Trek Full Stache - First Ride

Apr 4, 2018 at 22:55
by Mike Kazimer  


Trek's 29+ Stache hit the market three years ago, a hardtail designed for riders looking for something a little out of the ordinary, and who harbored desires to monster truck over everything in their path. Now Trek has taken those oversized wheels and created a full suspension frame to accommodate them – the Full Stache. The aluminum Full Stache has 130mm of front and rear travel, and uses an interesting looking elevated driveside chainstay to create enough clearance for those 3.0” tires.

Trek bill the Full Stache as being for backcountry adventures, a bike you could load up with gear and disappear into the wild for a few days or weeks, or cruise around the woods at a more casual pace than all those enduro bros racing for KOMs.
Trek Full Stache Details

• Intended use: adventure
• Wheel size: 29" x 3.0"
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Aluminum frame
• 427mm chainstays
• Weight (size large, with tubes): 32.7 lb / 14.8 kg
• Sizes: M-XL
• Price: $3,700 USD
www.trekbikes.com

It's a decidedly niche bike, which is why there's only one complete model for now, along with a frame-only option. That complete model comes with a SRAM GX 12-speed drivetrain, Guide R brakes, and a 130mm RockShox Pike RL up front for $3,700. The frame with a Fox Float RE:aktiv shock retails for $1,999 USD.



Trek
This definitely isn't a Fuel EX... The elevated chainstays make the Stache stand out from the crowd.

Frame Details

The silhouette of the Full Stache's front end doesn't deviate much from the look of the rest of Trek's trail bike lineup – it's at the swingarm when things take a turn for the strange. The Full Stache's driveside chainstay curves upwards, passing over the chain before reaching the main pivot, which has been shifted forward to create more clearance for the big rear tire. That clearance also allowed Trek's designers to give the bike a chainstay length of 427mm or 430mm, which is quite short for a regular 29er, let alone one with 3.0” tires.

For riders with dreams of turning their Full Stache into a bikepacking rig, Bedrock Bags, a small company based in Durango, Colorado, have bags available that are specifically designed for that purpose.


Trek
Moving the main pivot to a location in front of the seat tube allowed Trek to fit in 3.0" tires and give the Full Stache short, 427mm chainstays.

Geometry

Trek Full Stache

As far as geometry goes, the Full Stache's numbers are close to what you'd expect from a typical, non-plus 29er. In fact, in some ways they're a step ahead of what you'll find on the current version of the Fuel EX, Trek's 130mm 29er trail bike. The Full Stache has a longer reach (484mm for a size large), as well as a steeper seat angle, at 75.9-degrees in the high position. With a 130mm fork the Full Stache has a 67.4-degree head angle in the high position, which drops down to 67-degrees in the low setting.

Smaller riders will have to look elsewhere, though, as the sizing is limited to M, L, and XL. That's due to the fact that the seattube on a 15.5" frame would get in the way of the rear wheel before it had a chance to go through all 130mm of travel.


Trek
The new 3.0" Bontrager XR4 tires have a more aggressive tread pattern than the Chupacabra tires that come on the Stache hardtail.
Trek
Those tires are mounted up to 40mm rims.

Trek
The Full Stache uses Trek's ABP suspension design for its 130mm of travel.
Trek
The Knock Block has become standard fare on most of Trek's mountain bikes, preventing the bars from turning too far in the event of a crash.








I haven't been able to take the Full Stache to anywhere quite as exotic as Argentina (the location of the riding photos featured in this article), but I have been able to get out on a few rides on my local trails. Granted, the Full Stache is a different breed of bike than what I usually ride, but I have spent time on the Stache hardtail, as well as on the Salsa Deadwood, a 90mm 29+ bike, so I'm not completely unfamiliar with the whole 29+ concept.

It takes a little extra effort to get the Full Stache up to speed due to the big tires and the overall weight of the bike, but once you gain some momentum it'll truck right along. Slower speed, chunky climbs are where the Full Stache really earns its keep. There's loads of traction, and I was able to easily spin up and over sections of roots that typically require all of my concentration to successfully clean. It's hard not to laugh a little as those 3.0” tires 'blump, blump' their way over everything in their path -- it's kind of like bumper bowling, where you're virtually guaranteed a strike, or in this case, to get up whatever obstacle lies ahead.

For as comically large as the Full Stache appears, it's not a cumbersome beast. Sure, it's more of a rock crawler than a rally car, but it's easier to maneuver through tighter sections of trail than I would have expected, in part thanks to the short chainstay length.

Trek

Get the Full Stache onto a high-speed straightway, and before you can blink the green machine will be rocketing down the trail like a tractor-trailor in search of a runaway truck ramp. Those big wheels can generate a serious head of steam – I wouldn't have minded even larger rotors, or maybe a tiny parachute, to help keep those speeds in check.

There is a limit to just how much you can push things, though, and hard cornering and really aggressive riding in rough terrain are when the Full Stache's limits start to appear. The maneuverability is there, but the precision you'd find with a typical trail bike is lacking, which can feel a little strange when really diving into a corner, or muscling through a chewed up section of trail. There's a noticeable amount of lateral movement from the back end, likely a combination of frame and wheel flex, and every so often it'd feel like the front end was going one way while the rear wheel still hadn't received the message. Of course, I doubt that most riders who are considering adding a bike like this to their quiver have high speed cornering performance very high on their list of 'must-haves,' but it's still worth a mention.

The Full Stache isn't a bike for the masses, and it's not meant to be. This is a bike designed for riders with a slightly different approach to mountain biking, the adventure riders rather than the adrenaline junkies. It's not exactly my cup of tea, but I still found myself thoroughly entertained every time I rode it.








214 Comments

  • 200 15
 Never go full stache.
  • 96 2
 The downhill model will be the Fu Manchu
  • 18 46
flag viatch (Apr 5, 2018 at 5:08) (Below Threshold)
 is what happens when you run out of ideas to not make it look like a session and nudge your mouse while designing it " Oh hey look that does it! "
  • 28 1
 @viatch: looks like the chainstay is a dog's leg peeing
  • 69 2
 Climbs like a goatee, descends like a happy-trail.
  • 8 3
 @schlockinz: Dirty Sanchez...
  • 17 3
 Should be called The Selleck. 90mm -The Adolf
  • 2 1
 I would have preferred the "Mouche"
  • 8 0
 @scary1: the 180 would be the ZZTop.....
  • 12 10
 Up there with some of the ugliest contraptions I have ever seen but at least it comes with a couple bananas.
  • 3 2
 Is that like a mu-stache ride?
  • 1 0
 Look it’s the mustache
  • 2 1
 FINALLY ... its one of the hell bike at least hard tail.
  • 1 0
 !?
  • 1 0
 So I think I will take a frame, and not full stache will become full hehehe.
+ one never ends...
  • 49 4
 Could be the future of the DH bike once the tracks are all smoothed out and corners are removed..
  • 5 0
 when imba takes over for the uci?
  • 1 1
 MORE? They love sidewalks too.
  • 2 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Come ride the DH trails MORE is maintaining in the watershed... Or even better come help us maintain them April 21st and 22nd. Maybe then I'll take your opinion more seriously.
  • 2 0
 I will tell you that, no smoothing out needed ...
  • 40 4
 This is an interesting bike for sure.. Makes sense for steep and loose and soaking wet trails where chasing KOMs is not the agenda. Also would make a decent back country bike.. And the color is spot on! I would be a bit more versatile if you threw on 29x2.8 or 2.6 rubber in the back..
  • 101 19
 KOM is always the agenda
  • 116 7
 Full Stache seems like MTB equivalent of lifted pick up truck. As opposed to some Haibike Prius
  • 35 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I was thinking to myself 'i would ride this bike!', and then I go and read your comment. And I realise you're right.
F@%&!
I'm bloody redneck!
  • 27 4
 Bigger tyres can change your perspective on riding - I went full fatty (Canyon Dude) and man, the thing is an absolute machine up climbs, between rolling over anything in sight, traction and frame stiffness - any slow technical/steep stuff just has confidence in spades compared to my enduro rig (Reign Advanced) which granted is not exactly a pedalling machine. Interesting things like off camber root sections there's more confidence than the skinny tyres - the lateral grip is huge with 4.8 (!!!) tyres. Everyone who's gotten on it just grins like an idiot .

I got it after taking my Reign bike packing and *not* loving the enduro bike packing experience.... thinking I would use it only for adventures. However I keep reaching for the fatbike when ever I go out riding...

Being anonymous in the bike park is all but impossible, everyone wants to come up, talk about it, lift it up (14.1kg pedals on & Mastodon fork) and everyone naturally thinks it's a tank up hill just by what it looks like. The steepest trail in the bike park is full minute faster over 8:00 mins compared to 9:20 on the Reign. In my particular riding area over the course of 2 hours, the fat bike would easily best the enduro on all but 10-15mins of the steepest/fastest trails. Granted we get quite a bit of loose sandy sections which plays to it's strengths.

So yeah, it is the mountain bike equivalent of a monster truck, but if you measure riding in how much fun you have - easily the most fun bike I've ever been on/owned.
  • 15 14
 @pakleni: hey, as a European you should know this - everything's better than Opel Calibra, especially ones with body work kits. I mean E-V-E-R-Y-thing... I cry for the future of humanity every time I see one. These belong to city rednecks, rednecks who moved to a city and instead of assimilating they decided to mutate into an even harsher form. City-billies... Also we have our own version of lifted trucks - like S-line white Audis, Smaller AMG Mercedes. It's funny how BMW revamped their cars giving them decent looks and morons stopped driving them instantly shifting to other brands Big Grin
  • 11 7
 @RowanH: I love the Stache. If you live in a place with lots of gloop, it's one of the best bikes one can have. Fat tyres for Spring and Autumn, regular tyres as soon as trails dry up.
  • 5 10
flag hllclmbr (Apr 5, 2018 at 3:04) (Below Threshold)
 FWIW, I regularly get both climbing and descending KOMs on my favorite bike, which happens to be an aluminum Stache hardtail with a Fox 36 and 29x3 Minnions, which just goes to show that it's the rider, not the bike. (some of those climbing KOMs are pretty loose and sketchy though).
  • 8 3
 For a bike door designed for KOMs, this bike already has a top 10 time in Santa Cruz on a trail that campers may or may not have died on...
  • 3 1
 Door? Not*
  • 3 0
 @RowanH: I use 2.8 and 2.6 rocket rons as a tamer wheelset on my 2015 Reign and can say it's better in a lot of local situations. Going all the way to a fatbike isn't a benefit around here, but I will go with a proper plus bike in the future with a carbon fork.
  • 3 0
 @jaycubzz: I almost feel sorry for you...
  • 2 1
 I have 2.3 butchers on my 29er, and when I go to 2.5 dhfs they feel kinda slow. I guess theres more traction but I dont feel like I need it. What am I missing? Just not riding hard enough? But then I look at EWS and WCDH and theyre kinda around 2.5 so Im like... ??? Also $2k for an AL frame wtf
  • 5 0
 @BryceBorlick: My experience, feeling doesn't equate to reality. 2.5" is where I've settled, perfect balance of traction and efficiency.
  • 9 8
 @BryceBorlick: Butchers vs Minions? it’s not a matter of width. Mount Minion DHF 3C Maxx Grip up front, SS in the rear and come back to me Smile yes Butchers roll quicker. They also slide quicker. It’s night and day, no doubts about it.

As to Plus tyres they don’t offer much more grip, they sink less into the gloop. Fatbike is a powder ski, regular 2.3-2.5 is a piste ski. Plus is the “Allmountain” ski that works just fine on both. You can ride 2.8-3.0” tyres in absolute sht or on soft forest floor, where regular tyres would just slug or sink. I rode Stache witch Chupacabras over stuff that would be unrideable on anything thinner. Then you can still roll on them on regular trails with certain degree of success. But I’m speaking of cross country/ trail riding.

I haven’t tried 2.8” Minions so it’s hard for me to say anything, but their larger knobs look promising. There was an article on NSMB about putting 2.8 minion on Enduro for riding the Shore and Squamish in winter.

Anyways, I have a hard time believing plus is something for a long travel bike in the summer. Also I found the increased climbing grip hype to be a bit of BS. Maybe it works for people who are not good at technical climbing. The sort that can’t even time their pedaling so they buy short cranks and whine on low BBs. If you see rocks and roots - Get your arse off the saddle!
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns:
@WAKIdesigns: But is it better than the 27.5+ that already have an almost 29" diameter? It just seems like overkill to have a 29+ based on how the 27.5+ feels.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Hey Waki - I've always been a bit worried that fat tyres would float too much in mud? Traditional wisdom has always been to get a narrow winter tyre to cut through it, and I kind of reversed the logic to come to that conclusion (I'll hold my hands up that I've not tried a fat bike or tyres). Your experience seems to contradict that - do you find them better in all muddy conditions, including deep slop?
I'm intrigued as over here I'm near one trail centre and it gets boring to do the same loop over and over, so summer I'll not touch it and just ride unofficial tracks (the sort that turn to slop with a bit of rain). Kids prevent any adventures further afield... If tyres like this extend the off piste season they might be a good investment?
(Oh, and before it gets raised I'm pretty conscious of not destroying trails by riding them inappropriately and in weather that is silly...)
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: off course when it comes to hard cornering yeah, they suck - they will float a lot. That's why Shorty seems to be VW of tyres in UK isn't it? But Plus is not for that. I am not talking about slashing gloopy singletrack or berms, I am talking cross country mileage when your local trails are absolute crap, so you skip carrying the bike. It's a niche use for sure, mostly for flatter areas or barely used trails.
  • 2 0
 @taletotell: 27.5+ doesn't have almost 29" diameter. They're shorter even when not loaded, and everyone likes to ignore the fact that tires sag under load. You're going to get a lot more tire sag with a 27.5x2.8 @ 13psi than a 29x2.3 at 20 psi, making the 27.5+ effective diameter even smaller.
  • 1 0
 @cartoon: its a joke m8
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I've been riding 29+ now for 3 years- where they really shine is the desert where you are going from deep sand to loose scree to hardpack to rock scrabble. Pretty heavily used trails really but you get a lot of different surfaces in a day.

They're fun everywhere, but that is where they are golden IMHO. And they ride a lot differently than 27+.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: I think it depends between 29+ and 27+. I personally can’t generalize that much but also haven’t ridden that many of them. I loved Stache 29 because it felt a lot like a normal bike but it went through unrideable terrain. Same with Kona Honzo 27+, although the one I tried was insanely long. At the same time Spec 6-fatty was too much for me. I will try to build a 27+/29 bike this winter. And I want to go this way rather than 29+/29 because I will use it as a commuter/roadie with gravel wheels/ tyres and that would bring the BB waaay too low. That bike will have a lot of tasks to fulfill Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: the 2.8 minions are amazing but if you spend more than 30% of you rides pedaling you definitely notice the increased rolling resistance VS a Recon 2.8.
  • 20 0
 All it needs is some of those new elastomer inserts, an oval chainring and maybe some bark busters and its the ultimate pinkbike trigger weapon!
  • 5 0
 I thought bark busters were cool now that Sam Hill uses them??
  • 19 0
 Does not look like a Session
  • 20 1
 Proflex called, they want their chainstay back.
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: Haro also used to run elevated chainstays, on hardtails no less. Pretty sure there were others who implemented the design as well...
  • 4 0
 @m1dg3t: The proflex was the first FS that burnt it's image on my mind. I'm also seeing the spectre of the Sintesi Bazooka. Damn, why is my memory only good for storing pictures of bikes?
  • 10 0
 Trek Full Stache Details

• Intended use: adventure?

Sorry but the image of riding the bike barefoot through a paddock yelling “I’m going on an adventure!” popped into my head.
  • 20 0
 That sounds like an adventure to me...
  • 5 0
 I like this bit from the website ...."Trek's Straight Shot downtube makes the frame extra stiff without adding any weight. You'll feel more composed and confident on even the most bone-jarring terrain.". ...The nextest bestest thing in mtb...straight tubes. "Everything does go full circle Daddy. It really does!" Old is new....old is new.....hahahaha
  • 7 1
 Looks ace in theory. My kinda' bike, but last time I tried a +wheeled bike, I felt that, while the rim was going where I pointed it, the bottom of the tyre was going In a slightly different direction. To get rid of the woolyness, you needed more pressure, which defeats the point.

I didn't like it.
29 x 2.4" is plenty for me.
  • 10 2
 Do they call it a 'stache because of the shape of the chainstay?
  • 1 0
 Maybe they looked at Gary Fisher and it just popped
  • 9 2
 Intended Use: Adventure

Hands down the worst up and coming descriptive marketing term currently going in the bike industry.
  • 11 0
 I think they're just stealing it from Salsa, "Adventure by bike"

Honestly doesn't bother me. The bike is clearly aimed at customers of Salsa Deadwood. And I like the look of this better. Although pedalling 29er+ tires/wheels sounds exhausting.

Admittedly you don't need a specialty bike to go on an adventure, but shhhhh, don't tell the instagram crowd that. They want you to know they're outdoorsy and hard-core, hence: bikes that are "different," complete with army green paint job and adventure slogans.
  • 1 0
 Nope. Salsa wins the award with intended use on their Blackborow with: "Creative thinking"

So f*cking core dude. so core.
  • 1 0
 I know right? When I think adventure I'm thinking of long distance riding on smoothish mellow trails mainly for a scenic experience. If that's the case, you do not need a ridiculously expensive plus size 29er. A hard tail would do fine (and easier to pedal)
  • 9 2
 Interesting machine. Love the inovation in our sport
  • 12 8
 Interesting innovation on your spelling of innovation.
  • 15 0
 @raditude: Give the Aussie a break. He's looking at his screen upside down and loopy from all the blood rushing to his head.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha, funny Clint, so true @Sardine:
  • 6 1
 @mikekazimer I would be interesting to hear how it performs with regular rubber.
  • 61 1
 Regular rubber takes a lot of the sensitivity away. Which also makes it last longer but at the expense of truely feeling all of the wonderful sensations. It does add more protection but its also nice to freewheel it every now and then, just make sure you exit the line before it gets too hairy or when you feel like your ready to come off the bike.
  • 10 23
flag headshot (Apr 5, 2018 at 3:13) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: What? Surely you jest. Fatter tyres are more sensitive? To what - thorns and sharp rocks? Surely a fatter tyre provides less trail feed back and sensitivity because the extra width, inherent suspension and so on mutes the trail surface more. Perfect for nervous beginners in other words?
  • 32 0
 @Boardlife69: you can't beat that raw feeling of riding on the rim without any rubber.
  • 20 0
 @headshot: Did you wave at that joke as it passed you by?
  • 6 0
 @headshot: *woosh*
  • 17 0
 @Odinson: It was more like a "Vroom", but I still missed it :-(
  • 7 2
 @Boardlife69: I don't care if i am labelled a chicken, I refuse to ride hairy lines these days!
  • 7 1
 @santoman: Those more manicured lines tend to look a bit early in their development to me... I'll stick with the hairy ones that are tried and true, and always good for a wild ride!
  • 5 0
 @fartymarty: I agree. Just raw dawg it. Think Danny MacAskill on those concrete steps. No rubber, just pound it.
  • 13 0
 @bikekrieg: I agree, I like hairy lines too, but as long as they keep the side bushes razed down so I can at least see the trail. Semi-manicured. Nothing worse than when the trail is over grown and branches start whacking you in the face, or stuck between your teeth.
  • 3 1
 @headshot - you were right about the "surely you jest" part
  • 1 0
 @bikekrieg: I am just a sloppy rider who eats it frequently and hate to have to clean grit off my teeth when I end up going head first...you can have as much fun riding a manicured line, you can really tell where you are pointing that front wheel, hence, you can commit without trepidation!
  • 2 0
 @santoman: No matter which line you choose, manicured or hairy, in the end we all get off our bikes. But not all get off easily, or at all. Some just crash and burn. I would not wish this on my worst enemy though.
  • 1 0
 The bottom bracket would get pretty low with regular rubber unless you upped the fork to 140...
  • 3 0
 Very interesting, I was wondering how long it would be before Trek released a full squish Stache.

But that weight tho... although going tubeless would save 1lb+ quite easily.
  • 5 1
 I absolutely love the hardtail stache so I guess I should start saving now... Coil-shock it and I bet it's like riding on clouds! :-)
  • 2 0
 as an owner of a Trek Fuel EX9 now im thinking to try wide rims and biggest 29 tire as possible to aproximate this.. maybe 2.6"? With standard trek 2.4 tires thrers a ton of room still left. I also have a set of 275 plus wheels and they ride awesome too (very different from standard 29ers). But if I could approximate the 29 plus size maybe be even better.

Another intersting detail is, despite also being a full float linkage like the Fuel EX, the pivot and shock mounts are in different possitions.
  • 7 6
 I like high chainstays. You can take a chain off without opening it, which is nice if you're cycling through two or three chains to extend the life of your sprockets. I can see the bikepacking people run Rohloff with a belt drive too on a bike like this.
  • 14 1
 how do you propose getting it out of your derailleur short of pulling jockey wheels all the time.
  • 24 0
 @raditude: why would you need to do that? just use two or three derailluers.
  • 4 2
 @raditude: The pulleys usually get pretty gunked up anyway. Taking them off every now and then isn't such a big hassle and actually makes it easier to clean them.
  • 3 2
 @smithcreek: How silly of me.
  • 2 0
 @smithcreek: Or two or three bikes. It's the clean fingers and empty bank account solution.
  • 3 0
 @BenPea: It's called "financial minimalism" these days. Get with the times!
  • 2 0
 Belt drive with a full suspension frame. You really thought this whole tensioning thing through now haven't you?
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: check out nicolai’s gpi bikes. They’re doing it just fine
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: Belt or chain, you need a tension pulley (or a different suspension design). The frame already has a derailleur mount. A tension pulley shouldn't be such a problem.
  • 1 0
 @raditude: Its got Eagle on it, so the chances of the top jockey wheel still being there in two weeks is remote to none, at which point the chain will fall off easily.
  • 6 0
 I’m exotic ????
  • 10 0
 Only if you want to be.
  • 3 0
 I'm Ron Burgundy?
  • 1 0
 I own a trek remedy with the knock block. Wasn't impressed. Didn't notice my frame armor they have preinstalled in case of a crash had fallen off. Crashed on an off camber turn and my fork went into the frame. Only damage was chipped paint. However it did not perform like I had hoped.
  • 5 1
 Does not even have gearbox!
  • 2 0
 Let's just make one build of this for now to see if it sells, what color should we make it? Definitely Matte Olive Grey/Gloss Volt Green.
  • 3 0
 I want that tire. XR4 team 29X3. Been waiting for years for 29 plus with a shoulder knob.
  • 1 0
 Surly Dirt Wizzard. Minion DHF also available in 29 x 3"
  • 1 0
 I managed to do a 1 minute parking lot loop on a Full Stache at NBX in Warwick this weekend. Geo is spot-on! Not that heavy, really. A bit like a long Fuel Ex with tons more grip. Love it :-)
  • 2 0
 Check out the 'new' Bontrager Agressors! Why only elevate the drive side chainstay?
  • 4 1
 That fluorescent kills it. Keep it all olive matte.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: What is Pike RL, I know that Pike RC is used as OEM only but have never heard of the RL.
  • 1 0
 Guessing remote lock out. Not the full rct3 Pike. Shrug.
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: It doesn't have remote lockout, maybe it's just a different name so it looks different but it's the same.
  • 5 1
 Are stache rides...free?
  • 3 1
 I'm no designer but surely that bright yellow/green part with the lift would have been better being black and blending in.
  • 1 0
 i agree completley. I dont mind the elevated chainstays but the yellow/greeen really kills me. Its like they took yellow highlighter to the rear end to show it off but it lacks balance in the colorway.
  • 4 5
 This is a new low point for pinkbike advertainment. Review happens at exactly the same moment that the ad for the same bike appears in the banner...photos aren't even from the review which Mike K (allegedly) conducted...Why not just run an ad ?
  • 4 0
 It's a first ride/first look. Not a review. All of their first rides/first looks are basically product release articles. Sometimes they ride the bike and give initial impressions, sometimes they don't.
  • 3 1
 @JaredHarzan: There is a section called "ride impressions" counts as a review in my books. Product release article my ass. There are plenty of release articles which aren't blatant advertisements like this is. I'm not saying there shouldn't be advertisements, but be honest about what it is. What about the timing of the ad ? nothing about this strikes you as a conflict of interest at all ? I love Pink Bike , but this hidden advertising bullshit is something I'd really like to see disappear. In the meantime I'll head on over to nsmb.com for real , honest product reviews.
  • 2 0
 @DGWW: usually the "first ride" articles are indications of products they are currently testing and can expect a full review of later on...
Not to divert you from NSMB, those guys are killing it and are great people
  • 7 1
 @DGWW, I can assure you that I rode this bike. Why would I lie about that? It just happened that most of my rides were solo ones in the pissing rain - any photos from those outings would have been dark and dreary. Milner's pics from his Argentina trip were pretty striking, which is why I chose to go with them.

And @JaredHarzan is correct - it's just a first ride article, a brief overview of the bike with my initial impressions. As for the big banner ad, I'm not a fan of the timing either, but unfortunately I don't have any control over that - editorial is separate from the advertising department.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: Now I know which button to push in order to get the boss on the line ! Wink I believe that you rode the bike, but if you're being paid to include content on your website, be transparent about it. I've been coming here daily for years, generating clicks which generate $$ for your business ; and I don't think I'm alone in feeling the way I do about how the bike biz and media outlets 'dance'.
  • 1 0
 This is a very interesting bike. Think this would work nicely here in the mountains. Especially where there are no trails. I would very much like to try this one.
  • 1 0
 So... The order will be: Sport - XC - XCO - XCM - Trail - ADVENTURE - All Mountain - Enduro - Freeride - Slopestyle - Park - DH...
Or not?
  • 1 1
 If I was going to buy something like this, I'd just get a Farley EX and a 29+ wheelset. Then I'd have basically this bike and a fatbike for the price of an additional wheelset.
  • 5 0
 Definitely not the same thing.
  • 2 0
 • Intended use: adventure

That should be the standard for all bikes in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 I thought that the straight bottom tube would make it so the front wheel would hit it when it blows through enough travel, how does trek avoid this?
  • 10 8
 Didn’t they mean to launch this four days ago?
  • 2 6
flag foggeloggliod (Apr 5, 2018 at 7:27) (Below Threshold)
 Dealers get to see it early. It was supposed to be a secret until today.
  • 15 3
 @treekilla: You clearly missed my reference to April Fool's.
  • 3 5
 @raditude: your joke wasnt that funny
  • 3 4
 @treekilla: fun fact, at least nine humans disagree with your statement.
  • 3 5
 @raditude: again another lame joke. You're good at those! ????
  • 2 1
 @treekilla: now 10!
  • 2 2
 @raditude: keep em coming! Fill the world with hate and fire! Watch people burn because they didn't catch your awful jokes.
  • 2 1
 @treekilla: 11! That joke goes to 11! One better than 10!
  • 2 2
 you mention "overall weight of the bike" but avoided listing the actual weight... so how much does it actually weigh ? My guess is 32lbs stock ?
  • 4 0
 Weight's listed in the details
  • 4 0
 Its listed up with the price, 32.7 pounds with tubes, so probably a little bit over 31.5 when setup tubeless
  • 2 0
 Maybe a hint what's coming with geo on Trek longer reach?
  • 2 2
 "well we needed an mid-west enduro bike for the one race a year at cascade mountain, then we just said let's make sure it can be used for back-packing too"
  • 1 3
 I don't understand the continued need for the elevated chain stay for tire clearance. Didn't Knolly just move their entire lineup to 150/157 to allow for more plus bike tire clearance? Also, the comments about rear wheel flex lend support for the wider hub provided by 157 spacing.
  • 3 0
 It's so that they can have a shorter chainstay while maintaining clearance.
The 29+ wheels could feel really sluggish with longer chainstays so Trek tried to get around it with this. That's why it's only on the driveside
  • 2 0
 @Lookinforit: Hmmm. 427mm chain stay for the Trek and 430.5 mm for the Knolly Fugitive. Fugitive only supports up to 29x2.6" tire, however. It's all too much to ponder without more coffee...
  • 2 0
 @jouly: yeahhh as a Knolly fanboy I gotta say I really enjoy their solution.
But I also like seeing different ways to do things and this bike definitely is... Different...
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: I hadn't seen the Knolly Fugitive before... that bike looks hot.
  • 2 4
 You men who long for love, you mustn't all despare,
Theres a secret you should know,
to capture the hearts of the fair.

You may not have the looks.
You may not have the dash.
But to win yourself a girl,
If you only got a moustache,
a moustache, a moustache
if you only got a moustache.

You may be common folk,
wihout a hint of pride.
But you needin to be a king,
to make any maiden a bride.

You may not have the name,
You may not have the cash,
But you'll make that girl your own.
If you only got a moustache,
a moustache, a moustache,
If you only got a moustache.

You may be big and fat or uglier than seen,
all the ladies shut you out, you wonderin
how to get in, well here is my advice
for how to make a splash,
You can have your pick of girls

If you only got a moustache, a moustache, a moustache,
if you only got a moustache, a moustache, a moustache, a moustache, big moustache , thick moustache
My moustache, your moustache, say the word, the word
Moustache: A moustache, a moustache.
Now we both have said moustache,
a moustache, a moustache.
If you only got a moustache.
  • 3 0
 29+ dh bike is next
  • 1 0
 Interesting to see a Thread Wear Indicator (TWI) on the XR4. Never seen that on an mtb tire.
  • 1 0
 I'm so glad they made sure to tell us the weight of the bike included tubes...
  • 1 0
 Meanwhile pole machine can accommodate 29 3.0 tires aswell, and nobody makes a big deal of it
  • 1 0
 Bought this bike in August...I'm so adventurous now. Isnt any ride out on a bike technically a small adventure?
  • 1 0
 Looks like the perfect bike for rugged bikepacking trips.
  • 1 0
 I can see all the Midwest summer fat bikers. Really taking too this
  • 7 0
 Oh you got those summer fatties too, I thought it was an Eastern thang. I watch and mostly listen to the sound the tires make and can't help but think its like pushing shit up hill with a stick.
  • 2 2
 With this more progressive geometry - I'm wondering what it would ride like with a shorter offset fork
  • 2 0
 "Triggered!"
  • 1 0
 It looks like a sess... oh wait this one is actually different.
  • 1 0
 nice to see different approaches
  • 1 0
 I think I would buy one just so I could offer Stache rides....for free.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Pine Mountain.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a polygon
  • 1 4
 The Knock block is not for crashes, its to stop the bars/forks knocking the frame in the car etc. If you actually have one in hand, you will soon see any sort of force will push straight past the block and hit the frame, ie in a crash.
  • 3 2
 Not april1st?? Look at that chainstay... :/
  • 1 0
 Why isn’t it called the mustache or the man stach?
  • 2 0
 The Trek Stab supreme
  • 1 1
 You would think an adventure bike that they hope people use on multiday trips would be lighter? Still cool though.
  • 1 1
 How tall do you have to be to ride these reaches? Seriously. Why is absurd reach being paired with small stack?
  • 1 0
 So sweet to see 40mm rims, like the ones I run on my DJ bike. Beste Leben!
  • 1 0
 It looks HUGE. Not my cup of tea for sure, but... interesting... I guess.
  • 7 7
 I like big wheels cuz it's less difficult
  • 3 3
 that lack of symmetry on chainstay hurts, otherwise pretty cool
  • 3 3
 can i run normal 29x2.4 tires on them?
  • 3 1
 probably will be a bit too low BB. It happens when i put 275x2.8 tires on my Fuel EX9. Rides awesome but have to be a bit more careful with pedal hits. Maybe using the "high" geometry or even increasing the lenght of the fork (just a air shaft swap) can mitigate this.
  • 2 0
 They'll be pretty square in 40mm rims. 2.6 is the smallest I'd go on these...
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Trek.... oh wait...
  • 10 11
 Knock Block, another Trek specific part. Only Trek stems fit.
What is the benefit? It's pointless!
  • 10 1
 Regarding stems; should you wish, you can get a locking headset spacer from Trek (circa £14.99) that allows the use of any aftermarket stem of your choice, and keeps the Knock Block function in place.
  • 2 2
 I think it's just the headset, right?

What's unique about the stem?
  • 4 0
 @hllclmbr: The system works as a whole - the headset upper bearing cover has two small projections that mate to matching groves in the headset spacers and ultimately also in the stem.

For anyone who might be interested (or indeed, sufficiently bored), check out this little video for more info on Knock Block:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gR0ClsDgck
  • 3 0
 Two major benefits, you crash and your handlebars don't turn directly towards you potentially going into your stomach...and because of knock block trek can use a completely straight bottom tube to greatly increase frame stiffness without increasing weight like most brands at the high, forward point of the head tube. Which is exactly where you don't want weight on a bike.
  • 1 0
 The headset is normal in it self, only top cap is special. Benefit... you don't hit the handlebar in the top tube or crown in the down tube.
  • 1 0
 @cdmbmw: funny, I thought that never really happened until I went OTB on Porcupine Rim, twisted the handlebar and it landed an inch away from the gentleman's sausage. Nearly turned my outtie into an innie!
  • 1 0
 @cdmbmw: A straight bottom tube to increase frame stiffness, by how much %?
You don't need a Knock block, a rubber bumper like on a DH rig will do the job.
  • 1 0
 @Corinthian: Trek says you need to replace your Knock Block after a crash.
The adapter is nothing more than a seat clamp, if you crash it will move.
  • 2 1
 @MatsuMatsu: straight tube is bullsht, no doubt about it. As to knock block you are missing something in the story. And yeah you absolutely MUST replace knock block after every crash - just like we all do with helmets.
  • 3 2
 BELT DRIVE WHEN???
  • 1 0
 I think with the elevated chainstay that would be an easy upgrade to make... I can understand why they didn't spec it on the release version though. (There's some belt drive Stache hardtails out there, I think.)
  • 1 0
 When chainring is attached to rear triangle buddy..
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: Just need a tensioner, or a suspension system without chain growth.
  • 3 4
 With this more progressive geometry - I'm wondering what it would ride like with a shorter offset fork
  • 1 0
 yikes
  • 2 2
 Too late for April’s fool guys...
  • 2 3
 Death to the Knock Block... Stop cheating out on us and saving money on one freaking tube...
  • 3 0
 If you think KnockBlock is simply marketing to cover a cost-cutting measure, you are misinformed.
  • 1 0
 nope.
  • 1 0
 Horrific!
  • 1 0
 Looks cool and fun.
  • 1 0
 14,8 kg??? no thanks
  • 1 1
 Floating shock?
  • 1 2
 Aagggghhhhhh have they mutilated an orange???
  • 4 5
 Next!
  • 3 6
 Saw 32.7 lbs....stopped reading.
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