. Surely the axles from shimano aren’t that weak?
  • 4 1
 As a bit of a hope fan (they're only 45 minutes away/same county) it's hard to argue that they'll be more reliable too. I suppose... Colours?
  • 11 2
 These have pins so have a true cage, the Shimano one is just for show and provides no real benefit. Saint are almost a better comparison. I do love the Shimano pedal bearing system the best, I kind of wish someone made a Mallet pedal with a Shimano axle. As it is I'll keep to my Mallet's with their wobbly bushings
  • 9 1
 @timothyjplatt79 nope. Hope (and Crank Bros) pedal platform actually connect with the sole of your shoe. I have always found Shimano platform to have no interface / connection with the sole of your shoe once clipped in. And as your sole of your shoe and cleats wear, the connection with shimano pedals deteriorates even more
  • 8 0
 @Vinnijussi: need to try Shimano pedals with Shimano shoes
  • 12 1
 I have no Time to lose with this.
  • 6 1
 @danstonQ: I don't even give it a Look!
  • 5 1
 Problem with Shimano SPD is: they have originally not been developed for gravity riding. So there is NO connection of the shoe sole with the platform, however tall it might be.
  • 3 0
 @sambobcat: Except for the Shimano DX.
  • 2 0
 @salespunk: have you tried the horizon pedal with Titanium axel?

I crashed so hard I bent my fork axle and ovaled my rear hub. But the pedals stayed true. No proprietary cleats but I would recommend the multi direction release spd cleats.
  • 2 0
 @drfunsocks: This is across six sets of XT and XTR pedals in four different bikes. Multiple carbon, Ti and aluminum crank setups as well including XX1, eeWings and 5Dev. It is 100% the pedals.
  • 1 0
 @hardtailhowie: thanks for the recommendation
  • 1 0
 I second that. @hardtailhowie: I have the same pedals and they have had relentless abuse and no servicing at all. They still work perfect and allow me to use a multi release cleat.
  • 31 5
 The uproar over proprietory cleats is well overblown, if Hope believe they can make a better option that performs better and gives people a tangable benefit (multiple direction clip in beats shimano and lasting more than 2 mins beats crank brothers) then good on them for not going with the easier option that would of been a worse product or wouldn't of differentiated itself enough from Shimano or other SPD pedals.
Time and Crank brothers don't get such a hard time over needing thier own cleats, it's not like the pedals don't come with cleats and they fit all shoes, for most people who have 1 mountainbike it won't be an issue, even if you do have multiple bikes it's likely a different type which you might have different shoes for anyway or if you can afford $190 pedals and have lots of bikes you can probably afford a few sets of pedals, having said that i do have multiple bikes but will be sticking with shimano on all of them purely becuase i'm a tight arse who wouldn't spend that much on pedals reguardless of the cleat situation.
  • 7 1
 Agreed, I'd rather they come with proprietary cleats and provide something different to the market. The pedals come with cleats so its not even a huge hurdle to make it work. They aren't going to make a better SPD pedal then Shimano so why even bother with that. I guess they could make them in better colors than the black Shimano provides but that's not really a big differentiator. All that being said, I do like having all my shoes on the same system so I can easily use them interchangeably. Years ago I swapped out the Time pedals on my mountain bike so I could have SPD across the board
  • 3 0
 When I bought my previous bike I bought also a pair of Time pedals. And I liked everything about them. Similar to CB for the float but (maybe) even easier to click in/out.

Usually the cleats are easy to find on German web shops but one time on the midweek ride I could suddenly feel that cleats had too much float, so I needed a new pair asap because we planned a bike park trip on weekend. I've checked several bike shops in Ch, Germany and France (I'm living close to the border) with no luck.

I know, it was a mistake not have a spare pair but anyway, with Shimano or CB cleats this would never happen. You can find them anywhere

This was the only reason I went back to CB pedals
  • 3 1
 @maglor I agree......BUT....introducing a new cleat means making them available. And from a USA perspective, finding hope components is hard enough. And you'll never go into a bike shop here and find Hope-anything on the fly. But you can pretty much go to any bike shop and find SPD cleats or CB cleats. But yeah from where you're sitting, I'm sure they will be easy to find and not pose a problem.
  • 5 0
 @foggnm: Probably a non issue but you could always buy a spare set and keep them handy. Or forget where you left them by the time they are worn/damaged lol.
  • 3 0
 For me the Hope pedals and cleats have the platform connection feel of Crank Bros with the clip in and out feel of Shimano
  • 4 0
 Hey Simmo once the fleet is on Shimano it's really hard to justify moving to anything else, Iv played around with CBs but having to remember which shoes to wear with which bike isn't worth the drama. Also no mention if these feature the most important SPD feature... the bottle opener.
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: Time pedals were bought by sram. As such, you can now find time cleats almost everywhere.
  • 1 0
 @experthucker: Hey, i'm sure you could manage to open a bottle on them Wink tbh i wouldn't mind trying them, seems like a really good system and the adjustable pins to help reduce the up and down shoe float which is my only gripe with shimano, although probably down to me getting my monies worth out of worn cleats. Saints are the only shimano pedal with pins i think but a bit heavy and almost as expensive, the Hopes can be found for £120 so not cheap but maybe worth it, just wouldnt want to spend that for the whole fleet.
Also on the cleat availability issue they wear pretty gradually so its not like you ever NEED new cleats desperatly in a pinch so waiting to order them is fine.
  • 2 0
 @Kiowa008:Probably. And if they are successful then I'm sure they can make them more available. Personally I'm glad to see it because clipless systems is one area I think we need more options. Though I won't be giving up my mallet pedals anytime soon.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: this!
I've also gone that road (z-attack) but returned to Shimano and never looked back again.
I've gor 646,530,520,M8120, and an old pair of 525 and 747 (almost 30year old...older than many over here! Ahahahha)

All still working flawlessly.
  • 1 0
 I’ve used several different pedal types and they’ve all come with proprietary cleats. Only way they will be an issue is if you have multiple bikes and want to use different pedal type. In a case like that…I would just use the same manufacturer. I have more than one bike…but they all use Shimano pedals. One has XTR XC pedals…and the other has XT Trail. Since they are both from Shimano…they use the same cleats. The benefit of a Shimano cleat is that they are widely available. You can pretty much go into any bike shop and find them in stock.

Sorry I accidentally downvoted…because of tiny buttons on a tablet.
  • 3 0
 I have these on my enduro bike for 3 years and haven't had any problems. I have Shimano spds on my 2nd bike and nice that I can use the same shoe/cleat for both sets.
  • 1 0
 Sweet... didn't even know these existed
  • 2 0
 Those stopped keeping me clipped in after just a few months. The problem seems to be the binding metal being softer than the cleat metal, so the cleat just erodes away at the binding until theres nothing left to hold onto the cleat.
  • 4 0
 I used to be a fan of the Nukeproof pedals until the most recent pair I bought had ridiculously high minimum clip tension, so I switched to Saints. I don't know why I ever bothered with anything else.

Looking a bit closer, the clip design on the Hope pedal looks to be almost identical to what Nukeproof uses, just cut for different shaped cleat.
  • 1 0
 @dividebyzero: LOL try Crankbrothers
  • 1 0
 These were my favourite pedals before I have switched to Hope. However, bushes needed replacing every two or so months due to poor seal and axle, other than that they were bomb proof.
  • 12 2
 That cleat decision must have been a hard one at Hope. We all know how many folks got stoked hearing hope had pedals coming only to find out they decided to design their own cleat... I bet they are great pedals and will last a long time and hold up to some good abuse but as shitty as it sounds I'm not doing the switch because I don't wanna stock my parts bin with another cleat.
  • 5 9
flag SterlingArcher (Jul 21, 2022 at 8:31) (Below Threshold)
 Ironic. Proprietary parts and non compatability with existing standards sounds more German than British.
  • 6 0
 @SterlingArcher: Stand by for these pedals to Brexit from the market.
  • 7 0
 Why have all the clipless platform manufacturers abandoned the tilting, spring-loaded platform? It made a lot of sense back in the Shimano 636 days. And when those went away, I grabbed a handful of VP-133DHs from ebay (they were dirt cheap!) and I'm on my third set, with two more still safely stored, awaiting to be put to good use.
  • 8 1
 Shimano die hard here. Hate Crank Bros with their appalling cleats. Decided to go with Hope and they are superb, made to a very high standard. Who cares about the cleats, the Hope ones are very well made and work just like Shimano. I really like these pedals, I think they will last years.
  • 1 0
 What made you change from Shimano? I like the look of these but I’ve just had zero issues with my Shimano XT pedals so it’s hard to want to switch. Change is scary haha
  • 3 0
 @MillerReid: in truth I have the new Hope HB916 frame in order and wanted more Hope bling! But also I liked the idea of these ones ie Shimano style clip in but a cage that actually connects with your shoe. I also like having the Hope factory just 1 hour from my house if anything goes wrong and I am big on buying British at the moment as I like supporting local as well as doing something really green rather than bullshit pretend green to look cool. I have tried HT which looked great but were terrible (clip mech way too tight) and Crank brothers were a joke with their cleats made of cheese that last 2 mins, so expected the Hope to be very pretty overpriced and pointless bling but they are superb. The clip in and out is so smooth yet just as reassuring as Shimano.
  • 6 0
 I got one of the first sets out the factory start of the year. After 30 years on SPDs including current get xt, xtr and saints I've converted all my shoes to Hope and (maybe) never going back. There's something so very intuitive about the clip in and release that can't be matched by anything Shimano makes right now. They're a really good pedal and look nice too.
  • 1 0
 I said that about Speedplay Frog and Wahoo bought them and killed them off. Cleats are unavailable.
  • 3 0
 @office: that's why you buy Hope though. Unless someone buys them I'll be able to service these pedals forever.
  • 5 0
 These look a lot like the Time Special 8, but with double sided springs, ala Crank Bros. I run the Times. I like them a lot better than Shimano XT Trails. The Times are easier to get into and out of, but don't eject you if you strike a rock like Crank Bros. Also, if you don't get immediately clipped back in, the platform actually does provide a bit of support compared to Shimanos. Downside ... nothing is as tough as a Shimano pedal. I've had to warranty my Times about once every 18 months. The pins that the loops ride on are press-fit. Enough rock strikes will loosen the fit and they will back out. It's not catastrophic, but the engagement becomes really loose.
  • 2 0
 I have the GC´s and they are great. I love Hope cleats, because there is no play and I do not feel like my shoe is floating from side to side. Also the width of the platform is okay and the support is noticeable. With all the PROs there is one CON that with my 5.10 Kestrel Pro Boa there is no contact with pins at all.
  • 2 0
 Having gone back and forth recently between flats and clip in pedals, I'm noting how a competitive factor with flats is how thin they are. This lowers you by almost half an inch on flats which is a lot! However, for some reason, total thickness has never been competed on with clip ins. Why not I ask - the benefits are the same.

I say that but I now collect 10 year old time pedals at 10$ a set. I have a collection that will last the rest of my life.
  • 2 0
 I’m kinda wondering how many people worried about cleat availability have ever actually been on a trip somewhere and needed to make an emergency cleat purchase. It just doesn’t seem like a common enough event to even worry about.
  • 3 0
 I like to wear the same shoes for the trail bike and the gravel bike, so bummer on the proprietary cleats. Otherwise they look awesome, and I’m a sucker for Hope bits.
  • 2 0
 I’m running the RC pedals on my gravel bike because of the same reason Smile works superb
  • 1 0
 I've only ever used the basic M540 SPDs and they're fine but I've blown out of them a couple times pulling up really hard to jump. Is there any reason to try all the other kinds like Crankbrothers, Time, platform SPDs, or are they basically all the same once you're in?
  • 13 0
 Sounds like you really need to work on technique.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Yeah probably, maybe flats for a while.
  • 7 0
 You shouldn't be pulling up on the pedals to jump. The technique is the same as jumping with flat pedals.
  • 3 0
 I run the Union GC's after previously using Shimano DX and they are great. Really strong a robust pedal with no complaints over clipping in and out.
  • 1 0
 I love hope stuff. My bike is decked out with Hope where it matters most as I believe they're a near-lifelong purchase. When I sell my bike, the brakes come off and go onto the next one. The hubs, bombproof and even a twit like me can service them. Pedals, however, are considered a consumable to most and a function-over-form to others, which makes these miss the mark in purpose completely.
  • 4 0
 It's good to have more options, but I'm a Time fanboy.
  • 1 1
 Obviously this is not an axle review but thought I'd comment on something that a lot of people would view. In your opinion, what is the strongest axle brand that is available out there to consumers?? Off the top of my head I'm thinking industry nine but I have no idea. I ask because I recently broke a rear axle mid ride on my Trek remedy 8 2021 model. Are treks/bontrager known for having weak axles by any chance?
  • 2 1
 How thick is the pedal compared to XTR? Does that mechanism retain the cleat farther away, vertically, from the axle than XTR?
  • 2 0
 Anyone have feedback on these vs HT? I love the HT release but am looking for more durability
  • 3 0
 I really like the HT feel as well (after 20+ years on Shimano). However, you are correct, HT just seem to need more maintenance. Shimano can be ran a decade or more with zero rebuilds
  • 2 0
 @bman33: This. I was going to say I'd give these new Hopes a try if my 5 year old XTs ever quit on me but unfortunately, or fortunately, I don't see that ever happening. XTs just seem bombproof and require little to no maintenance.
  • 3 0
 I have had the GC pedals since October, and have also run HT's. I've had good experiences with both, but have to say I prefer the feel and overall quality on the Hope pedals. So far they've been bomb proof.
  • 2 0
 I switched from HT to these in the last year Hoping for better quality/durability. Happy so far and both HT/Hope feel better in terms of float and overall feel to me than Shimanos.

Plus purple.
  • 1 0
 I have Hope flat pedals since their release in 2012 I think... opened one once out of curiosity and the grease was like new. Decided not to open the other one because never change a running system. I think these use the same bearing and axle setup. I wish Hope would overhaul their flat pedal... larger and more concave so you don't have to rely on 5 mm pins.
  • 7 0
 @mxracer185, these use three cartridge bearings and a bushing, compared to the HT's which use a needle bearing, thrust bearing, and a bushing. In my experience, the HT's tend to develop play pretty quickly, which hasn't happened yet with these. The feel when clipping into both of them is pretty similar, although the HTs do have a higher possible release tension. Getting out of the Hopes is smoother and quicker than the HT's, at least for me.
  • 3 0
 Same. I tried to switch back to Shimano after wearing out multiple sets of HTs quickly, but the HT feel is far better. The Shimanos feel like I'm standing on a ball bearing, HTs feel like I'm standing on a flat pedal, except my feet stay put. I have a set of these on order. I'm hoping they're a more durable HT experience.
  • 1 0
 @shimstack: That's interesting! I have some Shimano shoes and the XT pedals, and although I liked the general feel of being clipped in, that 'standing on a ball bearing' feeling is exactly what I felt with them when I tried them. I found I was smoking my legs really quickly on descents because I was subconsciously trying to keep my feet in one place (I've ridden flats for 20+yrs), and without the pedal assisting with that my legs were taking over. Your post does suggest at least that going for a more platform style pedal should alleviate that issue...
  • 2 0
 HT just updated their internals with sealed bearings. T2 and X3. I’ve been running the Hopes and HT’s over the past couple months and my knees prefer the HT T2’s but my eyes prefer the Hope’s…
  • 2 0
 @crgcrmny: Interesting on the T2. I'll snag a set of those too and set up a cage match...
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks for the feedback! I will have to try these out
  • 1 0
 @crgcrmny: I saw that, but I couldn't find any info at all on what had actually changed. Does the durability seem to be better?
  • 2 0
 @mxracer185:
So far so good, I’ve got 500 or so miles on a pair including park days, there’s zero side to side or wobble developing.
  • 4 0
 @tbubier: My first pair of XTR's lasted for almost 30 years, so if you want to try something different you probably shouldn't wait for an equipment failure.

Personally, I bought another pair of XTR's. I'm planning on them lasting until I'm 100.

Your mileage may vary.
  • 4 0
 Spent time on both the T2 and the Hopes over the last couple months. What hasn’t been talked about much is the power transfer. Whatever it is, cleat design, pedal interface, the Hope feels great, super solid connection with very little roll. Hope pedal entry is also great and predictable, makes throwing a foot out for a fast plant corner and slamming back in a viable race move. However, I want more progressive feedback from the Hope at the edge of release, the disengagement point could be better. Also, if you like the extra retention force on the HTs over Shimano, you’ll feel the same about the Hopes. If the Hopes had 10% more retention vs. entry effort and more ramp at release, it would be no contest. It’s the T2’s winning for me still, no play so far, and I wanted the Hopes to win so bad.
  • 1 0
 @norcal101: So the Hopes tension is same'ish as Shimano? I switched from Shimano to HT because of HT"s better tension. Bummer Hopes are a bit more retention, they would be on my buy list
  • 2 0
 @bman33: Correct, pretty close between Shimano and Hope, maybe a touch more. No scary releases on the Hopes while I was running them at least, had that more than once with the XTR trail pedals and gave up on those.
  • 3 0
 Why are a lot of pedals so expensive?
  • 12 1
 These ones are made on Plague Island where we're currently breaking all kinds of records for high prices.
  • 4 0
 1: High end bike stuff is pretty low volume, so little economy of scale/they can charge a bunch.

2: Imagine a rider weighs 80kg, so each pedal has to support 40kg. What happens you they hit a hard turn? Or a rock? Or a big bottom out? That weight goes up a lot, and this small, rotating piece of metal has to support all that weight over and over again for years.
  • 9 1
 These ones are expensive because they’re made by people who are paid a living wage, have national insurance and pensions, and are protected by health and safety laws. Not sure about other expensive pedals.
  • 3 0
 Because inflation out paces wage growth.
  • 3 0
 Do you mean why is Hope stuff so expensive?
UK-made, high quality, top customer service, many athlete sponsorships, small-ish batches and - of course - a bit of aspirational pricing because it's Hope.
Personally I buy their hubs because I know and trust them, but I generally go with other brands for the rest of my bike.
  • 3 1
 As a flat pedal rider this is a comment section I don't need to get involved in
  • 6 0
 But you decided to anyhow?
  • 2 1
 As a flat pedal rider, I am slightly curious about going back to clips because my shoes would last SO MUCH LONGER.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: Word. The Shimano shoes I got for my on-again-off-again SPD adventures are so nice they're part of the reason I want to go back to clips again! Not having to burn through Five Tens will be a refreshing change...
  • 1 0
 After years on spd and flats I tried Time pedals. Much better for me, they feel very natural but without getting my shins minced like with flats.
  • 2 0
 I hope they work as good as they look
  • 3 3
 Yes proprietary cleat, but they seem to work very well and come in purple so I’m still considering them for my gravel bike.
  • 3 2
 You can strip the anodizing from the XT and anodize it yourself.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: purple is a super difficult color to anodized yourself, especially if you're trying to match something.
  • 4 0
 @RonSauce: not to mention my time is more valuable to me than messing up a set of shimano pedals and buying the hopes in the end to get the desired effect.

I am also genuinely curious to see if they’ve bettered SPD, nothing has come close in the 25+ years I’ve been riding.
  • 2 0
 I hope these weren't the pedals in your bag for the Stone King Rally...
  • 3 0
 Flats are good.
  • 2 0
 So are clipless ...
  • 1 0
 I've got shimano XT's and I unclip when I don't want to, like in a turn. Is it because my legs are short?
  • 1 0
 Was so hoping shimano was re releasing the blue xtr pedals...sad face
  • 2 5
 Metal pins digging into rubber is the most elegant solution-without a cleat locking you in.

For the riders/situations where clipping in is appropriate, cleats that aren’t regularly available would be an issue.

Also, the limited amount of twist (these have zero true lateral float) means that aggressive cornering can still lead to the inside pedal unclippng. For all the durability issues Crank Brothers pedals have had, their design does allow the rider’s feet to twist further. It’s why pro DH riders prefer them.

Final thought-Shimano tried this design years ago with the 858. It wasn’t as durable/didn’t work as well so they abandoned it. I’ll be curious to see what issues may come up from a longer-term thrashing of these.
  • 2 0
 Why did you mention twist and lateral float together? Doesn't matter if the have "zero true lateral float" if the twist is what you claim makes the CB pedals better.
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: CB pedals have both more twist AND lateral float, better replicating the repositioning of the foot that happens when cornering hard on flats.

Some other designs (the old Speedplay Frogs come to mind) had enough twist alone to improve cornering, these days CB and Time clip-ins are the only ones that allow enough foot movement for more natural cornering through a combination of float and twist.

I should have been more specific in my statement.
  • 1 4
 "then adjusted the rear pins so that they just barely contacted the bottom of my shoes for a little extra retention"

"Personally, I don't like using pins for that purpose"

"I ran the pedals in the middle of the [retention] range"

So confused. Doesn't like "pins" (is a socket head really the same as a normal pin?), but uses them anyway to add shoe retention instead of turning up the cleat retention spring...
  • 6 1
 I'm not sure why you're confused - the pins and the spring tension both affect how the pedal feels when clipping in and out, and the settings you quoted above are what worked well for me. Some riders may want to run the pins (or socket head if you're feeling pedantic) higher than I did, which will make increase the effort needed for entry and exit.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: because you said you don't like pins for tension, but then used the pins for tension, while there is still tension left on the table in the spring. Why not just tighten the spring and leave out the pins that you don't like to use?
  • 1 3
 Nice how marketing still likes to imply XC is the only real "racing". Or that "racing" is all about weight reduction. They really couldn't find a better name for the small one than "Race Clip"?
  • 3 2
 you guys ride clipped in?
  • 8 0
 Yeah dawg you should try it once you take off the training wheels it’s pretty great
  • 4 1
 @sophisticatedhonky: flats for life my guy
  • 2 0
 Looks like an HT...
  • 1 0
 "stepped into the clipless pedal" nice ;-)
  • 1 0
 no one makes affordable bling like hope.
  • 1 0
 No teardown to show bearings???
  • 3 3
 only a 1 degree difference between the two sets of cleats. Genius.
  • 5 0
 This is the FlipChip of pedals
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: Best…..commment!!!!!





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