Review: Maxxis's New Forekaster Tire is Heavier & Better Than The Original

Jul 26, 2022 at 15:12
by Mike Kazimer  


The Maxxis Forekaster used to sit squarely in the aggressive cross-country category, a tire with enough tread for slipperier conditions, but with a fairly low weight. That's changed a bit with the new version. The tread has been beefed up a little, and Maxxis now says it's designed for modern short travel trail bikes.

The numbers on the scale have gone up as well, and where the previous version weighed 735 grams, the new version comes in at 915 grams. That'll get the weight weenies in a tizzy, but focusing solely on the weight would be selling the new Forekaster short.

Forekaster Details
• Size: 29 x 2.4" or 29 x 2.6"
• EXO casing
• Dual or MaxxTerra rubber compounds
• Weight: 915 grams (actual, 29 x 2.4", MaxxTerra)
• Price: $93 USD
maxxis.com


Forekaster V2
Forekaster V1

WHAT'S DIFFERENT?

The biggest change to the Forekaster has to do with the positioning of the side knobs. On the previous version, every other knob was offset towards the center of the tire, and on the new one those side knobs line up for improved cornering traction.

The center tread still uses a pattern that has a row of two blocks followed by a row of three with an offset center block. The heights have grown slightly, and there are now deeper horizontal sipes – the subtle diagonal siping found on the previous version is gone. There are also small raised portions that look like little rubber sprinkles occupying the spaces between the tread. The idea is that those nubbins willl make it harder for mud to stick to the tire, keeping it from packing up in wet conditions.

At the moment there are only two versions of the Forekaster available, but that'll likely change as time goes on. Both options are 29 x 2.4” (a 2.6" version is on the way) and use Maxxis' EXO casing. The only difference is the tread compound – one uses a dual compound design, and the other uses Maxxis' MaxxTerra compound, which uses a hard compound as a base later, a medium compound on top of the center tread, and a softer compound for the shoulder knobs.



ACTUAL WIDTH

It's no secret that not all tires measure up to what the markings on the sidewall indicate. One of the reasons is that many companies, Maxxis included, measure tire widths at the maximum pressure, and take the reading from whichever part of the tire is wider, the casing or the tread.

On heavier duty tires with thicker casings the width at 20 psi isn't going to change that much at max pressure, but it's a different story with a thinner casing tire – that casing expands more as the pressure is increased. Still, even at 50 psi on a 29mm internal width rim the Forekasters I was testing measured 2.36” at the widest part of the casing. The tread was slightly narrower, at 2.35”.

Dropping the pressure down to 23 psi, a pressure that's actually usable in real life, the Forekaster measured 2.28” at its widest – it's a bit of a stretch to call it a 2.4” tire, at least in my book.


PERFORMANCE

Installation was drama-free, and both tires popped into place without requiring any trickery on a set of Roval Control wheels, which have an inner rim width of 29mm, and on a set of Silt XC wheels, which have a 27mm inner rim width.

ROLLING SPEED
The Forekasters will feel speedy if you're coming from something like a Minion DHF, but they're not as lightning fast as a true XC tire. I'd classify them as neutrally quick – I never had any “holy crap, these are fast” moments, but I also never felt like they were sluggish or too heavy. Running a Maxxis Rekon or Ikon as a rear tire would be a good way to maintain traction up front with a little less rolling resistance out back.

Another possible pairing would be to run a Dissector up front and the Forekaster in the rear; that'd be a good combination for riders looking for more grip without resorting to heavier, more full-on trail tires.

TRACTION
I've been able to subject the Forekasters to the full gamut of Pacific Northwest trail conditions, everything from extra-slippery and slimy winter days to the marbly moon dust that mid-summer brings. In the wet, they do a good job of contouring to the ground, keeping the number of unexpected slide outs to a minimum. All that siping combined with running fairly low pressures (20 psi up front and 22 in the rear for my 160 lb weight) made it possible to put a lot of trust in the Forekaster's ability to hold a line.

That traction carries over to drier dustier conditions too; these tires have an impressive amount of bite considering the lower profile tread pattern. I bumped up my pressures a pound or two as the ground hardened, but the grip still stayed predictable and consistent while climbing and descending. More than once I dropped into an extra-steep section of trail curious if the Forekasters would be able to provide enough braking traction for me to remain in control, and each time I ended up at the bottom unscathed and even more impressed with how well they handled the loose terrain.

Those taller side knobs create a nice sharp edge to push into, especially compared to tires with a slightly rounder profile.

DURABILITY
I haven't experience and flats or sidewall slashes during the test period. The tread wear has been even, and the MaxxTerra compound has been holding up well. Some of the knobs are starting to show some rounding and pitting, but all of the wear is on par with the amount of use and terrain.


Specialized Ground Control tire review
Specialized Ground Control
Maxxis Forekaster
Schwalbe Wicked Will


HOW DO THEY COMPARE?

Schwalbe's Wicked Will and Specialized's Ground Control tires both sit in a similar category to the Forekaster, straddling that middle ground between XC and trail tires. The Forekaster is the most aggressive of the three, with more all-round grip for slippery conditions or pushing hard into corners. It's also heavier, and unlike with the Wicked Will or Ground Control there currently isn't any lighter, more race-oriented version.

Personally, I found the Wicked Will to be the most unpredictable out of these three options, at least when running it as a front tire. It was the most likely to break traction, and the SuperGround casing required more pressure in order to keep it from folding over in corners. The Ground Control's performance was more consistent than the Wicked Will, and its rolling speed was noticeably faster than the Forekaster. Realistically, the Ground Control is more like a beefed up XC tire, and the Forekaster is a slimmed down trail tire. That may seem like splitting hairs, but the difference is noticeable on the trail.

If I was placing more of a priority on speed, and didn't mind slightly reduced traction I'd pick the Ground Control, and if I was looking for a tire that I could run year round in all conditions I'd go with the Forekaster. When it comes to price, the Ground Control tires are the hands down winners.

Weights & Prices:

Schwalbe Wicked Will Super Ground: 892 grams, $94.99 USD
Specialized Ground Control Grid T7: 880 grams, $60 USD
Maxxis Forekaster EXO MaxxTerra: 915 grams, $93 USD






Pros
+ Excellent traction in wide range of conditions
+ Great all-round trail tire

Cons
- Measures narrower than expected
- Heavier than the previous version





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe new Forekaster has morphed into something new, and while it may no longer really be an XC tire, it's now an excellent all-round trail tire. It has the grip and predictable handling of bigger, burlier options with faster rolling speed and a little less weight. For trail riders who don't want to lug around heavy enduro tires but still want plenty of traction, the new Forekaster gets it right. Mike Kazimer









291 Comments

  • 125 10
 WTB called, they want the Trail Boss back.
  • 21 10
 Very similar to the Schwalbe Hans Dampf.
  • 34 8
 The difference is this one will cost more and last half as long
  • 47 5
 WTB does not get enough love. Super reliable and they just work. And typically for less money than other big brand tires.
  • 9 4
 Looks more like the Vigilante 2.3.
  • 10 2
 @adrennan: Very much agreed. Their OEM spec tyres can be garbage, which hurts their reputation. Their top spec tyres however are fantastic.
  • 1 0
 @jwestenhoff: but with smaller knobs.
  • 8 0
 @adrennan: The constant sidewall seepage of my WTB Ventures would beg to differ with your "super reliable and just work" comment (a regular complaint in reviews as well), but performance-wise and value-wise (when they work) I've been happy with WTB tires.
  • 13 8
 Who cares, WTB tires last a week
  • 4 0
 @jwestenhoff: Vigis are great tyres
  • 2 1
 @fartymarty: I agree. 4 months on a 2.6 in the front of my Honzo ESD.
  • 6 7
 @dhrracer: Yes, very similar to Schwalbe Hans Dampf or Magic Mary and both tires are lighter and measure exactly the dimension given by Schwalbe. Why can't Maxxis do the same thing? Seems they always run narrower than their claim tire widths, which really sucks! And this is the WT version!
  • 2 0
 Trail Boss is my favorite tread pattern, my least favorite rubber compound for wet weather, and weak sidewalls. Maxxis has my attention now
  • 3 3
 @atourgates: the ammonia in Stan’s sealant eats the rubber. Orange Seal doesn’t seep.
  • 3 0
 @adrennan: There's a reason they don't. I've never had more punctures that refused to seal than with WTB tyres.
  • 7 2
 @babathehutt: Ammonia corrodes aluminum rims and nipples. This is why Shimano wheelsets won't be warrantied if you use Stan's or other ammonia-based sealant. The Orange Sealant seems to work pretty well.
  • 6 0
 @TimMog: WTB tires I've run all had impressive tread patterns...and casings that were either far too heavy for what they were or unusably thin.

Back to being robbed by Maxxis.
  • 5 1
 @TimMog: never had more punctures or wobbly casings than with maxxis
  • 3 0
 @hi-dr-nick:

Must depend on which tires of theirs you're running or something like that.

I've used a 2.6in Vigilante, and 2.5in Verdict (both in the light/high grip config) that have lasted pretty well. The Vigilante I swapped for the Verdict at around 300 miles without any visible wear, and the Verdict currently has ~450 miles on it and is still in great condition.

Only downside I personally have noticed with WTB tires, is on my rims, they are VERY tight, making initial install a bit of a bear (especially with inserts). Also, they're a bit heavier than avg.

I'm not a WTB die hard (currently looking to switch to a Kryptotal F for the marbly summer), but have been really happy with their tires so far.
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: Can confirm the same, switch to Orange Seal and no more seeping sidewalls
  • 3 0
 @atourgates: This. I wanted to love WTB Byways, but they seep, and they actually puncture pretty easily. I went through 5 in 18 months. In contrast, the Pirellis I got to replace them have been bullet proof... and comfy and fast rolling.
  • 3 0
 @bman33: well that must be why i have never had these problems. I have exclusively run orange seal since forever.
  • 1 2
 @adrennan: the Vigilante 2.8 to me is nearly as bad as the old version of the Schwalbe Nobby Nix, at least when it's wet. Granted, it was the fast rolling compound, but they were outright dangerous in the wet. Plus i nearly had a puncture first ride on the hardtail which was only prevented by the buttery soft Sun Ringle Duroc Rims. These are hands down nearly as bad as Spank rims and even softer.
  • 4 1
 Except the Trail Boss actually measures up to its advertised width.
  • 5 1
 @Muckal: well you are trying to ride plus tires is your problem.
  • 5 0
 Also similar to Spec Eliminator, which is a great intermediate trail tire and much cheaper.
  • 5 2
 @CSharp: Whoever downvoted this, has never had to replace all the nipples on a wheel because of Stans.
  • 1 0
 @atourgates: I concur, I had 4 pairs of Cross Boss’ warrantied in a row because their sidewall couldn’t do more than a few miles before they blew. 4 new pairs in a row? Come on.
  • 6 1
 @CSharp: I’ve always found maxxis to come up to size on 30mm rims and slightly over on 2.6 but does it really matter? I don’t think it helps they measure tyres in ye olde English combined with a weird type of metric system that nobody uses. 2.4 inch = 60mm, 2.3 = 58mm. Hardly any difference and not something you’re ever going to notice on the trail. Like who’s being held back by their tyre being 2mm narrower than claimed?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I have tires that are only .11" oversized and they don't fit in my frame, so I would lean towards undersized by a little is better than oversized.
  • 3 1
 @RonSauce: Tires with only a tenth of clearance would end up rubbing the frame with flex anyway. That is VERY tight
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Maybe I'm misunderstanding your comment. But if a tire doesn't fit in your frame (meaning it rubs on the frame), then shaving 0.055 inches off of each side of the tire means you're now running a tire with insufficient clearance to the frame for wet and possibly marbly/gravelly conditions.
  • 5 2
 @thenotoriousmic: It does matter when a Maxxis tire says it's 2.5" and it comes out to like 2.1" or 2.2" (7.6-10.2mm less!) even at the tips of the flaring nobs on the tire. You can actually tell the tire is way narrower than what you'd expect, especially if you're putting the tire on the front and you want it wider. I'm not talking about putting tires on narrow XC rims either. If it was 2mm, yeah, I wouldn't be complaining.
  • 1 0
 @hellanorcal: LOL, looks like you're probably downvoted by the same person. Guess the guy likes Stan's ammonia! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @hi-dr-nick: A weekend of racing if you get the soft compound on rocky conditions!
  • 2 0
 @CSharp: I’ve used tyres from most brands and all of them are slightly out ether way by 1 or 2mm. Maxxis the majority and I’ve never experienced anything close to that.
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: TB are good in tough casings but not a wet tyre - that's the Judge.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: the tire "fits inside the frame" but is now giving clearance and rub issues meaning its too big. On a stand everything is peachy, on the trails I have rubbing on jumps and hard turns.

Point being only an additional .055 added on to each side is plenty to cause issues. Im sure is the tire measured 2.49 I'd be better than 2.71.
  • 1 0
 Had a pair of WTBs once. They were made of butter.
  • 2 0
 @Nickbikes85: not all wtb tyres are the same. The tough casings are 2x60tpi which is about as tough as it gets really. Come in harder compounds as well for those who want a DH tyre but don’t want the super sticky compound, even the soft compound is more like a max terra than an all out max grip.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: I ride mostly in a sandy/rocky area and the trails get better when wet. The WTBs fail on wet granite rock where other tires grip like it’s pavement. In summer dust and loose over hard, they’re the best.
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: maybe that's why I love them, we don't get rain in Utah anymore
  • 2 0
 New nobby nic copy
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: The old formula of Stan's did that, but so did the old Orange Seal. I had Orange Seal blowout the side of tires back in 2014. After a LOT of convincing my mechanic got me to try Orange Seal again this year and it was okay. Still dries up pretty fast, though. I've had better luck with Muc-Off, Bonty, Hutchinson, and Conti Revo.
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: So that's why my tires always end up seeping. Why does everyone keep recommending Stan's sealant then? I used Slime in years past with good results. I'm tired of seeping tires.
  • 1 0
 @Scnelson1: it’s like recommending Kleenex for your runny nose. People call it Stan’s but they might mean a different brand. Someone from Stan’s PR probably downvoted me, but I have not had tire seeping with Orange Seal, and Stan’s reeks of ammonia.
  • 53 9
 Modern XC/Trail bikes allow speeds that require modern tires. I don't think its crazy to acknowledge that a 735g tire is no longer enough to handle the riding that we can do on better bikes now especially in rocky or rough terrain. I may be biased, but I think it being slightly heavier and more aggressive makes a lot of sense, and fills a nice space for bikes like the Spur, etc. You want super lightweight xc? Get the Ardent Race
  • 18 7
 The ardent race is far from super light
  • 17 2
 The Ardent Race can handle a lot more than you're probably giving it credit for
  • 5 0
 The Spur is specced from Transition with a Dissector 2.4 in front. For as rowdy as that little bike makes me want to get, I'd be frightened to go with anything less, especially in dry conditions.

This is my first summer on it, and as our trails dry out, I'm noticing more and more (semi-terrifying) front-wheel slippage.

I'm prone to weight-weenie'itis, but even I wouldn't want to go down to anything lower-traction than the Dissector, even though it'd save me close to 300g.
  • 9 0
 Super light would be the Rocket Ron or Thunder Burt in the discontinued liteskin versions. (RIP!)
  • 17 0
 It makes a lot of sense until you realize that Maxxis has like 7 other tires that are basically this tire.
  • 5 0
 I still rock RaceKings 2.2 and Rekon Races on my HTs and love them.
  • 10 2
 @atourgates: never save weight on lesser tires if you don't have to, I've never needed less grip when mountain biking. Same as smaller rotors, I've never needed less braking power so I'll take the pound or so worth of rotors and tires over not being in control at speed.
  • 4 0
 I run the Forekaster V1 on my Oiz TR, 2.6" front, 2.35" rear and for the 'primitive' trails I ride here in New Hampshire it's a brilliant tire, grips well on wet rocks and roots, finds good traction in the loam, nice and light for all our tight and twisting trails with lots of short punchy, techy climbs etc...
  • 9 0
 @atourgates: That Dissector is a great all around tire... but the one weakness is pushing/sliding out. The tread design is great for rolling fast, and the side knobs are pretty good when you get them to hook, but the center knobs and lack of transition can often lead to letting loose before the side knobs can catch.
  • 4 0
 For a little burlier but good rolling what about High Rollers? Good side knobs and ramped center knoobs.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756: My Meta TR came with Dissectors front and rear and can 100% confirm this statement. Fine for the rear buy holy shit the front traction in turns is unpredictable at best.
  • 4 0
 I run a Forekaster on the front and a Ardent Race on the back on my XC hardtail. The AR is a excellent tire but I wouldn't use it on the front.
  • 2 0
 @atourgates: I just got a new Spur a day ago and have been getting used to the tire combo and found this to be spot on with my experience so far as well. I too found that the dissector front can get overwhelmed easily and I really wouldn't want anything with lower traction than the Dissector either. That said, what do you think is a better alternative? It's a tough weight pill to swallow to go all the way up to a DHRII. I'm thinking this Forekaster may be almost as grippy as the dissector but corner better because it doesn't have the giant gap between the center and cornering nobs.
  • 4 0
 @Baller7756: I think you're right on this too. When the dissector is up front, you really notice how big the gap between the center tread and cornering nobs are. I've also had a couple scary moments with the front sliding out. It has always caught so far, but I'm sure with enough speed then slide it won't always catch.

Also, I currently run a dissector rear on my enduro bike and front on my trail bike, and have no issues with it as a rear and it's currently my favorite tire. When it drifts in the rear to the corning nobs it catches reliably and ups the fun factor. The front is a whole different story though.
  • 2 0
 @atourgates: Both tires are pretty close, but IMO this tire would seem to be better on loose over hard. The dissector does okay in that, but better in slightly deeper dirt.
  • 4 1
 @atourgates: it could actually save you more than 300g, if you account for blood loss after eating sh!t
  • 2 0
 @Beaconbike: Don't I know that.

My last two bad crashes were trying to get the weight of my Smuggler down ahead of the BCBR a few years ago by swapping to XC tires.

After the second one, I realized that being able to trust my tires was way more important than saving a few (hundred) grams.

It takes some of us longer to learn than others. But we still get there. So long as we survive.

@Reno233 - That'd be interesting. I didn't slip out on any corners on the Dissector until it dried out, so if the Forekaster really is better in the dry stuff, it might be worth a try. But I'll wait 'till I hear some other rider's experiences before I make a swap.

@tgent - I've honestly thought about putting an Assagai up front. With it's lightest compound it's not that much heavier than the Dissector. But, I'll probably just keep the Dissector on there at least for now, and try and figure out its dry-conditions performance and spend the $90 on something else.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: Not good for Off cambers covered in decomposed granite either.
  • 2 0
 @jeza08: as long as you're okay not having grip
  • 5 0
 @kiddlivid: Opposite would apply to XC. Never take on weight you don't need.

No point pushing a DH casing Assegai around on the front wheel when a Racing Ray is enough.
  • 7 0
 735 is heavy by xc standards If it doesn't start with 6 it's too heavy.
  • 3 0
 @nozes: Ardon't run it as a front.
  • 3 3
 @atourgates: can’t ride xc tires the way you would trail tires otherwise you will eat dirt, just sayin
  • 1 0
 @continuity: How about starting with 4? That's where it's at for XC, IMNHSO.
  • 2 0
 @EdSawyer: only if the tires are 26". and not racing around here for sure. I used to say the only difference between DH and XC here was the spandex and the need to ride up as well.
  • 1 0
 @jeza08: Mine lasted 214km, less than a month before it got a 5cm slash on the sidewall. Tread was looking brand new . Great speed/grip ratio, but casing was too weak.
  • 41 0
 They made it longer and slacker
  • 56 20
 Oh look...an IMBA tire. Grips on grade reversals & rolling grade dips....joy. Perfect for gripping water bar edges and outsloped, machine built, repetitive dozer trails in 2022 & beyond.

(just ranting about boring ass trail designs for no reason)
  • 23 1
 god I hate all things IMBA trail design
  • 17 0
 If there's not a giant, smooth berm on every turn can we even call it a trail? God forbid anyone wants to get loose with a foot out on some flat turns.
  • 6 1
 Tell me new Middle Black is your favorite trail ever without telling me.
  • 3 0
 @pisgahgnar: "The reroute . . . is being built with modern trail design principles, which focus on sustainability and proper water drainage." Yup, that's what we're talking about. www.transylvaniatimes.com/lifestyles/popular-pnf-trail-receiving-needed-reroute/article_aff86265-21bb-5c1b-85f6-833d5944b1fa.html
  • 2 0
 @Ridgeline5: Butter is up next. Fun times ahead for the ranger district. But hear me now, if they ever try to touch buckwheat I’ll be chaining myself to a tree.
  • 2 0
 @pisgahgnar: Whats up P-Gnar! Still haven't ridden it (I'm north of AVL so have more than enough AVL & north/NW) and I've heard all the tales, but I'm curious if you think its gonna flush out better with a couple years & veg coming in on the edges. Or is it just nuked?

My last memories of the Middle just before it closed was that it was pretty nuked and looked repairable but - no? Dunno...whaddya think.
  • 3 1
 @Mtn-Goat-13: In a few years it's going to fall off the mountain.
  • 2 1
 @Mtn-Goat-13: would you like me to link the video of me rolling down the new Middle Black filming it one handed with my phone to give you a better idea of what it is now...or does that paint the picture?
  • 4 1
 @Mtn-Goat-13: they paved it. In a few years the retirement homes in Hendersonville will be having recess on it with Rascal scooters. The ones who can still ride bikes are already ebiking up it.
  • 1 0
 @Ridgeline5: Just imagine if Ed had gotten the contract and pulled another "Cantrell Creek" re-route on it.

Shrimper did what he could, but was limited to what the USFS basically copied and pasted that hot turd brainwashing trail design handbook of IMBA thanks to good old Woody and crew & he did what he could to keep it from being 10 times worse than what other contractors would have done.

It's not consolation to me, but it's a compliment to Shrimper that he got the contract and not "Dozers R US"
  • 1 0
 @bradwalton: you say that jokingly, but in the future, you'll be deemed a prophet.

You're not back here are you? Still out on the cedar side of the country?
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: When did they redo Middle Black? I was last there June 2020.
  • 2 1
 People still ride non-ebikes in Pisgah?
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse @bradwalton @pisgahgnar - Was aware of the paving of middle black (and agreed with blowmyfuse that its better to be Shrimper than anyone / constraints - just hadn't made it a destination since the sidewalking and didn't (don't) get Pisghgnar's ref to falling off the mountain (?) Anyway - have ridden all that stuff since the early 90s but am north of AVL now so - plenty going on here & the area so going to Pisgah is white noise for me (and more crowded) vs. the off map stuff elsewhere...ya know, gotta stay ahead of the curve!
  • 2 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: "falling off the mountain" probably references the practice of "outsloping" so every IMBA trail sucks and you're always sliding off the outside of it
  • 2 1
 It’s okay, let it out. This is a safe space.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: still PNW. After getting charged with felonies for making improvements to a mess made by USFS in Pisgah and having to work with IMBA as punishment, it really soured my taste for my homeland. I do whatever I want here and people love it.
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: so weird to ride that on my recent trip there. Not surprised to see a xc dude climbing up it that day.
  • 2 0
 I'm all for dissing IMBA trail designs, but don't bring water bars into this, IMBA doesn't know what a water bar is. They'd have to leave the trail fall line to use one which they don't hahaha
  • 2 0
 @TwoNGlenn: You will be disappointed. Paving was completed last year.

Let me be clear though, I actually like upper black, (turkeypen to maxwell). I think it is a fun trail and when ridden at speed it can be challenging. I am PISSED about what they took away to build it though. I would have loved it more if it were anywhere else.

middle black (maxwell to thrift cove) is a sidewalk. A travesty to trail design and destruction of one of the best downhills in the the area.

And @blowmyfuse I can understand if you have some respect for Shrimper. But during the process when I saw him gloating and laughing when he shared photos on social media of the destruction of the old trails, I lost all respect.
  • 2 0
 Time for someone to write a new trail standard that actually makes for fun trails and appeases land managers. IMBA's guidance is basically just to get land managers on board, despite in practice royally being insufficient to meet the needs of land managers and mountain bikers alike. IMBA standard is just whatever sounds good in a community lecture hall, not what actually best suites the terrain, environment, or communities.
  • 1 0
 @timothyjplatt79: Some of us do, but many have moved in with ebikes mounted to their Revel Sprinter Conversions... Mills River Ingles is a van life hot spot.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Gotcha. I think maybe the only one I've been on that I'm aware of is Cantrell Ck and - not a fan. Snoozer (for me), just a bit too swoopy for what could've been a more baller DH run (in my view) , esp for how far ya have to pedal back.
  • 3 0
 @pisgahgnar: I'll be honest. Shrimper is 100% a friend. He can take all the bitching and moaning I do and come back with a hug and helping hand. Easily the single nicest guy I know of in all of Pisgah.
Must have been a contextual thing.

I mean...the guy showed up at my neighbors house and moved a MASSIVE landscape boulder, flipped it and placed it...just on his way home from a job on his day off during a 2 hour drive. He likes to build gnarly stuff too.
He helped on this project out west that has serious exposure: www.instagram.com/tv/Ce_5FgcJMsi
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse @pisgahgnar I'd agree that Shrimper has no hate for former Middle Black or glee for riders not riding it. He's just got that Woo Effin' Hoo thing about him and it had to be done...I didn't see his post so - dunno, but from what I've seen, he's just a full out person, laughs after most sentances even.

I wish I'd taken pics of Middle Black (and other sections like on Avery or Bennett) back in the 90's when all that was just singletrack / hiking trails with no big gullies or erosion, and no one was one them. There are now 6-10 ft deep gullies in some places and entirely new outcrops because of 20+ yrs of us hittin them and while that's fun, its pretty much the mtb world vs. hikers that caused the widening, the incision (downward) and endless tons of sediment in to Avery & Davidson...some of it's pretty bad. I'm guilty.

Lots of these sections actally need shutting down & recovery, but I'd just personally not like Dollywood Sidewalks in return for that... its a conundrum b/c USFS wants the structured stuff now. I'm sidetracking but I think Shrimper's just a full-on personality, just talking about what he does with gusto.
  • 1 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: My take is that Black could have been maintained, but it would take an army of devout volunteers led by a professional getting paid for their part of the work to armor/revise/narrow/tighten that corridor. And guys like Shrimper are battling dozer teams trying to low bid, toss a blade down, get in and out.

I think we've overcorrected to the extreme of "Moar is better" and at some point, people will want to get back to really taking a LONG time, raising a LOT of money and doing narrow, technical, well armoured trails without dozer tracks and outslopes.

Hopefully the more organic looking trail will come back into "fashion" at some point when people decide they don't want to drive to the other side of the country to ride the rolling grade dips on outsloped banks at less than 10% grades.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I agree - great points. I don't live in that area now (used to in the late 90's) and even though I'm Pisgah NF, its still 2.5 hrs roundtrip from my house north of AVL to Brevard and with bigger drops, no pressure and zero tourons near me - I don't usually have much reason to head down there. Not a diss on Brevard - killer stuff, cool people, and waaay cooler town than when I lived there but there's nothing there I don't have more of closer.

But yeah - your idea is awesome - just takes people. I personally that your by-hand Middle Black maintenance idea could've been done EASILY done, given the numbers & enthusiasm over there. Just have a tool stash nearby, a coupla leaders & rotating crew of locals and even pressuring passer-throughs to stop & take 20-30 mins from their rides, and put in some elbow grease during rides - add a few well made alt-lines & occassional abandon the worst...not that hard. There's no lack of people now doing trail vol stuff.

Bummer... the things that could've been. However - I think this is a great idea to push on the next Sidewalks in the Sky plan for something that remote.
  • 26 0
 Improved but with the same name. Cant wait to get confused and annoyed at the online retailers for the next 2-3 years.
  • 8 0
 Just like how there are two versions of EXO+ right now and you have to look up the TPI to know which version it is lol
  • 5 8
 @swenzowski: both EXO+ versions are meh, so you’ll just know which inadequate casing you’re getting.

Maxxis tires don’t get sturdy enough for rear use until DD.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: This was my experience too - EXO+ wore out about 2x faster than DD. Scored a DD dissector last Aug and only just wore it out in May - about 1500 miles maybe? Took a beating.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: Been very happy with EXO+ casing but that's with a really good insert to lend support/protection, nice to have the suppleness to get nice rolling.
  • 6 0
 @wyorider: Lighter and less aggressive riders like the EXO+, and it's good enough for most people as a front tire. Not me, cuz I'm 190lbs and smash rocks with the grace of an elephant, but you know.
  • 2 0
 Earlier this year I ordered two identical MAXXIS EXO+ tires from a large German online retailer for my trail bike. What came in the mail was the same tires, but one of them with the old and one with the new and completely different EXO+ casing. Only way to distinguish is looking at the label if it has a TPI count printed on it…
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: Are you using them on motorcycles?
  • 1 0
 @swenzowski: I'm using exo+ ardents and they are serving me quite well. 210lbs rider here. Albeit I don't let my bike handle rock gardens, I try to smooth out the best I can.
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: they don't make ardents in DD
  • 1 2
 @swenzowski: Yeah, I know. It's Exo+ that is not unholy crap. It all depends on rider.
  • 23 1
 The OG Forekaster is a great tire as is. It's my favorite trail tire. Been running them since they were introduced. Its fast, has great traction in most conditions and durable. Why make it heavier ? I haven't had any issues with the casing not being durable enough. Not stoked on the changes. Going to have to stock up on the OG tire.
  • 6 0
 @sofarider1 I also loved the O.G. Forekaster. I tried a Kenda Regolith SCT when I had trouble getting them during the pandemic shortages. Great alternative, hadn't run a Kenda in over a decade, was pleasantly surprised.

Also recently tried a Regolith / Karma2 Pro (front / rear) SCT combo. (Just make sure it's the new 2022 version of the Karma2 Pro) Has worked great.
  • 2 0
 Same here, stocked up on gen 1,
  • 7 0
 Agreed, not super happy with this move. They're uprating/upweighting the Forekaster into a Dissector without filling that niche in. Currently I run a Forekaster/Rekon and it's absolutely butter for wisconsin/minnesota XC and tech.
  • 10 0
 The general direction that riders are going is pushing their bikes more and more towards their limits and riding more aggressively. The older tire was definitely not a bad tire but this one is certainly better for what it is made for, a grippier but still relatively fast rolling tire. XC racers who love to get "rowdy" will like the first tire better, but rowdy riders who like to ride XC is the bigger demographic and that's who their focusing on.
  • 10 1
 As an addendum, if this is "better" than the old tire a DHF is even "better" and an Assegai is "better" than that. For a certain style of riding that adjective works, but the new tire is aiming for squarely a different market than the old.
  • 2 1
 @sofarider1 agree 100%. The v1 is awesome as an aggressive xc intermediate tire. Maxxis doesn't seem to be backfilling this segment, which is a shame. I'll run Assegai/DHRII/Dissector on the enduro rig all day long, but for the short travel whip the v1 is great blend of grip, rolling speed and weight.

@Maxxis pls develop a 29 intermediate mid-block 750g 2.35. New branding and launch... I'd buy me some Fivekasters.
  • 7 1
 @g123: your enduro rig has 3 wheels? Sick!
  • 3 3
 My cynical side is wondering if the moulds were wearing out and it's very cheap to just cut everything a bit deeper to refresh them?
  • 4 1
 Yup. Completely agree. It was such a great tire. Too bad the industry has to cater to the current generation of mountain bikers with no real bike handling skills.
  • 3 0
 @krka73: THIS!

The Kenda Regolith has been a fantastic alternative to me and others who like the Forekaster, Nobby Nic, and the Bontrager XR4. Regolith SCT is way more durable than snakeskin, EXO casing or the XR4 casing. It is stiffer too. The lighter TR casing has been fantastic on the front of my Ripmo and I love it's suppleness yet surprisingly durable. Way better than the last gen Nobby Nic Snake skin on the front of another bike. The difference is the Regolith has more grip than any of these tires in our dry central Oregon climate.

Currently also trying the Karma 2 SCT rear end its brilliant. Very similar to the Forekaster but a lot burlier and more predictable side knobs. Going to get a Karma 2 TR front and Rush SCT rear for the short travel bike next. Likely 2.2s on 30mm ID rims. The other 2.4s on 34mm ID rims still have a nice round profile too. These Kenda 2.6s need 34mm or larger IMHO.

After experimenting a lot, I'm running Kenda tires on all of my bikes. Lighter but still tough, These new casings, and patterns are killer. Tread widths measure true to size on properly wide rims. Check out some YouTube reviews and you might find a decent coupon code too.
Way less than Maxxis and still cheaper than Specialized with the coupon.
  • 1 0
 @braydenkromis12: I get pretty rowdy. Given that I only weigh 150lbs and ride fairly smooth may translate to me being less abusive on my bikes and parts. I also do not consider the Forekaster to be an XC tire but more of trail tire that I run on my short to mid travel bikes. Assegais go on my long travel bikes. I don't own an XC bike
  • 2 0
 @sofarider1: I understand that the Forekaster isn't an XC tire, that's why I called it a tire for rowdy riders who happen to ride XC. It's a fast rolling trail tire, therefore it's about as little grip as a lot of the real rowdy riders would want. I also didn't mean that anyone didn't get rowdy, just that a lot of people aren't rowdy enough to be considered a rowdy rider, just a more aggressive XC rider.
  • 1 0
 @jymontoya:

I have 2 Nevegal 2 EMC and one Hellkat ATC and while I agree with most of you said (I have been very happy with the weight, strength and grip) all 3 tires have developed some wobble after a couple of months. I had to throw one Nevegal away because it was just too much vibration. I had this phenomenon on some old Maxxis dual exo in the past but nothing with other brands like Spe, Continental or newest Maxxis
  • 1 0
 @G-Sport: could be the case, why not
  • 22 2
 Marketing: Take the best lightweight sloppy condition XC/trail tire in the game, make it half a pound heavier, narrower, and slower. Then obfuscate all that behind "downcountry" verbiage. HOT!
  • 18 1
 It's like they're trying to help Specialized sell more Ground Controls?
  • 17 2
 I want a tire named the spellkaster. then I'll show the LARPers in my woods whats up, just like the prehistoric dog video from redfang.
  • 2 1
 Ummmm...... what???
  • 4 1
 @blazersdad89: Here's the referenced video, no idea why we can't just let the LARPers LARP in peace. www.youtube.com/watch?v=VufilzHKTqk
  • 3 0
 A Redfang reference on Pinkbike!? Today is a good day.

If you haven't heard of these guys, check out some of their videos. They are gold and the music is awesome!!
  • 1 0
 @jeffrocx: Them hanging out the woods pretending like they're a wizard is no weirder than us hanging out in the woods pretending like we're Remy Metaillier.
  • 15 0
 My 2.6 magic marry was 870 grams not so long ago LOL
  • 1 0
 Schwalbe added Magic Mary in Super Ground casing - shall be withing 1100g (if not 1050g).
  • 1 0
 It was probably long ago, I have a 2.35 650b Mary, it weighs 1150g. That tire is 6 years old.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Not that long ago, just depends on the casing. Until a couple of years ago the MM was available in SnakeSkin and it weighed around what the OP said. It was a nice front trail tyre, shame they dropped it. Your 1150g is likely in SuperGravity.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: It was addix so within last 3 years
  • 11 0
 This reads like an add for the Ground Control.
  • 7 0
 it's seriously such a good tire and runs about $20-30 less than Maxxis too. Been running em on trail bikes for yrs
  • 7 0
 For this use case, here is what I decided to do:

Rear: Schwalbe Wicked Will Super Trail Addix SpeedGrip 29 x 2.4 - 920g
Front: Scwhwalbe Nobby Nic Super Ground Addix Soft 29 x 2.4 - 850g

seemed like I get a fast rolling, tough (super trail) rear and a grippier front.

Did I do it right? or, did I do it wrong?
  • 2 0
 That is where I'm heading once I have worn my current Rekon. Fast rolling and supportive out back, more supple and open tread up front where it is needed most. Makes sense to me...
  • 2 0
 I’m running Wicked Will in the back with Hans Dampf front both 2.4. @MikeKazimer thoughts on the WW are spot on IME but once you get used to mitigating it’s weakness with technique it’s pretty fun on the back. I’m really digging the looks of this tire. Can’t waits for them to release it in a EXO+ casing. Would like to try it on the front as it is now along with whatever their fastest rolling EXO+ tire is. I think that would be perfect for Midwest flatland
  • 3 0
 Yup that is the setup!
  • 2 0
 same. great setup for the ripley.
  • 9 0
 I don't know why they call this an XC tire. At 915g for a low-volume 2.3" and a slow-rolling tread pattern, there's nothing XC about it.
  • 12 4
 And how do they compare to a Dissector? The Dissector is amazing. Rolls way faster than a DHR, doesn’t brake or corner much worse.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I'm running dual dissectors on my Epic Evo right now, which is a perfect combo for trail conditions out here. I also love Ground Control, but I was shredding them way too often. Haven't had that problem yet with the Dissectors and, as you point out, they're a pretty fast tire and brake very well.
  • 3 0
 @RogerMexico: they also last a long time. I’ve never gotten more than 500-700 out of a rear (Clyde) and I got almost 1,200 out of my last dissector
  • 3 0
 @RogerMexico: I have a Dissector on the front of my EVO. Still running an Agressor in the back. Considering the dual Dissector or this thing in the back. Any thoughts on Aggressor vs. Dissector in the back, re. RR and cornering?

Also, still 50-50 if the Dissector is actually faster than the DHF, cornering feels a smidge off or at least different.
  • 8 0
 Maybe when they're new but the side knobs quickly undercut and start folding in corners unpredictably. Much better tires out there that roll just as quickly.
  • 9 0
 @bigwheels87: I never really liked the Aggressor. It does everything “ok” but not great. It’s barely faster than a DHR but brakes and corners worse and weighs just as much. Dissector is better in every way. I’ve been on DHF front/Dissector rear for a little over a year now and no plans to change.
  • 3 0
 @Alias530: agreed. I am not a fan of brake traction with the aggressors.
  • 2 1
 @RogerMexico: I'm also running dual Dissectors on my new Top Fuel. They are way faster rolling than my other bike with Assegai/DHR combo, brake well, and still rip through turns well/predictable. I feel like I'd need to drop to a Rekon to really see a difference in rolling speed.
  • 6 0
 @bigwheels87: I actually went Dissector front and Aggressor back before moving to dual Dissectors. It's definitely a matter of preference, but I always struggled with braking on the Aggressors.
  • 4 0
 @RogerMexico: Thanks! I've never minded Aggressors' braking but usually riding east coast stuff so rear braking traction is rarely an issue.
  • 1 0
 deleted duplicate comment.
  • 2 0
 I just don’t get why they released the new Forekaster, when they already had the Dissector. The Dissector is actually lighter and almost certainly very close in rolling speed.
The only reason I can think of is that the suits desperately wanted something they can market as “Down Country!”.
  • 7 0
 @Alias530: Really? A Maxxgrip Dissector usually lasts like 10 days at bikepark. Dhr2 usually lasts 3 weeks ij my experience
(Also don't buy Maxxgrip for bikepark)
  • 8 0
 @Alias530: I couldn't dissagree with you more on the Dissector's longevity... the side knobs seem wear out for me without even riding them. I can usually get a full year out of a DHRII but go through 2 Dissectors in the same amount of time.

That said, I've been running a Dissector out back with a DHRII up front for the past 2 years and this is the best performing trail tire combo I've ever used! The Dissector even does deceivingly good in the PNW winters since it sheds mud so well.
  • 2 1
 @bigwheels87: Stick with Spesh... the Eliminator is very similar to the Dissector. 2/3 the price!
  • 2 0
 @Bikerdude137: this for sure. I thk its about where you run them... on trail they last me pretty well on the front, but as a rear in the park, the sideknobs lose interest in staying on the casing after a handful of rides. Ride the same everywhere, but the park just has the speed and features to remove Dissector sideknobs immediately.
  • 7 0
 @millsr4: The side knobs on the Dissector do tear almost immediately. Brilliant tire otherwise it’s too bad.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: yep, definitely a decision from the suits.
  • 3 0
 @ZSchnei: Give a rekon rear a try. i've been running a dissector front and rekon rear for trail bike needs for a bit now and love it! Rekon on the front was not my thing at all, but as a rear its ideal for my trail needs.
  • 2 0
 Tried running the Dissector on the rear recently, and they get schralped way too quickly. I want to like them, but they don't last long enough. DHR2 is also a far, far superior tire for control (race braking heavily with the rear brake), whereas the Dissector encourages too much front braking. I would rather run an Aggessor in the rear for a drifty + long lasting tire.
  • 1 1
 Ha, I tried the Dissector and felt exactly the opposite. Doesn’t roll much faster than DHR and much worse traction.
  • 2 0
 @bikerdude137 @millsr4 I'm talking about the 29x2.4 dual compound one ridden on trails. Are you two riding the 3C model at bike parks? That could explain the difference. I got ~1,200 miles out of my dual compound one and I'm 220lbs.
  • 1 0
 @Alias530: I am running the 3C MaxxTerra but it's on a 120/140 trail bike that has never seen a bike park. My comment was in comparison to a DHRII in 3C MaxxTerra that was run on the same trails for the same amount of time. I also live in the PNW which is not particularly hard on tires with our softer ground and rounded rocks.
  • 5 0
 Jumping in here with a few random observations, for reference my big bike (SC megatower) I'm running Assegai front Dissector rear, and on my trail bike (TR Spur) I'm running Dissector front and Rekon rear.

I love the dissector on the rear. It rolls fast, is light, and corners well. One of my favorite rear tires to date and prefer it to my second favorite a DHRII. I too find they wear incredibly fast, I'm tearing off cornering nobs within a few weeks and am going through them really quickly, already on my second one of the year, but like the tire enough to deal with it.

On the front, and note I only have a few rides on the bike so far, I am not getting along so well with it. I feel the lack of transition from the center to the cornering nobs is way too big and you can feel the tire drift badly when you initiate a turn until the cornering nobs catch. Haven't crashed because of it yet, and some of it is just adjusting from a high grip setup to an xc oriented setup, but not a fan so far.

I'm thinking of trying the Forekaster on the front as it has a better transition, but worried it may be too fast rolling for my riding. Not sure what else I'd try over the Dissector in the front to maintain a similar level of grip without going to a very heavy DHRII.

I hate the aggressor lol.
  • 2 0
 I don't get all the love the Dissectors get as rear tire. For me at least the side knobs aren't adequately supportive- they give you the false impression that they'll hold, but then they fold away on you unexpectedly and you're left with nothing. I'm in NorCal though, the land of no loam... maybe they work better in the PNW? I'm back to Rekons as my go-fast trailbike rear tire. They don't brake as well as the Dissector, but I think they corner just as well IRL (at least for the dirt I ride) and they're fast as hell.
  • 1 0
 @quehill: You are making a great point, tire choice in large part comes down to what terrain you are using them in. The only reason the Dissector last long enough for me to be ok with it is because I'm in the PNW, I most likely wouldn't run it somewhere like UT or CA. You are probably right about the cornering support and the dirt too, my back end definitely gets more drifty as the trails dry out.
  • 2 1
 Dissector suuuuucks. To be more specific, it's a nice rear for about 10 rides, then all the side knobs get undercut and it loses all cornering support. Sketchy AF. It's dies a quick death for aggressive riders over maybe 160 lbs. Possibly a great tire for lightweights and people who have a mellower cornering style.
  • 4 0
 @tgent: Try the Eliminator (T9 for front, T7 for rear). Bigger supported side knobs, no transition zone, lots of grip, better in the wet, and rolls just as well. Also, it's cheaper.
  • 2 0
 @millsr4: I see. I've only ever tried dual compound of either of them as a rear and was ~20lbs heavier the last time I ran a DHR so that could have something to do with the wear. 3C only for the front for me.
  • 1 0
 @Alias530: same here, OEM DHF/Agressor, just waiting to wear out the Agressor
  • 2 0
 @ruggedmaine: Dissector front/ Rekon rear is what I'm running on my trail bike right now. Our trails close when wet so I only really ever ride dry and dusty conditions and they do that well. The cornering grip certainly isn't as good as something like an Assegai or DHF, but I actually kind of find that fun. It means I can actually work on cornering technique on my local trails which aren't particularly fast.
  • 6 0
 29er only, because no one with smaller wheels would want a tire like this. Seriously, there are plenty of riders with trail bikes that this would be a tire for if it came in 650b.
  • 4 0
 Likely coming. Most popular size get a mold first.
  • 5 0
 "the Ground Control is more like a beefed up XC tire, and the Forekaster is a slimmed down trail tire"

Maybe by tread, but Grid casing usually has a bit more sidewall support than EXO. If not running inserts, I'd much rather have a Grid tire up front than EXO, could save a couple psi to add traction. Of course, I'd need like 30 psi in the back to not unseat or just destroy either of those pretty quickly...
  • 1 0
 This. Blew up a carbon rim and still using the Ground Control tire, can't even see where the rock strike was.
  • 6 1
 I love the gen 1, for off season, and to use as front xc racing tire. It is lightweight and a great size at 2.35. I’m really disappointed. Not everyone wants a nuke proof 30lbs rig to ride. I love my lightweight xc rig.
  • 4 0
 I don’t know if this is just me but I found out as my braking and cornering skills have progressed I find tires like Assegais are kinda overkill in grip (at least in the MAXX Gripp) and I have started to prefer tires with much smaller lugs in the centre and faster rolling speed.
  • 5 0
 I go back and forth on this. 99% of the time I totally agree, but that 1% of the time the less grip can be the difference between being on the ground or not. Had this experience recently with some hikers who were not where they should have been, missed my DHR very much in that moment. Maybe I’m just getting old, but I’m starting to lean towards absolute grip/safety over faster rolling.
  • 2 1
 @Betacygni: Yes. I'm braking most of the time I'm going fast anyway so the only penalty is the extra energy on the climbs. But I guess that's why we have to buy ebikes now.
  • 1 0
 @Betacygni: It could also be my riding style I almost always brake in compressions and in fast quick bursts.
  • 7 0
 50% rekon + 50% dissector = 100% forekaster v2
  • 8 0
 $93. lol
  • 5 0
 Looks like a Kenda Karma2, I wonder how they compare. The Kenda is a bit lighter and in stock even
  • 2 0
 I have been very surprised ( pleasantly so ) by the terevail Honcho 2.4 (light and supple casing) this year. At a measured 825-850g in the 29 * 2.4 I think they are a great comparison in this list based on tread pattern, weight and purpose. I would have never even considered them having always trusted the usual suspects of maxxis and schwalbe (for good reason). I have been riding everything that I rode with exo+ maxxis (agassai fr / aggressor rear ) with zero issues. The roll obviously fast, save measurable weight on honest grip very well with predictable break points. The only big difference is moving up 2-4 psi in both front and rear to offset the casing thickness. ( from 18/20 to 21/23 ). Seriously lets put them in the shootout !
  • 5 1
 hey gang.
This tire is not heavier to make it better or more durable. It is heavier to satisfy e-bike standards because that's who is paying the bills at LBS. (sadface)
  • 2 0
 I might just have to make the new Forekaster F/ Ground control R my next set of tires. Currently running Bonty xr4 team issue F/ Rekon R and the setup is so light and fast rolling, but lacks in cornering and braking. (Or maybe I should work on cornering and using my rear brake less, idk...)
  • 2 0
 "It's no secret that not all tires measure up to what the markings on the sidewall indicate. One of the reasons is that many companies, Maxxis included, measure tire widths at the maximum pressure, and take the reading from whichever part of the tire is wider, the casing or the tread."

Really, where did you get this information? Are you saying Maxxis is also posting false ETRTO numbers?

The ETRTO is listed as 61-622. 61mm = 2.402 inches.

last time I checked all maxxis tires are simply converting the ETRTO numbers to inches.
I seriously doubt they have a person with calipers measuring the tires after inflation.

This is the way it should be - it takes pressure and rim width out of the equation and has nothing to do with the size or placement of the knobs. It is a true measurement of casing size.
  • 5 0
 So does this sit in between a rekon and a dissector?
  • 3 0
 That's how I read it. Though I can't imagine every using this over the Dissector.
  • 1 0
 @deez-nucks: It depends on what you're looking for. To me, this seems like a much better option than the Dissector for the front of my short travel bike (running a Ground Control in the rear). I'm not a huge fan of the Dissector as a front tire because of the huge gap between the center and cornering knobs. It wasn't a big deal when I was running one front and rear, but I now have that up front and the Ground Control in the rear, and I find myself understeering unless I corner aggressively (to engage the cornering knobs quickly).

The Ground Control has ridden so well as a rear tire that I've been considering running them front and rear. Ideally, though, I'd like to find a tire with a similar tread pattern, but with larger knobs (and maybe a slightly wider width). This seems like it would be perfect, but It doesn't seem worth paying ~$80 when I've been getting the Ground Controls for ~$40.
  • 2 0
 @DaneL: "The Ground Control has ridden so well as a rear tire that I've been considering running them front and rear. Ideally, though, I'd like to find a tire with a similar tread pattern, but with larger knobs (and maybe a slightly wider width). This seems like it would be perfect, but It doesn't seem worth paying ~$80 when I've been getting the Ground Controls for ~$40."

Spesh Eliminator...
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: The Eliminator's tread pattern isn't exactly what I'm looking for, and it's narrower than I want (assuming it measures true to size). It seems like it would be a great rear tire for a more aggressive tire combo, though.

I'll honestly probably just run the Ground Controls front and rear and just put a fresh one on the front every time the rear wears out. It will probably have sufficient traction for a front tire for those first couple hundred miles of its life.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: I actually run the same combo on my Ripley and love it. I haven't noticed understeer from the dissector in the front. Completely agree with you about the Ground Control. That's a great rear tire. I have Grid t7 on the back, and ran it with a liner recently in Pisgah with no issues.

I like the Ground Control in the front too if the traction is good... if it's a little loose or wet, I don't feel like it holds up in the corners as well as I want. But just depends what you're going for on that particular day.

When I was in Pisgah I ran a 2.5 Assguy on the front. That was noticeably slower rolling, but hooks up about as well as any tire I've used.

Let me know when you find that perfect front tire for the ground control. I'll give it a shot.
  • 3 0
 @DaneL: Those Spec 2.3 non xc tires do run wider than advertised.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: The Eliminator is listed at 2.3, but measures a solid 2.4+. Its nearly identical to the Dissector, but with some transition knobs.
  • 3 0
 How do the cornering knobs compare to an Xr4? Seems like a tough sell given the extra weight but the XR4 isn't great in the wet.
  • 1 0
 The xr4 is super unpredictable and clogs immediately. I have owned 40-42 gravel tires from wtb that corner better on the same trails.
  • 2 0
 I've tried many of the DC front tire contenders and the XR4 is my favorite in this category. Keep in mind that I ride baked hardpack with a bunch of rocks and dust on top. A close second would be the Conti Cross King.

Syerra is a turd, as is the Dissector, the GC is especially a turd. I'll be passing on the Forekaster V2. These tires might work better if you have soft dirt to really bite in to.

Would like to test the NN & the Honcho next.

The best Enduro style front tire for me is the Tioga Edge 22 SOFT. 2nd favorite is the Mazza 2.6.
  • 3 0
 Ditched the previous version of the Forecaster for something beefier. Not enough traction and kept leaking PSI. Might have given this version a try if available sooner.
  • 1 0
 A very good front tire option is the 885 gram actual weight, Specialized Purgatory T7 29 x 2.3. The Ground Control is a no-man's land offering. Too heavy for XC, not meaty enough for trails. Specialized claims the GC Grid as 810 grams, nice to see Mike get an actual weight. Speci also claims the Purgatory Grid as 810 estimated.
  • 2 0
 I have weighted two GC grid 29x2.3, one was 915g and the other 900ish. They are nice but really heavy
  • 1 0
 Loved the Forekaster, used it for my rear tires previously. It's a great all-round trail tire, where I lived, especially in mud, but the thin sidewalls was always its weakness. Being a heavyset fellow, the sidewalls squirmed whenever I had to turn hard, it was a bit unnerving. If this solves that issue, I'm game to buy it after my current set wears out.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure they work great. They just look like they should, yea? Tire selection seems to be like shoes. Personal preference plays big. But to me - these look like they sit in that sweet spot so many tires occupy, somewhere between the bazillion tiny knobs, and the few massive buttes. However that works out - at least as important to me is durability. Especially at prices geared to make 13 yr old purchasers at any age, look like bling-coveting oblivious fools. I don't ride Minions any more. Not just about price - tho that's always a consideration. Gotta admit that here in the PNW, at my pedestrian pace, DHFs F&R, work well. Even with a DHR gracing the driver. But I got tired of putting fresh sharp ones on my bike at the beginning of the 6 month wet season, and finding that there was nothing sharp left of the knobs after a half dozen rides. Suddenly - and I mean that literally - I was skating more than riding. Not looking for a mud tire. Just a good all-around performer that'll give me a nice predictable feel for the whole dang wetness. So. Hey. Other brands. Other models, right? Very happy to have sharp knobs pretty much all wetness, now. Still with good wet-root adhesion. And just fine theough the 6 month dryness. Same story when I was running the big M on my offroad motorbikes. No matter how beat up the tires - they worked good in the dry. But be nice if I could have got through the wetness without needing to purchase two sets of tires. So what's the dealio? Any sense of how these brand new redesigned $100 cushions are gonna hold up? Why should I shell-out almost $200 for a set of tires that'll give me crap durability, in the face if other good performers that'll hold up like champs over the course of the wetness z and work as well as any in the dry? That big gold sand-dollar-shaped M medallion hanging from the chain around my neck?
  • 2 0
 How would the new Forecaster stack up against an Ardent? I feel like that would be the next most comparable tire in the Maxxis lineup
  • 5 0
 I think the Rekon is the modern Ardent. either way, I think the Forekaster probably is better in soft, sheds mud and corners better than those two.... but rolls slower.
  • 4 2
 Well only problem is the casing. Maxxis trail cassings just aren’t up to snuff imho. Love the tread patterns but tear exo+ cassings like lawn darts through cardboard.
  • 3 0
 DD casings for the win. Wish Maxxis’ racier treads were available with DD.

On the rocky chunder I ride, a faster rolling tire would be fine….if it wasn’t sliced open like a gutted fish on a granite flake.
  • 3 0
 So, I know I'm so 2018 here but...27.5" please, if you're reading this, Maxxis. My Thunderbolt wants this...
  • 3 0
 Any reason why the Maxxis and Schwalbe tires cost some $30 more than the Spesh?
  • 2 0
 Would have really liked to see the Syerra in that comparison at the end. Or at least how the Syerra and Ground Control compare.
  • 3 0
 Schwalbe's Nobby Nic seems to be the more suitable comparison rather than the Wicked Will.
  • 2 0
 Dear Maxxis, please change the name of the tire when coming out w a new tread design. Maybe Forekaster II or something to help difftentiate
  • 1 0
 All my bitching aside i like the tread pattern and wouldnt mind experimenting w these. Looks like a great front tire for mid travel bikes. I think i’d prefer to run a faster rolling tread for the rear though
  • 1 0
 How does it compare to a Rekon 2.4? (Off a Minions, I managed the Rekons traction on the rear paired to a Dissector up front, but the 2ply casing wasn't strong enough and I've had to Manny flats)
  • 1 0
 Have all the Maxxis tires gone way up in weight? My usual Aggressor DD has gone from 1180g to 1325g and Assegai DD are up around 100g. Not insignificant for rotational weight. DH Assegai's are pushing 1500 grams now.
  • 1 0
 Had my $$$$ at the Headline: Heavier, Better, More expensive, and backprdered. As I good American, I vow to give you my money, to get nothing for 6 months, only to be told it’s now going to be 12 months.
  • 3 1
 or just run the Vittoria Syerra at 2.4 actual and 830g with burly 60tpi trail casing.
  • 3 0
 I'll get some once I find out a way to black out the enormous red logos
  • 1 0
 @rusty904: Black leather dye works pretty well for that.
  • 2 0
 @rusty904: yeah-choosing the best performing tire the hot patch is THE deciding criterion.

Because every other rider will judge you by your hot patches.

Or you won’t be able to sleep-thinking about your hot patches.

It’s a big deal!!
  • 5 1
 Maxxis is the new Kenda
  • 1 0
 Except the exact opposite. The new Kenda tires are fast AF, but lack traction.
  • 3 2
 Unsprung weight: bad. Rotational weight: worse. Unsprung rotational weight at the very farthest point: worst. So this is not at all a "weight weenie" thing.
  • 2 0
 Tread pattern, knob heigh/size, and compound all matter so much more for rolling resistance.
  • 2 0
 @deez-nucks: I don’t disagree, I just take issue with the author dismissing it like he did. It ain’t no small thing.
  • 1 0
 @deez-nucks: Overall rolling resistance from the tread style is def the biggest factor. On my last bike I had a pair of hans dampfs on a very heavy alu wheelset(~2300g). I changed the tires to a teravail ehline f and a maxxis ardent r and the difference was night and day even though the weights between the tires wasn't that much.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer so a good option when switching tires from usual Whistler trail riding to heading out for some days in the Chilcotins?
  • 5 0
 Yep, it could work for that, although it'd be nice if there was an EXO+ version just for the added peace of mind. The Chilcotins aren't super chunky, but if there's one thing I hate it's fixing a flat in the middle of nowhere and getting attacked by bugs at the same time.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: and even a DD one for, hem, very muscled people.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Picaridan bug wipes. I have 3 packets stashed in my SWAT. Life savers.
  • 5 1
 Maxxis Foreskin
  • 1 0
 Put me in the I-like-the-original-Forekaster group. I’m a pansy rider so any more grip is unnecessary, and I’m a whimp so extra weight only slows me down.
  • 3 2
 Plenty of other choices will get you down the bike path to the coffee shop.
  • 3 0
 To sum up: Heavy, narrow, and not fast.
  • 2 0
 So what are British riders meant to use in the winter? The Forekaster was a great wet weather / light mud XC tyre.
  • 1 0
 I thought you guys all used dual Mary's year round
  • 1 0
 I wish they would bring back the ADvantage tread pattern- rolls great and bigger side knobs than a Minion DHF in the 2.4 width... I think that tire was ahead of its time.
  • 5 3
 Forekasting says a lot of flats to be expected
  • 3 1
 I want a 2.4wt ardent race
  • 1 0
 "but still want plenty of traction traction"

That must be a lot of traction....traction^2
  • 2 0
 Next week on Win in Wednesday… 2 pairs - Value: 321$….
  • 1 0
 Considering the weight and intended purpose, I’d like to know how these compare to Aggressors.
  • 2 0
 Did I miss the commentary about how it works as a rear tire?
  • 2 0
 90+ bucks for a tire? Is someone f....d up? This is not a funny joke
  • 2 0
 Skin wall Assegai in dd please !
  • 2 0
 They should make a tan-wall version and name it the "Foreskin".
  • 2 0
 That's pretty neat.
  • 2 1
 Should make a Flueckin’ Forekaster limited run of these…..
  • 2 0
 Another con - expensive
  • 1 0
 Yeah, looks like a Schwalbe
  • 5 3
 Another ruined xc tyre.
  • 1 2
 just wear even less lycra to make up for it
  • 3 4
 Plenty of other choices to get you to the coffee shop.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. They need to keep making tires with more grip to cater to the enduro bros that lack any bike handling skills.
  • 1 0
 @mrkumro: as if I'm ever gonna turn down more grip hah
  • 1 0
 Ya, but does it come in tan...
  • 1 0
 the ground control does
  • 1 0
 Looks just like my Magic Marys
  • 1 0
 I just wish the MaxxTerra version was available before 2023.
  • 1 0
 Avast ye matey! We have a new boat anchor of a tire!
  • 2 0
 Wagon wheel only
  • 1 0
 so this tire sits in between the dissector and the rekon?
  • 4 1
 Yep, that's correct.
  • 1 0
 At that weight I'd rather have the Edge 22.
  • 1 0
 Next thing you know we’ll have the “new DHF”
  • 1 0
 Actually, I may not know what I am talking about...
  • 1 0
 omg no 26"!
  • 1 0
 Down country tyre?
  • 1 0
 Translation: Not serious enough for a trail bike, too slow and heavy for xc.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Nobby Nic.
  • 1 1
 Hey Maxxis, make it DD please, xc rider don't all weight 50kg
  • 5 0
 Do you really want a 1100gr tire for XC?
  • 1 3
 @nozes: absolutely.
  • 1 3
 Didn’t we have this review posted last week?
  • 3 0
 No, it was a product intro.
  • 2 5
 @Joecx: ta. You will forgive me, they’re practically indistinguishable on this site.
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