Review: Stan's Flow EX3 Alloy Wheels

Aug 20, 2019 at 14:36
by Mike Kazimer  
Stan s Flow EX3


Carbon may still be hogging the spotlight these days, but aluminum rims have never gone out of style. Whether you're an enduro racer who simply can't afford to risk having a broken rim dash those podium dreams, or a non-competitive type who's unable to justify purchasing pricey plastic, a durable aluminum wheelset makes a lot of sense.

Stan's Flow EX3 wheelset is aimed at enduro and DH riders, with a new design that combines the elements of the previous Flow EX and MK3 rims. During their in-house testing, Stan's found that the older Flow EX rims were withstanding impacts better than the MK3 rims, despite the fact that the MK3 rims used a stronger 6069 aluminum alloy. Further investigation led them to the conclusion that it was the Flow EX's Tiebeam, the internal bridge that runs between the sidewalls, that was helping the them perform so well.

Flow EX3 Wheelset Details

• 29mm internal rim width
• 6069 aluminum rims
• Neos Durasync hubs, 10° engagment
• 27.5" or 29" options
• 32-hole
• Sapim D-Light spokes
• Weight: 2,150g (29") / 1,000g F / 1,150 R
• MSRP: $699 USD
www.notubes.com


The Flow EX3's rim design combines traits from the EX and MK3 rims.

Stan s Flow EX3
The 29mm internal rim width is intended for tires between 2.35 and 2.8"
Stan s Flow EX3
The wheels come pre-taped with tubeless valves installed.


The new Flow EX3 rims are made from 6069 aluminum and use that Tiebeam design, along with a thicker spoke bed, to help them withstand all the pummeling that aggressive riders can dish out. The 29mm internal width is designed to work best with tires from 2.35” to 2.8”.

The rims are laced with 32 J-bend Sapim spokes to Stan's own Neo OS Durasync hubs. The freehub body has 6 leaf-spring-loaded pawls that all engage simultaneously with a 36 tooth steel ratchet ring, which equates to 10-degrees of movement between engagement points.

Available in 27.5” and 29” diameters, the wheelset retails for $699 USD. There are 12x148, 12x142, and 12x157mmm rear axle options, and all 15x110mm front hubs also include 20mm end-caps.


Stan s Flow EX3
Stan s Flow EX3
Stan's Neo Durasync hub uses 6 pawls and a 36-tooth steel ratchet ring.

Ride Impressions

The Flow EX3 wheels come pre-taped with tubeless valves already installed, which made getting them ready to roll a quick and easy procedure. I've had multiple tires on these wheels over the course of testing, everything from DH-casing Maxxis Minions to Michelin's Wild Enduro tires, and in all cases they sealed up and popped into place with a floor pump and minimal effort.

The wheels have also seen a wide range of riding conditions, including laps in the Whistler Bike Park mounted on a DH bike (props to Specialized for giving the new Demo 12x148 spacing), and lots of long, non-lift served rides on a trail bike. The wheels have a solid and comfortable feel to them; this is the kind of wheelset that fades to the background once it's installed, despite the fact that it's not exactly the lightest option out there. They never felt harsh, but they're also stiff enough to avoid any unwanted flexiness or vague handling.

I'd classify my riding style as relatively smooth rather than smashy, but I'll usually still end up with a few dents and dings in a set of aluminum rims, especially if I've been riding the bike park. That wasn't the case this time, and after more than four months of riding both rims are still running true and dent free. They have required a couple trips to the truing stand to add more spoke tension, which is something to pay attention to, especially if you're putting in a bunch of downhill laps.

The Neo hubs have held up much better than the last set that I spent time on. The bearings are all still running smoothly, and there haven't been any disconcerting pops or noises when cranking up steep climbs. Yes, there are faster engaging options out there, but 10-degrees between engagement points is still relatively low, and I never found myself thinking, “I could totally clean that section of trail if only my hubs engaged quicker...”



Pros

+ Durable, DH-worthy rims
+ No proprietary or straight pull spokes
+ Very easy tubeless tire installation

Cons

- Not the wheels to choose if you're counting grams
- Need to pay attention to spoke tension



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesStan's Flow EX3 wheels have proven to be tough and reliable, which is exactly what you want from a wheelset designed for DH and enduro racing. Even if you're allergic to starting lines or organized events of any kind, they're a worthwhile, reasonably priced option, one that's capable of handling a substantial amount of abuse without any issues.  Mike Kazimer








130 Comments

  • 88 15
 A durable set of aluminium wheels doesnt make "a lot of sense" at all...its is TOTAL sense!!!! Its cheaper, performs just as well and will defintely last longer and be less prone to rock strikes etc. Why anyone would spend £2000 on a set of plastic wheels when they can spend £400 on a great set of aluminium wheel mind boggles me!
  • 70 3
 Its a well known fact that aluminum rims are better at avoiding rock strikes 60% of the time always.
  • 34 1
 @scottyrides5: I've done some research and talked to a good number of people running superlight aluminium road cycling rims. Without exception none of them has ever suffered from a rock strike. Not a single one, pretty incredible stuff. Full report will follow soonish.
  • 11 14
 Right then, I need some new wheels so I want to see the £400 wheels that are just as good as the £2000 wheels. Looking forward to seeing what must be an extensive list!
  • 17 1
 @scottyrides5: 60% of the time, it works everytime...
  • 12 5
 @kingtut87: Fill your boots, i have bought great wheelsets for around £400, Hope Hoops on Stans flow rims for a starter. Bet they would out last Enve stuff all day long.
  • 9 0
 @kingtut87: if you're actually looking, you can get some great deals from build-to-order wheelbuilders on ebay. Or better yet build them up yourself.

I've never ridden a $2k wheelset so I'm not in a position to say if it's "better".... but if Flow+Hope, Flow+DT, Frequency+DT, Spank+Hope, etc isn't good enough, you must be some hot shit. And it'll cost you way less than carbon (except maybe some of the chinese brands).
  • 8 9
 Well, technically they're not *plastic*...
  • 17 4
 Rotating weight. But I agree that the price people spend on Enve's and the like is insane... Most brands are just re-branded Chinese carbon. Do yourself a favor, find some reliable Chinese carbon yourself, like Nextie or Light Bicycle, and add some DT 350 or Hope's. They'll be just as good as the 2k-3k wheels and you can get them under 1k.
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: Thats a fair point!
  • 3 1
 @bkm303: I had my eyelets all crack on a set of spank rims like 6 months after I got them. I assume they botched the heat treating process. They ignored my e-mails though and I gave up trying to get them warrantied.
  • 3 3
 @stumphumper92: Which brands are rebranded Chinese carbon?
  • 1 0
 @scottyrides5: 60% of the time, it works every time.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: good to know. People I know seem pretty stoked on them and have been riding them pretty hard for multiple years, but idk how old/new their rims are. Weight/cost for the Spanks seem pretty great but I don't have personal experience with them (I have WTB).
  • 6 1
 @bkm303: That's the thing. I have ridden $2k wheelsets. And they've all been better than the usual things thrown around. A good chunk of the cost is in the hubs, which a lot of commenters always seem to forget and the rims have all felt 'better' to me too (I'll happily admin that better is subjective). That's a different thing from being 'good enough' and it's also a different thing from being worth the extra cash.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: They could still be decent. I mean a 0.01% defect rate would be pretty good maybe I just got unlucky. Perhaps too they just lost the e-mail or forgot to respond. I was not real persistent. But it was enough for me to decide to looks elsewhere for rims.
  • 4 0
 @kingtut87: how do you define good? ive had a set of sub £400 dt swiss wheels for 18 months with no issues at all, in the same period ive relaced 4 DT swiss carbon wheels with broken rims.
  • 9 0
 @kingtut87: guess I'm coming at it from a different perspective. I've ridden a couple expensive high POE hubs, and while it's fun to hear the obnoxious hiss and know that it's well made, I can't actually say it was "better" for my actual riding than a durable 36 POE ratchet hub. As with everything it's all about how you define "good", but I'd go so far as to say for most riders the $700 wheelset (or better yet a DIY build for less) is no less fit for purpose (ie. "as good") than the $2k wheelset. A ferrari is nicer than my subaru but it's not better for what I use a car for.

(Disclaimer: there's nothing wrong with liking nice things, and I know there are people out there who shred way harder than me and need 2° engagement for whatever reason, etc etc)
  • 3 11
flag rh00p (Aug 23, 2019 at 9:32) (Below Threshold)
 @stumphumper92: "reliable Chinese carbon". Oxymoron of the day.
  • 5 0
 “Oh, people can make up statistics to prove anything, Kent. 40% of people know that “
  • 3 0
 @slish: You can safely multiply that number by 100%.
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92:

see, stumphumper gets it!
  • 3 0
 @kingtut87: I notice nobody has provided wheels that are 'just as good'. Many cheaper and better value wheel sets, sure, but just as good? None that I see.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: For the terrain I ride, janky, often slow speed, the extra POE make a difference. I've cleaned climbs on I9 hubs and Chris King hubs that I usually stall on.

If we're defining 'as good' as fit for purpose then yeah, sure, you've got a point, but I think in most situations 'as good' goes beyond that.
  • 2 0
 @Garethccc: CFRP = Carbon Fibre Reinforced PLASTIC.

Sorry to nitpic but they are technically plastic matrix composites!
  • 3 0
 @gmt: Correct, a composite material. I was objecting to his use of a pejorative - "plastic". They are not plastic, they are carbon fibre reinforced polymer/plastic. Two very different things. Sorry to nitpick.
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: I know it comes up every time we talk carbon wheels, but I gotta be a hometown booster: We Are One Composites - made in Kamloops BC, No BS warranty and at $1275 canuck bucks they're under a grand US with enough left over to buy a couple cases of beer.
  • 2 4
 @Garethccc: Gloried plastic, never as good as metal.
  • 1 1
 In terms of the weight argument, carbon is not really lighter is it. If you get a tough set of carbon wheels that are made to stand the abuse, they’re 2kg a set. Much like alloy.
  • 37 2
 *pinkbike commenters* WE NEED MORE ALLOY WHEEL SET REVIEWS
*also pinkbike commenters* THESE ARE TOO HEAVY AND EXPENSIVE
  • 12 3
 You mean compared to the carbon ones which are too heavy and even more expensive?

Plus, the bar has been set pretty high by the Newmen alu wheels which PB tested a while ago.
  • 4 3
 @Ttimer: you dont go to carbon for light weight on MTB.. you go for the major stiffness increase
  • 1 0
 @TylerG96: and if you’re buying the right brand, lack of spike tension maintenance required. I’m on 2500 miles with my Ibis carbons and I’ve put them in the stand twice, both times I couldn’t find a spoke to tweak.
  • 2 0
 @pr-g: this.
wheel stiffness is a double-edged sword, but not truing & tensioning spokes is the main win for me.
  • 24 1
 32 j bend spokes, just the way it should be for mtb wheels
  • 20 3
 Had Stan Flows for years after leaving DT Dwiss but the later Flows cracked around the eyelets. Now have gone back to DT Swiss at the recommendation of my wheel builder. Maybe I’ll come full circle ...again. Watching with interest. Don’tgive a shit about ‘grams’ just want somethings reliable and sturdy.
  • 13 1
 The problem with cracking rims around eyelets was caused by too much spoke tension. Now, with tensions tools so popular it should not be a problem.
  • 19 1
 Interesting as Stans Flow rims don't have eyelets
  • 10 3
 @mihauek: nah they don't have enough material/referment around the eyelets, that's why they crack not spoke tension
  • 3 1
 @ctd07: Not to split hairs, but I have their cheaper Flow S1 wheel set with rims equipped with eyelets. Mk3 rims do not have eyelets.
  • 11 0
 Yep. Same. MK3 rims all cracked around eyelets. First two at recommended tension. Replacement rims set at a lower tension. Still cracked. Now gone to DT swiss. No issues so far.
  • 3 0
 Same problem on my e13 (trs) rims.
  • 9 0
 Yeap, I had MK3 split around the spoke holes very quickly from new. CRC wouldn’t honour the warranty, so that sucked. I think twice before ordering from overseas now. But i also remember all the Stans hype, about how much stronger MK3’s where over the EX. All lab tested, what garbage. We ate all that marketing crap up it too.
  • 11 0
 @up-left-down-right: I can still taste the shit they shoveled...never mind they also had the new rim marked the same as the MK3 last year for a little false advertising. At this point why would anyone buy anything other then an EX511?
  • 3 0
 @Clem-mk: on my e13 rims it showed even next to a tube valve, so those rims were made out of butter I guess
  • 12 5
 "just want somethings reliable and sturdy." = Spank.
  • 4 0
 @up-left-down-right: Interesting, I had a MK3 with the same issue from CRC and they warrantied it no question ???? EX511 since, they're solid.
  • 1 0
 @mtbpro661: totally agree. At 65 kg I manage to broke 2 front rims (WTB one´s) by cracked rims at the spokes.
  • 3 0
 @Eatsdirt: to be fair to Stans, EX wheels were available with the DH spaced hubs while MK3 were not, as they were not for DH.
  • 2 1
 @mihauek: My wheel builder adds a small washer to each nipple nowadays to help prevent this very issue of rims cracking at the eyelet.
  • 7 0
 @Eatsdirt: ..because you want to run 2.3 tires. In which case ex471
  • 5 0
 @mihauek: Had a set of flow mk3's and a set of Arch Mk3's crack at the spoke hole. Stan's told me it was tension too, however both wheels were built up to 100kgf, and are rated to 125kgf, So i call bull. Will never buy stan's hoops again.
  • 3 0
 @gnarnaimo: Nuthin wrong with that!
  • 2 0
 Had two sets of crest MK3 on my commuter where the nipples pulled through the rim in about 3 months and have seen the archs with this issue too. Spoke tension was definitely not above recommended. Know people riding the flow MK3s for quite some time without this issue though. Had flows exs and original flows for years without any issues. I am now a bit wary of Stans rims. For stans pre-built wheelsets constantly needing to re-tension has been an issue for years. Makes me wonder if either they are cheaping out on spoke prep or wheel tensioning or whether the drilling of the rims is an issue.
  • 3 0
 I use the Newmen washers
  • 13 1
 Why, oh why would anyone get this next to DT Swiss or Newmen wheels that cost the same, weigh 20% less, and have much better and more robust hubs.

Ratchet based freehub has much better load spread and much bigger contact surface compared to pawl systems.

These porky wheels come with weight weenie D-Light 2.0-1.5 spokes, the ones you'd expect to find on 1600-1800gr wheelset. They're in no way heavy duty or DH rated spokes.

You can pick up something like Giant or Roval low end 30mm alu wheels that are take offs and people sell them for 100-150$. Engagement isn't much worse, use normal spokes and have good quality rims. The weight is the same but they're 4-6x cheaper.
  • 1 0
 Do you have bad experience with these spokes or do you just not trust them? Unless something changed, Stans rims don't accept high tire pressures (so no ProCore or anything) so there is no need for high spoke tension to counter such pressures. I've never seen a spoke break in the thinnest section either. In fact I prefer butted spokes because it redirects most strain to the thinnest section which alleviates the more vulnerable ends (the bend and the thread) from fatigue. And as I've seen quite a few comments on these wheels being subject to spoke hole failure, maybe the increased flexibility of the low profile rims works best with thinner spokes under less preload. Yes I know the theories from Specialized etc that spoke tension doesn't matter but that's merely based on the assumption that rims don't flex. It doesn't quite hold for low profile rims from Stans, Zipp etc.
  • 1 0
 I agree, price to performance wise there are much better options. Not just the complete Newmen and DT ones, many online retailers also sell decent wheelbuilds using a mix of parts. I would argue that the EX3 are pretty good if you need strong rims, just have them laced to DT hubs using mid-weight butted spokes.
  • 3 0
 Roval alu and good quality shouldn't ever be used in the same thought..... Those are the softest, flexiest rims I've ever used.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: that "redirection" does not exist... all of those sections (bend, midspoke, thread etc...) will bear the same force.
  • 2 0
 Agree. $699 for a heavy (DH heavy) wheelset with average engagement is not great. I’ve had a bunch of issues with Stans hubs in the past as well. Pass.
  • 2 0
 yeah, get some bontys line 30, buy more springs and ratchets and forget about it.
  • 3 0
 @Davichin: Yes, you're correct. But I wasn't talking about force, but about strain which is proportional to stress, which is inversely proportional to cross section area, which is squarely proportional to spoke diameter. So again, the thinner part of the spoke is subject more stress and strain than the ends. The confusion in conversation and articles is because when people talk about "tension" they can either mean "tensile force" or "tensile stress".
  • 1 1
 I've had great luck with a used set of Roval Traverse wheels. Got them for a song too.
  • 2 0
 "These porky wheels come with weight weenie D-Light 2.0-1.5 spokes"

They are 2.0-1.65
  • 11 1
 For the 2200 gr $700 is expensive; there are cheaper and stronger options in this weight, also for the bike park poe is not that critical;
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh For those who might be in the market, any chance you could elaborate on the "cheaper and stronger options" bit?
  • 3 1
 @iduckett: Halo Vortex
  • 8 1
 @iduckett: custom build from prowheelbuilder.com, dt rims and hope hubs
  • 1 0
 @CullenHerring: Wow, sick site! I like how they lay out starting/max prices, and component prices are fully broken down. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: yeah no problem! I've bought 3 sets of wheels through them, they usually ship within 2 or 3 weeks. They often run discounts of 8-15% which is awesome.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: custom built wheel based on bitex/other analog hub’ and rims of your choice;

Actionsport.de europe
Prowheelbuilder.com us

For dirty cheap/strong wheels you can opt for the sun ringle / mavic rims
  • 1 0
 Another great option for those in the US: www.speedgearbike.com Killer prices with great service and quality built wheels. I've gotten a few sets, aluminum and carbon, from them and all have been solid.
  • 7 0
 Is there a point getting these as complete wheels? For this money, you could have these rims laced to any decent hub. I haven't looked into exchange rates, but I think you'd actually be much cheaper off when you have Superstar lace these rims to their own home-made hubs (not to be confused with their earlier Taiwanese catalog hubs). I don't even think POE matters all that much unless you're taking these for low speed tech climbs (in silly low gearing) or trials riding. But if this is for fast DH and enduro type riding, how are you ever going to tell? Or is there anything else particularly cool about these hubs?
  • 2 0
 There is no point if it's the same 6 pawl Neo hub they used on the MK3s. I warrantied my rear wheel twice before having the LBS lace up a DT350 and throw the Neo in the recycling bin. 160lbs riding a Process 111 getting 500 miles out of Stans hubs.
  • 7 0
 For that price you can get handbuilt DT350 + EX511s. You'd be a silly goose to buy these.
  • 3 0
 I've still got my original Stan's on my Mojo. They haven't given me any issues. I may have bust a spoke , but a rock hitting your wheel will do that. I'd say they are bombproof I don't comprehend why people rage about carbon for something that is essentially disposable. Mine are built on Hope hubs so they'll run till the sun explodes..
  • 6 1
 Great rims, but the axle snapped in my neo rear hub after 10 months of riding. Currently awaiting a warranty decision.
  • 2 0
 I am not a bash-everything-type rider but I had a broken NEO hub shell, a broken axle on the warrantied replacement and the ratchet puke its guts after I replaced the axle. Stans is pretty good about replacement but the hubs are now a niggling worry in the back of my mind. The rims, on the other hand, look new! No dents, gouges or anything. They make great rims!
  • 3 0
 Yeah my axle snapped in July after 7 months, and the freehub bearings had to be replaced for the third time since I bought them in January. All this happened while I was on vacation. They overnighted me a replacement freehub and axle. The rims (flow mk3) have been super solid, but the hubs are awful. They're typically really good with getting warranty replacements, but I'm probably going to get a new rear wheel with some other hub that's less terrible.
  • 5 0
 We did 2 week long biking trips this Summer. My buddy had a brand new Transition with Stan's wheels and Neo hubs. Granted he is 215 lbs of muscle and we climbed huge steep 1st gear uphills all day, but he broke the freewheel and had to use my spare wheel. This last trip he had a new warranty replacement and he broke the freehub again. I then loaned him my Syncros take off wheels (again) and this time he broke that freehub too, so not just a problem with the Neo hub I guess. Thankfully I had yet another rear wheel from my backup bike with a Roval (DT SWiss internal) ratchet hub which he did not break. He was very luck y he was able to coast out the first time and short walk out the 2nd time as these were 7-8 hour backcountry rides.

I would not trust a Neo free hub !
  • 4 0
 This comment thread needs to be at the top. Stan's has no right to sell such a failure prone product for $700+. The 6 pawl upgrade to the freehub doesn't make it any more durable. Especially when my warranty wheel shows up with only 5 installed. Absolutely the most ripped off I've felt by any mtb component. Even the junk Formula hubs last longer.
  • 2 0
 Just a casual mention of needing to keep
an eye on spoke tension could be re-worded as terribly underbuilt undertensioned wheels destined to die quickly if you even ride them off road.
And no mention of the slip fit axle caps being so slippery that your cassette unit is for sure going to fall off and roll around in the sand or off the floatplane dock into the lake if you don’t take a massive amount of precautionary measures.
Thanks for the half assed review pink bike.
  • 3 0
 It's probably more to do with the fact of the 25mm width. You know, the same width as EX471s which most of the pro riders are still using...
  • 1 0
 Just had a rear wheel laced up using this rim based on others reviews. Not too worried about the weight, just wanted something bombproof and these seemed to be just the ticket. Can't wait to get out on them and see how they hold up.
  • 7 4
 If you are a gram counter and think these are heavy, you need to change sport to something country or outstanding carbon rim warranty service Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I'm with you. Where are these sub 2,000g 29" DH wheels anyway?
  • 3 0
 By using the phrase enduro, they incited many rider groups. Enduro, Upduro, Broduro, Downcountry, Trail, and the forgotten All Mountain trolls. How many pinkbikers downhill on a downhill bike anymore anyway?
  • 6 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: wow as a 38% upduro / 62% trail rider I feel attacked
  • 3 0
 Onyx Hubs, Flow MK3s - The silence is blissful, the engagement is absolutely instant, the rims are durable af. (unless youre racing DH or clyde)
  • 1 0
 Running my 3rd set of Stan’s Neo hubs. They replaced them each time without hassle but now I think my 3rd set is starting to slip. Still a pain to wait for the replacements to arrive. The rims are great but none of the replacements have matched my bike graphics very well. (They replaced the whole wheel each time). What do they say? Burned once shame on you, burned twice shame on me.... I guess I’m in the really stupid category.
  • 1 0
 I have this rim laced to a hope pro 4 in the rear and it an unreal combo. I’m 6’5” and 230 on a good day and so far have had zero issues with it. One trip to the shop to check on spike tension and that’s it. Will be doing the same to my front when I cave in my race face rim up there.
  • 1 0
 XM481s laced to DT Spline One hubs(DT 240s bold new graphics) are my go-to aluminum wheels. E1700s are my back-up wheelset. Best aluminum wheelsets I've ever had. Holds true forever, relatively lightweight, and easy to work on. DT Swiss wheels cast a very large shadow, which make it difficult to want to try other wheels.
  • 4 3
 I just wish they mounted the tire logo centered with the valve stem. I had to walk away when I saw those ghastly images. It doesn't help that Maxxis is now slightly shifting the logo so it now only lines up on one side ...
  • 21 1
 I like to turn the light on and off four times when I leave the room too.
  • 1 0
 You’ll never buy these anyways!
  • 3 0
 Idk but i bought a set of Hunt Wheels Enduro Wides for $430.

33mm I.D.
J Bend
and 2000g

Why pay more?
  • 1 1
 hope hoops all day long....carbon wheels for 2 grand are reserved for gram counting doughnuts with more money than sense! The difference in price to weight is ridiculous not to mention the fact that carbon rims break regularly irrelevant of brand or carbon quality!
  • 4 1
 Kazimer’s 2020 Demo review is coming
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer do these hubs ship with the steel axle ? I've broken about 4 need hub alloy axles trip riding. Able failure fries the freehub and kills drive side hub bearing
  • 1 0
 Yes, this wheelset comes with a steel axle in the Neos OS hub.
  • 3 0
 I'm not riding stan's crap hubs.
  • 1 0
 Superb rim, although the superstar hub (V6) I built it on completely shit the bed.
  • 1 0
 Was that with the revised freehub?
  • 2 0
 @DC1988: the freehub springs were pretty shot but it was the non drive side bearing that died and the push in axle adaptor. Poor quality.
  • 1 1
 My Sentinel came with Mk3 rims. Best described as 'fromage". If adding all that weight is what it takes to build a strong alloy rim, I can't wait to get back onto carbon.
  • 2 0
 My Alloy wheels look like stop signs after about five laps..
  • 1 0
 If you want to go and and buy one, I have a NEW front Flow EX3 27.5 on the PB classifieds!
  • 2 0
 Stans rim are great... stans hubs are absolute garbage
  • 2 4
 So glad to be abandoned by the industry with 26" wheels. Like really what's the difference between 27.5", and 26"? Pretty much just being a prick. I would literally buy these in 26" version. I understand 26", and 29"; but 27.5" like give me a break.
  • 1 0
 I've broken about 4 NEO hub alloy axles trail riding. Axle failure fries the freehub and kills drive side hub bearing
  • 2 0
 Y'all really need to bring Paul Aston back for the wheel reviews.
  • 1 0
 Running Mk3’s on both my bikes. Perfect.-
  • 1 0
 Is that front tire an unbadged prototype, or is it mounted backwards?
  • 1 0
 It's mounted backwards =)
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee, it’s an unabadged Assegai sample. The sidewall looks the same on the other side.
  • 1 0
 I can't look at this photo with the backwards tire. It burns my eyes.
  • 3 0
 @austinTRON, it’s not backwards - there’s no tire model hot patch on either side.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: I feel better now. It did kinda look like the tread pattern was backwards too though.
  • 1 0
 @stansnotubes when will this be available in Malaysia?!
  • 2 1
 lost me at 29mm
  • 1 1
 I saw that too, are there that many people running tires under 2.5"? After the first time I tried 30mm+ inner width rims I never went back. Admittedly I am a heavy rider and ride in muddy/wet conditions a lot but even in dry conditions when I am at my most fit the wider rims were a big performance boost.
  • 4 0
 @highfivenwhiteguy: I live where the trails are very rocky/loose. I run tires from 2.3 to 2.6. My 'ideal' tire is always something 2.4-ish in the back. As the tires get wider they tend to feel less precise to me. Right now I have a 2.6 Eliminator on the back (which measures 2.45) and a 2.5 Assegai on the front (which measures a little under 2.5). I know a lot of people that do run 2.6-2.8 and love them. I just feel like they slow me down.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: Interesting point, I have noticed the same thing. That vague feel is hard to get over, at least for me. I still like the grip and predictability of wider tires and rims but I have had to scale things back and will be going to slightly narrower tires when my current ones wear out. Wide rims on the other hand are great so far, very good support for the tires.

Anyone tried running a 2.5 on a 37mm internal width rim? I suppose the tire shape will have more of an effect than the advertised width but I am concerned about a 2.5 being a bit too squared off on a 37mm rim.
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 I have a suspicion that going above 30mm starts to make sense in CFRP but, below 30mm, aluminium makes the most sense.

Trying to make an aluminium rim above 30mm width with the correct strength, damage resistance and stiffness probably adds too much weight.

I also don't understand, with CFRP rims, why they don't use thermoplastic matrix resin (e.g. PEEK, PEKK, PPS) rather than epoxy. This would massively improve impact resistance. I can see Gorilla Gravity doing something here at some point, given their current use of these materials in their frames.
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 yuck, gross
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