RockShox Reveals Inverted XC Fork

Mar 20, 2014 at 18:49
by Mike Kazimer  

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Over the last few day, RockShox has been posting images on their Facebook wall that, when assembled and flipped, make it clear a new inverted fork is on the way. Called the RS-1 (the same name as RockShox's very first, non-inverted fork that was released back in 1989), the new fork looks to be aimed at the cross-country crowd, with a tapered carbon steerer and uppers designed to keep things light and stiff. There will also be a remote lockout, likely running through the right leg and out the small port at the top that can be seen in the pictures. Photos of the very bottom portion of the fork, where we'd imagine an air valve, damping adjustments, and a 15mm thru-axle are located, have just now been released. It will be interesting to see what steps RockShox has taken to maintain the new fork's torsional rigidity, one of the potential downsides to a inverted suspension design, but given the fork's short travel, cross-country intentions, this won't be as difficult of a task to achieve as it would be on a longer travel all-mountain or downhill fork. Cost, availability and other details are still up in the air, but full specifications should be available in the coming weeks. Is this initial foray into the world of inverted forks a sign of longer-travel options to come? We'll just have to wait and see.

















www.rockshox.com
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268 Comments

  • + 504
 I'm getting the shivers just thinking about it.
  • + 47
 And a woody.

*Here come the negative props*
  • - 4
flag Thimk (Mar 20, 2014 at 19:48) (Below Threshold)
 i see what cha did there...
  • + 31
 I always used to be a Shimano/Fox guy, but over the last years it seems the 2 companies are just always trying to play keep-up with the mega AVID/Sram/Truvativ/RockShox R&D budget and constant innovations. Seems like the monster company's always got the edge (except *arguably* in the brake department, though Avid may have redeemed themselves recently). I've owned 2 different bikes with the PIKE and every time I go back and forth between that and a FOX 34 I'm just blown away at the feel of the RS.
  • + 113
 Im totaly ƎpISԀ∩ down for this...
  • - 45
flag rage67 (Mar 20, 2014 at 20:38) (Below Threshold)
 I see what you did there
  • + 45
 no tits dingus^
  • + 31
 thumbs for the inverted totem tho
  • + 59
 SRAM the monster?

Lol

Shimano is in a different league.

That was a quality laugh.
  • + 21
 Sweet! Bring back the inverted forks! Also, @maxlombardy Just because a conglomerate makes a large variety of products doesn't mean it is the giant. SRAM Group (SRAM, Avid, Rockshox, Truvativ, Zipp, Quarq) to my knowledge in 2012 (I think, couldn't find an exact date) grossed around $500 million. For comparison, Shimano Cycling Division in the same year was near $1.6 billion. I would imagine we see SRAM as being the big innovators (although that is obviously arguable) because they have a larger proportion of their products and research dedicated toward mountain biking, and as this is a mountain biking website, we hear about and see them more.
  • + 4
 no fork will ever compare to Shivers except maybe Durados
  • + 4
 I hope your referring to the retro Durados? If so, high five to that! Taking mine (bolted to the front of an '09 Judge) to Whistler this summer. They help keep pace with friends on £6-7k super bikes Big Grin
  • + 6
 I am I run shivers on both my bikes single and dual crown and they feel better than new Marzoochi's
  • + 0
 Inverted XC fork eh... wonder how wide that leg spacing is...
  • + 9
 to be brutally honest…I don't see what you did there.
  • - 37
flag tjet (Mar 21, 2014 at 14:34) (Below Threshold)
 What are the advantages of this? Lol, just as worthless, useless, overpriced piece of shit lefty....
  • + 3
 how is this in anyway a shitty lefty? just because it is inverted doesnt make it comparable to a lefty fork. The lefty has a hole double crown thing going on, and a ton of proprietary parts that wont be available after a couple years of release, if any way, this is more innovative, with the carbon uppers, and looks a lot stiffer than a fork that only hooks up on one side.
  • + 12
 @Big-JD have you ever ridden a lefty? Its def the lightest and stiffest xc fork ive ever tried.. i doubt this could compare...

On another note it reminds me of a carbon niner rigid fork.. looks cool but not sure how itll ride
  • + 5
 regardless of what fork it is, i love the idea of inverted forks, but with the amount of lowers ive seen that are bashed i hope the stanchions are cheap to replace.
  • - 13
flag justshredit (Mar 21, 2014 at 18:11) (Below Threshold)
 Where would you mount your disc brakes??
  • + 35
 On the disc brake mount...
  • + 3
 I always regretted selling my Shiver and buying an 888.
  • + 0
 why is there a hub on it....?
  • + 4
 @Jonathan

Most people won't remember Maverick, but when they did the DUC 32, they had a 24mm hub to try to stiffen the front end. While this is likely not that big, they might be using a specific hub that adds stiffness.
  • - 5
flag Quesadilla34 (Mar 22, 2014 at 23:01) (Below Threshold)
 Maxlombardy, agreed in the sense that brakes that are not the monster brands are better, and that the pike's new damper seems to have all the hype, but aside from that, rockshocks rears all suck but the vivid air, and the boxxer is falling behind though it is decent. The 40 is the best dh fork on the market, and now marzocchi is taking down the boxxer for second, where as the float forks (non CTD) reighn supreme for freeride-dj,and now DVO has shocks to try and dethrone the fox seeries. But hell, even the VanR feels amzing compared to most RS rears. Monster company rules for suspension. As far as drive train, its a toss up between shimano and sram, though srm seems to be massively improvi.g
  • + 2
 sǝɹɐɔ ʎpoqou
  • + 1
 April Fools? Surely!
  • - 1
 Quesadilla34- The newest Rockshox product is really good. The new Monarch+ rear shock is really nice, the Pike doesn't have much competition, the new Boxxer is and will be the best dual crown out there and will be released at Sea Otter (never tried the DVO, so keep that in mind). Sram has the drivetrain market cornered. There literally is no competition in that segment right now.
  • + 3
 HOW BOUT NO.
  • + 3
 @downhillolly

You crazy dutch bastard.
  • + 2
 RS is far to be the best in dh fork, Fox is not best one either... Missing the old school forks meant to least long philosophy on the new forks. Perhaps a turn of head to look back would help to make better things. That's why I like the Kowa 200 GF, DVO and new Dorado.
  • + 57
 Hopefully this evolves into an inverted Lyrik or Totem.
  • + 13
 or even a inverted Argyle! dirt jump world have yet to seen inverted forks! Big Grin
  • + 23
 atomlab had a 60mm USD fork for DJ, IIRC.
  • + 11
 and single crown shiver worked as a DJ fork.
  • + 5
 And suck it did. even fell apart.

But this would be something much nicer. Wink
  • + 2
 I don't know if there'd be much of a substantial benefit from a inverted 160mm+ single crown fork to make it worth while, if they could ensure the torsional stiffness is on par with a traditional long travel single fork then I'd be curious.
I'd love to see a lyrik with a DH version of the charger damper in it.
  • + 7
 I miss the totem, hopefully they will replace it tho.
  • + 1
 Manitou had a single crown inverted dj fork also didnt they?
  • + 2
 You're thinking the single Dorado. It was a 4x fork, if I recall, but realistically that means it's great for DJ.

Maverik also had an inverted single for a very long time, but eventually got rid of it while keeping their 6" dual crown inverted fork. Neither is much a DJ entry though.
  • + 2
 Atomlab made an inverted DJ fork a few years ago, no idea if it was any good, but there's a review of it on bikeradar:

www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/forks-suspension/product/review-atomlab-pimp-60-10-37742
  • + 1
 Think personally the lyrik will get beefed up along with the boxxer, 38mm chassis anyone ? makes sense now the pike is 35 mm stanchion and 160mm travel. lyrik pushing 180mm on 38 stanchions would make sense and in all honesty the boxxer line up could do with a refresh, whether it needs bigger stanchions remains to be seen but the dampers certainly need sorting out.
  • + 3
 So.. no love for the totem?
  • + 2
 If you think about it, whats the point? they had far too much over lap with the lyrik and totem, the existing lyrik can be setup as 180mm travel, you dont need 40mm stanchions really. as much as i love the idea of the totem it was a 2.7kg fork that only offered 20mm more travel than the original lyrik at 2.2kg, not that i care that much about weight, but....
  • + 1
 I have a totem, love it, but kind of want to be able to put a charger damper into it, probably wouldn't work but would be nice if it did
  • + 1
 The Totem was too heavy even the solo air was heavy. My Lyrik dh always felt better
  • + 2
 It was heavy and rode like crap.
  • + 2
 Talking about the Alab fork^^
  • + 1
 Same here. Somehow there is an extra comment in between now...
  • + 4
 I love my Totems. I don't know why people say they ride like crap, maybe your not pushing them hard enough. If that's the case thn get some Pikes.
  • + 1
 Yeah they are a fork that has to be riden hard but they will take absolutely everything you can throw yourself at, smoothest fork i have ever ridden
  • + 1
 Boardlife69- Totems don't ride like crap, they are really nice forks. If you think that the damper is better than the Pike for aggressive riding, you are sadly mistaken. The new Boxxer will be using the charger damper from the Pike, just like the last gen Boxxer took the damper from the Totem.
  • + 1
 Dave, the damper may not be better than the pike (because it was designed a few years ago) for aggressive riding, but it still handles it very well, and the chassis is much better than the pike for the rough stuff.
  • + 1
 bigger stanchions, more stiction. I had a Totem but much prefer my Lyrik. I didn't notice the travel difference but the weight and stiction was noticeable.
  • + 30
 Are we know going to have to "pick a fork direction... And be a dick about it"
"Eww is that inverted... On a 29er"
  • + 0
 Gotta tell NSMB this haha! They need to add it to a vid.
  • + 3
 Some of us have been being dicks about this for years. :p
  • + 23
 Thats a double seatpost
  • + 17
 Sweet! Now I can have an Enduro specific saddle for descending AND an XC saddle for climbing. I hope it comes with a lever control. My handlebars could use one more lever or button...
  • + 29
 Nay, its a double lefty
  • + 9
 I wish marketing teams would stop trying to tell us we need something new, still waiting for my electronic shifting, gearbox, 29er dh bike, with a zero stem, belt drive, rear air shock, inverted fork, 800mm bars and an 11inch high bb that I cant do without. Dont forget my i beam saddle with a tyre glued to the top.
My current fork works fine thanks, no need for a new fork here. I dont buy into marketing bs.
Why dont rs work on a rear shock to challenge the ccdb in terms of performance instead?
Take the ccdb, do back to back testing on the trackmand the dyno against the vivid and find out what ohlins have done to make the ccdb so good and fast on the track.
Take the learnings and employ them over the range.
Or improve your processes and assembly techniques in the background to make the same or better quality parts for cheaper....
.
LOVE ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE, HATE MARKETING DEMANDS.
  • + 12
 Hyping new technology is what EVERY industry is going to do to justify R&D costs. Its the way progress works. Prices will go down with time
  • - 3
 Yes all companies do the hyping of new crap. But Sram are definately the market leaders in overhyped new crap.
  • + 6
 Less hype, less work for engineers.
  • + 24
 No one is forcing you goofballs to buy a new component. Gabriel, name some overhyped new crap. Are you referring to the new Pike? Which is arguably the best single crown fork ever made? Are you referring to 1X drivetrains started with XX1 that have revolutionized MTB drivetrains?

The "hype" you guys speak of is marketing, and every company on earth worth anything does it. Welcome to the world.
  • + 18
 Learned a new word, "goofball" thanks pinkbike users, my english is improving every day Smile
  • + 2
 "...still waiting for my electronic shifting, gearbox, 29er dh bike, with a zero stem, belt drive, rear air shock, inverted fork, 800mm bars and an 11inch high bb that I cant do without. Dont forget my i beam saddle with a tyre glued to the top."

You just described my wet dream, right there!
  • + 2
 Neverlost... not every company. There is much material that engineering do not tell marketing. How many undesclosed claims are in a product? If you claim it, they can copy it, analyze it, block its future path with blocking IP etc. Could be a design item for performance, or for dfm. How many changes do you think happen to a product, characterization testing v development testing. What things can do, compared to what the marketing claims say they can do is invaluable information to those who have it. The are of can v claimed is the space where the blackbox guys etc operate. Knowing a products real limitations means you know many of its possibilities. It is what drives development engineers, it is what we live for. It is what I live for, its why my work laptop comes home at night and at the weekends. Make a better product, to a higher standard in less time and for less money.
  • + 2
 nobody has to buy anything if they think it is hype. What I want to see is companies pushing the boundaries and innovating. Motorbikes have been using upside down forks for decades now, and a conventional fork is seen as retro. Revolution, not evolution!
  • + 6
 Betsie, what you say describes more an entrepreneur with engineering background than a regular engineer. You are not describing enginners job, you are gloryfying it as if you were the carrier of the light for the masses, the masters of using science transforming matter into an useful goods. Every profession has it's share of arrogance and utopian ideals having little to do with reality and that one is yours. But your case as many more, has stain at the core because you are talking about honest and righteous, erhical approach to design a mountain bike which is useless for the good of humanity, It is yet another fruit of surples. Zoom out... the point is the demand to ride a bike, without it, engineers work is a mental masturbation, the bike needs to be built and sold, and marketing does the selling part. Marketing increases demand. How about the aesthetical dimension that in most cases compromises performance? Have you seen a sports car where more money have been put to enginering than to Outer body design and marketing? You can't put everything into numbers especially that the main principle of most purchases is not the rationale, that engineers operate on. For As much as the profession of an engineer is at the core of every innovation, he is still a piece of the whole process and larger and more complex the design the more hype is necessary to sustain it's development.

Peace
  • + 3
 Neverlost, you have done it for me:

1x drivetrains were not brought about by xx1. 1x drivetrains have been around forever, but Sram have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars telling everyone they they ALONE thought of perhaps not having a front mech and putting on a wider ratio rear block to compensate.

In 1998 I had a Dmr Trailstar with 1 front ring, a crap chain device and an 11-36 rear block. It was a bloody awesome bike and my chain didn't fall off as often as when I had multi front ring set up. Roll forward ten years and suddenly Sram come up with this genius new idea and hype the crap out of it until everyone thinks that no one had ever thought of it before.

There are plenty of other examples, but you handed me that one on a plate so there you go...
  • + 2
 Dont think that marketing have the complete say, they don't, it is not how it works or has to work. I work as a development enginneer for a very good company. Our Credo is very important to us.
www.jnj.com/about-jnj/jnj-credo
Marketing plays a part, industrial designers play a more important role. On how it works intrenally.... well that is confidential...
As an engineer, you can sit on the fence and watch the world go by, or look for IP, trade secrets, develop and evolve. Any engineer that has worked with me over the last 20 years, knows which camp I come from. I get to work one some very exciting projects and challenges, often driven and led through the whole stage gate process by myself. We have some very tallented engineers and a great team who are all focused on the 11million patients we serve every day. Its just how we roll. There is a pretty strict entry process for jnj, medical devices, I guess that is why we have so much focus and innovation from within R&D, this drive comes from the very top, which is great.
  • + 1
 The lesson to be learned in this "discussion" is: don't be so arrogant as to think your profession is more important than anyone else's. In every business, everyone works together. Without marketing, engineers wouldn't sell anything. No matter how important or innovative it is. Without engineers, marketing would have nothing to sell. Without custodial services, everyone would get sick and not be able to work.

Get off your high horse. Pretend that you don't buy into marketing. The beauty of Marketing is that they've already got to you, even when you deny it.
  • + 2
 smike, sorry if it came across that way, but it is not the way it is intended.

Have marketing already got me?.... I would say mostly no, I don't buy into a new fad, I buy into what I can justify and afford, then test it, normally buying 2nd hand, unless it is the likes of handlebars. I find testing things enjoyable.

I am the strange one who has a little blue book with times for different local dh tracks, sections of tracks (using freelap), settings used, how they made the bike feel, mistakes made and where, the weather conditions, tire choice etc. Sad I know, but I enjoy this side of riding. I love building a track, then trying to find the fastest way down it for me.

Having just tested a CCDB on my DHR, I wish that I had bought into that one a long time ago.... it was always just too expensive, but having found a good deal 2nd hand, the test results were outstanding compared to the 2013 Vivid and 2012 RC4.
  • + 2
 Inverted forks are not a fad. The first ones I saw were made by Simmons in the early 1980's, maybe 1981? The tracking is so much better on an inverted fork that the moto world switched in the late 80's early 90s. I am aware of the incorrect claims that the weight penalty is easier to take on a moto, but the reality was Suzuki tried ti keep the conventional fork alive, but it needed such large diameter tubes to equal the tracking of an inverted design that it suffered from stiction and was heavier than an inverted design.

THE MAJORITY OF THE FLEX THAT HAPPENS IN THE FORK HAPPENS AT THE BOTTOM CROWN. LARGER TUBES THERE INCREASES STEERING PRECISION, AND COMPARE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN INVERTED DESIGN TO A CONVENTIONAL DESIGN THERE. ITS SIMPLY MARKETING THAT PROPOGATES THE FALSE INFORMATION THAT CONVENTIONAL FORKS ARE MORE RIGID!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Wow, neg props because I actually posted accurate information.
  • + 2
 Willie so old and caring about neg props Smile
  • + 2
 However I advise you to look at steel masts for electric lines and consider why are they made from thin rods a d have bracings, instead of being thick tubes with gigantic foundations Wink cost + weight + simplicity of construction
  • + 1
 It would be pretty hard to keep mud out of a latticed structure Smile . A tube remains the simplest way to make a sliding structure (which a mast for an electric line does not have to do.) I have seen a company make a frame out of a latticed structure though. It was too expensive.

I know what you mean as the arch creating the cross support. It simply isn't going to affect the clamping area (or rigidity in a cast structure) at the crown. You can do the math, but there is a slight hit in torsional rigidity, which actually allows the wheel to follow irregularities in the surface better than a conventional design, but that is significantly overshadowed by the increase in rigidity in the other planes. The conventional design gives up a lot in fore/aft, and lateral rigidity compared to an inverted design.
  • + 2
 Sorry willie, was trying to hit positive props and hit negative by accident. Tablets!
  • + 2
 I know crap but I did hear opinion of two ace Dhillers who had to do with latest Dorado, they both are now happy to be sponsored by Fox to ride a stiffer Fox40 at the same weight. So I guess bicycle USD forks will have to follow the path of "one day they will be better". On paper they may be stiffer... An inverted usd fork for XC racing? those people still ride 620mm bars, 120mm stems and refuse to use dropper posts. Give majority of dhillers ans endurers on usd forks and then we can talk marketing. In fact I do not believe in your theory because marketing can market and push anything making at least a bit of sense and people will still buy it. XX1 11sp bubble is burst, but people will always see it asthe onlygoid way of running large gear ratio cassettes. They brought n/w chainrings, thank you forever but smooth gear changes, in mountain freaking biking? Only marketing can give sense to it.
  • + 1
 Try riding with a WC level XC rider! Their technical skills are very good. We had an U23 XC WC racer pitch up at a local timed dh event and go faster than some WC dh boys, and he was on a Mondraker Zennith with single ply minions on. Dropper posts just don't work for XC racing, no point being slightly faster down a hill when you are slower up, so stuck behind the guy without the post. Just because they race XC does not mean that they are not very fast at Dh or Enduro.
  • + 1
 I did have a chance to ride with good xc racers, I do not doubt their skill, I meant that in irder to be best at what they do, they make major compromises to overall bike handling capability which are silly to make for an enthusiast. They also can get over obvious disadvantages like Nino Shurter not choosing a 29er for fireroad epics. So whether they ride usd fork or not, XX1 or Di2 tripple chainset, it is ONLY a matter of own subjective taste and... marketing.
  • + 1
 Willie, tracking (as in your front wheel pointing in the same direction as your bars) is worse in a USD. The advantage is fore/aft rigidity as you say and unsprung weight. The unsprung weight is far lower so the wheel spends alot more time in contact with the ground. Moto forks are already far heavier built to deal with the loads encountered at 160mph so the slight loss in steering stiffness goes out the window as by far the weakest link in the chain is your arms. On an mtb your arms are strong enough to twist the forks quite a lot, so usd designs at a sensible weight are very difficult to achieve with todays material tech.
  • + 2
 Was Nino at a disadvantage... Nino was 18th at the first round, where he had an issue with his fork when out in the lead, then 3 wins, a 2nd, 3rd.... Sorry, I don't see where his disadvantage was with wheel size.
  • + 2
 Betsie I refered to a tiny disadvantage by runnig 650b in opposite to 29er for riding Cape epic... and by riding with your buddies of serious caliber you should obtain enough perspective to realize that as far as XC racing goes tech plays such a minimal role that any of the top guys could take a bike from 2007 and still remain competitive, which cannot be said about DH or Enduro.
  • + 1
 I would love to test 650B against 29, to see what the advantage is for a non-elite level rider.
Is it really an advantage or was it all marketing?
Remove the sales pitch from the equation and see what actually works, keeping the external variables as controlled as possible.
Sorry, not sold on the 29er speed argument, if it covered smooth ground that fast compared to 26 or 650, we would see other disciplines and sports moving to 29. If it was just a case of going bigger and bigger to go faster and faster over smooth ground, why stop at 29? The fact is that companies have to sell things, and if they tell the masses it is better, many of the masses will follow and buy into the placebo effect they get from what they are told.
  • + 2
 Gabriel, tracking is the wheel's ability to follow your line through a corner. The slight (and I mean SLIGHT) flex allows the wheel to shift slightly without breaking traction. Too stiff is no good. Think 1997 Honda CR250R. I had one, and revalved the fork to 1/4 the factory settings as the frame had no give, resulting in too little flex making the fork bounce around (this is a frame issue, not a fork issue.) The service manager at the local moto shop who sponsored a number of pro level riders used my fork settings. BTW, moto is typically less than 50mph. Top gear rarely exceeds 80mph in an MX bike. I raced the 6 speed Husqvarna (XC version, rather than the CR)in the 80's and it was one of the few bikes that could do 100mph in stock form.
  • + 1
 I wrote moto as in "motor powered". Yes MX bikes rarely hit over 50/60 without a bloody long run up, but 160 is quite easily achievable on a lot of larger street bikes, meaning the forks have to be over engineered to deal with those loads despite rarely actually getting there.

Indeed to little give is a very bad thing, i remember a few years ago (05/06?) Yamaha bringing out a new chassis for their Moto GP bikes and all the riders complaining that the front end was too stiff, similar to the CR250 you described. You could see their front wheels skipping about in hard corners compared to other bikes. So yes a little give is a good thing, but on an mtb USD forks generally give FAAAR too much flex. I have myself plowed a set of Dorados into a deeply bermed corner and looked down to see my front wheel pointing a good 20 degrees to the outside of the corner compared to my bars. I only weigh 10 stone and the fork was pretty much box fresh (and yes all the relevant bolts were torqued.) This is too much flex. Waaay too much. I am yet to see any USD fork on an mtb that can compete even with a boxxer for stiffness, and to be honest boxxers arent the stiffest right way up forks out there...

On an interesting side note, I was in the British Motorcycle Museum the other week having a look at the line up of Norton Race bikes from 1900 to 2010, and noticed they all had right way up forks except the original 1900s one. Which surprised me more than a little I must say. Figure that one out...
  • + 0
 People need to have respect for various occupations and for various designs. Everyone shills out the myriad reasons why inverted forks are better, then why do the guys winning world cups do so on non-inverted designs? Do we think that the bike industry just glommed onto a bad idea for the last decade? It is all about what makes sense for the intended application. Right now that is not inverted DH forks in my opinion, but it may be inverted XC forks.

Everything from engineering to ID come together to sell a product that will be successful. If you are an engineer, then you must have noticed by now that the VAST majority of the population does not think like you and they need technical concepts to be broken down and described from a 10,000ft level. That is what you are calling hype. What do you expect someone to write? "Oh, we made this fork. It is kind of like some old BS that you rode back in the day, but better now because we know our stuff". Not a lot of folks buying that. I dig the tech as much as anyone else but you need the marketing to sell products to the populace. Yes, there are performance design attributes that don't make it into a marketing pitch, but those are possible missed opportunities for marketing and sales.
  • + 1
 That is all true indeed. You can't really sell something without doing any marketing, but its when a crap product with amazing marketing sells more than a good product with poor marketing that I get annoyed. Some companies seem to spend more on marketing than they do on R&D, and that's just plain wrong. I have grown used to seeing identical products from the same Thai factory being sold for completely different prices purely cos the more expensive one is a shiny colour, has a cool brand on it and has been advertised far more. The really depressing thing is 9 times out of 10 people buy the more expensive one because they believe the hype (more often than you'd think, outright lies). It makes me sad. It makes the parts I want to buy more expensive for no reason, and it lines the pockets of the greedy whilst driving the good guys who just want to sell nice parts that work, at reasonable prices, out of the market Frown
  • + 1
 Gabriel, as far as I agree with most of you are saying here, your last three sentences are a bit overdone. People buy what they want, and let them do it, sure very often it's driven by the short sighted vision of buying improvement - I used to care a lot about it but then I realized that it doesn't make my life any better by recognizing it. It definitely does little to people reading my moaning in that subject. I mean, it's good to point out someone's mistake but you have to be aware of the fact that it takes it's toll on you. Just let it pass by, you never know if in the greater scheme it does more harm or good. Judgment is ok, what we do with it, is what matters. Too many people take it too far putting others into drawers. The moment we see a poor rider on an expensive bike, and we think "what a wanker", is one thing, you say it and forget it. But if it follows by "what a fkng wanker, i can't believe it,he em ekh whaa ehh..." it starts to fuel itself, it is the moment when we should realize that we have a problem Wink
  • + 1
 Hehe. Wise words Waki

I must say I don't go in for all this hating on crap riders with nice bikes. If I see a guy on a bike waaaaay too good for his skill level, i think "good on him, if he really loves the sport he will get better very fast on that bike". If I see a really good rider riding all the most fashionable current hype parts, rather than just what he needs to go fast, i have been known to think "what a wanker" Don't really think much more about it than that. but yeah on Pinkbike I do have a habit of going on a bit longer than necessary. Once I start typing I figure I may aswell make my whole point. I quite enjoy the discussions to be honest as long as they have interesting points of view in them, rather than just a slanging match.

But yeah, perhaps I should just let people get on with buying shiney crap if it makes them happy. Just think they will be so much happier in the long run if they see through the hype and buy what they need.
  • + 1
 Take it ease, we all go there from time to time Smile
  • + 5
 wow this is totally new ... i had never seen this before...
www.marzocchi.com/template/detailProdotti.asp?LN=UK&idC=1686&IdFolder=113&idMY=2145&IdOggetto=3077

are you kidding me?
  • + 3
 I don't think anyone is claiming this is the first inverted fork...
  • - 1
 im just saying its a look alike... a few years ago fox was wondering about a inverted fox 40 and it was nothing a look alike of shiver...
  • + 8
 What is this a fork for ants?
  • + 4
 Isn't having the inner stations at the bottom with no guard much more susceptible to damage on the trail. The scrapes and chips on my forks are all on the bottom half of the lowers.
  • + 3
 I bet they'll incorporate some kind of stanchion guard at the production version. I guess the teaser pics feature no stanchion guard as it looks cooler this wasy and you can see more clearly the whole inverted design.
  • + 5
 Rock shox seals leak right side up. You might have to refill the oil after each ride with these.
  • + 0
 you know that you should change your seals once a season if you ride a lot right?
  • + 1
 Once a season..yes.. I always have. But with the boxxers I owned it was more like at least once a month. I will never own a rock shox fork again. There are too many other options that just do the job better.
  • + 2
 looks like they have taken the technology used by some other brands ... the oval shape at the upper part of the fork (can I call the uppers uppers on an inverted design - please help. I am confused!)

Have a look st this stuff here seen at Eurobike show last year and it was the stiffest fork I had my hands on so far. Better torsional rigidity than an Fox 36, The tappered head tube also uses the same system, which is a 1.1/8 shaft in combination with an 1.5 cone set that is worked it the bridge. The reason for doing so is a reduced load of force to the shaft. What should result in a longer lasting unit.

But check it for your self. Here is the link:

www.german-a.de/de/pdf/flyer/GA_katalog_2014.pdf
  • + 3
 I'd be much more inclined to get this than a 2014 fox fork.. they changed the CTD remote and is only good for 2014 Fox forks. Good move Fox. Way to make some of us want to switch to another company! -End rant
  • + 3
 I'm guessing they did this for the Costco and Walmart assembly dudes do they can't install the fork with the brace on the wrong side!
  • + 4
 I think April 1st is coming soon, wouldn't be surprised if this is just a teaser for a April Fool's joke... Just saying
  • + 6
 Specialized got me bad on April Fools a couple years back... The "Ultralight Carbon Disposable Demo" that was supposedly only good for 1-2 race weekends. It was something like $15000 got you 5 frames for the season.

Turns out the pictures were of an S-Works Epic with a Fox 40 and DH tires...
  • + 1
 I'm love new technology, but this has me scratching my head. The idea of inverted forks is to reduce unsprung weight, and on a sportbike that makes sense, but on mountain bikes, even XC, unsprung weight has a lower impact on performance and lowers (uppers?) are already pretty damn light. Am I wrong here?
  • + 1
 Waste of time I had upside down forks on my Beta Trials bike years ago and I had more hassle with them than anything Beta ended up going back to the normal way up as the forks had to much flex and the seals went on them much faster and not many people were buying the bikes with them on. And on top of that they mark much easier. I would not have upside down forks if you paid me been there worn the tee shirt I shall be staying with my normal up right forks thank you very much.
  • + 2
 Wellp, thats it lads. Call up Rockshox. Tell them to stop the production lines, MightyChub aint buyin.

It is possible that suspension technology may be better in the years since your Beta Trials bike I am thinking. At least entertain the possibility?
  • + 1
 Maybe I will be proved wrong but I will stick with what works and has worked since I have been on two wheels using shocks. They look great but lets see how they perform in the real world of mountain biking.
  • + 1
 I bet this thing will flex...like me in any mirror. That being said, I bet it would be awesome on a devoted XC race bike...which has kind of fizzled off in these recent years, and has morphed into "Enduro". Whatever the hell that is...
  • + 2
 It's going to be a good 2014/2015 for Rock Shox as the charger damper is going in a number of different models from boxers to XC forks, plus Boxxer is getting black gold stanchions.
  • + 2
 charger damper is cool
  • + 2
 dinosaurs are cool too.
  • + 0
 The entire market will go USD, and here's why. You can run any size wheel in a USD fork, clearance will not be an issue.with very small travel mods. Trail can be altered by changing just the stanchion axle blocks which is a very simple threaded on assembly. This allows manufacturers to greatly increase major component crossover in their lineups. Also it looks bitchen and Enduro as fuck.
  • + 4
 guna need a longer steerer
  • + 2
 Are there any advantages of the fork being inverted? I'm about to buy a new fork - Manitou Marvel - but if there are (major) benefits I can wait for this Rockshox
  • + 26
 Number one advantage: It looks badf*ckinass.
  • + 3
 I'd wait until after sea otter to classic next month.
Will fox debut its answer to then pike there?
Many new bits are made public there...
  • + 5
 David, as a rider that lived through many fork releases, I would wait a year before jumping on one. They will be expensive at first because they will be top of the range, and let other riders see how they go in the real world (i.e. no mobile workshop in tow).

Advantages? Wetter seals. That's about it. Anyone who says less unsprung weight is incorrect as the magnesium lowers of forks weigh practically nothing. Fox just tossed the idea of releasing an upside down fork because, if I remember correctly, they couldn't get the torsional rigidity they were after within their desired weight limit. MX comparison is not valid as MX forks can be a lot heavier and stiffer.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the comments all, I've read good reports on the Manitou so I'll go with that, I reckon. It seems as there really aren't any worthwhile advantages with an inverted fork. Have to say though, some of the 'offs' I've had have left my current fork inverted, wheels up though.......
  • + 1
 If you have lots of offs and crashes, note that rocks are more likely to gouge a fork down low, which is cosmetic damage to a normal fork, but could be fatal for an upside down fork.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel - absolutely right! The lowers of my RS Lyrik are trashed with scratches and gauges. The uppers....still butter smooth!
  • + 1
 Less unsprung weigth is probably almost allways a benefit.
I loved my old Shiver and Dorado so im exited about this path RS are treading.

But for a hardtail im sold on the www.lauf.com forks. Smile

Cheers.
  • + 4
 I thought everyone already knew this was a fat bike fork?
  • + 0
 As time goes by, our mountain bikes are becoming more like Motocross Motorbikes. How long before inverted forks, gearboxes and back wheels smaller than the front are all developed and become our new standard, It seems so obvious to me that it will be this way. Repectfully, if you disagree I would definitly like to hear why as I am not a mechanic of any kind - just an interested rider. Thanks!
  • + 1
 Inverted forks have been on mountain bikes for years, gearboxes have been on mountain bikes for years, smaller back wheels have been on mountain bikes for years. Taking inspiration from other sports is no bad thing.
  • + 1
 In my case its not convenient because it gets dirtier faster and could afect the fork lubrication and wear with less durability. unless they come back to the rubber boots.
  • + 1
 So is carbon one piece steerer and lowers cheaper than a traditionnal design found on not-USD forks?

This fork on a XC hardtail would look sweet!
  • + 2
 LOL, all those enduro maniacs was waiting the travel and then... XC?? Hahahahahahaha...
  • + 1
 I always hear the worries of torsional rigidity being a downside compared to a usual fork but what benefits are gained from turning you fork upside down?
  • + 2
 A slicker feeling fork, the bushings and seals are always in the oil, unlike (not-all) normal forks where the oil has to splash up to the seals
  • + 1
 ahh thank you
  • + 2
 This is definitely interesting! Like the design and looking forward to see what the future holds
  • + 4
 Cool
  • + 1
 I wonder if they'll be using the keyway from the Reverb to stop them twisting? That could be a win for functionality and an epic fail for service intervals.
  • + 1
 Maybe its only going to be good enough for 97‰ of people and this is a marketing scam to get the professionals all wet, then they'll piss on them.
  • + 1
 Carbon axles with something like the manitou hex-lock might make inverted forks really viable in terms of torsional stiffness. Bring on the the new technologies and designs!
  • + 1
 I never thought I'd see the day. Good for you Rock Shox. I still don't like you, but good for you for doing something right for a change.
  • + 4
 FOX fan boy alert.
  • + 6
 he's never heard of a pike
  • + 1
 If you want to spray some fork spray on the forks, for example Juice Lube fork spray, how can you do it without getting it over the rotors/calipers/brakes?
  • + 0
 inverted:
flip bike, spray round seals, wipe excess with a cloth, flip bike

non inverted:
spray round seals, wipe excess with cloth

Oh no, please don't make me flip my bike, that's such an arduous task...
  • + 1
 Well it's kind of obvious that you flip the bike, but I meant if you got it in the caliper part of the front brake, like over the pads and stuff by accident. But never mind...
  • + 1
 That's the point I'm making. If you've flipped the bike and are spraying downwards then you're not going to affect them. If you were really that worried you could put a sheet up. You're probably more likely to catch it on a standard fork as the brake is below the seals, so some could run off or you could mis-aim.

Plus the fact that the oil readily sits at the lowest point, up against the seals, means you don't need to lube them as often.

Tip, check which manufactures back the use of juice lubes. Pretty sure Mojo (Fox UK distributor) actually recommends not using it.
  • - 1
 Interesting. Will they scale up the xc-tech? Usually its trickle down limited functions from the dh offerings. That means RS has an upside down dh-fork ready... Can't have Manitou, DVO, MRP dictate the high end. Normal forks are dead.
  • + 17
 Yea first they killed 26" now they will kill normal forks. I will now go, listen to David Bowie "This is not America" and cry a bit
  • + 4
 @Wakaba: Thats a pretty big assumption, but you may be right.
The only major argument I can come up with for them going with an inverted design for xc first, without prior development and POC in a DH fork is purely for weight savings. Looking at ways to reduce weight, they are going to look at how to incorporate as much carbon, or rather remove as much metal as possible. In a regular non inverted fork, the magnesium lowers are already plenty light, but that cant really extend further up the fork, and going with a carbon steerer and crown, and bonding it to an aluminum stanchion is going to require a lot of carbon material to maintain adequate strength, and that design approach just doesnt suit carbon that well anyway as the gains are quite minimal. Going with the single piece carbon steerer/crown/uppers has been proven already in rigid forks. It looks like they essentially took that, a rigid carbon fork, and used that as the POC to build off of. And the result has got to be absurdly lightweight.
  • + 1
 ..
  • + 3
 Still waiting for a fully eletronic, 29 er, DH, inverted, Carbon-TI, ultra-light AND cheap option. All the rest is corporative crap. Dead Horse
  • + 1
 Wakaba I disagree homie. The RS and Fox forks are the top of the food chain in dual crown currently at least from a racing and performance standpoint. Manitou is a memory, DVO is about as unproven as anything can be, and I had to go search MRPs website to find the "groove" that is how successful that fork is. Inverted forks are cool and all, but I'd say for our application it is debatable that any of the current inverted forks are better than the modern non-inverted counterparts, at least today. That is not to say that one couldnt be made to beat the current top dogs, but I don't think that it exists yet.

Meta i agree with your comments.
  • + 2
 "Manitou is a memory" Thats a pretty bold statement, I see lots of people riding them now, and everyone who does loves them (The Dorado). I have a 2010 Boxxer WC and I rode my friends bike with a Dorado and loved it way more then my Boxxer. The slight flex of the Dorado made it easier to hold lines in off camber rough sections and was just a nicer feeling fork. I'll be riding an inverted fork on my next DH bike for sure.
  • + 1
 You hit the nail on the head. Steering precision is up due to better tracking on an inverted fork.
  • + 1
 not a big fan of any kind of inverted fork, but that's just my opinion. If it works for you, totally fine, to each his own. I think it looks weird though....
  • + 1
 ..well... I'd rather endure the looks of this fork on the rides of lycra dudes than the lefty.... the latter being the travesty to man....
  • - 1
 Inverted forks on MX bikes wasn't instantly better, lots of riders preferred the traditional set up but due to ruts and the way traditional forks went below the axles, they would hang up in ruts. Eventually it was the fact that you could go faster cause you could get through ruts better. I don't see this as an issue in MTB. It will be interesting to see if there is a shift to this technology.
  • + 3
 Less unsprung weight is a huge advantage, too, dude.
  • + 0
 Less unsprung for MX forks, but not MTB forks. For example, Maverick made unsprung forks and said that unsprung weight is not a consideration as their is no real difference.
  • + 2
 Plus, any small difference will be eaten up by the weight of the wheel and tire. That's the BIG unsprung weight in the equation.
  • + 3
 The unsprung weight test has been discussed somewhere before. Lower/outer leg castings are pretty damn light, certainly comparable to the weight of the reciprocating lower/inner tubes of a USD fork.
  • + 2
 Another advantage to usd forks is better lubrication for oil seals and bushings. Those are small differences that add up.
  • + 2
 As far as performance gains, I agree with the oil being above the seals as being a great thing, but next time you service your fork pick up the magnesium lowers. They weigh like nothing.
  • + 1
 I think they just put the stickers on upside down. Gotcha! Easy marketing move to make all you alls sport puptents.
  • + 14
 Or right now someone at RockShox is yelling "That was supposed to go up on April first you idiots!"
  • + 1
 The hub shell says "Predictive Steering". Ought to say "Predictable Steering".
  • + 1
 zeroing out is going to be horrendous on those !! cool idea but defo for the endure chaps
  • + 2
 It's not april 1st yet....
  • + 1
 Someone is going to make a boat load on covers for the lowers if this sells well.
  • + 1
 dont know if its a silly question but where does the brake mount go ? Smile they look awsome though
  • + 1
 bring back triple clamps but light weight, It would take a lot of unsprung weight off the front wheels.
  • + 2
 WTF? A week-an-a-half early for April Fools Day!
  • + 1
 I hear this fork is crazy expensive at retail ...like Boxxer World Cup expensive.
  • + 1
 Not to mention the cable rub on the uppers from where the front hose rubs during compression.
  • + 2
 Seems to be like Manitou's... with shorter service intervals!
  • + 1
 INVERTED RULES Smile THEY LOOK BETTER THAN THE OTHERS AND WORK BETTER TOO. I LOVE MY SHIVER.
  • + 1
 Good thing i didn't blow the wad on the leaf fork. Going to rock this carbon junt on some 10 foot step downs. #enduro
  • - 2
 Not gaining anything by going inverted on a single crown. They invert dual crowns because it offers a much more solid fork clamp area. Offering a more sturdy feel with less flex in the overall fork than a non inverted dual crown.
  • + 2
 Good job to the boy at Rock Shoxs
  • + 2
 Nice! Hope they follow through!
  • + 1
 Wish Fox kept up with the inverted 40. Winners dont quit and Quitters dont win
  • + 1
 It was a marketing ploy for Fox who missed the boat when redesigning the 40. There are two ways to market: Ours is the best, or theirs is worse. Fox is using the latter. How many negative reviews have we seen on a Dorado? I haven't seen any.
  • + 1
 Is it just me or am i the only one worried about scratching the stanchions?
  • + 1
 Looks like they just released the photo of the hub and axle of the fork: www.pinkbike.com/photo/10732984
  • + 1
 Now on sale in New Zealand.
  • + 2
 so ugly.....
  • + 1
 there defoe not gunna take off
  • + 0
 How would this work? the tire would be pushed into the upper part of the fork making it stop?
  • + 0
 too funny...they heard the rumors of DVO coming out with one so they hurried to put one out before DVO...
  • + 2
 We are definitely going to make one! We did it with the RAC fork 15 years ago without todays advanced manufacturing technologies. Its good to see RS getting inverted!
  • + 1
 2001 called. Marzo wants it's ideas back.
  • + 1
 I'm not sure that steerer is long enough ;-)
  • + 1
 Why does Rockshox keep making awesome things I cant afford??
  • + 0
 Actually I don't like it... DVO looks great and this looks a bit strange to me.
  • + 0
 You guys all realize this was done 15 years go by Bryson Martin who is the founder of DVO.
  • + 1
 kill it, kill it with fire. before it lays eggs.
  • + 1
 We'll probably need to sell our cars to buy one
  • + 1
 released a pic with an axle and hub now
  • + 1
 What's the advantage of an inverted fork?
  • + 1
 Vo v-brake mounts. No buy Wink
  • + 1
 Good thing it keeps the center of gravity at the lowest point possible....
  • + 1
 Inverted Boxxer with Charger Damper!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Look at it. It's wider than the bottom picture, and flat instead of round.
  • + 1
 Dumda da dum da dum DORADOOOOOO!!!
  • + 1
 Black invert lyrik with charger damper and 20mm axle would be great
  • + 1
 Black inverted boxxer please
  • + 0
 i got FOES inverted and it incredable .. but for xc R S got the best fork for sure!!
  • + 1
 This has to be an april fools joke right?
  • + 0
 keep the rigidity? the lefty can do it with only 1 leg.
so what's the advantage of this fork?
  • + 2
 Its an ambiturner.
  • + 0
 That new that do not even have a prototype for top shot, Its not even a new idea
  • + 1
 fat bike fork in the future?
  • + 1
 that would be awesome!
  • + 1
 it's already been conceived. Frames are already being built suspension corrected.
  • + 1
 Rockshox has already made a fat bike fork? link?
  • + 1
 There was a Lefty on a Fatbike with custom clamps at a gallery online from the Canadian Handbuild bikeshow last year. That looked like a good option for a fat bike. Cheers.
  • + 2
 The PITA of getting the custom clamps + the cost of those clamps on top of the cost of the lefty fork makes it not worth it for me. I'm excited to see a dedicated fork for fat bikes from one of the big players.
  • + 0
 No thanks I already have shivers.
  • + 1
 Ugly f....ers anit they
  • + 1
 I want my RAC back!
  • + 0
 Coming soon from DVO!
  • + 1
 Thru 20 mm axle pleeease!
  • + 0
 gonna be a fat bike fork first.
  • + 1
 kinda ugly, huh?
  • + 0
 Upside down forks = upside down mammaries. Different but looks good.
  • + 0
 dangit it's an xc fork :/ I can't enduro anything with it
  • + 1
 thats because its not enduro specific. maybe you could run this fork better if you got that 650b specific saddle
  • + 0
 I'm calling April Fools....
  • + 1
 Looks sick.
  • - 1
 Inverted forks work on motorcycles because of all the weight. Not effective for a mountain bike IMO
  • + 1
 Check your facts. That is all out wrong.
  • + 0
 Ah this is so weird to look at.
  • + 0
 who cares, its a XC fork - the CF will be covered in lycra.
  • + 0
 Next up inverted spandex.
  • - 1
 Ummm... Im sorry. It looks like poo. Anyone remember white brothers? Marzocchi shiver? Barf.
  • + 0
 Looks like it might fit a bmx lol
  • + 0
 An inverted lefty would just be dreamy!
  • + 3
 eerrrrmmm......Wouldnt that just be half of a regular triple crown fork since Lefty's are already inverted?
  • + 0
 Fat bike Frown
  • + 0
 Sounds gimmicky.
  • - 1
 I'm wondering how it will hold up in dusty, muddy and sandy terrain. Pretty pointless imo.
  • + 0
 In that regard, probably better than a regular fork. With inverted gravity is on your side to keep crap off the seals and keep those seals lubricated. I just think about every MTB fork I've ever had and all the lowers have had scuffs and scrapes galore, a lot of which are not from crashes. Doesn't matter on the lowers, but gouge the stanchion that way and your fork is done. Too risky to me for the type of terrain and riding I'm into.
  • + 2
 @satans they'll surely have a cover over the stanchions just like any other inverted fork, moto or mtb
  • - 1
 This will turn the Enduro world upside down.
  • + 0
 It will cost too much.
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