Stan's Bravo Carbon Wheels - First Look

Jun 25, 2015 at 18:14
by Mike Kazimer  
Stans Bravo

Stan's NoTubes may be best known for their tire sealant and aluminum rims, but they're venturing further and further into the world of carbon fiber. Last year saw the introduction of their carbon rimmed Valor cross-country wheels, and they recently unveiled details of the new Bravo all-mountain / enduro race wheelset.

Measuring 32mm externally and 26.6mm internally, the Bravo's carbon rims use Stan's Bead Socket Technology (BST). According to Stan's, by using a shorter rim sidewall profile and no bead hook the likelihood of pinch flats is reduced and the overall volume of the tire is increased, due to the fact that the lower portion of the tire's casing is not compressed inwards as much as it would be with a taller sidewall.

The Bravo wheelset is built around a completely new hub called the Neo. When designing the hubs, precision and durability were the company's top priorities, and the CNC'd hub shells are designed to have extremely tight tolerances to ensure that the bearings and freehub pawls are aligned correctly. Compared to Stan's previous mountain hub, the Neo's bearings are 4mm taller and 2mm wider for increased longevity, and the sealing has been improved throughout for better resistance against the elements.

Even the front hub end caps have been carefully designed to remain securely in place when the wheel is removed, preventing the frustration of pulling up to the trailhead only to find out that an endcap has somehow gone missing. Each end cap has a barbed seal that allows it to press on and rotate easily while being held much more securely in place.
Stan s Bravo
The Bravo rims measure 26.6mm internally and use a hookless design.

Stan s Bravo
A look inside the Neo Ultimate hub. Note how the hub flanges are angled to improve the the angle of the spokes as they travel from hub to the rim.
Stan s Bravo
The four pawl Neo freehub body on the left, and the six pawl Neo Ultimate XD driver on the right.

The 28 spoke wheels will be available in two different versions, the Pro and the Team. The Pro version is built around the Neo Ultimate hub, which uses a six pawl freehub body design to deliver a quick 5 degrees between engagement points, and has more extensive machining than the standard Neo hub to save weight. The Bravo Team wheels are laced to the standard Neo hub that uses a four pawl design and had 10 degrees between engagement points.

Claimed weight for the 27.5” Pro version is 1640 grams, with a price of $1900 USD. The Team version is expected to weigh 1705 grams and will retail for $1575 USD. The Bravo wheels will be available in 26”, 27.5”, and 29” versions for 12x142 or Boost 148 rear hub spacing, and 15x100 or Boost 110 front spacing, along with options that will fit a Cannondale Left or the RockShox RS-1. Available mid-July 2015.



www.notubes.com


121 Comments

  • 115 5
 Carbon isn't a new thing anymore. The $2000-3000 for a wheelset thing needs to go away- Particularly with hookless rims. Companies like Light Bicycle, who are making other companies' rims in addition to our own, are demonstrating how much wheels like this should cost.
  • 12 3
 I tried to read up on the Chinese generic carbon goods. How well do actually hold up? Has anyone actually confirmed they're coming out of the same (or similar) factories with same (or similar) materials/machinery just without the branding?

I mean, Kirkland Signature and many store brand groceries are just as good as General Mills, Kraft, etc. I just don't know how good these knockoff bike components are.
  • 7 3
 I'm interested as well. The last thing I want to do is drop $700 bucks on a nameless carbon rim only to have it disintegrate under its first drop.
  • 20 2
 I've got a bunch of friends on them, and haven't pulled the trigger myself, but I will. Most people love them. One has broken one by bottoming in a rock garden- which would have toasted an aluminum rim too. We call him Smashy, and he breaks everything.

My buddy said the Light Bicycle folks said they made rims for companies "like Specialized".
  • 9 1
 I have a first generation set of light-bicycle carbon hoops I've beaten... drops, even 5'+ to flat, rock gardens,I even came up a little short on a 20' foot double and my hoops are running strong. All in all, I'm pretty impressed, and everyone i met who's used them has said good things. Again, not invinsible like anything else, but for a fraction of the cost, damn good hoops. Buy ur self some profile hubs, good spokes, lace em up to these hoops and u got ur self a nice set of wheels.
  • 6 1
 From I have read they hold up quite well. A meticoulous friend of mine built a set for his GF and they are solid, so good he wants set now. I would pull the trigger myself, but the CAD$ is so crap. Oh yeah, they also have the option to build them on DT swiss 240s for like 900 USD + shipping.
  • 19 4
 Awesome! A carbon rim with internal width and price from 10 years ago. Amen to Light-Bycicle!
  • 6 1
 Lots of light bicycle and derby wheelsets out there doing just fine, many years later. More options the better, and if poeple wanna pay more so be it.
  • 4 25
flag theminsta (Jun 25, 2015 at 19:20) (Below Threshold)
 @cmkneeland nameless carbon rims are $200 a piece... who would buy nameless carbon rims when they are the same price as Enves?
  • 8 2
 There are at least 4 of my riding buddies on NEXTIE carbon rims. I have the 26in, 35mm external diameter hookless rims. They are freaking amazing for the price and I have thrashed them plenty of times. Nextie hasn't had the failure reports of Light Bicycle.

So yea...$2000 wheelsets make no sense.
  • 4 1
 I've been on LB rims all season in North Van. I don't huck but they get ridden hard on everything out here.

DT350's + the rims + 64 WS butted spokes and deal on build I was out the door for $850CAD. That was in November and the $ has tanked way further since so add another 10% to that to buy now, but still a deal.

They're the 30mm internal ones. I run Maxxis Minion 2.3 TR rubber at 25psi front and 26psi rear and I'm 175. I can probably go lower but still feeling that out and I've dented aluminum rims badly in the past.

One big bonus with carbon rims is you rarely (if ever?) have to true them.
  • 2 4
 I rode a set of "knock off" wheels that I bought from a dealer, I can't name the company but the knock off came directly out of the same moulds as the high end $2-3000 wheelset did.

The thing you don't usually get with the knock offs is the nice paint job and refined hubs, etc.

they are Carbon, will last if you ride them right
  • 6 1
 Its a bicycle part- they all have failure rates. More people buy light-bicycle than nextie because nextie originally sold only light duty xc racing rims. I have ridden hundreds of miles of cross country on my light-bicycle rims, and i have also used them at skateparks when things go wrong on my dj. They have survived several bails, lots of flyouts, miles of roots while tubeless at low pressure, and rarely burp, even if I 180. For 175 a piece the have already outlasted two other rear wheels and one front, while still being flawlessly straight and obviously zero dents. I have no idea why i would choose something else. For anything.
  • 1 5
flag wuzupjosh (Jun 25, 2015 at 20:24) (Below Threshold)
 Nextie rims and Ligt bicycle rims aparently come oout of the same factory , i cracked the dh version of the nextie 6 days after riding whis , im a racer but i only weigh 130lbs so i was not impressed
  • 5 2
 I been riding LB wheels for a couple years now. No issues at all.
  • 6 5
 @drpheta On a recent trip to China (Shenzen) - work related purposes - I looked at some golf equipment. Virtually perfect copies of known brands, I enquired the price, the answer was, " What quality do you want?" Ultimately, I bought a titanium driver at medium/high quality, just to see what it was really like when used for intended purpose. It lasted about 2 weeks before the face cracked. Personally, I wouldn't buy any cheap Chinese bike parts, and high quality parts from China are approaching the price of name brands anyway.
  • 8 1
 Light Bicycle rims are proven now. It's been several years of production now - they've figured it out, and they are more consistent. There may have been problems in their initial offerings, but I feel that stuff is sorted out. That's why you never buy first generation of anything. FWIW, my set of LB wheels have been awesome.
  • 5 1
 @killerb09 what do you suggest the "right" way to ride rims is? making sure you dont hit a rock in that rock garden?
  • 2 2
 I actually broke nexties several times I would not buy them again. @y0bailey
  • 4 1
 Actually these stans rims look like the Light-Bicycle 27mm wide rim.
  • 3 1
 So I've ridden the LB rims, hooked. They came on a canfield jedi I bought. They held up for a while, until I aired into a rock garden onto an arrowhead rock. It cracked the rim. Would've cracked an enve rim and destroyed any aluminum rim. It held up the rest of the run down A line to get me to the bottom.

There was someone who actually did the research and cut an enve wheel and a LB hoop to look at the carbon structure (I believe he was a composites engineer). The layup was the same except...LB started and stopped their layup at the same point, where enve overlapped their layup. It was the only difference, but a big one. I'll admit I read this article before I got the wheels, and they were a 2013 set. They may have changed things. Needless to say, for the price, they are awesome. They held up to my abuse. I wouldn't hesitate buying them again. You can definitely feel the difference in stiffness between them and Alu hoops
  • 2 1
 I could be wrong, but I think he means just being as light/weightless, and as fast as possible over technical, and even jumping. I have buddies who just plow not caring, and their rims are usually in worse shape...
  • 9 19
flag Matt76 (Jun 25, 2015 at 22:58) (Below Threshold)
 Theres a very simple solution to all this dabate about price and quality....don't buy bloody carbon!! Buy some Hope Hoops, save a fortune and ride with maximum confidence. It's an absolute no brainer.
  • 13 1
 I've had a set of Light Bicycle carbon rims for over a year now - I bought them for $150 each - they weigh under 400g and I've beaten them properly - rode over the Himalayas on them - decended 5000m in 2 days over serious rocks. I can see where the rocks struck the rims in a few places but they're as good as new. I'm ordering a set for my 29er. You're mad if you order anything else.
  • 6 1
 Don't class it as a price/product quality debate. Class it as price is not a problem and I want a amazing ride or to knock time of my stage times. Hope can't do that. There heavy, narrow and not as strong. Can't run as low a pleasure, corner as hard and ultimately they can't take as big a hit.
My LB rims might not look amazing like enve or cool green hope stickers, but the ride is a big improvement and there saving me money by out lasting alloy rims. I have way more confidence in them. So to me LB are a no brained from now on. Got some superstar am 26 carbon wheels aswell and gotta say the LB rims are much better in every important detail and handling. I watched LB for over a year before buying and they evolved so much, it proved they didn't just wanna pump out cheap and fast they want to improve all the time. Plus they have a great rep for backup. like hope do
  • 7 1
 I have the 38mm wide hookless 650b rims built up on to dt swiss 350 straight pull hubs with cx-ray spokes. I would not swap these wheels for any other out there, regardless of brand name ... they have surpassed my expectations and I am now a believer..

The days of > 1000 Eu wheelsets are over.

It is only a matter of time before the same ( chinese ) approach hits frames .....
  • 6 1
 I built LB on to some pro IIs best wheelset iv ever had corner like they are on rails and hookless rims are the future worked great with maxxis and shwalbe
  • 2 1
 Superstar Components is selling their "AM Carbon Switch Ultra Edition" for £449.99. Which it's a fair price IMO.
  • 1 1
 Got my complete switch ultra wheel set for £350 on one of there one night only sales :-) so for that price there awesome. Wouldn't dream off paying the full 750 they usually charge there not good enough for that price IMHO. Right pain in the arse to set up tubeless the rim bed shape is stupid. And there to narrow. Great for more xc/trail centre work tho
  • 2 1
 @KrashDH85 I have a set of Derby and 2 sets of LB, that said you're comment is wrong, so I think your source wasn't much of an engineer if he couldn't spot the molded spoke holes vs. drilled
  • 1 2
 I'm on nextie 40mm freaking amazing and I weigh 240lbs.
  • 5 1
 My issue with carbon rims, besides the price of most reputable carbon wheels, is use among top racers. We are seeing a very slow increase but in a lot of EWS/WC bike checks the pros are still rolling with alloy rims. If they are superior, then why don't 90+% of pros roll with carbon rims? I've always been curious about this.
  • 3 8
flag cmi85 (Jun 26, 2015 at 7:53) (Below Threshold)
 @ryan83 because you only ride what the pros ride?

C'mon man.
  • 1 7
flag R-trailking-S (Jun 26, 2015 at 8:37) (Below Threshold)
 Because top wheel manufacturers have no interest in throwing away everything they invested into alloy rims?

Duh.
  • 7 1
 Pros ride what companies give them. I have owned the Chi-Com Light Bicycle carbon wheels, they were the DH version on my Knolly Chilcotin, Rode them ridiculously hard in the Pacific NW for over a year, not one issue, never had to tighten a single spoke. The truth is, it is way better to have an Aluminum frame with Carbon wheels, than a carbon frame with aluminum wheels, however that doesn't sell bikes. If you have not experienced carbon wheels? The difference is amazing! They roll over everything in a completely different way, the light weight, combined with stiffness and the carbons increased ability to dampen small bump chatter is unreal. Off camber traction, absorbing big hits, acceleration out of corners, everything is so much better, that i literally will not ride a bike that doesn't have carbon wheels. Under a grand for the light bicycle wheels shipped to your door with hope hubs, why the f*ck would you spend $700 to 1K for aluminum wheels from Mavic or whoever?
  • 3 4
 Think any of these direct from China companies hold product liability insurance in the US?
  • 1 1
 Yeah, there is a range of wheels to choose from at different prices, but correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the ridiculously priced wheels drive the market price up for all wheels so that the price on less costly wheels increase? If so, its not just a matter of not buying the expensive wheelset but also about an increase in price on affordable ones.
  • 4 1
 ryan83 has a point. Yeah, racers ride what their sponsors give them, but only up to a point. Would Clementz ride Mavic wheels if he thought it might cost him an EWS title? I'm guessing he'd choose a lower paying sponsor with carbon wheels if he felt they gave him a significant advantage. Carbon wheels are hyped as game changers - lighter/stronger/better-handling, and not just a little bit either. Asking why more EWS pros are not riding these rims is a legit question and I'm still waiting for a convincing answer.
  • 7 1
 DH/ENduro Team manager here. Andes pacifico type of trails all over:
Both female and male riders on LB rims. Hookless, 650b 28 and 32 spoke counts. 1 year of racing so far on the Enduro bikes, not trued them ONCE!, only minor spoke tension adjustments. 1 Failure : landing on top of a pointy rock( i think ivb read that happening somewhat often jaja) When landing on the rock it didnt even came apart in pieces like it should, just some delamination, and it allowed my rider to finish the the stage , and not also that, to finish the whole race(2 more stages)......first!
Only trouble noticed so far; they are kinda "Too Stiff" on the front when not riding top o the line forks that can handle the shatter better than the Aurons we where using, put´ed a BOS on it, end of troubble and chatter.
  • 2 1
 Can't speak to all-mountain china carbon, but I have a set of dirt cheap ($450us) Far Wheel road rim brake wheels, and they have done fine, including loads of dirt road and light singletracks on 700x23 tires. These were sold as "not CX" wheels. Granted, I'm light, but my first experience with chinacarbon seems solid.
  • 6 1
 Pro mountain bikers don't make much money, so they are not going to leave a higher paying sponsor for any reason. Plus many of them run on custom spec parts made specifically for them. Hell, they have pro mechanics tuning their bikes differently for each race as conditions and terrain change. One point might be that most pro racers are pretty small guys, were talking 140-160 pounds, so maybe they find a carbon wheel a little stiff for their desired preference. I'm Lean at 210, and with bigger wheels i generate way to much force on the aluminum wheels and they feel like noodles! Carbon wheels are game changers, especially with the larger wheel sizes, their lighter, stronger, and faster. One last point, durability, you never have to fuck with them, their always straight, throw the spoke wrench away, That alone is worth it!
  • 3 4
 Four of my friends are riding LB rims since a few years, each broke at least two of them, of all kinds, the lightest ones go quickly, their DH/Enduro layups take a while longer. None of them had a catastrophic failure, small crack and delamination. One of the guys rode with the cracked rim for some time. A guy I know with lots of connections hears many reports on broken ENVEs, even the strongest ones under really light girls. I ride LB and I will be selling them before they go, most of all I hate how stiff and noisy they are. Then i have to fk with them like with a virgin to not scratch them, when changing tyres/fixing flats, while on alu rims I'd just take a stainless steel lever and fk the tyre out of the rim. They are stiffer than freaking EX729s I have on the other bike.

Carbon rims have as many advantages as disadvantages even price aside, but while we are on the subject they are nowhere close to be undestructible, weight gains to modern alu rims are minimal, and the most expensive alu rims are half the price of cheapest carbon.

#ryderimssponsormeplease
  • 2 1
 @chrisingrassia Fair point and I'm nowhere near the level of a pro. I guess I just grew up riding in the camp that pros ride the outright best-of-the-best, sparing no expense. True, Mavic doesn't make an Enduro/DH in carbon so I get that. But DT Swiss and Bontrager do and you see a lot of those sponsored riders on alloy rims.
  • 2 1
 Weird, I ride in the pacific north west, non of the issues you stated with the DH layup. Inside knarly rocky downhill, and lots of park. 30 plus foot doubles.
  • 1 1
 We have sht loads of boulders, roots and rocks but at relatively low speeds, unlike me, guys ride lots of DH elsewhere with them (like Hafjell, Åre) For the comparison one dude raced a whole season in DH on DT EX500s. Yes they needed straightening, including some shoe mashing and pliers to bend sidewalls back but still, they survived. I hate the freaking sound when hitting a rock or a root at speed, I hate it - it feels like Karl Burkat and Mike Levy hitting concrete wall with V10c frame on that old vid from SC head quarters...
  • 2 1
 I have over 2000 miles on my set of LB rims and haven't touched a spoke. 1470g on dt 350s laced with 74 Sapim cx-ray spokes. They ride like enves and cost me $850 for the build.
  • 1 1
 If you ride even slightly wider carbon rims above 400g, then you will not touch a spoke unless you break one. This sht is stiff as hell.
  • 1 0
 My riding weight is from 230-250lbs depending on the time of year and ride. My rims are both under 370g. Very stiff and strong.
  • 43 9
 "Oh cool, I'm so excited that they are available in Boost 148." > Said no one ever.
  • 4 1
 Eh, we'll need it for frame compatibility (the Pivot 429 trail is just the first of many bikes that won't take a 12x142 hub)
  • 13 0
 But there a 26" option!!! Hallelujah! All I need to do now is find 1900 bones...
  • 5 0
 I am HANGING for Boost frames if they can get 1 x 14 or 15sp going
  • 4 10
flag skilots (Jun 25, 2015 at 23:09) (Below Threshold)
 Nobody in their right mind would actually by the new Pivot 429...
  • 6 1
 @skilots Please explain your reasoning.
  • 1 0
 If you're selling an old bike and buying a full build of a boost frame then why not?
  • 3 0
 fantastic they made them in 26", oh crap, after all that development work they couldn't invent a simple 20mm front hub adapter, failed there then
  • 31 8
 26" IS NOT DEAD!!!
  • 28 8
 No, but it's had the snot kicked out of it by some bullies and it's lying face down in the gutter.
  • 3 4
 game over
  • 6 5
 But it stinks though...
  • 15 0
 26"??? Bravo!!!
  • 15 4
 The boost shit is really boosting my blood pressure!
  • 4 1
 That was nice
  • 1 1
 Why? Are you concerned that your bike will suddenly have Boost dropouts and your current wheelset will no longer work?
  • 11 0
 i9's aluminum enduro wheels are cheaper and lighter.
  • 2 0
 I have them in 650b and love them, very rigid wheel and never true any, 8 months already and just running step,rocky and nasty trails.
  • 8 0
 $1900?

Or you could spend $550 less, and get some Nox Composite Farlows that are
a) Wider
b) Lighter
c) Handbuilt, and probably the most durable carbon rim on the market.
d) Come with better hub options
  • 11 2
 $1900 for a set of wheels...
  • 26 1
 For that price, the wheels better come with a bike.
  • 6 0
 I like carbon hoops, but 1900.00 for 1640g is just stupid and makes no sense when you can get a set of custom built CK or I9 lace DT Swiss EX471 or Flow Ex that weighs about 1650g and cost about 1200 at most.
  • 1 0
 @Jhou, I am not saying the price is justified but the weight is excellent on these wheels. Flow EX's or 471's are both 500g or more each each, or a king on flows wheelset weights 1985 www.pinkbike.com/news/chris-king--stans-flow-ex-wheelset-review-2014.html 300g lighter in a wheel puts them completely in another catagory.
  • 1 0
 Yea...I just weigh mine and it was about 1736g with tape and valves(I9s/EX471 and Sapim CX-Ray x28 for 650b). Still 1900 is just nuts.
  • 3 2
 @jhou- also anyone who has ever owned flow's knows they are bendy like noodles. .. seriously,weakest wheel set I've ever owned!
  • 4 0
 Watched a buddy's virtually new stan's hub crap out this weekend on a pretty tame course. Basically turned into a fixie witha mean wobble. NOT impressed at all. We spoke to a couple of industry guys at the race and they were like "Oh yeah, Stan's shit hubs..." in such matter of fact way I can only deduced this is a very common problem.

Have had good luck with a few of their alu rims though, just wouldn't buy a full wheel build from them any time soon.
  • 5 1
 There is no indication of where these rebranded wheelsets are made. If they are made in the US that might justify the out of this world price tag.... if they are made elsewhere GTFO!
  • 4 0
 I have a set of Nox Composites Teocalli 275 laced up to some Hope hubs. 26mm internal width, 1500g on the dot for the set. I'm 250lbs, and they're holding up great. Oh, and I paid $1400...
  • 5 0
 Nox rims laced to I9's for $1650

stans with lousy engagement for roughly the same

Hmmm...
  • 2 0
 I really have trouble looking past the big Stan's Notubes logo on the side. For some reason, that just doesn't say $1900 to me. I know they're generally good, solid products, but the branding vs pricing promise seems off to me. I guess this is why Toyota invented Lexus?
  • 6 0
 happy to see the 26 option..thats the best thing about this option
  • 2 0
 I ride light bicycle carbon rims on both my Dh bike & AM bike. They are amazing and have put them through rough steep terrain. Very impressed by the strength,quality and price.
Better than any aluminum rim I've ever owned!
  • 2 0
 I don't see how 15/14 speed would work the chain would last 5 minutes and snap consistently specially if it was a shimano chain lol. I'm running kings on 38mm LB rIms as they were the first ones to get the new way of manufacturing 1 join a posed to 3 joins like their older rims, they have done a lot of research into their products listening to what their customers are feeding back. If you are a rim dinger you can ask for extra layup you don't see any one doing that for their customers. I would recommend them to everyone I no of lots of people running them now and have started a trend in my lbs. + crash replacement with just the shipping cost.
That's my sales pitch done Smile
  • 1 0
 An extra $325 just to get good hub engagement seems a bit steep. I mean I could get a DT Swiss 240S rear hub and the 36T upgraded star ratchet for that much. They charging that much more just for the upgrade. Seems sort of heavy for a carbon wheelset too...
  • 4 0
 Looks at ZTR Flow EXs on bike... damn it!
  • 2 0
 Meh. A plethora of options exist when it comes to carbon. I like the details they placed on the hubs though. And yes, I know what a plethora is...
  • 8 0
 Isn't that the thing that comes out after the baby?
  • 7 0
 there is a placenta of things wrong with that statement
  • 1 1
 I hope the extra 13mm Boost width could also be used to fit another 2 cogs on the cassette. Let's assume 12sp is coming to 135 spacing anyway soon, would it be such a stretch to add another 2 gears from the extra 13mm for a tasty 1 x 14sp drivetrain?
Such a drivetrain would come close to duplicating the full range of 2 chainring setup.
My 3 bikes all have Stans wheels, Alpha 340 Disc & Crest Gold but unfortunately I'm not really well heeled enough to be dropping $2k on Wheelsets.
Hurry up with the peasants edition please Stan!
  • 1 0
 Gear range is not a matter of how many gears on the cassette. Look at the new XTR 11-40 11spd. You can get same range in 10spd (or 9spd) but you get bigger gaps between gears.
  • 1 0
 14 speed, ffs what next 50-11 cassette, may as well just put the crank arms on the rear spindle
  • 4 0
 After all these years and I still don't know who Stan is.
  • 4 0
 Just what we wanted...another expensive carbon rim with out of date width.
  • 1 0
 I can't speak for durability yet , but I just put on some 36 mm carbon rims on my enduro 29 and the stiffness and control is unbelievable! I can afford them so I would never go back, even if I break one.
  • 1 1
 After reading all the comments. Carbon rims are noisy, less compliant so you get rattled more, fracture, deliminate and when they break your ride is over. Oh very very expensive! Aluminum rims fail. They flat spot but you can still ride. Aluminum tacos. But you can bend them back so you can get home. Carbon wheels are not an improvement unless you are a weight freak. And ride like a pussy.
  • 4 0
 Woop 26!
  • 1 0
 Im not going to change the way I ride because Im afraid of fucking expensive carbon rim to explode. just spend the money on tri
  • 1 0
 and on top of that. have you seen the age, wage and safety conditions the poor chinese slaves have to go through so you can ride "cheap carbon rims frames etc"?????
  • 2 0
 These rims on Hope or King hubs! Mmm
  • 2 0
 28 hole? Why not a 32 hole so you could pick n choose your hub? .
  • 2 0
 I guess to keep the weight headlines low. Makes for a more flexy wheel tho so I'd much rather have 32.
  • 2 1
 Rim is so much stiffer, no need for 32, except as a way to add extra weight.
  • 2 0
 Running a 28h spoke Light bycicles rim on the front, 220pounds fully kitted, agressive rider and the rims feels as strong, stable and rigid as any 36h dh wheel i have ever tested. No need for 32h
  • 1 1
 Nextie & Light Bicycle need to export to the UK. I wanta tubeless wider upgrade thats carbon, potentially and something that wont cost a bomb.
  • 1 0
 Finally another hub with more POE.
  • 2 0
 Light bicycle carbon
  • 1 0
 Ill stick with my Flow's, thanks
  • 1 0
 i want a set..after they go on clearance
  • 2 0
 pssss
  • 1 0
 Bravo!!!!!! He learned how to import. wow.
  • 1 0
 When will the carbon flow wheelset be released?
  • 1 0
 But how loud are the hubs?
  • 1 0
 Now they are selling aluminum wheels have price carbon wheels !!!
  • 1 0
 My Spank oozy trail 295s work fine....
  • 1 0
 Derby Rims...
  • 1 2
 hookless, the fashion design. I'll stick to having a hook in my rim.
  • 3 0
 The hook is dead. Simply don't need it it's just a week spot. I doubted at first but hookless works just aswell seating and sealing but is much stronger. Also gotta be easier to manufacture so might help with pricing.
  • 3 4
 except you are using tyres designed for hooked rims so won't have the contact area.
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