Trek Slash 29 - First Look

Jul 18, 2016 at 15:12
by Mike Kazimer  


The last few months have produced a fresh crop of long-travel 29ers from the likes of Nukeproof, Evil, and Yeti, just to name a few, and now Trek is joining the fray with their new Slash 29. Designed to be even more capable than the Remedy 29 that preceded it, the Slash was built with the menacing tracks found on the Enduro World Series circuit in mind.

The full carbon frame's 150mm of rear travel is paired with a 160mm fork, giving the Slash a 65.1º head angle in the low geometry setting - that's one seriously slack big wheeler. Trek also claim its the stiffest non-DH bike they've ever created, thanks in part to the front triangle's massive downtube.
Slash 29 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro race
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• Wheel size: 29''
• 65.6º or 65.1º head angle w/ 160mm fork
• Frame material: carbon
• Metric shock sizing
• 148mm Boost hub spacing
• MSRP: $3,700 USD (frame w/ Float X2), $5,500 - $9,000 USD (complete bikes)
www.trekbikes.com, @trek

There will be two complete bike options, the 9.8 and the 9.9 RSL, along with a frame only option when the Slash hits stores in October. The 9.8 is equipped with a dual position RockShox Lyrik RC fork that can be switched between 160 or 130mm of travel, a RockShox Super Deluxe RC3 shock, and a SRAM X1 11-speed drivetrain for $5,500 USD. The 9.9 RSL (RSL stands for Race Shop Limited) is the no-expenses-spared version, which uses the same carbon frame as the 9.8, but receives a 160mm Fox 36 TALAS, a Float X2 shock, SRAM's 12-speed Eagle group, and Bontrager's Line Elite wheels for $9,000. For those who want to build the Slash from the ground up, the frame alone will go for $3,700.

Trek
No Full Floater here - Trek went with a fixed lower shock mount to create the stiffest frame possible.

Frame Details

The Slash shares many of the same frame features as the recently announced Remedy 29.5 and Fuel EX, including the Straight Shot downtube and the Knock Block system, which relies on a stop chip located on the top tube that works with a keyed headset top cap to prevents the fork from turning too far. Trek's Control Freak internal cable routing design keeps everything neatly tucked inside the frame, including the housing for the new Bontrager Drop Line dropper post that's found on both models. Somewhat surprisingly, especially given the type of terrain the Slash is meant for, even the largest frame sizes come with only 125mm of drop, even though there's plenty of room to run a 150mm post.

In order to get the chainstays as short as they'd like Trek's designers had to eliminate the front derailleur, but with the advent of wide range 1x11 or 12-speed drivetrains that's likely to be of minimal concern for most riders. There are ISCG 05 tabs for running a chain guide of some sort in order to make sure a dropped chain doesn't dash those podium dreams, and downtube and chainstay protection are in place to protect the carbon frame from trail shrapnel.


Trek
Trek's Control Freak internal cable routing is very well executed, and can easily be adapted to different housing configurations.
Trek
Like the new Remedy and Fuel EX, the Slash 29 uses a stop chip on the top tube that keeps the fork and bars from rotating too far and contacting the frame.


12x148mm rear spacing creates a generous amount of tire clearance, and the Slash will fit up to a 29 x 2.6” tire. What about running the bike with 27.5+ wheels? The official line from Trek is that “We designed Slash around 29 wheels and tires for maximum speed. Running any other wheel/tire size will adversely affect handling and speed.” In other words, it would probably work, but it'd be like putting a donut tire on a Ferrari - not ideal for achieving maximum velocity.

The Slash still uses Trek's ABP suspension design for its 150mm of rear travel, with the rearmost pivot located concentric to the rear axle, but notably absent is the Full Floater layout, where the shock is positioned between two moving links. That design is found on Trek's other full-suspension frames, including the Session downhill bike, but according to Trek, using a fixed lower shock mount gave them more room in the lower frame area, which in turn allowed for the creation of a stiffer main frame and beefier chainstays.


Trek
The chip on each of the seatstays can be flipped to adjust the Slash's geometry.
Trek
The 9.9 RSL gets SRAM's 12-speed Eagle drivetrain and a Fox Float X2.


Geometry

The Slash has two different geometry settings, and by flipping the chip found on the bike's seatstays riders can select from either a 65.6º head angle and 433mm chainstay length in the high setting, or kick it back to 65.1º with 434mm chainstays. In the low setting this is one of the slackest long travel 29ers out there - for comparison, the Yeti SB5.5C checks in at 66.5º, the Evil Wreckoning at 65.5º. It's also worth mentioning that there's a 15.5” frame in the lineup, something that's often overlooked with longer travel 29ers, since it can be tricky to balance the amount of suspension travel and wheel size in a frame that's small enough to accommodate smaller riders.


Trek Slash 29 geo

Keep an eye out for the Slash on the EWS circuit, and we'll report back with ride impressions as soon as we get our hands on one of these enduro race weapons.


373 Comments

  • 392 8
 I like the message that Trek is sending with wheelsize on their trailbikes.

Fuel EX - Plus tires and shorter travel are most suitable for moderate trail riding, where their traction and flotation outweigh any relative deficit in feel.

Remedy - Expert, aggressive riders tend to want the fun and responsiveness that 27.5 wheels offer - their better handling in the air relative to 29 and their increased precision relative to plus.

Slash - But as far as racing is concerned, 29ers have the rollover advantage and are therefore the final word in out-and-out speed. An actual racer, according to Trek, will be willing to muscle a long-travel 29er around a bit more in turns in exchange for its unmatched ability to plow rock gardens clean.

I like this scheme. It makes sense - it feels complete. No one wheelsize is superior to the others; different applications attract different kinds of riders and therefore suit unique wheel formats.

Or hey, maybe I'm just a marketing sponge and should be shot for treason. Who can really say these days?
  • 472 8
 Totally agree that it looks like a session.
  • 22 3
 Yeah makes sense. Love the Slash and was considering buying one eventually but, being a smaller rider, the remedy is looking a bit nicer (Both price and spec wise). its not that I hate 29ers, I just prefer the smaller wheel sizes for jumping and cornering.
  • 12 2
 Thats a pretty good take on it all i would say and not just the Trek line up!
  • 18 81
flag poozank (Jul 19, 2016 at 0:47) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah that's why we don't see 29 enduro bikes on podiums.
  • 52 0
 It reads well for sure. But Richie Rude continuously choosing to race his sb6 instead of the 5.5 definitely lends to the notion of just race with what you are most comfortable with.
  • 13 3
 @poozank: Justin Leov had his best results on the Remedy 29. I think Richie Rude if he thought a 29er suited a course would use it and we know what the result would be.
  • 23 0
 @AznKiDrew: totally agree 29'r are fast but some riders will feel better on 275, whatever suits just go ride
  • 13 1
 The issue is making a new model that you don't have a similar one already. You have to buy it and try it and see what is all about. It's probably slightly better in one aspect, slightly worse in other aspect but the manufacture gets your $$$, you will say that is the most incredible bike you've ever had and every one is happy. (assuming you had nothing better to do with $5500-$9000)
  • 48 7
 I like Trek, the only thing I wish that the names of their road bikes weren't so confusing. Domane, Madone and Emonda are all the same letters in a different order.
  • 9 8
 Interesting... Oddly enough, I recently commented to my team mates about how we could start seeing a crop of more race-oriented enduro bikes. This could be the first really marketed that way.
  • 10 1
 @Roostduro: @Roostduro: Haha I think its the first time Ive read something calling 650b the "smaller wheel size" Big Grin
  • 13 4
 @enduroFactory: Graves feels better on a Yeti
  • 15 2
 @Roostduro: Exactly why I've stuck with my 26er Slash
  • 16 69
flag Thustlewhumber (Jul 19, 2016 at 5:18) (Below Threshold)
 From experience, I will tell you that a 27.5+ tire has way more rollover and speed than any 29er tire on the market. This bike would be sick with a 27.5+ wheelset.
  • 4 17
flag endurocat (Jul 19, 2016 at 5:22) (Below Threshold)
 @poozank: you are correct sir.
  • 8 2
 Is this derived from that DH 29er prototype that Trek have been running in the US for a couple of years???
  • 17 13
 @Thustlewhumber: retarded
  • 11 5
 @bohns1: actually he is probably correct.

www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/article/are-275-wheels-and-tyres-better-than-29ers-47047

Not a complete experiment nor totally conclusive (as they say themselves in the video) but the surprisingly the 27+ tyre was faster in more areas than one might think:
  • 6 2
 @Mattin: it's easy domane - comfort, emonda - stiffness/lightweight, madone - aero.
  • 11 0
 I think it has more to do with the trails you're riding. But for the same set of trails, maybe? On the other hand, anecdotally from living in Bellingham, just about everybody rides one of two things: 1. a Patrol or 2. a short-travel, slackish-to-super-slack 29er in the Smuggler/Kona Process 111/Evil Following vein. The prevailing wisdom seems to be that if you're riding rooty, bombed-out trails, you either need the big wheel or the monster truck suspension. Which doesn't seem to quite fit into the Trek calculus above.

On the other hand, maybe we're all just total homers and refuse to ride a bike designed more than 100 miles away. I know I fall into that trap...
  • 13 0
 @bmck: Man you know your spoiled when you consider Bellingham rocky and rooty. I absolutely love the place because your trails are buffed out bermed and beautifully smooth. Maybe It's all relative but you guys got it good.
  • 3 0
 @amrskipro: Maybe it's my trail systems but I have both and all my pr are smashed on my fuel 9.9 29..
  • 2 0
 @ihatetomatoes: Lots of volunteers helping keep up the trail system helps.
  • 2 8
flag alexgosu (Jul 19, 2016 at 11:38) (Below Threshold)
 @amrskipro: Marketing bullshit? Thanks no!
  • 2 0
 It is a session with out the extra travel
  • 22 3
 I don't know, one of the major advantages to going with a mass-production manufacturer like Giant, Trek, or Specialized typically always came down to cost, despite the quality. Trek used to be good value for dollar. Larger volume of sales and manufacturing typically meant increased ROI on R&D, easier scalability, and better buying power, which meant lower pricing overall. At these prices, you're better off going with a more boutique brand that has [arguably] better bikes with [arguably] better suspension designs, rather than buying a Trek. In the US you have amazing bikes from Ibis, Pivot, Evil, Santa Cruz, Marin, Intense, Yeti, Rocky Mountain, etc. in this price range or cheaper. Why would you buy a Trek at this price? I personally don't get it, but that's me. Trek has lost their minds with their latest pricing. Look at the costs for their hardtails now. They threw some plus sized wheels on and added a $1000 premium for the privilege.
  • 2 2
 @BaeckerX1: in UK the 9.9rsl is priced on equal terms to sworks Enduro and yeti sb6c(x01build) nomad & cheaper then mondraker dune carbon XR.
Overpriced but it is inline with other top end bikes.
  • 4 1
 @BaeckerX1: I just bought the '17 Fuel 9, and will pick it up Friday. i didn't think it was overpriced, especially when you compare the cost and spec of the Remedy 29 from '16. I'm getting a bike that has the newest Fox for $600 less than last years Remedy (bike of the year). So stoked to ride it this weekend, and then take it to Copper Harbor next week.
  • 7 0
 @BaeckerX1: Maybe it's just me, but don't you just take your budget and find the bike that suits you and your riding style the best? Trek was in my range, but I just didn't like the fit. Interestingly enough, when I bought my bike everyone one was talking about how awesome the Bronson was, yet it was one of the first knocked off my list after a test ride. So, boutique or not, just get the best fit in your budget.
  • 4 0
 @Roostduro: As a recent remedy 17.5 purchaser, its one hell of a bike. I am super happy with mine.
  • 1 1
 @ihatetomatoes: right. Super bermed in B'ham. Nothing to see here, just downhill pump tracks!
  • 3 3
 @deadtime: Maybe, but the new pricing for Trek doesn't make sense. I'm not talking about the old bikes, I'm talking about Trek's new bikes. I can understand the premium price if you're a boutique brand that doesn't make many bikes and you need the higher margins to stay in business. But when you're a company like Trek, with as many bikes as they sell, charging so much more money than before, it just doesn't fall in line with the market. I won't look at Trek in this price range. It's all about economies of scale. Being that big should have at least some benefit in cost to the consumer. It's just like shopping at Amazon. There are some downsides to shopping from a huge mega-online-retailer, but the benefit is in the pricing. Instead they've gone the other way and priced their bikes MORE than a lot of the competition. We'll see how they do going forward, but I don't expect people to be lining up to pay the premium for these. I could be wrong though. It's happened before. At least Giant hasn't gone crazy with their pricing yet. I say this as someone having a long-travel carbon bike with great components that I paid good money for, but do you have any idea how difficult it is to get new people into the sport when you tell them how much a quality mountain bike costs these days. It's disheartening when you see companies increasingly ignoring new riders with astronomical price tags for anything decent. Luckily there have been some other brands going the opposite direction and offering great value. I just was surprised to see one of the "Big 3" going this way. When the LOWEST cost of a complete bike is $5500 there's something wrong there. Last year's Slash 7 was $3500. That's a $2000 increase! You can't tell me a few changes like Boost spacing justify the huge Boost in price? Maybe I found the real benefit, for the bike companies.
  • 1 0
 that was life changing hahaha
  • 1 0
 @ihatetomatoes: try riding it in August Smile Also, depends on where you go--Unemployment Line stays buffed, but if you look you can find some rough stuff for sure. Personally I don't really care for buffed lines, so I guess my experience might be a bit different from a lot of people who visit Galby for the bike-park-lite feel
  • 5 1
 @BaeckerX1: Last year's Slash 9.8 was $5,500, just like the new Slash 9.8 at $5,500. The new Remedy 8 is a better comparison to last year's Slash 7 and it's actually $150 less at $3,300.
  • 5 0
 @Mattin: Don't forget the Mondae. It is the recovery bike for riding the day after a Sunday race.
  • 1 0
 bang.
  • 5 3
 @BaeckerX1: I trust Trek. I'm willing to pay for that feeling. I pay a little more than I have to for several things; 5 Guys, Apple, Sony, 5-10, Camelbak, AT&T, Coca-Cola, Go-Pro, and on & on. All of those brands are industry leaders yet I don't see them slashing prices because they sell more than everybody else. That's just not how things work. I just picked up my '17 Fuel 9. I haven't ridden it yet, but I see good value. I never test rode my '11 Fuel or my kids '13 Stache, I just trusted that they would live up to the reviews and comments on forums, and they did. Trek and my Trek dealer have dealt fairly with any issues I've had (bad wheels, 3x, on the Fuel, and bad brakes on the Stache). In every year that I bought a bike there was a consensus amongst commentors on Pinkbike that one bike was the "best deal" to be had, often a Santa Cruz or Spesh, and now it's the YT or Evil. And 2 years ago it was the Kona. Yeah, I might have gotten a bike slightly better (debateable) and slightly cheaper, but that would mean 3 different bike shops and 3 different brands... no thanks.
  • 3 1
 @deadtime: that's quite a big risk you were taking. Mainly because geometry is very personal. A friend of mine for example loves the Cannondale F-SI, where as I would not want to ride that and rather get a Honzo Carbon for the same money (if I actually had the money lol). I work at a bike shop and we always let people test ride the bikes. You can immediatly see on the smile on their face which one they like most, even if they've never ridden a mtb / road bike before. In the same price class, if I show people the same bike, after the test rides people end up choosing for the geometry (/ how the bike feels and handles), and all of them choose something different because they have different preferences.

It's kind of like fitting shoes, doesn't matter how sick Sidis or many sneakers are, I will dislike them because they won't fit around my feet properly (I have wide feet). I always recommend to try first.
  • 2 0
 @deadtime: I hear you. I'm on a Marin Attack Trail Carbon right now despite ignoring Marin for years. If I had been going off popularity I would not be riding this bike. The new bikes are just so good. The Attack Trail kind of bucks the trend of super long Enduro sleds to make a bike that is more nimble and snappy yet still super fast. It's not that I don't think Trek makes good bikes. It's just that if you look at the Trek Stache line for example, you used to be able to get the decent specced bike for $1600-ish iirc. Now they put 29+ tires on it and the $1700 model has a rigid fork. If you want to get a suspension fork, you have to pay $2500 for that. It's not so much that I don't think their bikes are worth money, it's just I don't like the big increases this year over last. It would be fine if they had another aggressive 29er to replace it, but they don't. And they don't even offer it in non-plus version anymore. When looking at everything across the board, I just don't think the value is there like it used to be. I can't see the reason for the big increases at Trek this year. I don't like the race to the top with prices that is going on with some brands in the bike industry. But with many things in life, value is a personal viewpoint.
  • 1 0
 @BaeckerX1: Trek actually has good value stuff on the lower end too. If anyone new to mtb'ing would want to buy a new XC bike for sub €700 I would recommend them a Trek Marlin.
  • 1 0
 @jlindy86: True that the new Remedy is remarkably similar to the outgoing Slash...

On pricing, I find Trek bikes are discounted heavily during the off season.

I purchased my 2015 Slash 9.8 in November 2015 for $4,800 CAD brand new. Oil & gas slump in Alberta is keeping high-end bikes from flying off the shelf.
  • 3 0
 @BaeckerX1: I agree with you on the Stache. My '13 Stache 7 was $1600 w/tax. It's bulletproof and fast and neutral off jumps. Prices for all the mtb's Trek sold seemed to go up 15-20%, but you had 1x and Pikes added to the mix and Bontrager started making better (costlier) tires. The quality of small parts/trim and paint greatly improved at the same time. But this year many of the models have dropped in price and some of the spec levels seem pretty fair cost wise. What do you think of the spec vs cost on my new glorious Fuel 9?
  • 1 0
 @deadtime: Haven't checked them out in awhile. The Fuel Ex line used to be too cross country and short travel for my taste, but I love what they've done with them this year by making it a true thrashing trail bike. Seems like a good value for spec. I wish the industry would get away from pressfit bottom brackets and go back to threaded. Solid drivetrain, brakes, and other components. Honestly though I wish they would have spent the money on a Factory series fork and used a GX drivetrain to offset. I'd rather have the better suspension and the GX stuff is still great. How are the Bontrager hubs? That's usually the one problem child with stock in house wheels.
  • 1 0
 @BaeckerX1: The reaktiv on the newer Treks is simply awesome..
  • 1 0
 @BaeckerX1: Have the 16fuel 9.9 a 130mm pike.. The thing shreds... Good even enduro smash on that thing...
  • 146 10
 $3700 for a frame. That's funny. I can't wait for Yeti's next model as it will now likely break the $4K mark for a frame. All at a time when the cost of carbon manufacturing is at an all time low globally. The bike industry has the luxury of an uninformed consumer base to fleece.
  • 23 1
 I agree with your comment. It's like a competition within the bike industry.
  • 33 1
 Where have you been? Specialized has had $4k frames for a while.
  • 21 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Been roaming the earth. I just haven't paid Specialized any attention for a while. I should have known that they have some of the most expensive frames currently.
  • 40 7
 While you might expect prices to decrease as the sport grew, the sheer number of dentists now in the market has pushed up prices - much to the dismay of the hardcore grassroots enthusiast.
  • 40 0
 Yesterday's $2200 Commencal complete bike is still available. As are the many direct sales brands if you want to save some dough.
  • 26 4
 They have the pay for their fancy marketing efforts somehow. There are a slew of companies emerging from Guerrilla Gravity, Camfield, YT, Canyon (coming to US in 2017), Commencal, etc that have a thing or 2 to say about the current pricing from the big box brands. The next time you are shopping consider one from the small guys. While I currently ride an Enduro my next rig will be from a company that provides more personal service and better components for the money.
  • 27 5
 @powderturns: Everyone should buy bikes from direct sales brands for the next few years to get some real competition going. Maybe then the big three will lower their prices.
  • 1 2
 Yeti's next model?
  • 29 0
 These prices are stupid. This frame will be $5000 (or more?) Canadian? Seriously.
  • 7 6
 My guess is that bike manufactures are giving the consumers what they want, they know people will pay it, and there is more profit built into the expensive bike than into the cheap one.
  • 28 4
 @ryan83: I've had 2 customers with direct to market bike have fairly major issues with them. They were then told they would need to wait for weeks for parts to be available, the grass isn't always greener on the cheaper side of the fence...
  • 30 1
 $3700 for a frame... or for the same price you can now get an Ibis HD3 with a DB cs and Fox 36...and 1x drive train and stans wheels.
  • 7 1
 @TheFunkyMonkey the evil wreckoning is only 2899 for the frameset with a vivid. You could get it with an 11-6 for cheaper than 3700 for sure
  • 29 3
 @vansk8r: Having major problems and waiting weeks for parts is not unique to mail order bikes. How long have you been in this sport?
  • 17 2
 Do like a lot of us do and just get something else. A logo doesn't make the bike. Happy with my YT. Cost a little more than Trek's frame for the high-end, fully equipped.
  • 5 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: you can get a Spec. Aluminum enduro 29er complete for less and in the right hands is pro level.
  • 6 21
flag 2bigwheels (Jul 19, 2016 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 @ctmtb98: and just f*ck over the local bike shops?
  • 23 14
 @Boardlife69: I'm going to vouch for @vansk8r

We've had massive issues with bearing quality on every YT frame we've seen in the shop. Every. single. rear hub has needed to be rebuilt whether it's fresh out of the box or had a season put onto it. Try finding a derailleur hanger in 5 years (you won't be able to).

Conversely, if a Trek, Norco, or Cannondale breaks we can have pretty much any replacement piece in the shop within a week. Even traditionally nightmarish companies to deal with (Giant, Spec) are faster than sourcing simple parts from the Direct Sellers.

Theres something to be said for buying a bike distributed near you, almost every major brand produces good bikes you're simply asking for trouble if you have one shipped across the globe dodging tariffs. You get what you pay for and I haven't been impressed by these mail order brands.

(None of this applies to GG, you guys are great)
  • 28 2
 @2bigwheels: You seem to be thinking we all have local bike shops worth looking after, I have one shop that I would class as local to me and have never had good service from them. as much as I would love to support local bike shops it isn't that simple.
  • 5 1
 agreed - at least these are not made in China like soo many other American bike companies charging $3K + for a frame
  • 2 17
flag allix2456 (Jul 19, 2016 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 @Grmasterd: Name a major American or Canadian brand made in China. There unless we're talking department store brands you won't be able to.
  • 17 1
 @allix2456: right off the top my head Ibis and Santa Cruz
  • 12 9
 @Grmasterd: I believe you may have Taiwan and China mixed-up. Big difference in this context.
  • 12 0
 @TheFunkyMonkey: call them up and ask - Santa Cruz carbon - China, Al - Taiwan. Worked @ a shop that sold Ibis, the reason I didn't purchase the great riding Mojo is bc they are made in China
  • 17 10
 I'd never pay more than 2k for a frame from Trek or Spesh since their mark up is insane, considering where and how they are made, then the fact that top models don't require much advertising, they are advertisements themselves. Bikes like Unno or Antidote are made in Europe, have better geos, are highly probably better made, and cost 3-3,5k. No matter what Trek or Spesh do, they are still BMWs and Mercedes of Bike World. Don't come into Ferrari, Koenigsegg price range, considering that Volksvagen like YT kicks your butt.
  • 2 1
 Yeah at that price and with just two models, this seems targeted at a smaller group of riders. I'd love to give one a go and wonder how well she climbs with that HTA, though she's light for sure.

Redesigned Slash 27.5 en route? Can't imagine Trek would abandon the 160-165 mil frame market.....
  • 4 1
 @powderturns: Yup, can get an awesomely specced alu bike for under $3k these days with direct. If I hadn't found a sweet deal on a '16 Stumpy, I would have bought a Jeffsy. Meta AM would be sweet too.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: surely they've got to appeal to the general public to sell?antidotes for all their attributes look a touch functional?maybe.
  • 5 11
flag allix2456 (Jul 19, 2016 at 9:16) (Below Threshold)
 @Grmasterd: Actually you're wrong on that. Norco and Santa Cruz carbon bikes are produced in the same factory in Taiwan.
  • 3 0
 @allix2456: You hit on a great point, shop service departments are irreplaceable because you will have issues with components. I've purchased my last 3 bikes from an LBS because of the great service they offer. The fact is however, that many of the big box components are sub-par as a way to maximize profit. A blended model where either the frame company smartly picks name-brand components or sells you a frame at a decent price is ideal. Then you can work with your local shop to build out and service.
  • 19 1
 @allix2456: Did you somehow forget the Norco range carbon nightmare from a few years ago? Frames cracking and no replacements for nearly 6 months? I know a guy who worked at one of the biggest Cannondale shops in the country, He was a salese manager and not just a shop Grom. When his lefty on his top level Jekyll went south it was crickets from the big C. He switched to a different bike (Trigger 29) and then the carbon stay snapped and it was literally months before he saw a replacement. Good friend just bout a Habit from the same shop and his lefty is already needing a full rebuild after 3 weeks. Have you ever seen a Dyad shock back from service in less than a month? You are seriously up in the night if you think size of company or LBS has anything to do with speed of replacement when things go sideways. Besides for the price of this bike you can easily have two consumer direct bikes (just in case) for the same money so your argument is a total bust.
  • 4 0
 @allix2456: Santa Cruz manufactures bikes both in Taiwan and China, point being they until recently charge to much for their frames especially given where they are actual made, not just assembled. Go ahead and ask them directly
  • 2 1
 @WasatchEnduro: in their interview on that other, unnamed biking website that has a district green color scheme they said the 650b slash is dead.

I also bet they are going to announce more reasonably priced AL ones in a few weeks. This bike doesn't even drop until October
  • 4 8
flag allix2456 (Jul 19, 2016 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 @mtnbikeUT: I'm both laughing at your ignorance and sending you pity for having to deal with sub-par bike shops. Your shop has a major role in expediting the process of your warranty. Let's use the recent debacle with the rims that were specc'd on Cannondales Slate adventure bike. Those bikes are out of stock until August while they swap the wheels with an upgraded Mavic set. I wonder how the customers at our shop managed to get their wheels replaced already and are enjoying their bikes?

Every manufacturer has bikes that snap and fail. Its a fact of life, and it's important to choose a brand that will do their best to help you out. Does this mean they have to warranty your obviously abused XC bike that was set down the local DH track? No, but some will.

I think your biggest problem is that you won't admit that things changed and companies get better. Norco has upped their game considerably, and I havent seen a cracked Cannondale in recent memory.
  • 6 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Go ride a Transition Patrol or Evil Insurgent. Don't get me wrong, I thought I needed the 160-165mm frame (Spartan, Nomad, etc.) considering I'm a DH guy who can only afford one bike and likes to pedal. I ended up with the 151mm Insurgent and I'm never looking back. It's insanely progressive (which is crucial to 150mm of travel) and super slack and progressive. Never once have I thought I wanted more travel on my trail bike.

Hopping on a Wreckoning (160mm 29er) it's just a more mobile DH bike. Luke Strobel runs a custom fox 40 with it and races DH. I absolutely adore the idea of a super slack, stiff, progressive 29er with 150mm of travel. I'm curious what the 27.5 (if there is one) will look like.
  • 2 0
 @Freerideguy14: STHU Freeride! You've almost convinced me to rent a Patrol instead of riding my new Stumpy when I head down south to do the Enchilada in September. There's enough climbing still that I'd get a good feel for how that 65 HTA handles on the ups. Life's so full of these difficult decisions......
  • 2 1
 @ctmtb98: I agree with this I mean I spent $3500 on a Carbon Remedy in 2011. Now there is no Alloy version at all of this bike guess I will buy a Devinci because at least I don't have to spend as much and as a plus they're made on this continent. Most of Trek's bikes are made overseas. My Remedy was the last year they made them here. Every time I look at a bike from the big three I think where did this come from. With that said I own allot of Taiwanese bikes. one American bike and soon I would love a Canadian bike because for some reason they seem like a better deal than a said Chinese Mid Fat bike.
  • 2 0
 @CircusMaximus: Buy a Devinci. your from Canada Buy Local.
  • 4 5
 @powderturns: FYI Trek is a direct sales brand now....
  • 4 1
 ANDDD this is where and why yt shines!
  • 5 0
 @browner: Dentists and heavy duty mechanics.. I splurged this year.. Lol
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Not that I have anything against a stumpy, well except for everything, but I'd say rent a Patrol! I run my Insurgent in the X-Low (about 64.5 degree HTA) and pedal it everywhere. In fact I love the challenge of timed climbs on it, I'm a climb to descend guy, with plans on getting a coil shock and such, but since I have to go up I may as well make it a challenge. The steep HTA doesn't climb too bad, takes some getting used to and some adjustment of seat rail position. I climb it on hills that are usually hike-a-bike where I'm confident is about as steep of a grade as anyone could ride, no complaints. Sure a stumpjumper would be better, but I rode a stumpjumper on a public trail that's pretty smooth relative to what's out there, and hated it. It jumped awesome, but the super short front end, short chainstay, and overall short wheelbase was a major deal breaker for me. Had absolutely zero traction in the rough, bounced everywhere, literally the only thing it did was climb fast and rail wide open berms and jumps on an open smooth machine built trail (BORING!).
Absolutely not trying to be the usual Spec. hater because I'm not, but I just find the stumpjumper is kind of out classed. The Insurgent (or patrol) climb a little bit less efficient, but are in a whole new league for descending. To me i'll take that any day, granted i'm 21 years old and am in the best shape of my life.

In all seriousness, if this is all you read, I'd rent one and get a feel for it. Having been on a stumpy, I find a Patrol will climb very similar. Less pedal bob I find, just steeper HTA (you can get used to it or get an adjustable fork). On the flip side, the patrol will descend like a bat out of hell, completely outgunning the stumpjumper in anything rough and loose.
  • 3 5
 @bohns1: get your spares now..Germany soon go kaputtup
  • 8 13
flag moroj82 (Jul 19, 2016 at 11:04) (Below Threshold)
 or you could get a carbon YT capra for a $1000 more that will STOMP the slash in every category...
  • 1 0
 @bankz: This is true however having a plethora of parts kicking around it doesn't hurt me as bad to just buy the frame
  • 2 2
 @SingleTackKiller: Actually, they're not. When you proceed to checkout on any bike in the US you're prompted to choose a local shop to ship the bike to and build it. There shop gets a slightly reduced margin on the sale. It's simple another way to ensure the bike you want is ready and in stock. Pricing is already heavily controlled by most brands so you'll be getting the same deal (or worse) that you'd get in your shop.
  • 17 1
 @allix2456: that's funny, b/c YT OVERNIGHTED a fork to me off a brand new bike b/c I complained of creaky fork issues.

They've always sent me any requested parts incredibly fast. It actually takes longer to call your shop, get them to process a warranty, wait for the part to come in (usually at their next convenient batch order), deal with them being closed at weird hours etc.

You guys realize most shops do not stock replacement parts on high end bikes. so you still end up waiting on parts, regardless.

bearing issues with wheels are not necessarily a "YT" issue; take that up w/ the wheel manufacturer. YT doesn't make wheels.
  • 8 1
 @Grmasterd: China is actually making a lot of decent goods nowadays.. Use the right manufacturer and quality has improved immensely... Besides who cares... You have warranty with the big brands
  • 4 0
 @FargoTravis: FYI while the aluminum Devincis are made in Canada, the carbon ones are made overseas.
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Had yt and my fuel ex is fsr and above a much better ride.. Geometry is highly subjective and depends on you're local trail systems to boot
  • 6 5
 @moroj82: I'm not disagreeing nor am i agreeing. I'm sure the Capra is an awesome bike but to the extent of using 'stomp' in all caps I will definitely argue that. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if it worked the other way around. Just because a bike is $3700 (I'm not happy about it either) doesn't mean it's garbage. Trek's got quite the history of winning races in all categories of racing, YT...not so much.
  • 8 2
 @bohns1: my issue is not with the quality or the people - it's the fact the Gov't is still a totalitarian state. when i have the option I don't buy products manufactured in China. All People have the right to things like free speech and uncensored media
  • 4 12
flag allix2456 (Jul 19, 2016 at 11:24) (Below Threshold)
 @moroj82: No, YT does not make wheels, it is their choice to spec sub-par parts on their bikes. Again going back to the idea of having a "good" local shop I don't expect a small shop to have replacement framesets in stock however if they do not carry a full set of small parts for the bikes they sell they are simply doing their customers a disservice.

Its cool that YT overnighted you a fork, but expect to hear "We only carried a 5 year stock of that part" a lot in the coming years.
  • 1 0
 @pcmxa:I forgot to mention that I guess what I was getting at is if we vote with our dollar and buy a Alloy Devinci. Maybe they will get keen on it I wouldn't buy an Airborn or anything for allot of reasons. I still want to have a good relationship with my LBS and I have a grip of Taiwan steel in my house. I would rather go and get a Hendrix before I got a Six Fattie any day. Make it Alloy because we all know these bikes dissentegrate into the ground after a few years regardless of witch brand you choose to support. That is why my last purchase was a Steel Hardtail. Oh and our trails are so buff you can ride a hardtail down them not as fast but it is still fun.
  • 4 3
 @WAKIdesigns: well i prefer to drive a bmw over a vw anytime ????
  • 11 0
 @allix2456:
Sub Par parts?

Like DTSwiss, Renthal, Race Face, Fox, Sram?

Your kidding yourself and your bike shop customers
  • 4 1
 @allix2456:
Just curious how you define "massive." Does that mean 2 bikes, 10, or more?
And about your other comment, regarding the use of "subpar" components... What brand? Shimano? DT?
And just for fun.. I am not sure I know a lot of people that own a bike for more than 2 years, let alone 5. But I digress..
  • 2 0
 @SingleTackKiller: Trek does not do direct sales. You can order a bike from them and it will ship to a shop to finish the transaction. They build it and get a cut
  • 4 0
 @WasatchEnduro: They snuck boost rear hubs on mountain bikes before they rolled out the stache 29+ which kicked off the whole BOOST thing, they created a proprietary headset for their mountain bikes and their road bikes have flex headtubes for ride comfort... when it comes to Trek... shit anything can happen.

As for the Slack HT angle... there's a reason this bike is equipped with a dual travel fork. Drop it down for climbing to help with that slack HT. What I'm most curious about is just how this feels being such a long bike.
  • 4 1
 Just plain dumb these prices are!
  • 3 0
 @WasatchEnduro: with talas down think HA around 67, should climb well all day long
  • 5 1
 @WAKIdesigns:

Until they have to pass emissions...
  • 1 0
 @mtnbikeUT:

Sounds like the problem is with cannondale
  • 2 0
 @Grmasterd:

A lot of Trek bikes are made in China

Source: worked at Trek dealers for over 10 years. Have a sticker right on the frame that says made in China.
  • 1 0
 @romdog: where?
  • 7 0
 @allix2456: no offense but your an idiot. With YT you get top of the line parts for less than a Trek with sub par parts. Please tell me which parts on my Capra comp 1 are sub par. The Pikes? Monarch plus? E13? Guides? RF Atlas? XX1 1X11? All sub par huh?
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Bike World: Chose your bike brand, spend all your life savings on that bike, be a dick about it. Fun never ends.
  • 4 2
 @someguy101: Social media on planet Earth: chose anything and be a dick about it.

We should smoke more weed. Or modify Catholic mass. I've been to church lately and I had an epiphany. On each mass there is this part with Communion. I understood the mechanism behind it. The revelation struck me like a lightning, it's brilliant! There's often a quiet melodic music accompanying it, putting believers into open state of reflection, bit melancholic making us feel "connected". The mistake they are making is that they give you a piece of round bakery, instead of mild psychodelics. Imagine 500 people trippin together on a sunday morning.

We should all start going to church for mass like that. World would be a better place.
  • 2 0
 @ctmtb98: so your saying you want to buy from the big 3 but unable to afford them so buy a bike within your budget?
I want a Ferrari but had to settle on something else within my budget.
  • 3 0
 @CircusMaximus: Totally agree. I was bemoaning the $3200 Rip 9 RDO frame, now Trek doubles down albeit with an X2 but $3700 USD is a crazy number in Canadian Dollars these days.
  • 1 0
 @WolfStoneD that's correct - most their bikes they sell are made there (comfort/hybrid/ lower end road and MTN - bikes that PB users don't ride) - their carbon bikes are still mostly manufactured here. And i don't and wouldn't own a Trek, even when I was working @ a trek dealer:
  • 1 0
 @Freerideguy14: The Stumpy's a great all around trail bike but of course as a 135/140 it's not going to out descend a 150/160 bike with slacker geo and a stiffer frame. It sounds like what you've got is best for your trails and riding style. Also, were you on a size too small with the one you rode?

Next season I may throw a 150 on the front and get Avalanche to tune the rear shock to squeeze a little more performance out of it on the downs. Anyway, keen to check out a Patrol and would love to try an Evil too.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Hmm you've got a 29er huh? I was on the 650B but it was the right size. I think the 650B has 150mm travel? Don't get me wrong, it's in no way a BAD bike. But you're right, it's definitely not the best bike for the trails I ride and my riding style. That's ultimately what it is, you've gotta get the bike that fits YOU best, and your terrain best.

A 150 or even 160 fork would be sweet to rake it out. I know some Transition guys who put a 160mm on their smuggler to rake it out, they also put a longer stroke rear shock in the rear to offset the rake. Avalanche also never hurts, I did find the stock rear shock on the stumpy I was on was pretty poor. A much more adjustable shock like the X2 air could totally change the bike. Most of my gripe was just rear wheel traction and stability (which is expected of a more trail orientated bike than a patrol or evil). Actually man, I guarantee a 150-160 fork (maybe get a 160 talas?) and an avy rear shock or an X2 or something would turn that thing into a machine. The coastal crew guys had Ohlin coils on their stumpys and I bet it was awesome. Trying out new bikes never hurt too, the patrol and Evil are my two top choices now, just don't get into a love affair with bikes, you and your wallet never win Wink
  • 1 0
 @Freerideguy14: Yeah I've read the Stumpy 650 can be a little twitchy and the big S isn't pushing reach numbers by any means so some riders should consider sizing up and rocking a shorter stem. I probably could have gone with an XL myself with a 40mil stem as opposed to the 60mil which seems fine on the L for me at 6'1".

I wonder if Specialized is getting close to ditching the wonky shock mount to free up some rear shock options. I was envious to see Graves and Brosnan rocking the Monarch Plus reservoir shocks on their Stumpys for the last EWS race. I know BikeYoke makes an aftermarket piece so any traditionally mounted shock will fit Enduros, don't think anyone's doing that for Stumpys yet (frowny face), so maybe I'll give them a call. I would think the demand is there with how many Stumpy are sold, but as the everyman's trail bike maybe most buyers are 'recreational' riders that wouldn't notice the difference.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Twitchy is the exact word I would've used. I'm 6'1" as well and having been on my extremely long Evil I probably would've wanted to size up to an XL now. Little disappointed of Specialized as I feel they're kind of slow to adjust to geo trends, but then again, they're just trends. Good friend of mine interned there for 6 months and said a lot of the design engineers did more road riding as opposed to say the Transition employees or Evil employees who live to try and rip the tires of the rims on every bike they make. Definitely excited to see what a new Enduro looks like as I feel the 650b could use a lot of change. The 29 enduro was an eye opener for me as far as big wheels (not all complaints towards the big S).

Yeah I forgot about the oh so loved shock yoke...that definitely makes it troublesome to fit shocks on it. I would definitely give them a call, I'm sure the demand will increase, regardless of the fact it is a weekend warriors trail bike, all of us love new stuff and upgrades Smile . Even a new monarch would probably make a huge difference on the bike.
  • 1 0
 @romdog: And, the discerning buyer would likely pick the HD3 even if it were dollar for dollar!
  • 1 1
 @allix2456: I recommend buying 2 YTs for the price of one of General Motors bikes. One Large and one Medium. One can then go looking for a partner to share one with. If they fail to mate, they will have spare parts while waiting for any warranty replacements or that apparently elusive hanger in 5 years.

P.S. YT didn't make the e13 hubs or the bearings - that shit is easily dealt with.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: love the idea of that. Getting a backup bike why I own a Krampus right now couldn't get much more reliable. I think it may become a very nice bike with a little more support from the tire company's make more mid size tires and make them a little more affordable. I believe there is a reason to have more volume I plan on running tubeless on surly wheels soon.
  • 1 0
 @Earthmotherfu: vut u talking bout!
  • 39 0
 Finally a bike with a drain port under the lower shock mount. No more muck puddles for your bushings to marinate in.
  • 5 26
flag iwasjustridingalong (Jul 19, 2016 at 3:51) (Below Threshold)
 we sold Giant at a shop i worked at, sale rep, told us 2015 that giant WOULD NEVER DO A 29er AGAIN, yeah we'll see about that, Giant the ban wagon riders, ps my 1st 29er was a 2014 TranceX, on have the best 29er at the time for me, \
  • 9 5
 @iwasjustridingalong: Maestro suspension just doesn't work with 29ers, chainstays are too long and geometry is all off. If Giant wants to go back to 29 they'll need Boost + ditch the front d to get reasonable geometry. Either that or ditch Maestro, but Maestro is pretty damn good, so I hope they'd ditch the derailleur instead.
  • 4 2
 @iwasjustridingalong: you have never rode an Enduro 29er? They came out in "14".
  • 1 0
 Giant took forever just to make a 29er in the first place! I think they're always beilhind the game.
  • 62 26
 A 5500$ single pivot carbon 29er? that's like a home-run of things I don't want
  • 11 26
flag Allergysix (Jul 19, 2016 at 0:49) (Below Threshold)
 Single pivot? What bike are you looking at?
  • 19 5
 @Allergysix: Do you know what a single pivot is?
  • 8 2
 @SileTzar: that bike is.
  • 3 4
 @SileTzar: actually. Now w/o the full floater it's a pure split pivot.
  • 4 1
 @SileTzar: which is a single pivot version.
  • 10 3
 @Allergysix: That design is considered a single pivot design as there is no pivot between the front pivot and the rear axle, like a horst link or VPP type (although having the pivot concentric to the rear axle will help with braking forces).
  • 10 11
 @SileTzar: My bad, looked like a four bar but no pivot on the chainstay. Is it not one of those special Trek single pivots (think they call in an ABP?) where the seatstay and chainstay are only connected by the axle? And yes, I do know what a single pivot is...I have one!
  • 2 3
 @SileTzar don't buy an orange then hahaha
  • 10 11
 Explains comment, gets down-voted into oblivion. God I love you people of Pinkbike
  • 4 3
 @Allergysix: take it like a woman man!
  • 5 3
 @dragonaut: Haha, will do
  • 10 3
 @Allergysix: Who gives a shit I get down voted all the time.. Has no effect on how often I get to ride.. This is all cyber bs anyways!
  • 6 4
 @bohns1: Word! Just makes me laugh sometimes. You try and legitimise a mistake and people are all like "Nope, wrong, must downvote everything this guy posts."
  • 3 2
 @Allergysix: how dare you admit you're wrong!
  • 24 2
 My last three bikes have been Treks. But not the next one. They have gone boutique pricing. $6000 CAD for the Remedy 9. Its alloy with a mid level spec! And now this Slash starts at $5500 US? Come on. Trek you have steered me toward Devinci, Commencal, YT and Kona for my next bike.
  • 7 2
 The new remedy 9 is priced lower than last year and specd fairly higher. Check out out
  • 15 6
 Devinci spartan and troy are nicer bikes anyway. Plus you're supporting both the guy who developed the split link before Trek stole it (sure sure, treks team of lawyers won in court, we know), and a Canadian company that didn't crush careers and destroy a mans business based on a doping liar.
  • 2 0
 @treekilla: um no it isn't.
  • 4 1
 Devinci, all the way. Love my Troy, oh and got he frame brand new for 1,300 bucks. Can't complain about lifetime warranty either.
  • 2 1
 Don't forget to look at Banshee Wink
  • 2 1
 @CircusMaximus: oh sorry, in my country it is. Come across the border to Oregon where we have no sales tax.
  • 1 0
 @treekilla: good point. Gotta love Oregon. ????????
  • 2 1
 @Jokesterwild: Yes, My Spitfire is the only bike I have owned that the chainstay hasnt broken in less than a year. 3 years of riding and not even a peep from the bearing/pivots. I can run 26 or 27.5, QR or 12x142. Broke 2 treks (1 Scratch, 1 Slash) and a SC Blur LT. Each chainstay snapped at the weld in less than 1 year and none have ever been to a bike park. All were broken JRA on XC type trails.
  • 23 7
 Knock block , stop chip ??? If you ride in anger I would have serious concerns about the carbon frame durability in a heavy bar spinning crash , I've twisted boxxer forks and bent handlebars , I don't think I could trust a knock block
  • 121 3
 But how many knocks could a knock block block if a knock block could block knocks?
  • 3 0
 You better knock on wood next time before riding, I heard that morning one is better choice in your situation...
  • 6 0
 @Jack-McLovin: as many blocks a knock block could block if a knock block could block knoks
  • 19 0
 Anyone else guilty of reading the article right up to the $9k price tag, then scrolling straight to the comments?
  • 10 0
 In order to get the chainstays as short as they'd like Trek's designers had to eliminate the front derailleur, but with the advent of wide range 1x11 or 12-speed drivetrains that's likely to be of minimal concern for most riders.

Do we still need to use this many words to talk about this?
  • 13 3
 ..........has anyone seen any info on Giants 2017 Reign? Going 29 too? Or does Giants maestro set up make short chainstays on a 29er too difficult? Knowing Giant the value will be a bit better than this :-)
  • 9 0
 Giant are reducing their range of 29ers. I doubt they will be releasing a 29er Reign when there is no 29er Trance for 2016.
  • 2 0
 You'll know this time next week.
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: yeah i kinda guessed that too. Doesn't even look like they're doing an Anthem in 29 either. .......still looking forward to the new Reigns tho, no matter what size wheel!
  • 1 0
 Some rumblings that a 29er trance is going to get rolled out just for the European market. I find this a little odd but that's how I heard it was going down
  • 1 0
 Still on 27.5 for Reign and Trance, (probably) the whole range for 2017 is on their US page. They look well priced and have good specs too.
  • 9 0
 A Trek store closed in our area, cause no one was buying these expensive bikes. The mom and pop store in the area selling $500-$1000 bikes are doing great business and service prices are cheap and free for when you buy a bike from them.
  • 9 0
 Anybody have any info on Dave Weagles appeal of the court ruling that says split pivot and ABP are different suspension designs? The removal of the full floating layout only seems to make it resemble a split pivot even more.
  • 6 0
 Yes Dave lost his second lawsuit against Trek
  • 4 1
 That was exactly my thought. Without the floater (pun intended) this is exactly a split pivot...
  • 12 0
 I don't know why I go on this website, I can't afford anything on it
  • 11 2
 Metric shock- don't want it. Boost- don't need it.....$3700 frame- no way. Canyon, YT and Commencal are going to be doing just fine.
  • 11 2
 Not a Trek guy, well... never had one anyway, but I'd ride the shit out of that thing.
  • 8 1
 Looks killer but I can't support Trek after they totally hosed me on a warranty claim for a road bike. When comparing big brands Spesh is on another level for customer service.
  • 11 2
 Take my money and a kidney and something else...
  • 6 1
 The missing puzzle piece!

Now it seems the perfect lineup to me and now Rene Wildhabers quote ''I'll get a 29er again. I was also involved with the development team, so with the final product, I'm always curious to find out how it works.'' makes sense to me!

Size seems pretty good to me in 20,5'' when i look at Reach and Stack! :-)
  • 5 1
 It's great but it's getting a bit much now £6832 for a new bike i could buy a new car for that even if it will depreciate faster Yeah yeah i know it all trickles down eventually but bike prices (for a production model) are getting a little out of control or is that just the state of the Credit/finance/eternally in debt world we live in?
  • 2 0
 Been told rrp
9.9rsl £6000
9.8 £4400
  • 9 2
 Can't think many places in the UK where you would 'need' a 150mm, 65deg 29er, maybe EWS racing in the alps.
  • 12 7
 If we are talking needs then who really needs a mountain bike at all?
  • 7 1
 With all of these Knockblock frames, why bother with single crowns. maybe next year, up fork stiffness and you have a session with wheelsize options!
  • 9 1
 I just don't know what to think about this. How slack is too slack?
  • 3 1
 My Jekyll has been modified to 65.5 degrees and it feels soooooo awesome.
  • 1 3
 @eicca: Yeah, can't wait for a review. No doubt it'll descend gnar like a runaway freight train but how well do the 65 degree bikes climb? An Enduro-bro still needs to climb, yo though I know these bikes are dh biased fo sho.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: That's probably why it's speced with a Talas so you can drop the travel 30mm when climbing. I have this years Slash 9.8 which has a 65 degree head angle, on all the big climbs I drop the fork and stiffen up the rear shock and the bike is a pretty amazing climber (for a 160mm trail bike).
  • 3 0
 Headtube is very slack and that's fine BUT that seat angle looks really slack... The angle of the shot is kind of hiding it - but not really.
  • 1 0
 I know a Whyte racer on his g160 running a HA64 same with a 275 Slash 180fork and shorter shock HA64
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: my Jekyll a la 65.5 climbs like a champ. Never have a problem
  • 9 0
 Carbon only? Lame.
  • 4 0
 Hoping Trek releases an aluminum option of this frame at some point. Reading comments on a bike like this is a bit like people arguing in an ice cream shop over which flavor is best. Hope this doesn't blow any minds but I can love what this machine is designed to do and you can hate it and we can both be right. Look forward to giving one a pedal and pump.
  • 5 1
 Dear Trek

This is "the bees knees" kind of bike. What i´m truly dissapointed on your whole line up of bikes, is lack of lower build of carbon bikes. Same for new remedy and slash. I´m meaning "what works"-kind of build. Good frame with good suspension is key, but parts could be lower specced. For example drivetrain, brakes and wheels. Lower Sram NX drivetrain works, Sram Level/shimano Deore/SLX brakes work, basically any aluminium wheelset with sealed bearings will work... And they don´t sacrifice that much in real world trail performance. It could be your first testrun with new bike and you smash your derailleur to rock. Rock doesn´t care is it X01 or cheaper NX. What i´m trying to say is that it would be cool to have bike with good frame and suspension and parts that wont blow up your bank when they broke. And these changes would lower the bikes price 500-1000 that would make the bike more competetive pricepoint.
  • 8 3
 @MikeKazimer is there an issue with PB's relationship with Evil? No review of the Following (although promised) and no first look of the Wreckoning?
  • 12 4
 evil doesn't need to pay for the advertising like trek does.
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: actually, I think evil only allowed a certain site to reveal their new bike, read some complaints about that somewhere on a pb photographer's insta
  • 6 3
 Is there an issue with Pinkbike and DMR? They make banger frames but I see no reviews anywhere...
  • 3 1
 Very nice and will no doubt be a rocket but is there going to be a wallet friendly alu version? I guess the 2 carbon completes are around what you'd expect to pay as is the frame only but its still a lot of coin! .........better start saving i spose. ..................shit shit shit, now i want one!
  • 3 1
 No idea on weight, so I'm guessing it's not silly ultra light weight hence no alloy version?
  • 5 0
 The remedy 29 9.8 was the best bike i ever owned. This slash looks very promising
  • 14 1
 nothing is, or ever will be
  • 3 0
 holy shit that shock must get destroyed quick!
  • 2 0
 forget how long and slack it isl....look at that seat angle!?!?
  • 2 0
 @dadunc205x: @74 effective, so whats actual?
  • 5 0
 Spot the typo. Just before it goes onto explain about RSL, I think it means 9.9, not 9.8.
  • 5 0
 "Slash will fit up to a 29 x 2.6” tire" - Where can I find a 29 2.6" tire??? Who is making these?
  • 2 0
 @TaylorRoberts @Maxxis @schwalbe

its the second new bike recently announced with this max size...are we about to see a range of 2.5-2.6" tyres launched?
  • 1 0
 Agreed. The brew crop of 30+ mm internal diameter wheels doesn't seem to have many tire options.
  • 16 0
 @Travel66: Thanks for the tag. The 2.60” market between trail bikes and plus bikes is intriguing to us since it offers a lot of the benefits of a plus tire without the added weight and change in bike feel. All I can say is to be sure to check out the Maxxis coverage at Eurobike and Interbike to see the new projects we unveil for 2017.
  • 2 0
 @Maxxis: sounds logical to me!
  • 1 0
 wish I knew I would love to buy some as my mid fat bike fits all 29" sizes
  • 3 0
 Glad to hear this @Maxxis I've always felt the jump from 2.4" to 2.8" was unnecessarily large- why sacrifice either overall diameter (if you prefer 29" wheels) or geometry/travel (if you prefer 27.5, and don't want a bike designed around 29) to gain a bit of volume.

Not to mention the diminishing returns that kick in as you incrementally add volume- seems like 2.8's won out over 3.0's pretty convincingly, but to date there haven't really been any 2.6's to compare to 2.8's (speaking of 27.5, of course).
  • 5 1
 Looks like I need to enroll in dentistry school. I could build a bike, buy a car, and a moto. And spend a lot less than $9000
  • 2 0
 who is still buying Trek at their current prices! i think they are very nice frames and i like this new slash's style but when bikes from smaller boutique companies are available cheaper with more prestige and wow factor due to being less common and designs that are just as good why would you not support the little companies and save yourself some dollar too!

Also just to add this $3700 is a relative bargain (still stupid money though) compared with it big brother, in the UK a session frame is £4500! that's over 5800USD, how is this acceptable when most carbon DH frames are £2500-3000, its nearly double!!! what is trek smoking, mind you the need to pay the athertons somehow (waste of money in my eyes)
  • 6 1
 this is my dream come true thankyou trek thankyou
  • 4 0
 Theres a video of the realese (by dirtmagazin):
www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxFY2aDQMwA
  • 5 1
 ActuallyI never wanted to buy a Trek... But that's exactly what I'm looking for.
  • 2 0
 sure have! scott have got fox all through their new Spark range which uses the trunnion mount and metric sizing
  • 5 0
 ooops wrong comment... missed it by that much.
  • 4 2
 Meh, enduro is the biggest selling discipline In mtbing the new slash was always going to be about marketing. Though I have no interest at every buying a 29er I like to see whats new, no hate.
  • 4 0
 And I'm sitting here with my 67.5 degree Enduro 29er, with a BB thats far too high...
  • 3 0
 But it still has front derailleur capability and 5mm more travel.
  • 1 3
 @mikeep: Looks like this may change your crank position/ lower it, but it doesn't bring the ass end of the bike down which is what gets you more planted.
  • 2 0
 @mikeep: I actually bought a 650b shock yoke link from a fellow pinkbiker; its a few MM shorter and acts like an offset bushing, lowering the BB by 20 mm, according to some. It also slackens it out by about a degree to ~66.5. So many people are doing this that the big S is sold out of the 650b link.

This still is over a degree less slack than this new Trek, and it creates some other issues, like a too-slack seat tube angle (made worse by the back-set command post) and a less progressive suspension curve.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: The 650b yoke on the E29 really makes the bike feel more planted. Seat angle changes by a degree but still very decent climber at around 74 degrees. It brings the BB down about 5- 6mm from 351 which is noticeable and the HA is about a degree slacker. I agree that you will lose some small bump compliance as your shock will move right through the beginning stroke and you live in the mid stroke.
  • 1 0
 Have a look at the article on the dirt mag web site. They did about 4 different builds on an Enduro 29 to fix the exact problem you've mentioned. It was pretty interesting
  • 1 0
 @NickBit: I have an offset bushing on mine at the moment and that's subtle, but noticable. I'm not fussed about it being much slacker TBH as I use it to race enduro and big days out in the alps (not bike parks) so it gets pedalled a fair bit.

I'm curious to see how the lower BB works out. Not quite sure what rickmheim is on about when he mentions just changing your crank position and having minimal effect.
  • 1 0
 @mikeep: Sorry, I meant that as a question. Wouldn't changing your BB lower your crank position without affecting the geometry of the bike? That could be a good thing because changing to a shorter shock link does noticeably affect the leverage curve.
  • 2 0
 @rickmheim: Yeah, the hope is the lower BB will make the bike feel a little more planted in the bends. I wonder if 7mm lower will make a noticeable difference, not sure about pedal strikes when climbing technical, rocky stuff.

Also not sure if the anti-squat will be affected by lowering the chainring. I think it may have more.

I'll keep you posted on the outcome!! Smile
  • 1 0
 @mikeep: Thanks. Yeah, I think a coil shock might help keep the shock higher in its travel? Ohlins TTX is the only coil (I know) that can fit some E29s. It would be nice to find a coil shock that matches the E29's 2.25 stroke.
  • 1 0
 @rickmheim: Part of my problem is that I have the Monarch Debonair Plus, and I think its a garbage rear shock. I have to have my pressure around 300 PSI (guessing; my shock pump tops out at 300) to get the correct ride height, but it still blows throught its travel way too easy. I have to ride in the medium or firm compression settings all of the time, so it loses out on any small bump compliance or damping trail chatter. Makes the debonair part worthless, and this is with running all the volume spacers. I might 3d print one that goes inside the can to make it more progressive. When I get my 650b shock yoke it will make the problem worse. A good shock like Ohlins or Cane Creek stays high in its travel much better (I've ridden them on buddies bikes).

@mikeep Yes keep us posted!
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: Wow, I think there maybe something wrong with that shock. I have a debonair monarch plus, a few spacers and run at 160psi (28% sag) (im 75kg kitted up) I think it's a great shock, much better than the CC inline that came with the bike.

You should maybe get it check out?
  • 2 1
 @mikeep: Are you on an Enduro 29? Because I've had dozens of conversations with people in the forums all trying to get their debonairs to work on the enduro platform, and we all share our frustrations with each other. I thought mine might be blown or defective, but my exact complaints are echoed by other riders: poor compression damping, so its either too stiff on the small chatter or it blows through its travel, theres a distinct notch feeling around the sag point where the negative and positive chambers equalize, the "rapid recovery" makes the rebound too quick after a big hit like a flat landing which can buck, etc. Granted, I weigh 210 pounds naked, so maybe for lighter riders it works better.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Yeah, enduro 29er. I've recently had it serviced and custom shimmed. It came back with lots of compression damping and really slow rebound (6 clicks from max). It's still really supply but has lots of mid stroke support and seams to glide over rock gardens. The whole bike rides better, more lively but can still monster truck.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Damn, bummer to hear. I've been reading that the non- Debonair Monarch + works better on the E29? Not sure why that would be the case? I thought the Debonair had a bigger air can which I think would be more compliant? Actually was going to put my CCDB CS (piggyback, not the inline) up for sale as I heard from others that the Monarch stayed higher in it's travel? I think the safest bet would be a coil? I heard that Fox was going to put out the DHX 2 coil for the Enduro? If true, it may have a completely different yoke interface to match whatever the new Enduro may be spec'd with?
  • 1 0
 @rickmheim: You can get the X2 air with the specialized mount now. Also a few weeks ago Pinkbike featured some guy who is machining and selling a custom link that lets you run any rear shock on specialized frames.

THe debonair has a much larger air can, reducing the ramp up at the middle and end of the stroke. I've also heard that the non-debonair works much better on the E29. To be honest, the debonair doesn't feel any smoother off the top at all. I think its all hype.

Ohlins makes an air shock now thats spec'ed on the latest enduros. I'd love to give that shock a try and see how it holds up.
  • 6 1
 65° headtube angle?? Holy jeez
  • 3 1
 I really want to try it
  • 4 3
 Trek is full of s###. They sang loud and proud about the floating shock and now they've ditched it on this bike. It's a pity they missed "designed" the down tube flaw. If anyone thinks this is a good idea they must be on crack. Anyway, the warranty claims will tell, but I suspect rider error could be the loop hole to avoid a replacement frames. Don't believe me...time will tell...!
  • 10 6
 Shame about the talas fork though
  • 10 3
 If your climbing for X hours makes a real difference
  • 5 0
 @enduroFactory: Previously you couldn't put tokens in the 2 step Pike, hopefully they've changed that...
  • 10 0
 @SonofBovril: yes it's changed with 2016 forks, but spec pike on this bike when lyrik is a option...
  • 9 0
 @enduroFactory: I've just been informed that the 9.8 will be coming with a Lyrik instead of a Pike.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: any pictures of the 9.8?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Lyrik makes 9.8 more valid option only concern is the comp wheelset? Really needs the Line elite wheelset as the intended use age of the bike is pretty harsh content.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: just been told there's a big change with 9.9rsl they dropped line XXX carbon wheelset for the line elite alloy :/
Makes it not as competitive vs sworks Enduro
  • 9 9
 Got really excited based on the picture at the top, but from there everything went downhill... Carbon only with ridiculous pricing, the stupid knock block thing, 125mm droppers... It looks great, but seems like only a slight evolution on the Enduro 29 geometry (same chainstay and BB height, but longer reach and slacker angle) for too much money and a weird stem... Probably rides great though!
  • 14 4
 I find the knock blok thing brilliant. If it works.
What IS your problem with it? Do you really think you're gonna barspin that bike? With it's huge wheels, 2 brake lines, shifting housing and dropper post cable?? I don't get it. New => Hate. That's the scheme? Or do you have a technical argument?
  • 14 1
 @EnduroManiac:

My issue with knockblock, besides the fact that you have to use a special stem and special spacers, is torque, in a crash if there is a force causing rotation on the bars or front wheel or whatever, under ideal or near ideal conditions, this force will be massive, and the force that the knockblock will need to oppose this force is have to be much much bigger (because Torque=Force X distance, and since the distance from the end of the bars or the tyre to the center is much bigger than the distance from the knockblock to the center). As a result I'm worried about damaging something, like the super expensive trek frame between my legs.

if i had to choose between replacing some cables (or even a fork, for that matter) and replacing the frame, id save the frame every day of the week.

which is why, my dream bike is still the old remedy 29 9.9.
  • 4 2
 @GumptionZA: Two things.
>You don't have to use a special stem and special spacers. You can run a normal set up on the bike and it'll simple disable the knock black from working.
>the knock black is designed to 'break away' in severe impact so not to damage anything. the knock block pins crack away and take the force, you then have a small cost to replace the system.

Trek are a pretty big player, let's not forget. They have some very experienced designers and engineers and a very expensive testing program.
  • 7 0
 @Justmatthew:
Im sure they do, and having a breaksafe is an obvious design feature, that said, it solves a problem that has no reason to exist anyway.

I get that people are riding harder and faster than ever and so stiffness is more of a priority than ever, but with some smart design and creativity you can get around the problem without giving the marketing department the headache of trying to justify these kinds of things.

I would explain how to get around it, but that's my secret Wink
  • 2 1
 @GumptionZA: I'm quite suspicious the problem arisen here may happen. I believe at that moment of the crash, most of us will most likely already be "off the bike" or at least, not having 100% weight on bars and pedals. Therefore I believe the high torque applied is actually very unlikely to happen. I believe the knock block will come in action 99.9% of time when the bike is flying away from you. So I keep thinking it's a good idea in general. Let's see in a few years from now if the way they realized it is a good one.
  • 1 0
 I meant "suspicious the problem arisen here may NOT happen..."
  • 10 0
 @EnduroManiac: I think even a empty bike with no rider on it carries quite a bit of force if you bail on a jump or smack a tree. From what I see with the knock block, a REALLY heavy impact has two outcomes: either it somehow damages your $4k carbon frame where the stopper-pin lives, or the pin shears off (by design?) and you go back to the first problem, which is your fork crown smashes the sh:t out of your carbon downtube.

I would way rather have a tangle of 3-4 cables gradually slow by spinning bars, and maybe at worst damage a brake line connector or something, then have a hard sudden thunk equal damage on top or down below.

Stupid design, nobody else has this problem, and I'm not convinced a straight downtube is worth this.
  • 8 0
 @EnduroManiac: adding more things to your bike that can break is rarely a good thing.
  • 7 0
 @Justmatthew: You do realize the Knockback was added to prevent the fork crown from contacting the straight down tube right?

So if the force is great enough to break the knock back system, you think that little rubber pad on the frame is going to be enough to keep the crown from damaging the frame?

All for small tiny % more stiffness in a lab.
  • 4 1
 @EnduroManiac: As others have answered, it is a fix to a problem which has not existed: single crown forks hitting the frame. As an engineer it is weird to see a problem that has already been solved get introduced into a design. I'm also not sure how useful it will be considering Trek appear to have some rubber stoppers installed to block the fork if the knock block breaks.

Again, the bike more than likely rides great, just a few weird details that I don't think should figure at such a high price put me off personally.
  • 2 2
 @Mugen: you're seeing things the wrong way around. Or rather you don't want to see the problem it's solving. You won't have ripped cables and pulled brake housing. So they made the frame differently and that way they could even get a stiffer frame (usual marketing argument...). But if you prefer being frustrated, that's your problem
  • 3 1
 Bummer a 150mm seat post won't fit for smaller riders, because of the sheer overall length of it. Main pivot position should be more offset.
  • 3 0
 It looks like a tight fit for even a 125mm Reverb if it needs to be fully slammed. I have that issue on my Giant Reign. For me to get my post fully slammed, which happens to be my perfect seat height, I had to get rid of the connectamajig and redo the hydraulic line without it. It still barely fits. I even had to opt to use my old reverb (380 length) instead of the newer 390 post because that extra 10mm would not fit due to the curvature of the seat tube.
  • 3 0
 I'm still trying to understand what they mean by "Smaller" rider. I typically would ride a 15.5 in treks lineup, but the jewels are already straddling the TT on 29 inch standover. The standover on this is a full 2+ inch taller than what I would be comfortable with.
  • 8 4
 @moslow: You ride a bike, not stand over it and when was the last time you crashed and landed with both feet flat on the ground straddling the TT? Stand over is really irelavent when fitting a bike.
  • 7 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Different folks, different strokes bud... all in rider preference and how one prefers to ride... By your accounts, Dirt jumpers, bmx bikes, bikes with low standover (Kona process line, Evil bikes, etc), make no sense? Regarding your question... I've never crashed with both feet on the ground but I've ridden quite enough tech in situations where you can end up stalling mid a tech climb/rock garden/tech sections where you may need to dab... or even set both feet down. Don't know about you but I wouldn't want to attempt said sections with a standover 2+ inches over my crotch.

Not to mention, from a fit perspective it's also about how much I can move the frame below me... being shorter with shorter legs, a small frame with low standover will typically have a lower saddle... both of those together allows me that motion through technical terrain or for maneuvering a bike in corners/descents/cambered lines/technical terrain/jumping etc... So no, I have to disagree with you that standover is "irrelevant". I seriously doubt ANYONE would want a bike where they have to have a leg hanging over the TT trying to dismount a tech section/needing to dab/or just standing over the bike on trails (YES STANDING OVER) waiting for their mates or just shooting the sh** during a quick break.
  • 3 0
 Says metric shock size, but then shows fox float X2. I thought Fox didn't jump on that bandwagon.
  • 4 1
 sure have! scott have got fox all through their new Spark range which uses the trunnion mount and metric sizing
  • 5 2
 Such a sexy bike. I'm surprised there isn't more pb hate for 29er and boost though
  • 2 1
 Ya should be 157, boost +
  • 6 1
 9k lololol
  • 4 1
 No one is going to comment on $3700 for a frame?!? I thought Transition was bad charging $3500 for a simple FSR frame...
  • 2 5
 Because it's still cheaper then the $4k Specialized has been charging for years.
  • 4 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Carbon Enduro frame $3500. . . . . .
  • 2 0
 Trek frame-only prices have always been very high. They really focus on selling complete bikes. I think setting a high frame-only price makes their completes look like a better deal.
  • 1 0
 @truehipster: So they brought the price down
  • 2 0
 I can't be the only one that noticed there's a new Bontrager dropper post called "Fall Line"... I see what you did there, Mike!
  • 1 2
 Am I also the only one a little put off by this? Maybe Trek's trying to hop on the 9Point8 Train.
  • 1 1
 @jlevandoski: Looks like it was just a funny mistake because they changed it lol
  • 1 1
 You know they tried cutting manufacturing cost as well. Not doing the full floater = less manufacturing going into the pivot system and less work to put it together.

Also instead of putting the bar diagonal to the seat stay and top tube, now it's solid which is great for stiffness and strength but easier to manufacture on their part.

And bontrager stuff and junk puts margins through the roof!
  • 2 1
 Im hijacking this thread and comment about the the 2017 Slash..... Looks so so nice, Love my 2016 Rem 9iner but may have to convince the wife for 2017 Slash. Cant wait for a Test.
  • 1 0
 @trek 1) Why did the XXX wheelset not make it to the 9.9 like pictured? 2) no 150mm dropper on the XL frame? 3) Frameset in black going to be available because they are exact from 9.8 to 9.9? 3) nice bike otherwise
  • 1 0
 Did anybody see Bambi in the back of the first picture? Nope!?.... 3... 2... 1.... Trek Slash 2017 RSL order done! What was the wheel-diameter? I don't care... it will feel great!!!
  • 1 0
 Hey man! I am also from Switzerland! where did you order your frame? I am interested in it!....Price, delivery time? thanks!!
  • 2 0
 The pictures look so sharp and vivid that it almost looks like a high quality CG rendering.
  • 2 0
 These photos don't look real for some reason. Computer generated? Or just really odd looking?
  • 1 0
 I never really cared for trek due to all the proprietary bs. This new crop looks pretty awesome. Running a float x and a super deluxe.
  • 3 0
 Is there a rule that every bike review has to include the word "weapon"?
  • 1 0
 that means you cant take it to school, airport, or courthouse
  • 2 1
 I just do not want a bike made for mass marketing. Its has to be unique in some way. This just looks like every other Trek. Same lines and looks.
  • 3 0
 Too beautiful to be affordable :'-(
  • 1 0
 Funny that higher-end model sports the Talas. I always thought that the Talas was unpopular because it was super heavy and had poor dampning/adjustment. Has it changed?
  • 3 0
 That's cool, but where's the 27.5 version...? Smile
  • 2 0
 i wish they were making a 27.5! that bike would be killer!
  • 2 0
 Just do what you want and don't let other people tell you that a bike will be crap. Decide for yourself
  • 1 0
 holy shit trek! you've just screwed this up! :c what's next? 29 DH bike? c'mon!! i think the good side is that this will get me a cheaper second hand 27.5 slash.. :/
  • 1 0
 $3700 for the frame sounds really steep considering boutique brands (who have lower production capacity thus at higher costs) such as Evil and Yeti have cheaper frames!
  • 3 2
 FINALLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I thing it will be real game changer. Real die hard !!!
  • 5 2
 looks like a session
  • 3 1
 No X-up's or whips?! what the hell is wrong w/ you Trek?!
  • 3 1
 One 29er I would love to try!
  • 3 2
 Do the "change" in geometry is really noticeable? Half a degree and a millimeter? Why don't they do away with it?
  • 1 0
 Direct sales and big wheels.... Thanks for being so impersonal bike industry
  • 2 0
 So broke to afford this. YT or Giant might be my Remedy, haha!
  • 1 0
 Who cares what it looks like, this bike is nasty and will out perform 99% of the bikes out there
  • 7 7
 So disappointing! Was hanging out for the 2017 slash but not for a bloody 29er. Looking elsewhere for my new bike now.
  • 3 1
 Same here.

I'm looking for something with 160mm all round, 27" rims, non-travel adjust forks and non-carbon and the 2016 Slash fitted the bill. Even liked one when I rode it earlier in the year. I have a Fuel Ex so like the feel of the Full Floater suspension. Thought I'd see what the '17 bike was like before making any decisions though. I can live with Boost hubs, Knock Block headset and Metric shocks but less travel, a changed suspension design and big wheels rule it out for me I'm afraid.

Unless they do a different style of bike in alloy, which is doubtful, it puts itself off my list. Might see if I can get a deal on a '16 model now or the new Commencal Meta SX holds my interest.
  • 1 2
 @DaMilkyBarKid: 27" rims? you waiting on a new standard
  • 8 0
 Remedy is the new 275 Slash...
  • 1 1
 @browner: nah,just call them what they really are!!
  • 1 0
 What about the 2017 Remedy 150mm travel and 66 head angle. Interesting the Slash and Remedy have the same rear travel..
  • 1 0
 @DaMilkyBarKid: What about the 2017 Remedy 150mm travel and 66 head angle. Interesting the Slash and Remedy have the same rear travel..
  • 1 0
 The holes under the top tube? Bottlecage? Tube holder? Tool holder?
  • 1 0
 You mean below the lower shock mount? Washing out the accumulated mud I guess.
  • 1 0
 They're present on my Slash 2012 as well, think they are for external dropper post routing...at least that's what I used them for with my old KS Lev.
  • 2 2
 I'm interested in a frame only so long as it comes in a colour besides red. Seriously.
  • 6 1
 But... Canada?
  • 2 0
 @bishopsmike: once you go black though...
  • 3 1
 Cue up the Nomad 29er
  • 3 1
 Intense will be there sooner with a new carbine 29....
  • 2 0
 So sick
  • 1 0
 Are those water bottle mounts under the top tube?
  • 2 0
 Why not go boost +? 157
  • 1 0
 Total newb question...how do the chain stays get longer?
  • 1 0
 Crudely speaking, on this bike, the BB is lower (on low setting) and that lowers the point when it fixes to the frame (above the BB) and therefore the kink in the chain stay is sort of evened out so when the CS is measured along the horizontal it is a tiny bit longer....I am sure there's a technical way of expressing it but I have NFI how.
  • 3 6
 Noooooo! Don't put the Slash on 29s! I've been riding a 2012 Slash for the last few years on 26" wheels. I still love the bike. I use it for everything but mostly freeride/enduro.

My Slash loves jumps and rough steep terrain. I ride a lot of rock slabs, jumps and wood features out here on BC's West Coast. 29ers are not the right wheels for this stuff. Trek please offer a 27.5 also, I want to buy a new Slash but not a 29er.
  • 10 0
 I ride a short travel 29er on all three north shore mountains... what are you on about 29ers not being able to ride this terrain?
  • 1 0
 Knock block= engineered sales driver! You buy it, break it, you buy again.
  • 1 0
 That downtube makes a 36 looks like a 32.
  • 3 1
 No X up's on this rig
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous bike, regardless of the brand. I'd buy one if I had the cash.
  • 2 0
 looks like a session
  • 2 0
 This comment is usually stupid as hell but this time it actually does look like a Session.
  • 1 0
 Have to give this one a spin down in Bootleg at the Demo
  • 2 1
 W O W
  • 2 2
 geez no boost 149 i am dissapoint
  • 3 2
 Beautiful 29er ever made
  • 2 1
 Sexy AF.
  • 1 3
 I demo'ed the 26" Slash a few years ago and thought it was a handful. I can only imagine how cumbersome it is now with 29" wheels and slacker geo.
  • 1 2
 I look at this bike and see what the Specialized Enduro should have been if it was given proper geometry.
  • 1 0
 New enduro29 next month, slacker etc
  • 1 0
 @enduroFactory: Thats what I keep hearing.
  • 1 0
 @enduroFactory: slacker witha threaded bb.. cant wait..
  • 1 1
 Vaya robo, se pueden meter ese plástico rojo por el culo.
  • 1 0
 I'm into it
  • 1 3
 See see why the duck did they need to do away with the full floater if the session employs it? in my unexperienced opinion this can be a deal breaker.
  • 1 0
 Possibly its as they claimed, stiffer frame as a result, maybe also b/c the full floaters develop cracks around the pivot points due to the extreme forces on this area, like my Scratch did. I'm on a '15 Slash 9.8 now, curious to see how the non floating feels in comparison.
  • 1 1
 Prices aside, that red frame is beautiful. Sooo smooth
  • 1 0
 sweeeeet bike
  • 1 1
 26 ain't dead
  • 1 2
 Looks Cherry!
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