Review: Wolf Tooth Components Resolve Dropper Post

Oct 10, 2022 at 11:53
by Mike Kazimer  


Wolf Tooth Components has had a dropper post remote in their lineup for years, but up until now they didn't produce a post of their own to go with it. That's changed with the introduction of the Resolve, which the Minnesota-based company is touting as "the world's first self-bleeding dropper post," although there are other companies, including BikeYoke, who have made similar claims.

The Resolve's self-bleeding cartridge system is designed to prevent the dreaded saggy-post syndrome that can occur when air mixes with oil in a post that uses an internal floating piston (IFP). Granted, that issue isn't as common as it once was, but it can still occur, and can require a cartridge replacement or a full rebuild depending on the post.
Resolve Dropper Details

• Self-bleeding cartridge
• Fully serviceable
• Travel amounts: 125, 160, 200mm (tested)
• 30.9 or 31.6mm diameters
• Weight: 563 grams (200mm drop, 31.6mm)
• Two year warranty
• MSRP: $379.95 USD
• More info: wolftoothcomponents.com

Wolf Tooth came up with their own patented system for the Resolve, forgoing an IFP and creating a system where the air and oil aren't physically separated. The configuration allows it to self-bleed when the post is fully compressed – if the post does develop some squish from too much air mixing with the oil, lowering the seat all the way and waiting 20 seconds should be all that's required to firm it up.


Along with designing clever internals for the Resolve, Wolf Tooth also managed to give it the lowest stack height on the market (32mm from the bottom of the collar to the middle of the rails when the post is fully compressed). It also has a very low maximum insertion depth of 289mm for a post with 200mm of drop – that means less room is required inside the seat tube for riders to run a long travel dropper.

The Resolve is available in 31.6mm and 30.9mm diameters with either 125, 160, or 200mm of travel. The amount of drop can be adjusted internally in 5mm increments. It's a fairly involved process, but riders that purchase posts from Wolf Tooth's website will have the option to add up to seven spacers to customize the travel amount to their liking before it's shipped. The spacers will also be available aftermarket, and the procedure can be performed at home without too much fuss, although it's not as easy as it is with a OneUp or Trans-X post, for example.

Prices for the Resolve dropper post are as follows: 125mm: $349.95; 160mm: $364.95; 200mm: $379.95 USD.



INSTALLATION

I went with the 200mm, 31.6mm version of the Resolve. Installing it was quick and easy, and completely free of any issues – the fixed portion of the cable slots into the bottom of the post, and the other end runs to any compatible remote. In this case I went with Wolf Tooth's own ReMote, which has a very smooth action and a large, grippy paddle to aim for when raising or lowering the post.

The seat clamp uses a fairly typical two-bolt configuration, and a 5mm Allen key is all that's needed to install or remove a seat. If you look at the very top of the post you can see one of the techniques Wolf Tooth used to lower the overall height – the top of the cartridge extends through a cutout in the top clamp.

Hash marks are etched into the post to make it easier to see the seat angle, and there are also height indicator marks at the back to make it easier to return it to the right position if it gets moved for some reason.


PERFORMANCE

The Resolve has seen regular use for most of the summer, and it even accompanied me to France for the Stone King Rally (although it spent the first two days of the race sitting in a dark corner of an airport somewhere). The action is light and smooth, with a positive 'thwunk' that lets you know when full extension has been reached. The overall feel is very similar to that of BikeYoke's Revive dropper, another post that's highly regarded for its performance. There hasn't been a ton of mud or wet conditions in the Resolve's life so far, but it has seen more than its fair share of silty, dusty conditions, and it's still going up and down without a hitch.

What about the non-squish feature? Honestly, I've had very good luck with the latest batch of dropper posts that use a sealed cartridge system, including options from OneUp, Trans-X, and CrankBrothers. They're not totally identical in construction, but the basic concept is the same, and I haven't had any get saggy on me recently.

I can't say the same thing for the RockShox Reverb – I had one of the newest versions develop sag that didn't want to go away, even after using the Vent Valve system to fix it. With the BikeYoke Revive, I found myself needing to use the reset feature every so often, although the reset feature only takes a few seconds and quickly removes the sagginess.

As for the Wolf Tooth Resolve, I did have it develop 5mm or so of squish at full extension on several occasions, typically after the bike had been stored upside down or hung from a hook. Each time, I was able to lower the post and let it sit for 20 seconds or so to remove the play. Sometimes it took a couple of lowering sessions before it was solid again, but in all instances I was able to remove the play. Of course, it would be nice if the squish never developed at all, ever, but the fact that it's easily remedied is a welcome feature.


SERVICE

The Resolve is still operating just as smoothly as the day I received it, free of any stickiness or unwanted side-to-side play. That said, it is good to know that it's completely serviceable when the time comes. Wolf Tooth are proponents of the right to repair, which means they offer replacement parts and service instructions in order to allow the end user to take matters into their own hands. It's even possible to switch the lower portion out to convert it from a 31.6 diameter to 30.9 if a rider wanted to go that route.

There are instructional videos available for performing a basic service as well as adjusting the amount of travel. The post is covered by a two-year warranty against manufacturing defects.


COMPARISON

The Resolve is one of the lightest and most compact 200mm dropper posts currently on the market. The price is on the higher end of the spectrum, but it's not far off from other higher end options. At the end of the day, there are a lot of dropper posts on the market that do exactly what they're supposed to – it all comes down to figuring out which features mean the most to you.




Pros

+ Low stack height & insertion depth
+ Fully user serviceable
+ Self-bleeding cartridge works as claimed
+ Smooth action and a solid feel
Cons

- Self bleeding feature is clever & effective, but it'd be even better if the post never developed any squish at all.
- Travel adjustment procedure isn't as quick as on some other posts






Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Resolve is an excellent addition to the dropper post market, with best-in-class numbers when it comes to weight and overall length. The short stack height and insertion depth mean that more riders will be able to reap the benefits of a longer travel dropper post, and the fact that it's fully user serviceable makes it even better.  Mike Kazimer








237 Comments

  • 209 29
 Never understood why anyone would need anything beyond a PNW or OneUp. They go down, they go up. They're dead reliable. An ape could fully service them. And they cost $100 less than any other post on the market. Glad to see WolfTooth broadening their horizons, but man this is a tough market to breach nowadays.
  • 28 1
 Yeah. This looks like a neat post from a company I like but I struggle to see why I would buy something other then a PNW/TranX/BrandX post considering my BrandX has had zero issues over the last two years once I got a decent lever. As long as a dropper post goes up and down reliably I don't see the need to spend extra.
  • 51 0
 I don’t need anything beyond OneUp, but smoother action and lack of lateral play would sure be nice.
  • 6 0
 And the cartridges can be sent in to swap for less than "servicing" an expensive post. I do love my bike yoke droppers but they are a luxury for sure.
  • 14 2
 As someone that often sizes up on frames, the low stack height is the biggest draw here, still get the odd ball tap from my 150mm post atm
  • 28 2
 Isn't Wolftooth stuff made in the US whereas OneUp has their components made in the far east? This does come at a price and it is worth it to some. Notice the question mark there, I'm not 100% whether this is the case but I recall I saw such a label on their Goat Link (derailleur add-on).
  • 25 6
 @anodyne22: not a fan of OneUp, lots of play and the damn thing rattles like a bitch. I may be biased tho bc their carbon bars snapped on me and i crashed lol.
  • 14 0
 My oneup v2 had too much wobble even after receiving the larger diameter bushing pins. Nothing wrong with pnw/clones but they are all the same with PNW just upcharging for branding and CS. I settled on SDG as it uses the normal wintek cartridges and all parts are available and cheap. Replace $10 worth of collar bushing and T slots a year (5000ish miles for me) and wipe/regrease. This is end if year 3 for me
  • 12 31
flag jesse-effing-edwards (Oct 11, 2022 at 6:59) (Below Threshold)
 They just have to do one job and not even particularly well. I too wonder why anyone would spend more, but, dentists gotta dentist sometimes.
  • 51 1
 I would've agreed with this whole heartedly had I not gotten used to a bike yoke. It's now on my hardtail, and when I use it after spending time on my bike with the OneUp, it's an absolute dream of a dropper and you do notice it. Such light trigger action, butter smooth, very stiff, wonderful thunk when it tops out. OneUp is plenty fine and I'll use it for the 240mm, but if there's ever a 240+ revive, I'll think about it, despite the $$$. They last forever too and can switch between 30.9 and 31.6 lower tubes. OneUp just feels lethargic, stickier trigger feel, and less robust in comparison. But like you said, it does what it needs to.
My advice: never use a bike yoke (and maybe same goes for this wolf tooth). Ignorance is bliss on this.
  • 20 2
 My BikeYoke Revive runs so much smoother than my OneUp, I would change it in a heartbeat. Unfortunatly my frame does not allow the Revive, so I sitill use the OneUp.
  • 7 2
 @fiatpolski: I'm gonna stay ignorant and just keep using my savings towards more suspension service haha
  • 2 2
 @foggnm: I love mine too. I’ve had it for two years and have had zero issues and haven't had to touch the cable and housing once. With that being said, I would never pay the premium for it and wouldn’t have it if it didn’t come on a complete I bought. I would never pay for anything besides a PNW or OneUp.
  • 3 2
 @93EXCivic: I had a TranzX that came on my DeVinci and that thing is a POS. Original OEM post wouldn't come back up on it's own after a year. Got a warranty replacement, same thing after about one year. The decent posts I've had in the past, only needed a rebuild once every 3 years or so, maybe longer. If you're spending money to rebuild a cheap post every year, did ya really save any money? I'm over the cheap seatposts at this point tbh. I got a Fox Transfer and Wolf Tooth remote to install on my Spartan. But.... I have seen where lots of PB users have used the cartridge type posts with no issues. So, to each their own I suppose.
  • 11 0
 Same can be said about Shimano Deore. Yet a lot of people (myself included) want more premium parts on the bike, hence the market for more expensive and refined droppers.
  • 4 0
 @Gristle: I hear you man. I put a Revive on my hardtail and had order another one for my new Jekyll.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Yep the post is made in the US
**edit assembled in the US**
  • 3 6
 @Crossmaxx: good shifting can actually make a ride better. nicer feeling up and downing less so. I understand buying fancy stuff as I've been logical enough to buy two Chris king headsets because they are beautiful, but droppers to me just need to work and even when they feel nicer don't really make my ride better cause they are usually just up when I'm climbing and down for the rest. If I was riding more XC stuff I may want something with a better action, but I'd probably get a fox for the gold, haha
  • 1 0
 @froman82 @vinay They're made in Taiwan. Doesn't mean it's bad, that's where my BikeYokes are made and those have been great. They're leaning into the repair-ability which I'm down with, a lot of what I like about the Revive and Devine (with Wolf Tooth levers, also repairable) and makes the premium worth it.
See below for PR guy quote on country of origin.
  • 2 0
 Smoother action means a lot to some people. The feel is on a different level
  • 2 2
 Considering how temperamental the performance is of such expensive components, wouldn't it be better if droppers weren't required to perform in such a limited space. Rear wheels got big and typically move forwards deeper in the suspension stroke, you need room for a drivetrain, suspension linkages etc. Liteville manages to make room for a large diameter straight seattube by shifting it forwards and so far I haven't heard anyone complain about their dropper system. Wouldn't this be an option for more brands? I see no harm shifting the seattube forwards and the increased diameter might make it cheaper to make a reliable and durable dropper. Not saying the one from Liteville is, just saying it could be. Head tube diameters have been increasing too when single crown forks got more than 130mm of suspension travel, just to accommodate the option to run larger diameter steerers and bigger bearings.
  • 19 2
 OneUp posts have a design flaw. The top bushing acts as the travel stop when the post extends. The brass pins jam into the bushing, gouging and flaring it out over time. This causes the post to develop a notch feeling at the end of the stroke and ultimately excessive drag.
  • 2 0
 Same. I have OneUp's on both bikes...
  • 3 2
 Fully agree, outside of wanting an AXS post I don't see the point. In a situation with a Oneup and a BikeYoke or Transfer being free or the same price I rather have those...sure, but not for the money. My OneUp and even my cheap brand-x were fantastic
  • 7 0
 @Gristle: +1 to bikeyoke being nicer. It's mostly the oneup rattling that's frustrating. When dropped the oneup has 5 mm of free vertical play and it's all I hear going down the trail. That plus my prior experience with a 170 oneup not coming up without a yank after a ~year of riding and I'm on team bikeyoke going forward. I just wish they would come out with a 240mm dropper. At 6'4" I like the extra space.
  • 1 9
flag Crossmaxx (Oct 11, 2022 at 8:31) (Below Threshold)
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Yeah, but the thing is Deore shifts just as well as XTR...
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: what is your inseam length like? How much post is exposed?
  • 1 0
 Problem Resolved….
  • 3 0
 If I can run 200mm drop with the Wolftooth vs 180 on the OneUp it’d be worth it potentially.
  • 5 0
 The coffin lid gas cartridges in most posts aren’t user serviceable and are garbage if they fail, which they do from time to time. At least posts like Bike Yoke can be torn down at home with basic tools and repaired and pumped up with a shock pump. That said, I have rarely had to tear down and service a cartridge post but my Bike Yoke has been apart many times due to reliability issues. I’d still rather be able to service my bike at home.
  • 1 0
 I will say, that thing looks like it can drop really low, so that's nice. Could literally be the difference between my girlfriend fitting on a bike and not, as I know some dropper posts sit extremely high even in their dropped position. *coughs in Reverb*
  • 1 0
 @vinay: That and the fact that everything I've ordered from WT shipped from Savage, Minnesota. Hopefully, both are still true.

I would totally give this dropper a shot. Problem is my old (1st gen - 6 years?) Fox Transfer post keeps working with an original WT actuator and has never had any service. It goes up and down a little slower these days, but so do I.
  • 4 0
 @Gristle: I also own both brands and the difference is eye opening (and taint pleasing). If it wasn't for needing a super low insertion depth on one of my frames, I'd never own a OneUp dropper, only Bike Yoke.
  • 2 0
 @hgardner: only has 1mm less stack than a oneup- if you're looking for more clearance you're better off going comando or getting a fresh shave
  • 2 1
 @vinay: The dropper is made in Taiwan, unlike most other components.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I saw on the Wolf Tooth website that it said "Engineered and Assembled in USA". Must not have the tooling in house...yet. Knowing Wolf Tooth, they will likely make all the components in the USA in the future, if possible. If they can keep it at this price point and make everything in the USA, many of us will gladly throw down our hard earned cash to support our closest neighbors and reduce shipping from far away lands.
  • 5 0
 Meh, I have a OneUp post and might give this a go. The OneUp is fine but incredibly sensitive to post clamp force and can get super gummy. I might be in the minority here but my Reverb went a lot longer between servicing and stayed smooth. Never had the bleed issues many people report, and the lever feel was incredible. I like the OneUp for the price, ease of service and low stack height. But it is definitely crusty.
  • 2 0
 @kokofosho: my inseam length is long. On my Large Pivot Firebird with a 240mm oneup I have slightly over 7cm of exposed post.
  • 2 0
 I have been mostly happy with my 180 OneUp post. Just over two years, think I am on my 3rd warranty cartridge? Have a cartridge on reserve for when the current one poops the sheets.

Pretty over the constant service needed to keep it functioning. Was considering going back to BikeYoke for the smoother operation and 5mm more drop available. I used WolfTooth's calculator and it says I can run 195mm drop. 15mm more drop is reason enough. I have ran the numbers and this appears to be the most drop I can run on this bike.
  • 1 0
 @mmarkey21: I just did the math and that is my situation on my Kenevo SL, which has a notoriously short seat tube because of the suspension design.
  • 7 2
 @drapeau: Maybe @wolftoothcomponents could tell us folks what exactly means "assembled in Minnesota". Is the whole post assembled in the US from single pieces / from scratch or is putting together Asian-made sub-assemblies to the final product or maybe just final packaging. I am sure a lot are interested in that, since it is specifically pointed out / advertised.
One reason we produce and then assemble in-house in our own production in Taiwan is because it's too risky to ship critical and not easy to make hydraulic parts across the globe before assembly and before you can check proper function. Mistakes will happen and if they were detected only in Germany, it'd be way to late.
  • 2 0
 @foggnm: I have have a Bike Yoke two seasons in, zero service other that external cleaning and a bike of stanchion lube... spot on reliable AND 100grams less that the my same travel Fox Transfer. Boom
  • 2 0
 @z08north: PROTIP: flip the white plastic bushing around and get double the life out of it!
  • 17 1
 @Sacki: when we say "assembled in Minnesota" we mean exactly that. Every single part is assembled and tested by us in our factory in MN -- no sub-assemblies from anywhere. We are proud of our in-house design, testing and assembly of this product. It's something most other small companies could not do.
I'm sure you understand the challenges of a product like this and what it takes to make it a success. We are fans of the BikeYoke droppers and we are excited to add our own dropper post as another alternative in the premium dropper space.
  • 4 6
 @WolfToothComponents: As a longtime WT product supporter, here is where the disconnect is. People want to know if you are using US aluminum tubing and/or machining those pieces on your own CNC lathes. I would think not, given the costs of scaling a product like this. The word 'manufacturing' is missing from your message. If you are doing in-house metal working, then you are missing an opportunity to state that. If you are not, the marketing comes off as a bit obfuscating (but understandable). If it is Taiwanese or other SEA raw materials, that's OK, as we have all learned to live with that, but if it is from the PRC, then I'll never buy again.
  • 1 0
 After a while they stop going down on you. Service response from OneUp was to send a diagram of the special butt angle technique they require to function properly and not bind up. I’m not even kidding.
  • 6 1
 @WolfToothComponents:
Thanks for clarifying that. Did not expect anything else from your company.
Yes, I do understand the challenges of such an undertaking very well, especially the challenges of separating manufacturing and assembly so far from each other. That's why I can only say: Hats off!
  • 1 0
 You said exactly what I was thinking after finishing the article.
  • 7 0
 @Blownoutrides: If they stop going down on you after a while, you have to find new ones. Especially if you're still going down on them. Fair's fair.
  • 7 0
 @suspended-flesh: I own a manufacturing company. There is no such thing as a supply chain for metal that has 0% material sourced from China. We try to buy locally but even thyssenkrupp Materials North America can't get certain alloys from North American foundries. Not sure what you expect, but certain bar-stock sizes can literally only be sourced from Chinese locations if you want any sort of reliability in supply.

That said, machining should be more than possible in North America.
  • 1 0
 @hotpotato: preach.... Big Grin
  • 2 1
 Yep. I have not had squishy post on any of the ones we have had in the house, so don’t see the need for this.

For an extra $150 or more, I’d want either significantly less weight (Vecnum), or more travel (Oneup 240), or adjustable offset heads (9pointCool .

This?
it is not significantly lighter, and doesn’t come in a dedicated 34.9 mm design, nor does it offer as much travel as the Oneup 240.
  • 1 0
 @hgardner: if that’s the case, why not get Oneup? Similar height, Easy travel adjust and way cheaper.
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12:
I am similar. On my Oneup 210 I had about 110 mm of post sticking out.
  • 1 0
 @Blownoutrides: hey hey, no need to go all XX rated!
  • 1 0
 I had two 8point9, which were wonderfull until it would lost air! I bought the service kit, a mechanic did the job and it was still losing air! Apparently they had a new seal a couple of weeks after but I would have not payed the mechanic a second time so I just lost a lot of money with that. Then a bike yoke which was really smooth, a lot more than OneUp but had to service it after a bit more than a year and the suspension shop here did the job even if they wouldn't distributed them anymore. Shitty job with their own seal, went back and was working half of the time. I don't go there anymore and I then bought 2 OneUp post. Not as smooth but problem free for a couple of years. They become loose quiet often though and a lot of lateral play! I have to buy a new one so I decided to try the PNW with the V3 OneUp remote, can't wait to try those! Don't seem to have lateral play like Oneup! Big Grin

And yeah that auto bleeding feature is nice, like the button on the Bike Yoke but I prefer a dropper post like OneUp that just don't have any of those problem (I'm on the 3rd year on one of them, without doing anything except tighten it and put some grease).
  • 2 0
 I would never touch a one up post again, I had one (V2), it failed and they send me a new one, then it failed again and they sent a new cartridge, that failed too and it was always on a race weekend, ruining my weekend. I've been on a bike yoke revive for 2 years now completely issue free, I just did the service again before the winter. I like that Bike Yoke also sells every component to rebuild the post as well in-case anything should fail (which it hasn't).
My New bike came with a fox transfer and I only used it a few days before putting the "old" bike yoke back on.
After suffering the disappointment of a failed seat post mid race I wouldn't change away from the Bike Yoke now. Sure I can buy 2 one ups for the same price and change when one fails but that's not really sustainable and I prefer reliability.
I'm still surprised Sram hasn't released a longer AXS dropper yet
  • 1 0
 @donovantrials: I'm not familiar with the AXS dropper but I can imagine the electronic actuation may take more room than a fully mechanical one. So insertion depth would get so deep that there would be too few bikes they can properly install them on.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: Thanks for clarifying that. I did get a bit carried away.
  • 41 13
 That's changed with the introduction of the Resolve, which the Minnesota-based company is touting as "the world's first self-bleeding dropper post."

Bike Yoke Divine says you're a bit late to claim that title.
  • 5 16
flag lwkwafi (Oct 11, 2022 at 6:16) (Below Threshold)
 I think they get past that because this one is tool-free, thus self-bleeding when in dropped position for 20 seconds. No other tools needed.
  • 20 0
 @lwkwafi: The Divine is self-bleeding as well. Only the Revive needs a little turn of an allen key for the bleeding procedure
  • 12 0
 @lwkwafi: Revive has a quick bleed feature, Divine auto bleeds.

I like Wolftooth stuff and have a bunch of misc stuff from them - it's always been good. I had a first gen B Rad adaptor that had a pretty obvious design flaw in the form of major stress risers where the zip tie slots where machined in. When mine broke I got the new, much better version in a couple days, no drama - and that version is still rocking 3 or 4 years later.
  • 6 0
 @lwkwafi: The Divine self-bleeds every time it is cycled, also tool free.
  • 1 0
 @esse-prometheus: Gotcha. Looked at it and the logo in place of the allen key port tripped me up.
  • 1 1
 @esse-prometheus: From what I understand from the article, the Wolf Tooth dropper also bleeds when you cycle it, as long as the cycle involves having it fully dropped. Makes me wonder whether you'll always be free from play if you just store it with the saddle down. Or that you'd actually get a lot of air mixed in the oil if you store the bike upside down with the seatpost compressed.
  • 29 11
 The Divine isn't actually self-bleeding. They just found a way for the dropper post to work with air in the system by moving fluid from one side of the piston to the other. The Divine design also requires high pressure for this to work. Drop the pressure to 200psi and it'll sag. BikeYoke has a clever design, but the Divine dropper post does not self-bleed.
  • 21 14
 A US company claiming a "first in the US" as "world's first" doesn't surprise me at all.
  • 4 1
 @Ttimer: Ouch. True though, in a lot of cases.
  • 3 1
 @WolfToothComponents: Thanks for the clarification! We peons only get what marketing tells us and not much on how things actually work.
  • 4 0
 @WolfToothComponents: When will @sacki enter the chat?

From Bike Yoke "Auto-Reset-Function: Every full drop automatically bleeds the hydraulic circuit for suspension-free lock-out. "
  • 26 0
 @WolfToothComponents: Sorry for having to correct you, but yes, our DIVINE does self bleed. If it didn't, it simply wouldn't work.
Congrats on your own dropper though. Can't wait to get one and see how it works.
  • 22 0
 @WolfToothComponents:
Furthermore, this is from 2018:
www.pinkbike.com/news/review-funns-150mm-up-down-dropper-post.html
Would be interesting to know what makes the Resolve (interesting name, too ;-)) the world's first self bleeding dropper.
  • 3 1
 @Sacki: I think this is from the same year.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/15821079
  • 1 2
 @Sacki: I'm not saying you’re wrong, I'm just going to say fun doesn't count because nobody rides that crap.
  • 2 1
 @Highgearcyclery: This is a more than unneccessary statement. Please tell us what makes the Funn dropper crappier than other brands mentioned here!
  • 9 0
 @WolfToothComponents: "moving air" from one place to another sounds a lot like bleeding to me
  • 2 0
 @stella10: Thanks for the info. Very interesting.
  • 20 1
 You want the most bang for your buck dropper? PNW Loam from their PNW Cycled store. $120, travel adjust, adjustable pressure, 1 year warranty, buying recycled goods = makes the trees dance, I've loved mine, and for the price, it's an unbeatable value. Cool to see lots of options though
  • 16 0
 Great value, though mine developed sag within 6 months and had to be warrantied. Pnw was great about it, but beware with the warranty process, they will make you send the entire dropper in, and they do not sell replacement air cartridges. I had the same issue with a OneUp. Also great customer support, and they overnighted me a replacement air cartridge instead of me sending the whole dropper in. Because of this, OneUp will be getting my money from now on. Way less downtime and faff.
  • 1 0
 I'd rather spend the extra $60-80 and get a new one with the lifetime warranty. A single breakage after 1 year would cost you more than you saved.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: that's a good option too! I've used multiple different PNW droppers, the loam dropper has been rock solid for me, and its incredible value with all the features I would ever want. Great way to save money so I can spend it elsewhere on the bike.
  • 21 0
 My brute force skills are lacking…can I have the password for the video?
  • 7 0
 I'll resist the temptation of the cheat code and will rely on brute force for now. No success yet but I won't give up.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Brute force? How about a little finesse - i.e. go to their website where you can fetch the link (as I did, and posted above).
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: bro we’re having jokes over here and you go and get all serious. Relax.
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: I could try finesse but I'm afraid my ego won't allow me to. If I'd go to their website, I'd physically go there, make lot of noise, smash their toilet pot and then watch the video together with them. Then we hug and all is good again.
  • 1 0
 @no-good-ideas: I'm just trying to be helpful, bro. I don't want you to miss the new WolfTooth flick!
  • 12 0
 It's heavier than all the other options, but I've had five Brand-X droppers over a long period of time on 5 bikes and they're all still flawless. My OneUp would constantly develop that stickiness in the last half of its travel and we won't even talk about the many Reverbs I've had.

IMO the Brand-X XL 200mm is the one to get. Heaviest, but they sure are reliable (and cheapest). $135 with a lever.
  • 10 1
 Stickyness on the OneUp dropper is easily fixed. have the post half up, undo the seal head (by hand) and then apply some grease. Do it all back up again and cycle a few times and it should be sweet.
have to do this every few rides on mine, although I wish it didn't happen it wouldn't put me off buying another one as it's been faultless apart from that.
  • 3 1
 @melonhead1145: yeah you just have to do it over and over though. Haven’t had to do that with the BrandX ones.
  • 3 0
 Cure for OneUp stickiness - I use just a little ForkBoost Lube on the stanchion every 3 or 4 rides. Been doing that for 3 years - keeps the stickiness away. Just do it at the same intervals as my fork and shock. I do the same for family's Brand X's even if they need it or not, just keeps the droppers (and forks and shocks) nice and smooth.

But ya, have Brand X's on my kids and wife's bikes... other than being slower than OneUp and most others, have been dead reliable... and so cheap!
  • 1 2
 @melonhead1145: I've been using triflow. Would the grease be better & if so, what kind are you using? I had thought the triflow would be best to avoid buildup inside the post.
  • 1 0
 weird, ive had ALOT of oneup posts and none of them have ever "stuck"
  • 2 1
 @ira4ever76: Having seen the buildup that Triflow creates on chains, I'd keep it way the hell away from my dropper.
  • 2 1
 @islandforlife: I use FB lube on fork, shock, and dropper after nearly every ride. Saved me a lot in seal service I bet.....
  • 3 0
 @ira4ever76: Something like slick honey is what I use. Mostly just regrease the plastic split bushing
  • 1 0
 It's like buying a lever and getting the post for free. Solid products.Love the 200mm drop ones.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: I will add to your advise that if anyone has the V1 post to get the new bushing. The original bushing seems to swell and get sticky. Also check that it is not getting mangled and jamming from the brass keys.
  • 3 0
 Agreed, I'm on 2.5 years with my Brand X ascend and I haven't even needed to take it apart for an overhaul yet. It just keeps working. Have a KS eTen on my hardtail and it legit needed to be fully taken apart and overhauled every 3-4 months. Might go PNW or One Up next but the brand x just keeps on trucking.
  • 2 0
 @ira4ever76: I'm using RSP suspension grease. Any grease that is ok for suspension should do the trick.
  • 3 0
 thanks all. I'll clean them out and switch to Fork Boost from now on.
  • 11 0
 BikeYoke the best performing - makes my OneUp feel like peanut butter - but OneUp with their bi-annual 20% coupon still the best performance/durability/serviceability/customer service and price.
  • 3 0
 Crunchy peanut butter
  • 10 0
 Agree. My BikeYoke dropper is the best dropper I've experienced.
  • 1 0
 Yep... patiently waiting for the 20% right now!
  • 3 0
 Get the Bikeyoke. In the long run it will remain fuss free and saves you the most money. Should be the last post to buy. Therefore the cheapest.
  • 1 0
 I have the OneUp V1 and the Bike Yoke Revive. Is the Revive much smoother? Why yes it is. Does it somehow change my riding experience? No it does not. The OneUp reliably goes up and down just like the Revive.
  • 5 0
 Brand X and PNW cheapskate here. What gets me about all these droppers is why don’t you see more coil springs? Its only got to lift the seat so surely a very light spring is all thats needed.
  • 3 0
 Thinking out loud (well, silently on a computer), part of it would be that the lower section of the post would need to be longer than a air/oil dropper? With a pneumatic (or hydraulic) system, the piston can retract fully into the body of the cylinder itself which keeps things a bit more compact, whereas with a spring at full compression you've essentially got a lot of coils to package somewhere within the lower of the post. For longer travel droppers that would be even more of a problem.

May be totally wrong on that though...

Also on board the Brand-X & PNW train here incidentally. My Brand-X post shit the bed when the brass keys randomly mulched the recesses in the body of the post where they sit, but my PNW has been spot on so far.
  • 2 0
 If you want the seat to be able to stop anywhere in its travel and hold your butt up it has to be stronger. There are posts with springs (eg dtswiss) - but just two positions: up, down
  • 1 0
 @CleanZine: I’m gonna have to sit down with pen & paper but for now I can’t think why the spring can’t reside within the ‘slidy bit’ too?

I’ve been lucky with my 200mm brand X & PNW so far… not had to faff with them at all. Unlike my old easton haven.

@pikabika Surely the doo-dah that stops and holds the post where you want it can be designed so that spring weight or air pressure are irrelevent to it’s grabbing & holding powers?
  • 1 0
 @Kebabroll: The spring could be within the cylinder too, but what I was thinking was that the piston on an air setup can retract fully within itself, whereas a coil spring can't go within itself in the same way as you've got the coils themselves hanging out in there as well. To me it would just mean that the overall stack height of the post would need to be longer than an equivalent length air setup. I'm probably thinking about it wrong though!
  • 1 0
 @CleanZine: you might have a point that my cider addled brain cannot grasp but with coil springs it depends how closely the coils are wound don’t it? You could use a spring that compresses to a maximum of one tenth of it’s uncompressed length??

Lets keep the numbers simple… Say you were designing a post with 300mm insertion depth plus 200mm of up & down movement that’d give you room for a 500mm spring which you’d be compressing by less than half it’s length. The thingy that holds the seat at the correct height when you ain’t pressing the lever would have to be a slightly unorthodox design (sussed it!, i think…?) as you’ve got your super light and reliable coil running up through the entire internal length.

Cheers for feedback though, I’ve rather enjoyed scribbling designs whilst slurping my coffees today
  • 6 0
 My only request for a better dropper, get rid of the slop. The noise from the seat chattering about makes me want to suffer with a solid post and QR.
  • 1 0
 Yeah lots of brands seem to have that wiggle
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: I kind of like the wiggle. Means I don't need to get my seat perfect as it'll move a bit.
  • 4 0
 Interesting that you chose not to include 9point8 in the comparison chart. They reset (with a lever hold) and they are easily serviceable at home with full support from 9point8 (at reasonable prices).
  • 1 0
 the negative reviews of terrible reliability of 9point8 droppers, especially early on in their release, has impacted their popularity. I know lots of people who have bought them more recently who have good luck, but anyone who bought them before 2020 seems to have ditched them for something more reliable.
  • 2 0
 The Fall Line R is much lighter too, though only going up to 150 mm.
  • 1 0
 How's the weight compare to the fall line R or the new fox transfer SL?
  • 1 0
 I have a 2017 Fall Line and I am very torn on it. I don't ride as much as I would want (less than 1000km a year - in Manitoba) and I have to regularly grease the post. It has also developed a very slow air leak (top up every week) with only having a season and a half on a new main seal kit. Oh and the foam rings are no bueno - the first time that I opened the post up since the seal replacement, the foam wiper is torn (it goes beneath the x-seal).

I like that I can buy stuff to service it and that it is easy, but I wonder if this post is worth the $500 CDN I paid for it. A factory service is about $100 +shipping, so I am just doing what I can to maintain it so it doesn't crap out on me.
  • 1 0
 My Fall line bought in 2017 works perfectly. I had an air leak in the first year, covered by warranty, and works great since then. Bought a rebuild kit in 2020, and still works great ! I am overall happy with it and would buy another one. I'm also happy to support brand who produce their stuff where they actually sell it.
  • 2 0
 Still rocking my 150mm Brand X dropper post that I bought from CRC 3 years ago for a whopping $130 CAD, or at todays exchange rate, about $95USD...WITH A REMOTE.
It has never failed to go up or down, replacement cartridges are $35 if you need them. Unless you need a super short stack, I don't see the value in this seatpost, especially now that you can get the Ascend X in 180 and 200mm drop. Was so impressed with the 150mm one I picked up a 200mm one on sale for the same price, or roughly what Wolftooth wants for their dropper remote.
  • 1 0
 To be fair, the BrandX lever is terrible. My broke within 2 months of getting the post. The post has been solid but the lever isn't good.
  • 2 0
 @93EXCivic: Fair enough, I haven't had any issues yet, knock on wood!
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: Yeah I've grown to like the brand x lever myself as well. I've heard some don't, probably just different ergonomics with different hands. Definitely thought about something fancy like a wolftooth lever but its been good with zero issues.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: I bent my Brand-X lever in a crash. Needs a little help to flip back now... what are you using for a lever?
  • 2 0
 Man the price. I love Wolftooth and run their remote, spacers, chainrings etc...but that's steep for a dropper post when PNW and OneUp exist. The stack height advantage tho...
  • 2 0
 The price isn't insane if you compare it to the fact that people pay the same to have a Kashima-coated Fox which is extremely challenging to service. With all of these features and quality, it's not bad. But still... OneUp is so much cheaper...
  • 2 0
 WT stack height is 32mm. OneUp is 33mm. Not quite a huge gap.
  • 1 0
 @brandonrock72: OneUp is also shorter overall for a given post length.
  • 1 0
 @ct0413: It's 400% more than a Brand X, and it doesn't even include a lever. Is it 4X better? Maybe if you need the stack height..but it's hard to beat the adjustability of the OneUp 210.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: I don't know if it's 4X better. I haven't used it. Why are you asking me?
  • 3 0
 My first thought: Is a remote included in the price? Appears not. Hard to get away from BikeYoke at the higher end of price points.
  • 1 0
 I had numerous issues with my oneup dropper even after having it serviced it would sag. My PNW has been very reliable but is heavy and not nearly as smooth as my bike yoke I had. The pnw does have a lifetime warranty which is why I keep it. surprise hero was actually the sdg dropper and lever, maybe I got lucky but it was smooth and reliable.
  • 4 0
 Really doesnt do anything better than anyone else's post.... but it's got a little wolf on it. I'm sold.
  • 3 0
 I just picked up a BrandX 170mm dropper for $130 bucks. Replacement cartridges are $35. I could afford to replace the cartridge six times for the price of this dropper.
  • 2 0
 Agreed, I’ve got the Brand-X Ascend XL 170 on my fattie and for the money it’s amazing. Developed some lateral play over the last year, but no different then my OneUp V1 150.
  • 1 2
 Why would you buy a BrandX when you could have gotten a PNW for like $30 more?
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: Because I like having $30 more in my pocket?
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: Why would you pay $30 more for the same thing?
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: same product, different branding.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: Brand X $135 vs PNW $320 dollars for 200mm post and remote. That's a LOT of after ride beers.
  • 3 2
 I'm not commenting on the new Wolftooth post, but reading all the comments about PNW, bike yoke, bleeding or sag, just wanted to say I've been 100% happy with a basic Fox Transfer post. Ran it through all kinds of PNW weather for 2 trouble free years and only sent it in as it got a bit sticky to go up in some situations (and you could always tug it up and keep riding). It would bug the heck out of me to have a seat post that "sagged" ever and had to be re-bled or messed with. The idea of pedalling out of the back country for hours on end with a seat post that was sagging and sitting too low would drive me nuts. The downside of course is that it seems only the factory can rebuild it.
  • 4 0
 Great now I have to lower the price on my reverb AGAIN on pink bike buy and sell. Thanks wolf tooth
  • 5 0
 at this point you might need to pay someone to pick it up
  • 1 0
 I think you meant to write "Thanks Rockshox/SRAM".
  • 1 0
 just wait a bit until the gravel train picks up on droppers and market the squish as a feature ;-)
  • 3 2
 They are all gonna get problems ,my fox doss looses pressure after 4 months of riding ,yes lateral play and forward back play (it’s old ),my one up v1 ,a perfect thing in terms of working procedure,just a litle love (easy work),some lateral play and side to side (with the nut adjusted in the air valve ),the Thomson one just also looses some air afer some time and it sags ,and yes side to side play and etc.,the new one up v2 same issues regarding the v1 ,and it sags a litle,it might not seem important but it is if you pedal some miles ,the one up’s droppers are a marvelous thing ,except,I think that their air pressures are too high for the posts (both the v1 and v2 )I used to run my v1 at 210 psi ,that it is lower then recommended,but the post was brilliant ,except for not raising fast enough (not racing so…,),but the smoothness was brilliant,I could drop the post just with litle pressure ,and pressuring in the back of the saddle with my fingers ,cause most posts don’t ,only when putting pressure on the nose of the saddle,BUT when I put the dropper within the recommended pressure 250/300 ,say 275 psi ,the post just starts to sagging a little,and that smoothnesses just disappears,same on the V2 ,so maybe the recommended pressures are not very healthy for the cartridges,maybe people at one up can’t feel that but it is there ,the only draw back I see with lower pressure is when the post is down you could raise it with your hands ,like it has a free stoke ,but I think that one up should figure this thing out ,i do not know what it is ,but it shouldn’t do that ,but I must say a very easy to maintain and the best for the price ,just a little thing I do prefer the first remote ,not so plastic like the second one ,how could people talk so bad about it ,ONE UP solve this sagging thing at higher pressures ((3/5 mm yes it’s noticeable)and that forward back ,the side to side it’s not bad at all when ridding .thanks :-)))))
  • 2 1
 I’ve used this dropper for several weeks and it has been great. Just make sure to drop the saddle before flipping it over or hanging it and you’re good to go. Great action and killer construction. It’s an excellent option.
  • 4 0
 I like wolf tooth stuff but I'm pretty sure my Bike Yoke Divine is self bleeding.
  • 2 0
 I’ll keep using the KS that came on my bike until it doesn’t work. It goes up, it goes down, what more do I need it to do.

When it does kick the bucket I’ll probably get a PNW Loam.
  • 1 0
 Low stack and clean looking but for 350 you’d think it would come with a lever and cable+ housing . Ive had good luck w spec command post and for under $200 each they both came w/ two different lever choices +cable/housing.
  • 1 0
 I currently run a couple BikeYokes, and I'm excited to read of the new Wolf Tooth. It's not that my Bike Yokes are in any way flawed, but the Wolf Tooth seems to have all the same features: easy bleeding and charging without removing the post, and serviceability by the user. Now that there are TWO manufacturers offering these important features, the other manufacturers will be pressured to follow suit. Competition drives innovation.

Sending one of the "big name" seatposts back to the factory, with their long turn-around times, and getting charged half the price of a new dropper is nonsense. The user-replaceable cartridges are an improvement, but substantially adds to the lifetime cost of the seatpost.

If social media posts are any indication, Wolf Tooth is throwing is really focusing on customer support. You see them participating in this thread. You also see Sacki from BikeYoke posting. Fox, OneUp, and PNW? Crickets. Maybe they're lurking but keeping quiet because they don't offer anything to compete with this new wave of improved dropper posts. Hopefully they're taking notes.
  • 2 0
 I wonder if they raise all the way to the top unlike every Fox Factory Transfer I have that stop short and cause me to have to pull them to max extension with my legs?
  • 2 0
 Can confirm, they go all the way up. Also has a very audible sound at top out, so it’s never in question.
  • 2 0
 For those of us that actually work on our own stuff, NSMB has a great review including travel reduction and general service pictures.
  • 4 0
 I must be the only person using 9point8 droppers still.
  • 1 0
 You are. But I still have their wolf tooth collab lever! Love that thing. And they had some clever things going too
  • 2 0
 Hah! You aint alone. I have three. I know many others using 9.8 posts as well
  • 1 0
 I still have the fall line R, but if there was anything else lighter weight I'd be happy to ditch it
  • 1 0
 Nope, still got mine too. At this point, I'm gonna ride it till it rusts out from under me! Paid almost $500 for it, might as well try to get my monies worth!
  • 1 0
 @mikkyberg: I wouldn't recommend letting it rust under you, 9.8 are prone to seizing inside the frame... if you can't remove it to service it, you're out the dropper and the frame!
  • 1 0
 You're not ! I bought mine in 2017 and it still works very well ! I would buy another one if I had to replace it.
  • 1 0
 Damn, I love me some Wolf Tooth stuff, but the PNW Loam is bombproof for two bones and change. I'll still use my Wolf Tooth levers though.
  • 1 0
 They say with the bleed valve you will never have to change a cartridge again, so even tho $100 more than competition, you will save on down time and cartridge costs i guess?
  • 1 0
 Given that the only Europe dealer of wolftooth stuff is unreliable AF. I'll pass. It's like pay your money, cross your fingers and good luck if it turns up or not.
  • 12 0
 We've got 14 distributors in Europe. Any bike shop that has access to those distributors also has access to Wolf Tooth. There's a full list in the Dealers page on the footer of our website. We also ship direct from our website to anywhere in the world, whether to a distributor, shop, or a customer.
  • 2 3
 This definitely looks like a better option than a Bike Yoke. I'm not as jazzed on that post as it seems some people are, even though I've had it on my bike for three years. Getting maintenance parts is kinda hard (at least through COVID) and I keep having to replace air valve cores on mine because they keep leaking. I'm getting a One Up soon, so we'll see how that goes. My favorite post is the 9point8 that's on my XC bike.
  • 6 0
 That sounds like an odd problem. We do have one or the other problem here and there, but air loss is definitely one of the rarest issues and off like to doubt that the valve core is the issue. Have you ever gotten in touch with it's about this?
Also I can not see how it was hard to get spares. Unlike other brands we had everything in stock (almost) at all times, restaurant spare parts. Also all our distributors usually have all spares in stock.
Can you explain how it was hard to get spares, just for me to get an idea how we can improve?
  • 2 0
 Support your made in USA workers! Sure it cost a little more but you are supporting a local company.
  • 1 0
 @WolfToothComponents Can the actuator at the bottom of the post be rotated to different orientations? This helps with insertion depth on my frame. Thanks
  • 5 0
 Yes actuator can be rotated. Please only rotate clockwise as viewed from the bottom and take care not to damage the actuator as you rotate. There will be quite a bit of friction as there are a number of o-rings in the path.
  • 2 0
 @WolfToothComponents: Brilliant, this will allow me to fit a 160mm drop with some wiggle room. I've been waiting for someone to make a low 160mm post!
  • 3 0
 9point8!! If you know you know. Enough said.
  • 1 1
 I've been running my OneUp for over two years. Had to rebuild/service it one time and I'm pretty sure it didn't take much longer than 20 seconds to do.
  • 2 1
 Guarentee this post is better than OneUps POS lol. and the low stack height is noice
  • 2 1
 I resolve never to spend 2 or 3 times what is necessary for a functioning dropper post.
  • 2 0
 When is the new gravity dropper being released?
  • 2 0
 Wolftooth is the best of america. awesome company
  • 2 0
 Wolf tooth lever finally found its soul mate
  • 2 0
 Where is this wireless xfusion post they teased us with this spring??
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know which saddle that is? Can see it's an Ergon, but not sure which model.
  • 2 0
 It's the Ergon SM Enduro - one of my favorites.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks Mike!
  • 1 0
 Rainier Gen3 for the win. Reverb for the loss. Like you said good for cold weather.
  • 1 0
 I was gonna say that's s got clean looks but then saw the tacky graphics on the rear of it, shame.
  • 1 0
 Hey and One Up ,that shim on the v2 is better than the first ,but at the same time worst
  • 1 0
 Pick a dropper post and be a dick about it. Bike yoke unless you’re a poor.
  • 1 2
 No auto drop? Not interested.
Seriously, if someone can nail that without having to buy a frame with my post or only be 80mm...take my money.
  • 1 0
 Wolf Tooth should make a stem. Just sayin’.
  • 1 0
 What's the bike in the pictures? Maybe the Nomad?
  • 2 0
 Yep, I tested the post on the Nomad for a while - I wanted more drop than the 175mm Reverb it came with.
  • 5 1
 @mikekazimer: "I wanted not a Reverb" would also have been a totally understandable reason.
  • 1 0
 Looks good! I don't have any money but if l did l would buy one.
  • 1 0
 A video of the action would be nice.
  • 1 0
 ....and its almost double the price of a OneUp or SDG Tellis or PNW.
  • 1 0
 So, then this post should be self-bleeding on every down hill?
  • 1 0
 Great jon Wolf Tooth. This product looks amaing!
  • 1 0
 Great Job Wolf Tooth. This product looks amazing!
  • 1 0
 Great job Wolf Tooth. This product looks amazing!
  • 1 0
 No 240mm plus?
No thanks
  • 1 0
 240mm or gtfo
  • 4 6
 OneUp for the win!!!
  • 1 0
 Mine gets sticky constantly. Have to remove the cap and throw some grease under it but no big deal… just a bit annoying. My pnw rainer has been on my fatbike for a couple years now and seen -30c and its been flawless.
  • 3 0
 @solarplex: You need to add air to them once a year. If its sticky, pump it back up to 280 PSI, add the grease and you should be good go (unless you've got a v1 which wasn't as good). I've got several of them and they just need a PSI top-off once in a while.

If its still got issues, your seat clamp being too tight could be a thing. Or it just needs a new IGUS bushing which they'll gladly get you. OneUp has been super legit for us for years on the V2's.
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: If it is the V1 the new style bushing can help as well. the original bushing seems to swell as it ages and add too much friction, especially when it gets cold. And pump that baby up to 300 PSI.
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