Trendspotting: 4 Predictions About the Near Future of Mountain Bike Tech

May 27, 2021 at 13:25
by Mike Kazimer  
Let's put aside all the talk of parts shortages, sold out everything, and focus on what's likely coming down the pipeline in the near and not-so-near future. Sure, it might be a little trickier to purchase the bike of your dreams right now, but that doesn't mean companies have paused development – if anything, they're busy trying to figure out exactly how many new widgets to order for 2023 and 2024, an especially challenging task given the current situation.

New standards? More mullets? 13-speed drivetrains? It's time for another look into the crystal ball to try and figure out what trends are going to stick, and which ones will fade away.




Commencal Supreme DH 29 - 27 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
NS Define AL 170 1

More Mixed-Wheel Bikes

Mixed wheel bikes have existed since the early days of the sport, but 2019 saw the concept come back to life on both the World Cup downhill and Enduro World Series circuits. In some instances, it seemed to act like a way to justify running a 29” front wheel without losing any street cred after talking smack about the bigger wheel size (*cough* Bruni *cough*), while in other cases it allowed smaller riders to retain tire-to-tuchus clearance and still have at least one 29” wheel.

Proponents of the concept pushed it as a best-of-both worlds type scenario, some magical combination of wheel diameters that made everthing else pale in comparison. That's obviously not the case, but it does look like the mixed wheel option is going to have a longer shelf life than plus size tires did...

Three years after the mixed wheel re-animation, where does it fit into the mix? Well, in the downhill world it's become a fairly common option. The new Trek Session, Commencal Supreme DH, Santa Cruz V10, Specialized Demo, and Canyon Sender all have a mixed wheel option, to name a few.

It's also become a fairly common sight on eMTBs, largely because a smaller rear wheel makes it a lot easier to keep the chainstays to a manageable length, something that can be a challenge when you're also trying to have room for a motor and a battery.

What about on bikes with less travel? Mixed wheel bikes popping up with increasing regularity, although in many cases its being done to replace a 27.5" model. YT's new Capra comes to mind. That way companies can spec the same fork and front wheel on more models, which reduces the number of different products they need to order.

My crystal ball says that's not going to change too dramatically in the future either. Yes, there will be plenty of mixed wheel bikes hitting the market in the coming months, typically with 150mm or more rear travel, but it's not going to be anything like the year that bike companies were tripping over each other to switch every model over to 29" wheels. If anything, there will be fewer 27.5” bikes released, with mixed wheel setups taking their place in companies' lineups.

Forbidden Dreadnought

High Pivot Hype Continues

If the mixed wheel trend is simmering, the kettle of high pivot hype is at a rolling boil. It's almost harder to name a company that's not working on a high pivot enduro or downhill bike of some kind, if they haven't released one already. Trek joined the party earlier this year with the new Session, and images recently surfaced of what looks like an idler pulley on a Specialized Demo.

Prototypes from Devinci, Norco, GT, and Cannondale have all been spotted over the last few months, so it's not a stretch to expect this summer and fall to have a bumper crop of idler-equipped machines.

What's fueling the high pivot fire? Well, some of it may be a fear of being left behind – if high pivot bikes are getting podiums and 'regular' bikes aren't, might as well stick on an idler and see what happens. There's obviously more to it than that, though. High pivot designs create a more rearward axle path, which in turn can make it easier to maintain speed in rough terrain. We've seen several different way of approaching this design – some bikes have higher main pivots than others, some use a single pivot layout, some use a Horst Link – but at the end of the day the goal remains the same: to create a bike that doesn't get hung up on obstacles and has minimal pedal kickback for a smooth, controlled ride.

Similar to the mixed wheel trend, I'd expect the high pivot designs to remain on gravity-focused bikes. That's partially because of the inherent drag that comes with adding another pulley wheel onto a drivetrain. That extra friction isn't that big of a deal if your focus is on having the best run possible when gravity takes over, but it's more of an issue if you're heading out for a multi-hour pedal fest. There's also the added weight that comes from the design – those grams are harder to swallow when they're on a lighter XC or trail bike.

Specialized Kenevo SL
16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

eMTB Evolution - Lighter & Less Powerful vs Bigger, Full Power Options

At this point pretty much every large company has at least a few e-bikes in their lineup, which means that the smaller brands are up next. I wouldn't waste too much time shedding tears over the fact that your favorite 'core' brand is sipping the e-Kool Aid either – bike sales may be booming, but there's no guarantee it'll last, so it makes sense for companies to diversify with at least one electric option.

Are non-motorized bikes going to go the way of the dodo? Despite the claims of ferverent e-acolytes to the contrary, the answer is a resounding “no.” Look at it this way – people still willingly choose running as their preferred means of outdoor recreation, and just think of how many easier ways there are to get around. Sure, some riders may fully cross over to e-bikes, but I see it more as a supplement to the sport rather than something that'll completely take over. Mountain biking is already expensive, and when you add a motor and battery it starts to get even less attainable, especially for people who aren't dedicated enthusiasts.

Returning to the eMTB trends, I think we'll start to see a split, with lighter less powerful bikes emerging on one side, and full power, extra-beefy machines on the other. Personally, I'd choose a full power, long travel machine over a lighter, less powerful one, but we'll have to see how Specialized's Kenevo SL does compared to their Levo to really see what the market wants. I do think that the lighter eMTB concept makes sense for shorter travel trail bikes, something like the Orbea Rise, where it can deliver a much more 'normal' feel while allowing riders to go further, faster.

We'll have to see where battery technology end up – there's certainly plenty of research being done in that area by car and electronics manufacturers. Maybe someday it won't be necessary to choose between light and not-so-powerful or heavy and very powerful, but that looks to be the reality for the near future.

Shimano patent image

Drivetrains – More Electronics, New Designs

Now that SRAM and Shimano both offer a full range of 12-speed drivetains, I don't think we're going to see any 13-speed drivetrains any time soon from either company, so those pitchforks can stay in the shed for now. There also doesn't seem to be much news coming from the gearbox world, so I think the idea of a wide range gearbox that uses a trigger shifter and works under load is going to remain a pipedream for the near future.

What's much more likely is that Shimano will enter the wireless world, a prediction that's bolstered by the patents they were granted earlier this year. Plus, their Di2 groupsets are overdue for an update, and it'd be odd if the next generation kept its wires, especially considering that SRAM has already trickled down their wireless drivetrain down to the GX level.

Speaking of SRAM, it looks like they have something up their sleeve too, likely tied to the introduction of that Universal Derailleur Hanger. Once again, this speculation is fueled by patent images, and there's no clear timeline as to when we might see something new.





255 Comments

  • 305 14
 All I want is to continue seeing solid mid range bikes. Good old Cable actuated shift systems. No BS maintenance, No batteries to charge, serviceable. The rest I've got zero interest in. Basically I don't think 99% of us need much more then XT 12 speed / Marzocchi Z1 / and some race face atlas cranks!
  • 70 1
 10sp for me as I don't like shifting, also 24mm cranks for bearing life, agree with everything else.
  • 123 2
 This is too much common sense for the pinkbike comment section.
  • 15 0
 @kanasasa: oh I agree these are marginal improvements, 24mm spindle and 104 BCD + bashguard... I still buy adapters just to run a bashguard on my chromag. we aint all riding groom trail around here
  • 100 5
 Oh yeah,
Which Z1 fork are you referring too, the OG from 97?
Or maybe the Z150 from 2004,
Or do you mean the newest Fox version of the Z1, that is essentially a Fox 36 Rhythm?

10 years ago all that “99% of us” needed was 9spd, 26” Crossmaxxs, 69* HTA’s, with 400mm reach on a medium bike.
Times change, things are awesome right now, and bikes have never been better.
The cool thing about progress, is you get some trickle down, and makes things more accessible.

My current 12spd, modern bike is amazing, at climbing, descending, JRA, jumping, pumping, and letting me escape. My fork hasnt needed repair, I haven’t broken a chain, my brakes modulate so well it’s astonishing, tires grip like a rapid pit bull, and I’ve managed to keep a set of wheels for an entire season. Progress is a great thing, good things tend to come from progress.
And If I remember correctly both of the Big S’s still make 10, and 11 spd stuff, Fox makes the Marzo line, and you can still find NOS Kenda Blue grooves, and Nevegals….and I honestly mean no Judgement at all

Be good to one another out there
  • 28 0
 My deore/DVO spec Ibis RipmoAF basically covers all this. Gimme an XT shifter and can't think of anything I'd bother changing on my bike that wouldn't just be cosmetic or fun. Not gonna lie, sometimes I'd like an ebike for getting in more laps, but over-all, solid mid-range bikes leave almost nothing to be desired.
  • 14 1
 @onawalk: the new Z1 / 36 grip -> its amazing
  • 21 0
 @kanasasa: 9 speed wide range ftw
  • 2 2
 @onawalk: My bike: 27.5 cst bft, 9 spd, 69 hta, 344mm reach (bike for tweens)
  • 6 0
 @BoneDog: on not for a second doubt that it is amazing. That’s what new stuff is, amazing!

It’s worth noting, that its new stuff, 12spd, Z1, etc….and there were those 10 years ago, telling people all that “we” need is 26” wheels, blah, blah, blah.

It’s hard to remember just how we good we have it, and its all based on new stuff, and progression of tech, trails, and thinking.
  • 15 9
 Change cables and housing once or twice a year sucks if you ride a lot. Not having to do that would be my main motivation to try electronic shifting.
  • 4 1
 @mior: maybe for you that makes sense, thats rad, cause you have some access to some great stuff if thats the case. I know my lungs and legs are thankful for the 50T bailout sometimes, and I really think suspension design has progressed by leaps and bounds with owing that damn front der.

Keep pushing that 9spd, much respect
  • 7 0
 @dthomp325: Really? Changing cables is that big of a pain? I probably do it 3 times a year for dropper and derailier. I guess it depends on the frame!
  • 3 3
 100%, many people buying high end thinking it makes them better.. it also fuels the market prices too much.
I can afford any bike i want but the mid value bikes are the best for sure.
  • 18 0
 The next "thought experiment" build should be the perfect pinkbike comments spec
  • 8 0
 @TomsiR: so literally just air, because no one can agree on anything
  • 15 0
 @mior: but what type of air?
  • 7 2
 @dthomp325: not shitting on you but changing a cable/housing is like a ten minute job for each one…really not that big of a deal
  • 6 0
 @mior: I'm still rocking one on my short travel bike and love it. XO 9spd 11-46T on a 26" DW-link 4x bike. Every time I think it might be time to replace it I end up just upgrading a few parts instead. That 9spd XO drivetrain is still the most reliable and precise I've ever owned. I've gone whole seasons without needing any adjustments at all.
  • 4 0
 if only we drove the market
  • 4 2
 @ahauck: I disagree, my old bike would get dirt in the cable housing very few months or if I took it on a road trip with it in the back of my truck. I got really tired of constantly second guessing my shifting, guessing if I needed a new cable or if it just needed an adjustment due to cable stretch. Ive had a new bike with AXS since the end of last summer and I just set it and forget it. Even the early setup was easy, shifting was slightly off and you just hold the button on the bottom of the shifter and press the paddle the way it's out and your done. I sometimes think I should've gone high end cable actuated due to weight savings, but then one of my friends has a cable tension shift issue and I remember how much that sucked!
  • 7 0
 @mikkyberg: nitrogen, it is THE next big thing in mtb. Drops pressure 0.5 psi, and acts 1 s short of an insert. I call it INsERT (tm).
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: the bike that most people need and will enjoy
  • 6 0
 @mior: I'd go 9 or 8 speed wide range if shifting under load like Shimano.
Progression of range % has been amazing but don't need too many gears to cover it.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: a NOS Blue Groove was the worst bicycle related purchase I've made in the last 3 years. I've never tried another tire with a worse ratio of grip to rolling resistance. Great example of something we can be glad to have progressed past.
  • 3 0
 @AndrewHornor: Amen brother, Amen!
I had a 45lb Norco 6, with the delightful Blue Groove/Nevegal combo. I pedalled that up many a hill in search of silly elevated wood structures, and dead sailors to flat!
  • 6 0
 Wow...guess I should be changing my cables more than once every few years
  • 1 0
 100% agree with this. I own a specialized Enduro S works only because I got extremely lucky as the shop had it on clearance for half price. The spec is far beyond my riding ability. I will never ride the bike to its full potential to really see the benefits of carbon cranks, wheels and top of the line Ohlins suspension. If anything it's preventing me from progressing because the bike is just too damn stiff and responsive. My next bike will be a meta in the rockshox/GX build.
  • 1 0
 @mikkyberg: More importantly, what pressure?
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: and changing cables 2 to 3 times a year, is worth electronics?
Do you really ride ALOT? Because if so, I would be more worried about smaching RD than replacing cables.
  • 2 0
 @dglass: For my Chromag stylus with all externally routed cables it's no big deal to swap it out. For bikes like my friend has with all internally routed where you need to use cable routing tools and nearly take parts of the bike off to do so, it can be a pain itb.
  • 5 0
 @kanasasa: I thought I was the only one. I understand wide gear range but I don't understand close ratio wide gear range. I would shift two or three years at a time on the 12th speed cassette but my 10 speed has a little bit wider gear to gear ratio. I just bought a used 24 mm XT crank for less than half of what my buddy and his new Izzo paid for a new spider and chainring because the stock Gear ratio didn't work for his knees.
  • 4 0
 @kanasasa: I’m pretty sure strong riders will view big gear steps as a feature eventually. At least for punchy terrain. Being able to transition big grade differentials in 4 shifts instead of 6 is nice.

I’m with you on 9/10 speed. My next bike will probably “downgrade” to box or microshift straight away and sell the “good” stuff. There’s just so many advantages- chain line, running costs, dirt tolerance, weight… and you’re not tied to a semi-proprietary freehub “standard” that allows shramano to avoid competition on cassettes.

I do worry about those shifts under load that you mentioned though. Hopefully the market inspires shimano to do a 10 speed hg+ cassette so that’s an option. Linkglide suggests they’re considering it already.
  • 1 0
 Ha! I'm running a hardtail with a Z1 coil, XT 11sp drivetrain, basic SRAM NX DUB crankset and T4 tektro brakes. Simple, reliable and fun! Don't need more!
  • 1 0
 @Warburrito: sick my 9 speed needs a tune up every couple of months because im always accidentaly tweaking something
  • 1 0
 @mikkyberg: idk, helium is light
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Looks like an OEM spec walmart Maxxis assegai
  • 3 1
 You don't need anything more than a SS hardtail to do what most riders do. The other stuff just makes it easier.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: One of the best comments on any thread, and not one bitch about price! Well done. We have it so good.
  • 1 0
 Where do you find XT on a mid range bike? It's all Deore/SLX on the less than $4k price range.
  • 1 0
 @mior: but it makes my voice sound funny
  • 1 0
 @pink505: if filling your tires with Nitrogen could you also inject a fluid that would be more reactive to normal air to more quickly seal holes? Stans is great, but chemically I wonder if Nitrogen would open new sealant possibilities.
  • 1 0
 @Warburrito: You dont want helium as it will reduce grip, you want INsERT nitrogen with PiSS additive. A urea based sealant with dissolved spiders silk.

I can't imagine the disasters awaiting the person who tries to create a reactive bike tire sealant, please make sure you get video....I think solid tires with no gas chamber are the future, 3d printing will allow them to make complex internal shapes not possible in today's moulding and vulcanisation process.
  • 1 0
 @kanasasa: I'm currently running box prime 9, my thoughts on it are that the concept makes sense, 12 isn't quite necessary but 9 isn't quite enough, 10 or 11 speed with something like 10-48 cassette would probably be just perfect there are also some things like the lack of narrow/wide on the jockey wheels that I think could make the drivetrain significantly better.
  • 2 0
 @kanasasa: Also like the 10 sp but only one mech (deore) runs 11-46 - it's working fine mind.

On the cranks, Hope 30mm BB seems to be overspecced for a modern MTB part - 10,000 km down and they're just fine & have beaten all 24mm bearings I've ever used
  • 58 1
 Eagerly awaiting my new Forbidden Dreadnought HSP and ziggy link so I can mullet it. I only drink the coolaid once every 5ish years, so I fill my glass
  • 38 0
 People just riding their bikes, laughing at each other falling off and having a beer afterwards
  • 29 0
 I think we can all agree that shit is about to get a little weird. But the real question is which of these upcoming advancements will stick around and which will be looked at in the same way we look at those late 90's/early 2000's mountain bikes and go "what the hell?"
  • 9 0
 Yeah I think there's going to be some tech that's fueled by hype and sales and tech that's fueled by practicality.
  • 5 0
 This was my first thought, feels like we are heading into a realm of advancement. I like it but there will be many strange and odd ideas thrown out there.
  • 5 3
 Agree. Maybe it's just aesthetics, but here's something about idler pulleys and mixed-wheel sizes that seem like a bodge to me. Plainly they're doing something good, but they feel like a step on the way towards something else...
  • 14 2
 @geltmanl: Well idler pullies enable a rearward axle path so that will stick once people start understanding how a HP bike works.
  • 6 0
 @Tmackstab: *for some bikes.

I think High Pivot bikes are here to stay, but I don't see them becoming common on every bike, or every type of bike (dh, enduro, all-mountain, trail, xc, etc.) They have their pros and cons and they don't make a shorter travel bike feel very poppy or playful.
  • 3 0
 @Spencermon: Not on every bike no but in the mix like single pivot, multi link, 4 bar etc etc
  • 34 5
 Wireless brakes in next 5 years.
  • 6 3
 Wireless brakes are the future for sure!
  • 18 1
 Just flick a 2 position 'on/off' switch on the handlebar. Perfect.
  • 1 1
 oh, so clean
  • 13 1
 With the addition of electric actuators and batteries, they would be heavier than hydraulically actuated brakes, with the potential of less feel. I'm not sure what the benefit actually is other than slightly less maintenance.
  • 2 1
 Yes please! No need to ask me to be the guinea pig, I volunteer. And Wireless lockout, which I'm thinking will be right around the corner with AXS technology.
  • 4 0
 @jayacheess: And also losing your battery power on a steep descent
  • 3 0
 I also predict there will come a time in the near future when wireless, electronic systems (especially for shifting) will be cheaper than mechanical counterparts. Think about watches. It's a weak analogy...but why not just make a sweeping prediction based on that anyway?!? It's not like I have any real skin in the game.
  • 4 0
 My brakes are already wireless. My face gets itchy long before my beard grows to lengths that would let me run cable operated discs instead of hydraulics.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: ABS on commuter e-bikes. Shimano is heavy into commuter e-bike stuff. weight and complexity don't matter if your bike is basically a replacement for a car.
  • 3 0
 Wireless steering is here to stay.
  • 3 0
 @WheelBased: that says shimano though. Op said 5 years. Most of us will be happy to buy a shimano chain within 5 years.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: like shimano
  • 27 2
 SRAM will release an all new method of pre-loading and tightening a crank. They will claim it is made simpler as you now only require a reduced amount of torque - 40,000,000,000 Nm - to tighten or loosen. Alternately SRAM will sell a breaker bar which is approximately 5 kilometres long to help home mechanics perform this simple task
  • 5 0
 Also the bottom bracket will now be 30.0001mm as sram will have found that is actually the ideal number for spindle diameter.
  • 3 0
 @grldm3: COVID-19 has been awful to the industry, we missed out on at least 3-4 new BB standards, and at least 3 new handlebar diameters and widths.
  • 39 14
 New trend, the young and healthy dump ebikes and earn the downs
  • 14 46
flag mtbtrekracer (May 31, 2021 at 14:07) (Below Threshold)
 or they continue to use thier ebike but use it everyday, bike to the trails and get more exercise in than a manual bike??
you have no idea clearly about how good ebikes are being to mtb and peoples fitness.
  • 31 3
 New trend, manufacturers integrate the ever-present Bluetooth speaker directly into the frames of their moped offerings.
  • 33 9
 @mtbtrekracer: Why are they all fat then?
  • 8 0
 @davec113: can confirm (anecdotally at least)
In the last couple of years I've seen dozens & dozens of ebikes and to a man they are all ridden by middle aged fat blokes in running shorts & trainers.
Not seen any riding to the trails either but seen plenty on bike racks being driven there.
  • 1 0
 @mtbtrekracer:
I’d really need that manual bike. How far can it go? And when is the bunny hop bike coming?
  • 1 6
flag mtbtrekracer (Jun 3, 2021 at 2:32) (Below Threshold)
 @davec113: first, man the hate of downvoters who are jealous or cant afford an ebike.
Second: lets take a second to look at the fact of this "fat" thing,
Fat person: wants to enjoy the dh mtb without all the slugging etc.

Person whos already fit: WhY YoU nEEd EbIkE, YOu LaZy

Fat Person: enjoying mtb so much hes getting on that bike almost daily and smashing out lap after lap.

Person whos already fit: i bike once or twice a week need to stay fit

Fat Person: still enjoying mtbing so much, does upgrades, now rides daily, has lost 25kg.

Person whos already fit: cheat day!! Login to PB to tell everyone ebikers suck.

the now skinnier(than before) person on ebike, MAN THIS SPORT IS SICK, decides to buy a Normal bike for Bike park - now has more money invested an loving it.

Now enjoying MTBing so much an has gotten alot fitter, bought a normal bike to use instead as is now fit"ish"
doesnt login to PB to be a dick about something they have no idea about.

Oh wait... thats me....
You clowns have no idea how good Ebikes are for MTB and human health for someone who wouldnt of got on a bike if it wasnt for the "E" part.
  • 3 0
 @mtbtrekracer: yeah well getting on a normal bike is even better for human health and we all had to start somewhere - without assisted pedalling.
I think of it this way - what problem does the invention of the e bike solve? On one hand it enables an enthusiastic rider to get more out of his/her day, and this is how they are marketed to us. But in my opinion the reality is that mainly it enables bike manufacturers to target a larger market, i.e the unfit/less willing who have a bit of disposable income. It's that mismatch between how they are sold and how they are bought. It's modern 'convenience' sold as progression.
  • 27 6
 GEARBOXES!!!
  • 5 4
 gates carbon belt drive and a pinion gearbox will never break
  • 4 0
 PLEASE especially with trigger shifters
  • 18 2
 Been around for ages, nobody buys them...
  • 2 0
 Electrical hub! rohloff e-14, what a beast, electrical version shifts faster than you blink an eye.
  • 3 0
 @mior: they do break eh. I’ve seen photos of it on multiple Facebook groups. Unsure of the reasons though.
  • 30 13
 I feel like we won't go past 12 speed if anything go back to 11 speed as 12 s is very unreliable
  • 12 0
 I would love a 10-46 11 speed sram cassette. Would work with existing derailleurs with no modifications. Could keep it under 300g at the x0 level. I know Garbuk makes one but the 42-46 gear jump is weird and their cassettes are clearly optimized around the 48t and 50t options.
  • 12 7
 I feel like 12 speed is the sweet spot. There have been some issues with 12 speed and its definitely finicky when it comes to set up. But I don't think anything that's come across with 12 speed makes it worth going back to 11 speed. Eagle has been out for 5 years now and especially with AXS people love it. Shimano 12 has been out for a minute now too and people are loving it.
  • 11 1
 @Zaeius: I am very happy with my e13 9-46
  • 10 6
 I just really hope that the bike industry doesn't make products based on wants of the mechanically inept.
  • 8 1
 SOOOO true my 11sp xt drive train has out lasted my friends 12sp shimano and sram
  • 5 0
 I'm enjoying my 11 speed, but a lot has happened in the 9-10 speed world in the last few years that nobody talks about. On one of my bikes I'm running a 1x 11-46 9-speed and it rocks. I did have to add an extender to the rear der mount to clear the 46 tooth CR, but I have had zero shifting issues due to the increased gap on the smaller cogs. I am running 9-speed XO which may help.
  • 2 0
 Garbaruk does excellent 11 speed stuff that is cheaper than the lightest xx1 cassette
  • 1 0
 @Zaeius: +1000 for this drivetrain option
  • 5 0
 I agree that 12 speed is too finnicky, I ended up going to a Box 9 speed (11-46 as it was lighter than the 11-50) and love it. It doesnt require adjustment, even after days in the bike park (same couldnt be said for my old XO eagle setup).

My old XO type 2 10 speed is still going strong too, and has never given me an issue... ever.
  • 11 0
 I've been running the Microshift Advent X 10 speed for about 18 months now and it is all the gears you ever need. 11-48 range, reliable, lighter and cheaper the 11speed XT. I've run Eagle GX 12 speed and it was garbage in comparison. Plenty of climbing in most of my rides and biggest issue with more gears is needing to change down 8 or 9 gears when going from up to down quickly.
  • 3 0
 @JiminOz: actually the need to not change so many gears all the time is a big selling point in itself.

There is only a couple of times where I wished that the ratios were closer but that was on boring / mundane / average trails, where there was very little gradient change. Nothing like the usual trails for my heavy duty AM bike.
  • 3 0
 Problem is that manufacturers are optimizing their anti squat for 50t cassettes, and therefore 32t front chainrings. Running 32 front 46 rear on a 29er is a tall order for most people
  • 2 0
 @Mntneer: agreed, such a great cassette.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I need a 10-50 with a 30t chainring. I’m fat and slow, and that’s an improvement.
  • 1 0
 @JiminOz: its unnecessary in my opinion, but 13 speed setups are already out...

rotorbike.com/catalog/default/rotor/xc-mtb-marathon/1x13-mountain-groupset.html
  • 2 1
 I hope to see more than a single number of gears specced on performance MTB in a few years. 12 speed makes sense to people who need small gear steps AND wide range, but how many people does that really include? Meanwhile, bigger gear steps can be seen as a feature for rolling or punchy terrain, and 9/10 speed offers much better weight, chain line, cost, and reliability. And if it happens soon, the HG freehub will still be common and companies like box and microshift can challenge the big S^2. In the meantime, linkglide shows that shimano suspects 12s is a niche product as well.
  • 3 0
 @Mntneer: that with an XT 11spd shifter and derailleur is my go to on my big bike. I don't understand why people spend so much on shifting, when it is so good with "old tech". Too many people just like to blow money on the latest and greatest, without thinking about what (if any) BENEFIT it brings to the ride.
  • 6 3
 @hamncheez: people need to harden up! 32x46 on a 29er is still an easy gear. I tried a bike with Eagle 52 and I believe a 28 up front, and it was barely faster than a track stand. But snark aside, people really are becoming too reliant on tech instead of skills and fitness.
  • 5 1
 @SprSonik: Come ride my local trails with a 32x46.
  • 20 2
 I'm looking forward to Mega Boost for no significant benefits.
  • 2 0
 Pressfit handlebar/stem interfaces!
  • 16 1
 I just want my rear break hose on the outside of my frame again.
  • 2 5
 Honest question, but why? How often are you installing and removing your rear break? Do you take it off the bike to bleed it or something?
  • 6 0
 @dlxah: once or twice a year. but why should that matter? There's little advantage to running the rear hose within the frame. But there is a big disadvantage: any time you want to remove the brake you are obligated to disconnect the lever or caliper, spilling fluid. To reinstall the rear brake you'll need to thread that hose back through the frame, install a new olive and barb, then re-bleed the brake. Snipping a couple of zip-ties is far easier than that.
  • 1 2
 @craigcanucks I only rarely remove the rear brake to change out the hose or if I'm swapping frames, which generally requires all of those steps whether it's internally or externally routed anyway. I've personally never found running the hose through the frame to be all that much more difficult or time consuming than doing up a bunch of zip ties, and if it's internally guided, it's actually even easier. It's worth it to me for the cleaner look and to make it easier to wipe down the frame, which is something I do far more often than removing the brake, but to each their own I guess.
  • 1 0
 I usually find the dropper post to be more of a pain to route through the frame, since it has to make that tight bend above the BB. Yet for some reason nobody ever seems to complain about those being internally routed XD
  • 4 0
 @dlxah: Oh, people do complain. AXS is there for a reason.
  • 2 1
 @MaplePanda: Externally routed dropper posts have been around longer than internally routed posts. Nobody uses them.
  • 13 0
 Can Pinion make a electronic shifter already!
  • 6 1
 I keep wondering if all this electronic tech will lead to some kind of automatic clutch so gear box shifting doesn't suck. If poeple are gonna put a motor in their bike, why not add a pound or so to get a gearbox that can't get eaten by rocks.
  • 9 0
 Trek will defy all their known engineering logic and proud hardtail design history and somehow release a 29er hardtail which has a head angle of less than 68 degrees. They will compensate for this brave and exciting geometry by ensuring the seat angle is is also 68 degrees and the chainstays are at least 3 metres long.
  • 11 0
 Integration of e-motor with gearbox.
New sub-industry will pop up: e-bike service and hacking to fix all the flawed designs
  • 3 0
 Effigear/Valeo motor
  • 1 0
 @RobinHoodOnBikes: I am sure other companies like Bosch have already developed efficient units but there may be a problem of packing it into small and lightweight box. It can be motor with small CVT at the mainframe and reduction gear hub at the rear wheel. There are many options, but they may be hesitant to introduce new concept because people are tired of all of those nonstandards.
  • 1 0
 @RobinHoodOnBikes: I'm pretty much sure that Pinion has been working on it as well because it's new possibility for them.
  • 12 0
 I really just want cheaper prices haha
  • 4 0
 Yeah just gonna keep riding what I got until then
  • 3 0
 Higher prices are here to stay...even if there is an unfrakking of supply chains.
  • 4 1
 @Dopepedaler: yeah maybe you're right, but my hope is that once the supply chains get back to normal there will eventually be "deals" again or "clearance" or last year's model. i guess it will take some time though :/
  • 8 0
 My prediction is that in a few years all DH and enduro bikes will be mullets after they win all the things. After Minnaar retires, nobody will run 29 rear wheels in DH. XC bikes will stay full 29 and trail bikes will likely be 29 or mullet based on sizing. Gearboxes will be integrated into ebikes and that will push forward the development of trigger shifting and shifting under load and then they will find their way onto more regular bikes. Ebikes eat deraileur based drivetrains and the drag is less of an issue so it makes all the sense in the world to integrate a gearbox in with the motor.
  • 1 0
 My prediction: the Reverse Mullet will emerge, just because......
  • 7 0
 Good to see the industry catching up to 10 year old tech from the real innovators. Speaking strictly about the high pivot designs of the battle proven Canfield Formula
  • 1 0
 ...and the Mongoose I-Drive bikes like the Teocali and Nugget from the mid to late 2000s.
  • 2 0
 Yep, Canfield has been doing high-pivot pulley wheel bikes since the beginning in '99. And they are still the only ones to do a multi-link high-pivot which has far better braking and kinematics all around than even these newer designs from the big players. My 2017 Jedi is unreal through the rough stuff. Let's you get away with dumb lines and actually accelerate through chunder instead of getting hung up.
  • 10 6
 i am pretty excited about wireless shifting prices trickling down to more affordable options, who doesn't want 1 less cable to mess with? i understand the pushback from people just liking the servicability and simplicity of traditional mechanical options, but you can't deny its at least cool.
  • 15 1
 ill give you its cool, but to counter your "who doesn't want 1 less cable to mess with?" argument, i have the simple "who wants 2 more batteries to charge?" argument. i think that electronic shifting is very cool, and now that gx axs is out its an option for a lot of people, its still to expensive with no real benefit beside from not turning a barrel adjuster every once in a while
  • 8 3
 @ltharris: Exactly. I don't get the "ease of ownership" argument when you have to remember to charge batteries every 3 rides vs change a cable once per year. I don't think twisting a barrel adjuster every few weeks even counts since, unlike charging a battery, you can do it on the bike when you notice it is required.

Even if costs were equal I'm not sure that I would want wireless for the added hassle (though a programmable shifter does seem cool).
  • 6 0
 @sspiff: unless your rides are 6+ hour epics you will get way more than 3 rides out of it. For most of us the charge will last over a month. I charge mine whenever I am doing other maintenance and I have never been caught stranded yet.
  • 4 0
 I'm crazy I know, but if the next Carrington Event occurs my mechanical bikes will still function flawlessly. If I'm gonna spend money on bikes I like knowing they'll be useable after an apocalyptic event. I wish I was kidding, but I really do factor that into my purchases. ...You'll also find bike trailer mounting points on my trail bikes.
  • 1 0
 @ltharris: hmm.. not all rigs have the port for internal routing, and some may be short external mounts. Wireless may give another option for a fully kitted rig, just saying.
  • 5 0
 1 less shifting cable in exchange for 1 more charging cable, so you pretty much end up messing with the same amount of cable tho...
  • 2 0
 @mnbob1982: well personally i like performance over looks, and having an external cable doesnt bother me. i think its rather ridiculous to spend that much money for a kitted rig. i know where you are coming from and to each his own, but to the average person, i personally dont think its a wise use of your money. dont take me as anti-electronic shifting, i really hope in the next couple of years and upgrade kit will be sub $400, but until then, i dont see the true value in spending all the money.
  • 2 0
 @Warburrito: TEOTWAWKI!!! Lol good points though, I think about that sometimes when I'm at work in the middle of the night 75 miles from my house
  • 4 0
 @Warburrito @RusMan :

That should be the topic of Pinkbike’s next Thought Experiment : The Post Apocalypse Bike Build. How would you spec a bike if you knew the end of the world was fast approaching? Smile
  • 2 2
 I don't understand the pushback, if you don't think wireless is something you want then you are obviously not the target market. Why not just let people who have no time for cable adjustment and are have the budget for it to enjoy it?

We are supposed to keep quiet and like ebikes, but somehow wireless shifting is bad?
  • 1 2
 @old-tube: no actually they are all bad.. ebikes and wireless shifting, dropper posts... completely unnecessary (and maybe i'm not the marketing target aswell)
  • 6 0
 yup more mullets fucking finally so i can actually choose which platform i wanna run instead of choosing the least worst of em
  • 8 0
 This isn’t the future this is just the last month of Pinkbike articles
  • 9 5
 As ebike justification progresses from "for the benefit of old and unfit" to "easer to ride to the trail head" to "you are a very bad person for not riding one", Cyclists found riding a bicycle not equipped with an electric motor will be arrest for some sort of hate crime that millennial types like to make up.
  • 3 0
 The future obviously electronically shiftable headsets that integrate with your dropper. Dropper post up?
Headtube angle set to 67 degrees, Dropper post down? Tiny (expensive breakable) servos in headtube rotate some spacers and bam, headtube angle 63 degrees, ready to party.
New headtube standard (obviously) to accommodate the new headsets, which all start at $800.

Also, for some reason the change in headtube standards require new hub widths, 16x111 in the front (we'll call it boast) and 12x148, but with a different thread pitch than anything currently out there (maybe reverse M48 threaded).
  • 4 0
 I'm waiting patiently for wireless electronic lockout from SRAM. Cannondale did wired lockout back in the late 90s and it was pretty neat honestly. Way ahead of its time.
  • 2 0
 You might be patiently waiting, I'm impatiently waiting! Magura had something called "elect" a few years ago. Was a wireless controller for suspension and dropper post. Super impressive, but you can't find it anywhere and pretty sure they aren't making it anymore, which is odd. Would love to see an article touching on that. Maybe not enough advertisement and sales? Not exactly the first company that comes to mind when you think suspension. Not the last either, but it's tough to think about anything other than Rockshox and Fox when you're spending that kinda money.
  • 1 0
 a loooong time ago there was a Girvin Smart Shock technology around. Buddy of mine had it on a K2 Razorback. And it was terrible. But this was in '99 or so.
  • 5 3
 All I know is I see a LOT more e-mtbs on the trails, and they're not the old cheap ones, they're all 10k+ models with loads of power and mostly silent motors. its pretty cool, other than when they pass you uphill only to block the way downhill haha.

But what that tells me is that they do sell and we'll see more e-mtbs in the future. To be honest, while i like my pedal bike, i could see the interest when you don't have easy uphills or lifts. They get 4-5x more downhill sessions than i do, no matter how fast I go up Smile
  • 2 0
 Can't understand why some in the bike industry feel the need to phase out 27.5. 29" wheels are great for XC and single speeds but they're no where near as fun as a 27.5. My SS is a 29er, my fun bike is a 27.5" 29" wheels suck in so many ways in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 I think Pinkbike need to get an understanding of their readers desires. I get the need for advertising and a very close relationship with the bike industry, but the vast vast majority of people are tired of bike industry nonsense. We just want good alloy bikes with good word and good warranty and some stability with standards. Fair play to the bike industry if they can generate interest through needless changes, but, as far as I can see, Covid came and the industry did not cope well. Am I wrong in thinking that countless incompatible standards and relentless change for the sale of it makes it harder to mass produce and stockpile components. And they can forget the ridiculous terminology. From what I see, a lot of people used to buy high end frames and build up high end bikes, bit this slowed dramatically about four or five years ago when people just couldn't be bothering with boost et al.
  • 9 4
 XT/SLX/Deore wireless 12 speed will dominate.
  • 10 2
 Ha, by the time Shimano releases anything wireless, SRAM will already have fully transcended all space and time.
  • 2 0
 @seraph: This is correct.
  • 2 0
 I think it will be funny to suddenly see many people do a 180 and like wireless shifting because it's shimano.
  • 6 2
 No gearbox in the crystal ball? You've just ruined a few Pinkbikers days.

(gearboxes can do one. Chains forever!)
  • 4 0
 Heavy e-bikes should naturally progress towards gearbox design, light e-bikes stick to derailleurs. Needless to say the former being just a grip squeeze away from a full on motorbike will make a lot of pinkbikers explode with anger.
  • 4 0
 @jollyXroger: I can see a world in which the frame for e bikes and gearbox bikes are one and the same. The gearbox and motor housing will share a common physical size / shape and either of the two will be capable of being installed in a given frame.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: That would be nice. I would like to see Fazua develop in a similar direction, having a fixed gearbox with a motor and battery that can be taken off.
  • 8 7
 These seem to be all good near term predictions. The longer term looks possibly amazing for us Electric assist people. All depends on access. We need to continue to blend in, pay for and build/maintain our shared trails and ride responsibly. Technology needs to provide the next step in energy storage beyond the current lithium tech. Either way, I've been shredding since '88 and could not be more stoked about how much fun is coming my way on these amazing trail machines we get to ride these days.
  • 4 1
 According to that patent drawing I reckon Cannondale will be be releasing a new model soon called the 'Super V'. You heard it here first folks.
  • 2 0
 lol
  • 3 0
 Insider tip - Cannondale will release 37 new pressfit bottom bracket standards. Each one requires a crank which is precisely 28.739mm in size. Every one will creak.
  • 5 4
 Bring back the 29+! Such a cool feature that won the hearts of some of the most experienced riders i know. My Stache is perhaps my favorite bike of all time...(yes, possibly more than my enduro bike). i cant believe this nieche is dying! Stupid trends.
  • 2 2
 I haven't even migrated to 29 yet, but I would like to at least try a 29+.
  • 2 0
 @Warburrito: its pretty much on life support. It really is surprisingly fun. The flotation and rolling is amazing, so its great on xc/expedition rides, but thats to be expected. The surprsing part is just how much fun it is on singletrails. Yes, its still a hardtail, buy does it put a grin on my face! Look at almost any review of the Stache, including Cam Mccaul ripping on it, and they all pretty much say the same.
  • 1 0
 Maybe this industry already exists, but as I understand it in the exotic cars world their exists a sort of timeshare/rental program. People get to swap cars as long as they pay their monthly or per rental fee. I'm not a finance person and maybe it could never be profitable, but I for one would love to pay into a program like that for bikes for a while.

Living in Indiana the most I could hope for here is to catch the BCSP bike festival and ride a demo or 2 if I'm lucky. Outside of that all you get is a ride around a parking lot before you decide on your purchase. We do have Cannondale Super Vs and maybe other models to rent not far from BCSP. The rest of our shops are in concrete jungles.
  • 1 0
 Exists in the UK for kids bikes.
Hope is one provider (there are othsrs).
Pay a monthly fee. Use the bije till the kid outgrows it. Get sent the next size. Repeat.

My mates sons hope equipped bike is the nuts, actually a better spec than anything i own.
  • 2 0
 I converted a Cannondale Prophet to 27.5 with 1x11 and 4 pot brakes. Best of both worlds?

But if I had cashola it'd be a GG Shred Dogg all the way. I'm still loving my single pivot though.
  • 1 0
 more 8,9,10spd and 1 piece direct mount chain ring options, more choices for cassettes close ratio 10-28 like slx,xt,xtr rear cassettes, i seem to always gravitate to a 6700. as few as bolts as possible more direct mount options for breaks; necessity to beat the crap out of that bike and it won't come apart. a bike built to do what it was meant to do, 29er dope, 27.5 dope, 26er yep!, clean cut in the front, party in the rear; if it was meant to be. i want these bikes built to do what they intend do, not 1 bike built for 3 different people and 3 different purposes.

yah not sure about the comments about not using hardest gears!!! I probably ride 12-20 most of the time and pop it up to 28 to do the fire road. i want selection to choose my speed going into jumps hops and downhill, probably the places we all drool to ride and for all the people that love going up hill, don't we all need to ride it like a single speed. get out of that saddle and attack it!!!, what i tell my 5 year old. explode, explode, explode!!!
  • 1 0
 Mix wheels are going to be a thing, even on shorter travel bikes. I think some of it will be driven by Fox's decision to not make a 27.5 Fox 34 (which still is weird). Santa Cruz sells a LOT of 5010's and Fertado's. Ibis has the Mojo etc etc.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer does the future of mixed wheel sizes mainly have a presence in the longer travel cycling disciplines such as enduro/DH? Would there be any advantages to having XC or shorter travel trail bikes setup as mixed wheel sizes, maybe a Spur/Blur/Epic Evo type bike?
  • 1 0
 I love all the new shit. It seems like a very unpopular opinion. My bike is 4 years old bike and I'll probably ride it for another year or two before replacing it, but I love watching all this new shit come out. I've heard from multiple AXS converts, who were sure that they'd stick with cables and then after they rode it were convinced. Anyway, I like the brands that are pushing things forward, bring on the downvotes.
  • 4 0
 9-48T 10 Speed Falcon drivetrain..... I can dream.
  • 4 1
 I don’t understand why they haven’t put a clutch inside of a gearbox to allow you to shift under power
  • 6 5
 Who really needs 12sp other than xc racers? When was the last time you used the bottom 5 cogs other than adjusting gears and riding on the road. 7 speed . 51-21. Way more durable/lighter...
  • 5 1
 Areas that have some smoother, buffed trails, or riders in techs stuff, that have little time to get in a pedal stroke, or transition stages between trails that are roads, or gravel 2 tracks, or the bottom part of some bike parks, or…..
Turns out we all ride different terrain, are different riders, of different abilities, with different bikes. I dont use my bottom 3 gears all that often, and I’m working to use the top 3 less, but I’m stoked that they’re there.
  • 1 0
 When I'm on the trail (I have a 9 speed) I'm in the high gear so i sprint to get up uphill on our trails. Most places, its a fire road up and a trail down. Where i live, its constantly fluctuating
  • 1 1
 Riding 10-50t here. I use the bottom and top end all the time, there are probably 2-3 gears in the middle of the range that I don’t use often but those are needed for decent gear changes to happen. All my rides are pretty much straight up then straight down (and maybe a couple laps of that), like 5km of 10% grade on the way up
  • 3 0
 @timschafer Every ride? pretty close to every ride, yeah, except for the ones with my kids.
  • 4 3
 You’re just not riding hard enough if you never use the bottom gears
  • 2 0
 @ahauck: dude lives in North Van. You wouldn’t use them often, if at all, there either.
  • 1 0
 Would love this option....where i ride it is a grind up with the top three gears...on the way down just take fingers off brakes and you are going fast.
  • 1 1
 I do, every ride
  • 4 0
 My buddy's e-bike had a short in it so he had to ride his fat bike...lol
  • 7 7
 Everything will be made of plastic, you will have a 42" wheel at the front, a 6" wheel at the back, an upside down stem, an electric motor so no need to use your legs. Best of all you will be charged £250000 for one and you can't get one until the year 4500 as out of stock. Rest assured the Industry has this!
  • 3 1
 Why the downvotes? Hilarious comment bro
  • 3 2
 @short-but-sweet: Some people have no sense of humor lol.
  • 1 1
 be cool if someone converted carbon emissions into carbon fiber
  • 3 0
 The Penny Farthings going to make a comeback. The original mixed wheel hardtail!
  • 2 0
 To benchmark your crystal..... when’s the mullet patrol being released? And, is Levy still kickin? Thank you for the article too
  • 3 3
 Predicting a 28" wheel size some time in the future. There is such a difference between 27 & 29" some bikes look strange. Also Sram/shimano please hurry up and make a gearbox so they can go mainstream, they have been coming and going for the last 15-20 years and its about time we got rid of the rear mech.
  • 2 0
 Right on. Ditched my rear mech for gearbox and have never looked back.
  • 1 0
 Shimano will realise the futility of having Rotors that are 140, 160, 180, 203??, 220 and release an all new large rotor size of 201.5 mm which requires all new adaptors to work.
  • 1 0
 I think bike companies will possible make their trail and enduro frames more compact looking like DH frames, but lighter. They may be able to make they lighter and just as strong.
  • 1 1
 Telling us that there's going to be more of what's already out there is hardly insightful. Personally I'm predicting that the next geometry puzzle will be from the downhill bikes in the form of Q-factor, wider is more stable after all. Longer stems that take into account bar back sweep, so that your hand position matches the off set of the fork. These two might be way off the mark but surely it's better that saying they'll be more cogs in the transmission.
  • 1 1
 What about adjustable tire preasure on the fly. Additional trigger for high preasure for low drag uphill or comuting and low preasure for maximum grip on the decends. Would be my most wanted feature. Store the pumping energy everytime you´re braking and use it, to fill the tire when you need it. If this will be possible with a not crazy more weight, this might increase laptimes of races as well
  • 1 0
 Ebikes with integrated gearbox? Check.

www.valeo.com/en/a-valeo-innovation-for-e-mobility-is-coming

Now, it's only missing the range of 100km, and increase max speed from 25km/h to 35ish km/h
  • 2 0
 Daring predictions.

I have one along the same lines: the sun will rise tomorrow, somewhere.

Way to stick your neck out on this one, PB.
  • 1 0
 "people still willingly choose running as their preferred means of outdoor recreation, and just think of how many easier ways there are to get around."
And running's not even fun.
  • 1 0
 I think high pivots will gain popularity once people start discovering that they have advantages beyond just axle path. Check out this nice suspension analysis on the Druid. www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qkBpOfJ4wA
  • 4 1
 29er are not fun and mullets are a poor attempt at making the big wheel fun. 27.5" ftw
  • 1 0
 Based and Funpilled
  • 3 0
 No thoughts about more mainstream additive manufacturing?
  • 5 0
 Hah. I have many. Kaz just isn't ready to download a bike. Jokes aside, we've been speaking to a bunch of very smart people about AM and I think I'm going to do a little series on it in the near future.
  • 3 0
 carbon fiber is basically just blowing up fabric with a balloon and the soaking it in glue
  • 19 19
 As for E-MTB, I predict people will boycott e-bikes enough to the point that it will finally become a thing on its own, just like motorbikes became motorbikes and not bikes with combustion engines
  • 10 6
 someone's fun at parties
  • 1 0
 hmm imagine
  • 1 1
 Tell me you have an E-Bike as your screensaver without telling me you have an E-Bike as your screensaver. LOL Salty much?
  • 4 3
 @mikekazimer you forgot about all the 'new technology' (Marketing & PR) designed specifically for the eMTB market Rolleyes
  • 3 0
 Love how nobody says prices go up a billion times
  • 1 0
 I’m waiting for my Dreadnought will go Ziggy and mullet and whistler is open best post pandemic present ever !! summer is looking good.
  • 2 1
 @brianpark
You sly bastard!
You edited the post, and my MX Patrol wheel comment right out!

I love it!
  • 7 7
 Prediction: 1.8" steer tubes will become the new standard on long travel enduro bikes, despite the industry promising it was an "e-bike" only thing.
  • 25 0
 Leo, is that you?
  • 1 0
 Weak. We should go full 3 inch
  • 1 0
 Why not 45mm?
  • 4 2
 Yes, all the marketing Kool Aid! Drink up, people!
  • 1 1
 You aren't truly edgey unless you call them "sheeple", sorry.
  • 2 4
 I would think 30.5" wheels would be interesting for XL sized bikes. It's well known that different height riders ride different wheel sizes (look at kids bikes from 12" through 26" as they grow). Tall people might benefit from bigger wheels than a 5' 4" person likes riding.

Tires with internal cross bracing to resist side squirm would be interesting to test. If cushcore is actually beneficial in this way, better to integrate it into the tire. Think bracing like shown in the cross section of the rims in the following link:

chromagbikes.com/collections/rims-wheels/products/rims-chromag-ba30
  • 1 0
 I have been thinking it's only a matter of time til someone comes out with an insert integrated into the tire. I guess it wouldn't be called an insert then.
  • 1 2
 How about the trickle-down of things like coil shocks and full-face helmets to trail riding?

Or seeing as this is an Olympic year, the trickle-up of roady lycra and no knee-pads from XC to trail riding?
  • 2 0
 im never wearing lycra
  • 2 2
 I am looking forward to mullet bikes fizzling out and years later looking back on it like "Hey remember when we did that stupid thing?"
  • 2 1
 Kinda wondering where IPAs are gonna go after this Juicy/Hazy thing runs its course.
  • 1 0
 Finally a topic worth discussing
  • 1 0
 More dropper posts that don’t get stuck high 5 to oneup 210mm, that thing always springs up in a hurry
  • 1 0
 Gosh, I've been riding my high pivot Corsair for years and years. Funny it hasn't caught on till now!
  • 1 0
 What I expect is more bs like offering 27.5 and mullets on most of the range but 29” only on xl bikes.
  • 1 0
 Gyroscopes to drive the optimal amount of lean, pitch, yaw, all that. Just get on and ride.
  • 1 0
 I'm anti-electronic shifting and braking but my rig is a YT Decoy Shred E-bike. Just trying to keep things pure. LOL
  • 4 7
 Ok I’m gonna say it. Mullets are long in the back, short up front . I know they’re also ‘business up front, party out the back’ which is the definition Mtb mullets have chose to emulate.

But surely if they’re longer (travel and in terms of wheel size) up front than in the back they’re more of a ‘short back n sides’ . Or perhaps a post punk new wave-y buoffant thing.

Discuss
  • 3 0
 Just ride backwards
  • 1 0
 @VelkePivo LOL that’s great
  • 1 1
 New drivetrain designs would be sick, I like mine how it is though so maybe not..
  • 1 2
 Hydraulic drivetrains with stored energy compartments in the next 10 years. The stored energy could also potentially boost your brake power for feather light lever pull.
  • 1 0
 I hope they will invent cheaper bikes in the future. That would be great!
  • 1 0
 The death of orange fork lowers.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha
  • 1 1
 giga boost "wheels a mile wide" lol i still have 9x100 qr axles
  • 1 0
 wide range 10 speed.
  • 1 0
 Make good bikes No BS.
  • 1 0
 Trandspondster
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