Pinkbike Poll: Dogs on the Trail?

Jan 7, 2014 at 20:45
by Mike Levy  
As anyone who has "owned" a dog can attest to, they don't call them man's best friend for nothing. In fact, ask any dog owner about their pooch and you'll likely hear them gush on and on about why their own special Fido is so great, and that the dog is part of the family rather than something that is owned. Hell, I know people who have more photos of their dog in their wallet or on their phone than they have of their own kids. The sense of companionship and unconditional love is both strong and simply different than what you have with a partner, and it doesn't fade after a few years of being together, either - dogs don't care if you plugged the toilet, would rather watch Supercross than the Gilmore Girls, and they most certainly don't want to spend a Saturday in Ikea picking out new fixtures. Some food, some exercise, and more than a few ass scratches and you'll have a resolute friendship for life, which is why it might be so difficult to write today's Pinkbike Poll article about if our canine companions really do belong on popular mountain bike trails.

Nearly 600,000 views on Pinkbike of the 'Lily Shreds Trailside' video (featured again below) proves that we all like the idea of a dog coming along for the ride, but the flip side is that many of us have come across dogs on the trail and have had a bad experience, sometimes even a dangerous one.


Lily Shreds Trailside

Views: 654,338    Faves: 2,287    Comments: 364
Filmed and edited by Rossimo37


Being chased down the trail by your dog is the kind of experience that's hard to explain without using clichéd, mushy terms about bonding, fulfillment, and love, but that's really how it is. There's a good chance that your dog has never felt as free as when he or she is high tailing through the trees, jumping the same jumps as you, and taking French enduro lines to try and keep up, or maybe even go for a dirty pass. And, in a way, the same can be said of the dog owner. There's something about letting your hound off-leash to run at full tilt in the wild that brings a big stupid smile to a human's face as well, and it definitely goes well beyond providing exercise, doesn't it? Maybe it's the letting them revert to being an animal in the bush, a real animal acting off of instinct rather than the desire for a Milk-Bone, before jumping forward fifteen or twenty thousand years of domestication to the present day where they pass out at 7pm while you're watching the Gilmore Girls... or Supercross. Domestication or not, most dogs love to get out on the trail as much as their human does, often waiting by the door as soon as there's a mere hint of a chance of singletrack in their future. Many of us admit to feeling like we belong on the trails, but just imagine how our four legged friends feel on the subject given that, relative to the evolution of other species, they aren't that far removed from the grey wolves from which they came. The singletrack, the forest, the wild; it's still an instinctual thing for them that hasn't faded away over thousands of years as it has in us.

Colt with a dumb look on his face shredding with his dog on the Whoops trail in Bend OR.
Projekt Roam's Colt Maule and his dog enjoy the Whoops trail in Bend, Oregon. Photo by Projekt Roam

If the dogs love it, and if their human companions love it, why would anyone ever frown on having dogs on the trails? There are the obvious reasons often cited by overprotective dog owners who can be seen in the park with their sweater-wearing pugs, things like the high-speed running being bad for their joints - certainly a valid concern depending on the dog's age and breed - or that a muddy dog needs to be bathed before it gets the carpets dirty - maybe they should consider a cat, then? But what about the safety of both the dog and the people out on the trail? Alright, confession time: many years ago I hit and killed a dog when mountain biking down a fast, open section of trail. It was a terrible moment, one that I'll never forget, and I think about it at least a few times a week when I'm out walking my own dog, although it must have been much worse for the dog's owner who watched it all play out. There was no avoiding the mid-sized black lab when he ran out in front of me, and I must have been doing at least 35kph when I T-boned him hard enough to send the dog flying, barely managing to keep myself upright long enough to avoid most of the large cedar trees close by. The dog's death was a terrible thing, but I also don't need reminding that it could have easily been very bad for myself. In fact, I've crashed at least twice since that day due to a dog being on the trail, and I've had a front row seat as dogs have stood on transitions of jumps and drops only to move out of the way at the last second, thereby causing the approaching rider to change their approach. It wouldn't have been pretty, and the sight has been enough to convince me to only take out Sherpa, my own dog, rarely during weekdays, and on trails that don't see much traffic. That's too bad because she loves it, but I don't want to see her get hurt or, more importantly, cause an accident that hurt a fellow rider.

It's not the dog's fault, though, is it? A dog is only as well behaved as it's been trained to be, and if the owner is lazy or hasn't taken control the dog can't be expected to know what to do when it's out there. There is also the simple fact that, despite all the countless hours of training, yelling, rewarding, and enjoyment, your beloved friend is still a dog that will act on instinct and curiosity no matter how many years you've spent on the trail together. The key is obviously to use discretion, to think about not taking your dog out to a busy trail on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, and to maybe leave the dog at home if it's going to be a large group, as much as it hurts to leave Fido behind when he knows that you'll be doing the one thing that his instincts tell him to do - run wild in the forest.





362 Comments

  • 210 14
 Dogs not on leads at trails are a danger to themselves! A small Jack Russell ran alongside me once, barking at me like mad, and ran along my left side and into my front rotor. It cut the dog along its back, like a razor! The owner tried to tell me it was my fault, even though he was NOT in control of his animal. I can't blame the dog for chasing me, just the irresponsible owner. Poor mutt! So personally, I think dogs should stay off if busy trails!
  • 146 7
 yeah busy trails aren't the place for dogs, however a local singletrack is awesome love riding with my dog.
  • 6 1
 ouch
  • 95 2
 I would have raged so hard at the owner, not only did his dog get hurt from his negligence, but then he had a go at you? I hate people that think like that.
  • 4 1
 they can also injure themselves pretty bad
  • 50 49
 hey guys i just got a border collie, she is 11 weeks right. and my dream is to turn her in to a trail dog, do u guys have any tips on training her? please let me know
  • 5 1
 at a race last year some guy let his dog run around on the finish line jump, the dog would of been killed if it got hit
  • 20 3
 @ stumper21 Don't run her too hard first year as you can hurt their joints. They will go and go till they destroy themselves... Found out that the hard way with one dog few years back...
Start with trail walks getting her to follow behind you and then solo rides when you know she will stay with you and work from there. Had a couple Collies and they run mean. Best training partner I ever had Smile
  • 8 13
flag Aibek (Jan 10, 2014 at 2:47) (Below Threshold)
 I had mixed success with dogs, it depends on the dog/owner , if he doesn't chase every "moving target" and stays with his owner no problems.
had problems with herding dogs chasing me in attack mode (4 of them) and biting my shoes (ankle) , so i bought some Sabre Red one squirt and most dogs loose interest but for the more persistent dogs get them in the nose area and presto no dog!.
when a dog is on attack mode it stops being a pet!.
  • 8 4
 it was because you smelt sexy to it Dan! You cant blame the dog for you being sexy
  • 13 1
 I love going on long rides in the backcountry with my dog. These are trails where you almost never see other riders or hikers though.
  • 20 65
flag DARKSTAR63 (Jan 10, 2014 at 4:25) (Below Threshold)
 I agree that the dog should have been leashed but you should have stopped. Sorry.
  • 16 2
 ive never encountered a "trail dogs" just idiots who think those nice big berms and tables are perfect for playing fetch on... the amount of times ive come round a corner, just missed a dog then have been raged at by the owner for " going too fast" or "being on a foot path" (in a trail centre...with berms and jumps and signs to warn walkers of bikes...)
  • 18 3
 You all have to admit that riding with a dog most be one of everybody's biggest mountain biking fantasies. But it is True, dogs should ride with you on that monday (week day) morning, when there's no body around, or if in the weekends, late in the afternoon when everybody's done riding. Your dog just like your kids is your responsibility... @DARKSTAR If a dog chases you, stopping is the very last thing that crosses you mind...
  • 7 14
flag coops2011 (Jan 10, 2014 at 5:49) (Below Threshold)
 I think its all down to the owner, if they think the dog is good then its fine.....
  • 20 3
 Trying to out run a dog almost never works. It's not safe for anybody. Like I said, the dog should be leashed. I agree. However in my experience with a dog that is barking at me, stopping, removing my helmet and remaining calm are key. Neg prop away, I don't advocate trying to out-run a dog on trail. You will fail and somebody will be hurt.
  • 7 1
 I agree that the owner should be blamed rather than the dog if there is an issue.

For my dog, I have a harness for me (fits around my chest, right near my centre of gravity) that uses a locking carabiner to a retractable 20' leash, to a running harness on the dog. She runs in front and I taught her "straight", "left" and "right" for navigational purposes. Works great and keeps her close enough and the leash sits high enough that it doesn't get caught up in my bars.

It helps that she's half Greyhound and can easily run >40 kph in a sprint, and can do 20 or 25km in a ride/run ...
  • 60 0
 Nothing I like more than running over a nice steaming pile of shit and having it slung all over me and my bike.
  • 5 4
 In Santa Cruz, I was riding down a singletrack, and some guy was riding up them with 2 dogs! He stopped and got out of the way, but his dogs didn't, and so I had to bail out because they just kept coming!
  • 13 4
 Darkstar- That's a great strategy if you have the ability to read the minds of animals... but for the rest of us regular mtbers, or people for that matter, a dog acting aggressively towards you in the way described is a good sign of a bad dog owner. If the owner cannot control their dog to not chase people while barking at them, then what else do you think the owner forgot to teach their pet?

Sorry, I'm not risking my health and potentially thousands of dollars of hospital bills just to protect a bad owner's dog from himself. Other peoples' shortcomings are not my concern.
  • 4 5
 The problem with stopping when being chased is that we have crazy good brakes and can bring a bike to a screeching halt incredibly fast. Dogs can quickly loose traction on loose gravel. I've seen dogs slam into back tires just because the owner had to stop suddenly.
  • 25 2
 Stumper21: I've got 2 collies that I trained from puppies to be trail dogs. The most important thing for them I found was the familiarization with the bike, so I introduced them to bikes from a very early age when I first got them. By that I mean I'd let them be around bikes to start with then just ride round the garden at very slow speeds for a couple minutes at a time, verbally praise them when they were away from the bike and be stern with them when they are close. I also made sure that if they weren't looking and were near the front wheel I'd just very gently 'buzz' their hind with the wheel so they jumped out of the way and learned not to go near the wheels, which was a great lesson learned for later on when speed increases and chance of harm is greater. As I say though, when they were puppies it was all about them when the bike came out and they were around, not about going for a ride. It needs to be such a gradual increase in learning and exercise for them so they don't get injured.
Also as someone else said, Collies are relentless and will carry on even when injured. A couple times my dogs have cut their paws quite badly, but will just carry on running and running so you've got to keep an eye on them. I now make them wear boots when riding as there is a lot of flint and sharp rocks out there. I also make them wear a harness in case at any point they need to go on a lead so won't pull at their neck collars. The harness also has a kestrel bell on so you can always hear them even if you can't see them.
And I think they get more excited than me when they see the mountain bike coming out of the garage since they know they are going to go for a ride!
  • 58 7
 My Dog is smarter than most people that I see out on the trails.
  • 14 1
 @bigtim I think you hit the nail on the head. I've never taken my dog out riding because she's just too old to keep up, but I have ridden many times with one of my friends' dogs who he trained from a puppy to be comfortable around bikes. Instead of chasing us when we ride, he actually knows to follow the trail and runs ahead so we never have to worry about riders running into him unexpectedly. We've never run into him or even had close calls. He's also trained not to run far enough ahead that we can't see him. There is a difference between a trail dog and a dog on the trail, and it's fully the owner's responsibility to train their dog as such. This said, even with a well trained dog there is a time and place. We would never bring him onto the shore trails on a weekend morning, and obviously we wouldn't go near a bike park with him. But it's great having a dog along for the ride on the after work rides in the summer!
  • 20 3
 @lishredman if you're going downhill and there's a rider, dogs or not, pedalling up, you need to yield to them. unless it's a DH specific trail where someone shouldn't be riding up it anyway.
  • 9 9
 Joeyjd: what if s faster rider passes you, then your dog could end upslowing down the faster rider or worse yet getting lost because you got separated from it .
I think it is better and safer to train your dog to follow behind you, problems are less likely to happen.. It also teaches the dog control since he won't feel like the alpha so much if he isn't leading and he is less likely to do something stupid.

I don't like when there is a group ride and some riders with slower dogs just take off first and say "if my dog gets in your way just teach him a lesson." No, I'm not going to intentionally hit your dog. love dogs on the trail but some of the owners who don't bother with training are a reckless danger.
  • 3 12
flag joeyjd (Jan 10, 2014 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 @Protour if a faster rider passes me, they have to pass me before they get to the dog. Think you answered your own question there. By having the dog ahead of me I'm aware of other riders behind me before the dog is so I can call the dog and warn the rider.
  • 11 6
 I've had more problems with people walking on the trail rather than dogs. People walking on the trail tend to be oblivious to riders
  • 8 7
 I agree, a trail dog, and a dog on a trail isn´t the same. Of course you have to be clever enough to not take your dog to bussy trails, and preferably ones he knows. But you also have to teach him to run after you in my opinion, it is safer, and you just have to assume you may have to stop sometimes to wait for him. Generally it´s the owners resposabilitty to teach him, look after him... same way as if you take a kid or an unexperienced rider. Of course there will always be risks.
  • 3 13
flag kleinblake (Jan 10, 2014 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 #freethedogs2014
  • 5 6
 I agree with those saying it comes down to owner responsibility and common sense. I frequently run into hikers with their dogs on multi-uise trails well-known for bike traffic yet the dogs go ape shit at the sight of a bike. Likewise I don't take my dogs out on trail. I'd love to, but knowing we may encounter hikers, horses and other cyclists I just feel it isn't worth the possible hassle of a bad encounter.
  • 1 6
flag MJ4LIFERIDER (Jan 10, 2014 at 13:23) (Below Threshold)
 Haha dam true!
  • 8 13
flag iffy (Jan 10, 2014 at 14:08) (Below Threshold)
 only good dogs are hot dogs, and i dont like them either..
  • 8 9
 Dogs and kids alike. Almost mowed down a 2 and a 3 year old last year going fast down a trail. Then get in shit because apparently trails have speed limits lol? DONT HIKE ON BIKE SPECIFIC TRAILS
  • 7 6
 accountability and common sense with humans.. there simply will never be enough to go around. my favorite to hit are oblivious trail runners with their headphones blairing who can't hear you calling out.
  • 5 6
 Pretty simple. Some trails are shared. Both parties need to be responsible. Dog owners should have their dogs under control. Bikers should slow down in anticipation of a poorly trained/behaved dog. Nobody can predict what an animal will do. I always presume the dog will run in front of me and route/slow down accordingly.
  • 10 3
 I have to bring the dog. I put the Garmin on him. It's my only chance at KOM
  • 7 11
flag iffy (Jan 11, 2014 at 1:34) (Below Threshold)
 if your dog runs out in front me i will run it over.
  • 1 4
 This poll shows 403 dogs has been hit by bicycle. that's how dangerous life is.
  • 9 3
 Dogs on trails dangerous,period,plus how many of you have ridden through their shit? Disgusting. I have dogs and bikes,I walk the dog and I ride my bikes, not at the same time.
  • 3 12
flag iffy (Jan 11, 2014 at 13:33) (Below Threshold)
 i will still run over your dog if it decides to get in the way even if you neg prop me Razz

I had a horse get in my way today as well, he now has new markings...
  • 3 8
flag downhilladdict (Jan 11, 2014 at 14:37) (Below Threshold)
 Got dog hair in mah chain
  • 4 7
 Keyboard warrior and animal cruelty supporter. What a catch.
  • 3 10
flag iffy (Jan 12, 2014 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 kill the dogs and feed them to the starving children!
  • 4 8
flag iffy (Jan 12, 2014 at 4:44) (Below Threshold)
 and their dumb as fuck owners.
  • 3 6
 and feed them to the dogs....no.... wait a minute....
  • 2 0
 So you guys would kill a dog in a situation when it could be avoided without putting yourselves in harms way?
  • 2 1
 I wouldn't want to kill a dog but if it accidentally went that way due to a poor owner and an aggressive dog, I wouldn't feel absolutely horrible about it... if anything I'd be really pissed at the owner for allowing that situation to occur. If it's a multi-use trail and the dog happened to be leashed, then it'd be a different story entirely. But why are we wasting time chatting about hypothetical situations? LAWL
  • 3 0
 Because sometimes it's hard to tell if people are being serious on the internet and I'm curious if some of the above comments are.
  • 1 2
 So you care if people that you don't know and will probably never meet are being serious on the internet? It's always interesting to me when people care about the thoughts of others that they don't know. Personally I believe they're kidding because usually blatant posts like that are but then again I don't take much seriously on the webz.
  • 6 4
 I've come across a few dogs on the trail, but shouldn't all women be able to ride, no matter what they look like?
  • 1 8
flag iffy (Jan 12, 2014 at 12:28) (Below Threshold)
 i would just do a steezy j hop o manual over our best friend. then kill it.
  • 8 1
 UR GAY! and dumb n shit
  • 3 1
 @ scott-townes Why else would we have comments sections on the internet? Not saying you have to be serious when commenting but I've been amazed a number of times by people who I thought were joking when they really weren't. That's all.
  • 1 1
 Then you find out if a person you don't know is not joking... so what? What does that accomplish other than your curiosity for people that you don't know and will never meet? What's the point in that? What's the point in owning a dog if you can't train it?
  • 1 4
 a trail dog and a dog on the trail ARE the same, just as an idiot and an imbecile are indistinguishable.
  • 1 2
 I used to run dogs on my POS mountain bike before I even got into mountain biking as a way to stay with the dog and better control it and give it more exercise. I gave up bush walking with dogs for riding in the bush with dogs but, haven't had a dog since getting into mountain biking properly. I used to have my mate's two Pit Bulls go up and down 3 story cliffs before I knew there were bikes that could do that. Wish they were legal here in Oz as they are the best parkour dogs by far.
  • 4 4
 A dogs life has just as much, if not more ethical value than that of a human being. If we fed all the dogs to the humans, the planet would continue on its same likely suicidal path. If we feed all the humans to the dogs, the planet would start to recover. I don't want to get into the logistics of how that could happen, just something to think about.
  • 4 4
 I thought my comments were dumb. you a pro bro!
  • 1 6
flag SithBike (Jan 14, 2014 at 0:52) (Below Threshold)
 @SORTAH you must be a serious poser. People carry guns all the time, but they never come on the internet and hint at it. Because where I'm from there is laws, police and government. Either you were joking or are a complete wanna be and a loser. Only hint or suggest a gun if you are going to use it, you internet gangster. I would try to avoid injuring your dogs at all costs if they ever came across me on the trail because it's not their fault. But I would have a field day kicking your wanna be show off ass, who claims to be packing on the internet while walking his dogs. Hahaha.
  • 4 0
 Maybe he doesn't understand that different states have there own laws and regulations. It's alot different down south, no restrictions on weapons. Hell even the supermarket has ammo. Every time I go there to visit family all you hear is bombs going off and machine gun fire for miles. Can't have that kind of fun up north. Same out west or southwest, anywhere in the boondocks has less or no restrictions. As for the dogs on the trails, from my experience if your dog is well trained and savy to the outdoors there is no problem. If you and your dog are unexperienced then a leash should be on. Most state parks around here require leashes and hand out fines to those who don't obey. Riding in control usually can spare you an embarrassing incident.
  • 2 2
 Bombs going off? Wtf? Im calling bs. Come on America is not bombs and machine guns everywhere and I've lived in a lot of different states including in the south.
  • 5 5
 Fact: owning a gun means you are more likely to die from a gunshot wound.
Even in retarded-ass Florida.
  • 2 1
 Wait...weren't we talkin' about dogs?
  • 3 6
 Please stay in Florida
  • 4 1
 How rude you are Protour
  • 3 1
 disenfranchised = deprive (someone) of the right to vote. Something that should have happened to all Floridian's after the US election of 2000. @Sortah, your making a case for this. Jokes. Just saying we are all MTB'ers. And if someone happens to have accident with your dog. I hope you don't feed them to the gators because it was just a "accident". And it's probably your accident. Because if your dogs are well trained, you don't have no worries. They will never get in anyone's way.
  • 1 1
 Yeah, that was sick. ID rather watch that dog run than watch most riders ride. It's all good, sortah. At least you Floridians provide millions with entertainment on the cop shows.
  • 39 4
 My dog is very often with me on trials. But not in parks but on mountains trials only. In that conditions . Its no proplem that is chasing my bike. But in parks I Think it should be not allowed. Its simply dangerous both for riders and dogs...

If you never experienced riding with trained dog . I can say its superb, extraordinary experience. My dog love it and I love it. But for many riders who are not common with dogs its simply not safe.

In mouintains - Holly yes!
In Parks - no way!

Thats the GORC . He even smoke cigarets...

lh5.googleusercontent.com/-jmpPjIsHeGE/UCKHRtgUlAI/AAAAAAAAGNo/rRspuyTBHBA/s640/DSC06277.JPG
  • 5 0
 your dog looks like one of my friend.
  • 2 0
 Bad boy! Smile What breed is it? Seems like it might have some Husky or Malamute in it ...
  • 4 0
 That's like a real life Brian from Family Guy.
  • 3 0
 Aside from the smoking bit, I completely agree with this statement. We don't have a park here, but I would never take mine anywhere that busy. We do have a lot of old trails in the mountains which see more traffic from moose rather than people and my dog absolutely loves it!
  • 3 0
 People just seem to have one bad Experience with a trail dog and it makes them think they're terrible. If they've been riding with you for a while, they can usually handle it. Hell, if my dogs in front of me if I shout anything I want she'll know to move and will often dive into the bush if she has too. Long live trail dogs
  • 3 0
 I agree with @michur. Been riding with my dog for 7 years. No issues. BUT only on trails/singletrack where I'm moving forward non stop. Bike parks and DH areas are a definite no no because a dog just roams around and is easily hit. It also depends on the dog. Personally I have had many more issues with riders and groups of riders than I have ever had with my own dog or any other dog. Ultimately though, the potential for a dog to get seriously injured is always there. My dog ultimately got killed by a truck on the road, but she had 7 awesome years blasting my local trails.
  • 1 0
 How did you train your dog to smoke? I've been trying to teach mine but she refuses due to health concerns.
  • 16 0
 I dont have a problem with dogs on the trail but some consideration should be made by the owner of other trail users and keep the dog under control at all times. I do however have an issue which is unrelated to dogs and that is big groups of bikers who block trail sections off when they all stop and chat with each other, big groups need to understand that sometimes other bikers have flow and when a good flow is achieved you dont want to be stopping and putting your foot down to negotiate around people. Rant of the day!
  • 8 0
 You've been to Llandegla then?
  • 1 0
 Yes and cannock!
  • 6 0
 Llandegla is shit for that. At the end of B-line everyone steps off the bike for a chat just as you land after the last tripple, and your doing about 30mph. 'F***ing mooooooooooove!!!!!!!!', Goes the usual polite request!
  • 2 1
 pain in the ass on push up downhill trails, that is!!
  • 21 5
 I've come across far more dumb or ignorant people, than I have dogs on the trail. Oh yeah and children, way worse than dogs. Do us all a favor and train your f*cking dog lazy ass. I've been biking with dogs for 10+ years and currently have two well behaved Australian shepherds that love the trails freedom, and don't deserve to be shut out because of a-holes with their disobedient or dangerous dogs. Why must we all suffer due to the negligence or stupidity of so few. It reminds me of the dumb ass sign on my coffee cup, "warning contents may be hot", all because one dumb ass spilled their coffee and decided to sue over it, thanks a*shole now we are all treated like idiots. Wow, the coffee is hot? How was I supposed to know? Didn't you order it?
  • 2 2
 You may actually want to educate yourself on that case, before spouting off in ignorance. You've just shown yourself to be the typical media sheep, swallowed what they told you hook line and sinker.

Stop letting mainstream media continue leading you by the nose, educate yourself.

12 minutes of your time www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCkL9UlmCOE#t=191
  • 3 0
 The coffee thing sure, that wasn't what it seemed. But he's right about dogs. As far as I am concerned, if I can bring my bike, then someone else has a right to bring their dog. Both do damage. Both add to the fun. My bike doesn't poop, but my dog erodes less and provides my home with protection too.
  • 1 0
 Ha ha ha! Yup.
  • 1 0
 TwoTone, after watching that video, I still hold the same opinion about that woman's case. Sure, I feel bad for her cuz of everything she went through, but I can't believe I'd go after anyone for my own mistake. Yes, I'd appreciate help with my medical bills, but I doubt even her legal fees even came close to her award settlement. This says nothing about anyone being led by mainstream media. Poor example.
  • 2 0
 Not a poor example at all. Did you miss how the media distorted the truth? She was in a parked car, yet how many of the news reports said she was driving with it?

There's a huge difference between serving hot coffee and coffee hot enough to cause 3rd degree burns in seconds.

Wake up, mainstream media is all about getting you to tune in, they forgot about the truth and facts a long time ago.
  • 1 0
 You're right, they distorted the truth, not the first or last time it'll happen. And true, coffee doesn't need to be that hot. But simply writing a cautionary note on a cup doesn't stop accidents from happening.
Society needs more critical thinking and responsible individuals. Sure, she was parked and not driving, but two facts never changed: she spilled the coffee all by herself, and she knew it was hot. In the end, she was the only one responsible. At least that's how I see it. And I'll teach my kids to own up to their own mistakes, and be responsible for their own actions. Paying attention goes a long way.
  • 1 0
 She is responsible for spilling, no one is arguing that. The point is McDonalds is responsible for ignoring other burn complaints and continuing to serve it at a dangerous temp.
  • 3 0
 Seems to me like it was really more about flimsy cups than hot coffee.

@danrowe, I think you're absolutely right. We spend so much time lowering ourselves to the lowest common denominator rather than trying to raise awareness to improve outcomes. Personally, I find it alarming how people are so willing to accept this type of behaviour, and even worse how many people justify it.
  • 21 6
 I hate dog shit, when you run over dog shit and get covered in it. You know that situation when you see light brownish material on your clothes.... ruins that day. So naturally i hate dogs on the trails.
  • 20 4
 How do you know it is dog poop, could be another animals poop, are you a poop expert?
  • 19 2
 @ afflicted: You can tell by the flavor. While skunk has a denser pasty texture and raccoon and bear tend to taste like a cliff bar, dog poo has a distinctly dry bouquet with overtones of horse liver and corn.

@ TheDude88: A little poo on the trail is fine. We have other animals living in the woods who refuse to use porter potties, so a dog is no big deal. Granted the owner should knock it off the trail when he or she notices, but all the same, it isn't the end of the world.
When riding you get messy. Poo is sometimes an unfortunate side effect.
Unless you are that guy who is more interested in having a clean rig and brand new kit than you are in riding hard.
". . .My bike's clean my kit is brand new, I'm fast, faster than you. . ."
Don't be that guy.
  • 5 0
 Reminds me of those times as a kid when I thought I was playing with "dirt clods". Oh man...
  • 7 0
 Absolutely. Dog poop is the worst thing in the world! Poop expertise not required. All dog owners should pick up their dog's poop ALWAYS! It's the descent human thing to do.
  • 9 0
 The average ride round my neck of the woods sees you covered in sheep, cow and horse shit. I don't mind that. Dog shit on the other hand is rank.
  • 2 2
 You think dog shits bad, that's fuck all compared to badger shit!!!! Do you think all wild animals should pick up there own shit as well, your in there domain at the end of the day.
  • 10 0
 ZERO dog shit is the acceptable amount to be on a trail, unless it came from a wild wolf/coyote. It is irresponsible to leave it for riders, walkers, or runners to step in. Control and clean up after your dog, or GTFO.

Herein lies the rub for me. I have ridden with probably the best trail dog ever, and love it. No issues, ever. I've also ridden on trails near residential areas, with posted leash laws, where nearby residents regularly walk their dogs unleashed, leaving their piles of filth right on the trail tread. It's not worth it to ride there. Dog shit absolutely ruins otherwise good trails.

You can't allow trail dogs and disallow unleashed dog walking. It's hypocrisy. So, if it comes down to allowing trail dogs AND unleashed walking, or disallowing ALL dogs... Sorry, but Fido gotta go.
  • 3 0
 Pretty shocking that people don't clean up after their dog. How hard is it to knock the crap of the trail with a stick or flat rock? We have a system of trails near here that are very popular and everyone brings dogs, but it is very rare to see doggy doo. I guess I am spoiled.
Also, when I see dogs I stop and pet them (assuming they aren't trying to kill me) and chat amiably with the owner. If we act like members of the same community then they tend to complain less about the bikers to the state trail ruining crew.
In the DC area I heard a weird story though. Because of cut backs they removed a garbage can from a trail head. Suddenly people were leaving little plastic bags full of crap along the trail. !!?? Why bag it? Why not knock it off trail and be done with it? Are people so dumb they think they are doing someone a favor? Seriously, the stuff breaks down over the course of a few weeks. I know it is gross, but the leaves will bury it and the ants will feed it to their grubblings.
  • 3 0
 I've had people tell me it's inconsiderate to use a stick to toss the poop off the trail... Idiocy!!! They'd rather see another bag of feces cooking in a landfill than to have nature take its course... And nobody should be stepping off trail anyways, unless goin for a pee or poo of their own.
  • 2 1
 dog shit is great, kids love to play with it and bring it home.
  • 13 0
 My dog corners like a housefly

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10469987

Always take him when I go XC, never runs after other riders ... only problem is that sometimes he starts barking at me when I take a rest... impatient little f*cker.
  • 16 4
 In 25 yrs of mtbing I have seen most every animal you would imagine on a trail, including every type of person. Anyone who has crashed into or because of the presence of another animal or human IS NOT PAYING ATTENTION! When you mtb you NEVER assume that your safety is the responsibility of someone or something else. When you ride, your ass belongs to you and only you. Mtbing is a life long practice of self efficiency, reliability, and responsibility. In short: DOGS ROCK and humans... well, you decide.
  • 4 0
 agree with this 100%. Everyone is responsible for being control and their own safety. If I crash into your dog, I won't be pissed at you, but if they're not allowed off leash in that area, don't expect me to pay for the vet bill either. I'd do the same if the situation were the opposite.
  • 3 0
 Plus, we all (at times) forget that the trail doesn't belong to us.. shocker for some I'm sure. I try to ride 80% all the time, and remind myself that there could be a family out for a walk, and animal, a kid, you name it. Seems like every week I am reminded that I shouldn't go ballz out all the time, because of another close call.
  • 1 3
 Sorry but if you or your dog are in the way and im on my downhill bike at speed you are getting yelled at shortly before you get run over. The worst though is walkers and families that don't control their kids or dogs!
  • 2 0
 dhridernz that's ridiculous if it's a shared trail where you know full well there might be dogs, kids or any other people on the trails, then it's irresponsible of you to rag it down the trails. i still slow down a bit before blind corners in some areas i ride, others i know they're bike only trails so i can gas as much as i want.
  • 12 2
 In my area there are tons of Rattle snakes so unless you want to pay $400 per season for inoculation one risks loosing their dog to a bite. I have had many friends involved in serious bike crashes due to a dog cutting them off on accident. It looks cool on videos but in real life it's more trouble than it's worth and I don't want to hurt anyone's pup much less myself.
  • 1 0
 And I'm sure the local fauna appreciates it too. In most of the forests around here its mandatory to keep your dog on a leash, pretty certain thats to prevent them chasing wildlife. And as a bonus bikers and runners. Wink
  • 5 0
 Most dogs prefer to go in the woods as it is. My dog is off-leash almost all the time and has always chosen to go about 3-6' into the forest to do his business. I've never had a problem.
  • 5 0
 Dog is mandatory equipment up here in Ak from April-June then again late August-October. Really nice to know when a Grizzly bear is coming. The dog will always let us know one is around and usually chase it off. My dog passed a few years ago & i always use one of the many loner dogs when riding. Have no idea how many times the dog has saved my bacon without me even knowing it...
  • 1 0
 @sbrdude1 - Lots of clinics do one hour sessions with snakes that teach dogs to stay away from them. It's dead simple using eCollars. Worth the money for sure.

JMH
  • 1 0
 I forgot to mention that many owners who walk their pups don't leash them and this has caused fights as well.
  • 2 0
 @Helm72, A predator see's any four legged action here, it's all game to eat for the wild animal. Dogs attract unwanted attention in the deep woods. You must have got a really mean dog, or some really nice predators.
  • 1 0
 bit of both, not real interested in people. Bears literally outnumber humans on the island.
  • 1 0
 There are also many mountain lions, bob cats, and coyotes.
  • 1 0
 @Helm if you actually live on a island that has more bears than humans. I envy you. I really do. Your bears got it good with all the salmon. And you got it good just because you get to live up there. You are so lucky. I'm so choked Canada did not buy Alaska when it had the chance. Not that I would be living up there, but still. I think one of the best things about America is Alaska, and US ability to control and coerce Canadian politicians. Now you are living the "real" American dream.
  • 2 0
 Kodiak island, estimated 15,000 bears. City of Kodiak has 9,000 people the entire island has 13,000 (7 small villages). Always tell people we are from Alaska, ya get treated different than saying America. Canadian border Mountie told me once that Alaskans have some maple syrup in the blood...
  • 8 0
 this is a ridiculous topic the way it is presented. i love dogs, and i love riding, but theres a time and a place for everything. if you take your dog on a trail where there could potentially be other riders your taking the risk of getting your dog injured, and the other riders, its as simple as that.
  • 7 1
 This: www.pinkbike.com/video/156217
This dog is alive and well, but my brother doesn't take her out anymore.
My dog stays glued to my rear tire (he actually hits his face on it if I stop too fast). That said, my cousin's dog runs to the top of every trail feature and stops, forcing you to brake hard. She is not a good bike dog.
  • 3 2
 This is absolutely, 100% the rider and camera person's fault. Whoever filmed it is an idiot to watch the dog walk walk on and around the jump, knowing the rider was about to come through. How difficult would it have been to just ask the dog to stay while you filmed your friend? And now the animal is hurt because of this negligence. If this were a small child, social services would be all over the people in this video.
  • 4 0
 Now that the upright citizen's brigade has assigned blame we can all rest easy. Preventable accidents happen on the trails. My 4 year-olds crash their bikes on the trail. My cousin's dog was simply running and got a stick in the vocal chord. My step brother fell in a ravine and broke his leg. I broke my back. All of this could be prevented by sitting in an armchair. The dog limped for 2 seconds and got back to running happily. The animal is not and was not hurt. She recently had a tumor removed, but is otherwise well. We learn from our mistakes and move on. Ask anyone who has dogs and horses. Sometimes dogs and camera men just learn the hard way.
  • 2 7
flag bigburd (Jan 10, 2014 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 Thing like that video are exactly why I would not take my dogs biking , if I ran my dog over I would feel awful , if i killed it I would feel suicidal , if some one else run over it , even if it wasn't thier fault I would probably kill them
  • 7 0
 You would kill someone for running over your dog- even if it wasn't their fault?

You know that makes you a POS, right?

Assuming you answered 'yes' to the above; why are you okay with that?
  • 7 1
 He loves his dog with the fury of a thousand suns.
  • 7 1
 I always have a bell on my dogs collar. not the jingle bells, but the cow bell type. many times when I am on the trails, riders comment that they hear us coming way before they see us.
  • 1 1
 Have you considered wearing the bell yourself? Dogs have sensitive enough hearing as it is without a bell ringing in it all day.
  • 1 0
 we see the occasional bear on the trail. I rather have the bear alerted that we are coming down the trail. when I am riding solo I have a bell on my pack for that very reason. has yet to bother me. Rolleyes
  • 2 0
 A bell is a great idea. Other trail users hear my loud rear hub or me huffing and puffing along, but my pup runs silent.
  • 7 0
 a buddy of mine rides with his doge all the time. then one day dixie got her tail cut off by the brake rotor. but shes back out again trail dogeing it
  • 2 0
 damn! I bet that was a scary moment!
  • 6 2
 much pain, very scare
  • 8 0
 Never mind dogs, I've come within an arms length of hitting a black bear on the trail.
  • 2 1
 Dogs & bears are a bad mix, that is the main reason I would discourage dogs on single track in places that have a healthy bear population. Your dog pisses off a bear, the first place the dog heads when the bear chases is between your legs. The only other issue I have is coming around a corner & having a choice between a tree & a triple coiler...
  • 1 0
 I totally agree with both of you on this one. A untrained wandering dog also causes havoc on the local fauna. I've almost crashed into many animals, including having to jump right over some kinda hedge hog. Worst one was on top of Signal mountain Jasper the summer past last. Ripping down the mountain me and my friend almost crashed into each other and a grizzly. Our yelling and the noise of the brakes plus the fact of being startled, totally put the grizzly's hair on end. It looked like a 800 pound porcupine. We really scared it bad to make it's hair stand on end so quick. Then last summer there is a bear warning on the Jasper web site that states there is a grizzly charging bikers in the same area. I have a feeling it's the same one.
  • 1 0
 Wow Sith, you & your buddy are lucky. Next to a mother with cubs, startling or scaring a mature grizzly is the biggest reason for attacks. Most of the time they hear (or smell) people & just step off the trail but when they are scared...I was in Waterton last year, a mature boar stalked & killed a hikers dog. Came out of the trees, totally ignored the couple & went straight for the poor dog. Not too many land mammals stand a chance against a grizzly.
  • 1 0
 I never knew we had wild boar's in the Rocky's. That's freaky. The full Signal mountain story goes like this. We were enjoying the view of Jasper town from the top. We were up a wind from a grizzly for about a hour, so the grizzly knew we were there and did not care. Then we decided to book it full speed down a fire road once we felt it the grizzly was far enough away from the trail. Next thing I know my head is smashing the back of my friends shoulder after he braked hard and I'm more focused on our tires/rotors not getting tangled up to make sure we were still good to bomb down the trail away from the grizzly. When I looked up over my friends shoulder I saw a few trees moving on my left side of the trail, and a two year old grizzly cub with hair on end on the right side. It looked like the grizzly on the right was so freaked it was going to turn back in fear but it just flash jumped across us in the direction of it's mother and sibling (looked like he did a road gap because the trail was cut threw the mountain and the right side was 10 feet higher than the left), we could smell it. My friend latter told me the tree's on the left were moving because I failed to see one of the two grizzly cubs crossing the trail. The grizzly's we almost hit were the cubs that we never even knew were there, as we were trying to get away from the mother. The mother was great, she knew we were there and let us watch her. She had no interest in humans, probably because she had no idea we were going to go in the direction towards her cubs. I hope this incident has not changed anything with the way her and her cubs deal/perceive people. Because the parks Canada web site reports of a grizzly charging (only bikers) but not attacking in that same area makes me suspicious.
  • 1 0
 Again, wow!! Juvenile male bears (all species) are the most prone to attack with or without provocation. Think of them as riled up teens with tons of testosterone & a chip on their shoulders. Male adult bears are referred to as boars while the adult females are sows (same terminology as swine).
  • 5 0
 As mentioned I think it really sits onto the shoulders of the owner being responsible. I've seen quite a number of people riding with their own dogs chasing them along and if I think back to it I've never seen a riders dog cause trouble. I have seen many dogs (due to irresponsible owners) cause trouble on trails but their owners aren't riders, Generally they are the type that go to the woods for a wander and get angry at the idea that bikers use the woods also. Ridiculous thing about that is half the time the walking trails are created purely because of the riding trails being built and the trail centres being provided. Still thats another discussion.
  • 2 1
 I dont really agree with your last point there, I now live in Scotland but before I moved here I lived on Cannock Chase - the riding scene has exploded there over the last 5-10 years, it used to be dog walkers the odd horse rider and the occasional mountain biker, now it is dominated by mountain bikers who not only use the trail centre but also all the natural deer tracks that I used to walk our dog on... I have a dog who I take riding with me, I lost a whole summer to training him but he is at a stage now where I dont have to think or worry about him coming on rides with me - he does his own thing on the climbs and on the descents he runs to heel or drops back a bit more if its muddy. My mum on the other hand has a 1 year old Collie who she is trying to train but she struggles with it. She still lives near Cannock Chase and being a collie its instinct is to round things up, and the dog will take off after bikers to do that. Some people slow down and let her get the dog back under control and others just keep on peddling and thats when issues arise. I think there needs to be a mutual understanding, dog owners should control their dogs but the answer isn't putting them on a lead - you cant excersice a dog properly when its on a lead - even if you go out for 4 hours - they need to run... on our little island that is the UK there isnt enough space for everyone to spread out and have bikers in one area and dog walkers in another - everyone just need to have a bit of patience and a bit of understanding and if someone is asking you to stop so they can regain control of their dog then stop - it doesnt hurt to be nice... on the flip side if a rider is wanting to take their dog on a ride then they take that responsibility of making sure that not only is it trained properly but also that the people they are riding with don't mind the pooch coming along for the outing too...
  • 3 1
 Yea I like that bit about the responsibility, it eases the conflict between the dog owner and the person who ate it because of the dog getting in the way in one way or another. I lie in the hospital and I feel so much better that it was not mine, but the dog owners fault. It's like with riding a bike in town, I rode on the green light and saw a truck driving at me, I didn't stop as I had the right to pass first, he surely crosse on red in the last moment. I wouldn't lie in the hospital if I stopped, but at least I've proven my point... Sht happens, if you get out of the house you may die, regardless of whoms responsibility it is. If you stick your head out with your dog, then he might die hurting someone. Stuff happens, we need to deal with it, who is responsible for what in which situation is always half relevant. It is how you deal with consequences that makes you the man who saved the day or a total douche, regardless of any kind of rules - it applies to the victim as well. Common sense is a btch, but you got to stick to it
  • 5 0
 @Waki: sometimes I think you are going one direction and you totally switch back the other way.
  • 2 3
 Oh you should have seen me going along the street today... mnah. I have had issues with animals on trails, dogs and horses, it always amazes me that a soon as there is a conflict people look in their heads for some rule. Who's responsibiility (read fault) is it that this and that incident happened? Some people just try to remember what sign allowing whom in, was at the beginning of the trail. So few people try to think what is actualy going on here, how can we resolve this between each other here and now. Like small kids looking for a mom or dad when another kid takes their toy or hits them, it's just that we adults change parents for rules made by God knows whom. I prefer to be kicked by a horse than talk to the rider, blabling about how should I react when I see a horse... anyways, people unnecessarily worry about threats (as if dogs were ones) before they meet them, why the hell we make up so much stuff in advance, just in case, to be safe? i'm not going to worry for a guy with a dog runing behind him because I never met one so I am not going to pretend that I am concerned about it and we should do something because that may be an issue... eh whatever...
  • 7 0
 Take your dog with you when you go out on that lonely stretch of singletrack, but don't bring it down the local groomed trails.
  • 5 0
 I've had several encounters with dogs on trail that were nearly disastrous. All of which were not due to bad behavior of the dog but from them being lost or confused on the trail. In all cases their owners had taken off down trail at speed and left the dog behind. One was actually a little tiny chihuahua who was stuck at a 5' + ledge and couldn't get down. i helped the dog down and continued. came across the owner further down just waiting for the dog. Some people are too stupid to be responsible dog owners on the trail.
  • 5 1
 I take my dogs out on the trail at least twice a week, they simply love it! I enjoy it as well..
There's some things to be aware of though:
1. You HAVE to teach them to stay behind you! It's not easy, but once you do so, they won't get in front of you on a technical section.
2. Always try to take them to more secluded places, and if on weekends at 'off-hours'.
3. Don't push it too much, I love my dogs and don't want to see them hurt, you gotta learn when to take it easy so they don't get over worked.
Where I live we don't have any poisonous snakes or tons of thorns fortunately!
  • 6 1
 Share the ride, share the tail! My two hounds hit the trails all the time, it's like racing 4x with Karim Amour and Will Longden. What I don't do though is take them to the trail center at busy times, off peak only.
  • 1 0
 And you've probably taught them some basic trail etiquette along with the other commands we like to teach them.
  • 4 0
 I only ride with my dog. We sometimes do up to 60 miles together. If you have a problem with a dog on the trail, it is the owners problem. The dog is just not trained properly. Why should I be restricted with my dog because the others do not control theirs? She knows left, right, wait, heel, back, front, go, leave it, drink, stay, slow. Required a lot of training in the beginning but worth it.
  • 4 0
 Agreed, dogs should stay away from busy trails... My biggest crash was beacuse of a dog... Hit him @ 50km/h with my front wheel, and went OTB and dislocated my shoulder so hard that I was out for 2 months,,, And even if you go on a hike in my opinion dog should be on a leash!
  • 5 0
 I have no problem with dogs on the trail as long as they are trained and under control. But I am tired of seeing green plastic bags full of their fecal matter left on the side of the trail by hikers.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns this is qiute a decent poll because I think we have all experienced dogs on the trails with some bad and some good. I think it's good that it can be talked about as it can be a danger to us and the dog if we don't
  • 3 0
 To be fair, you kind of know what you are going to get when the title starts with "Pinkbike Poll". Whoever doesn't want this kind of feature can easily avoid it...

Personally I quite like stuff like this - random opinions humanize a website that could be just bland fact reporting, and we all interact with each other. Clearly it's something people are happy discussing by the number of comments on here...
  • 1 0
 *highly sponsored bland fact reporting
  • 4 1
 I love taking my dog out too. But the last time I took her out was on a very rocky trail. I felt so bad cause her paws were all cut up. Now I don't take her there. They're so loyal and won't (or can't tell you) complain until they're really hurt because they just want to please their masters and will just happily keep up regardless of pain
  • 1 4
 Dog does not get enough running if the pads are cut like that.
  • 3 0
 That's just not true, at the end of the day no matter how tough a dogs paws are they will get cut on a sharp rock if hit at full running speed. If I'm taking my dogs out to a place I know has a lot of stones like that they wear boots (not all the time though so their paws aren't tough).
  • 1 0
 I had 2 dogs, litter mates, one's paws get torn up no matter what, the other's never even show a sign of wear n tear. It's just genetic makeup.
  • 3 0
 www.pinkbike.com/video/316145 this is my little pooch. Totally pinned through the corners! In reality, if everyone is aware that there is a dog around, then accendents shouldn't happen. The video above of the chap dropping off into a dog is terrible. That dog is just wandering around and gets landed on. Like all things, you just need make sure what you are doing is sensible.

Would I take my dog to a bike park, no.
Would I take my dog to a DH race and let her off the lead, no.
Would I let my dog wander onto a trail when people are shreading, no.

Oh, and all poo should be collected. It doesn't matter if you are in the woods. pick it up.
  • 8 1
 Wow, Such Berm, Much Gap, Wow, Many Switchback - Trail Doge
  • 5 2
 Either ride your bike or walk your dog Anyone who is truly a dog lover would not put their dog in a situation it could get hurt As for the people who bring their dogs on group rides well they have no respect for their. Fellow riders
  • 2 0
 I disagree. My dog can get hurt just when i let her run off leash and she jumps over trees etc. just like any of us put ourselves at risk when riding. But she does it for the same reason I do it, we both fucking love it.
  • 1 0
 I disagree as well. I love seeing those stoked dogs on trail rides and the dogs are quite good at getting out of the way when necessary. If the dog doesn't get it, then yeah, it shouldn't be off leash on the trail. A friends dog had a serious spinal injury chasing a friesbee. Life has risks!
  • 1 0
 Better stay at home then dogs can get hurt at the dog park to so better just leave them in a cage
  • 1 0
 My dog actually does better on a ride than a walk. When walking he wants to run all over the place because of the slow pace. On a ride he has to keep up.
  • 3 0
 My dog has been running with me on my bike since 12 weeks old I get compliments all the time about how good her trail manners are. She gets out of the way anytime she hears someone coming up on her. So I think if you train the dog well you can go out there and they have as much a chance of getting hurt or doing something stupid as anyone else on the trail. Not to mention people that park in bad spots that can be dangerous to other riders sometimes dogs are smarter than humans.
  • 3 0
 I wonder if anyone is taking note to the massive amount of market data that pinkbike is collecting from all these polls. I imagine they will eventually be selling it to market researchers at big bike companies at a bargain price.
  • 1 0
 No need to sell it, it's right here for everyone to see
  • 3 0
 It all depends on the dog, I have no problem with well behaved, mild mannered dogs being on the trail. I have wrecked because of dogs on the trail but for the most part everything is just fine, It's fun as hell having a dog chase you down the trail! One thing I will have to say is if you can, train your dog to run behind you. All of the close calls and wrecks I have had that are dog related came from a dog running in front of me abruptly stopping in the trail.
  • 3 0
 Oh,that's maybe the longest discussion I've ever seen on Pinkbike Smile )) It's interesting poll. I have greyhound and I never took him for a ride on a trail,Im so scared I will hit him or something else Im just taking him for a ride around the river where he's running near me and its safe Smile )
  • 3 0
 I don't mind the dogs on the trail even though its not a good place for them. What I see the problem is the owners do not realize that dogs cannot handle the constant running they get hot and need to cool down I have seen some dogs that look like they are going to fall over and die because the stupid owners is not realizing they are running the life out of them and do not have either a water source for them to cool off in or shade. I have seen dogs lying in pools of water along the trails trying to cool off with their tounges hanging out of their mouths.
  • 3 0
 I got t boned by a husky on a climb. The poor guys nose got in the spokes and to tell you the truth I was more worried about the dog than me. My opinion about dogs on trails is just to be smart about which trails you take them on. Hikers need to know that they should probably not hike up trails with jumps and berms. And bike riders with dogs shouldn't take their dogs on trails that have tons of dogs or deer or other wildlife near the trail. Just use your head.
  • 3 0
 Very few breeds are well-suited for the rigours of chasing a mountian bike. Most dogs are built specifically around short bursts of speed to capture prey, and only a few can handle long sustained runs without damage to their joints, back, or heart and lungs. Your dog may look like it's loving it, and the activity may in fact be stimulating for the dog. However, in reality, in many cases you are simply shortening the dog's lifespan by running it beyond it's actual capabilities. Remember, your dog will happily look up at its master and desperately try to keep up, even when you are killing it. Secondly, riders should have their minds on riding safely and responsibly 100% of the time. Anything that detracts from that focus puts them and others at risk. Yet a dog-owner must devote constant attention to minding the welfare of their pet, and minding the presence of other people (and potentially wildlife). This means a rider with a dog can never be as tuned in to what they are doing as a rider just focused on the bike. I love dogs, I have a little mongrel I adopted 7 years ago, I vollie at the local animal shelter, and have organized rallies to protest animal abuse. I also ride several times a week all year round. I NEVER have considered riding with my dog even once.
  • 3 0
 My opinion: If you're on your bike then leave your dog at home. You can't control it in the event of an encounter with another rider or animal. If you're hiking then please keep your animal on leash and remove its waste from the trail. If that is impossible for you then go to a dog park where at least everyone is dog-friendly. The only thing more infuriating than cleaning dog crap from my bike and kit is having to risk bodily injury or death because a dog owner was not smart/conscientious enough to leash their animal.

I can see how many wouldn't think it's a big deal if they have never been hurt or had a damaged bike because of a unleashed dog encounter.
  • 1 0
 I totally agree with you. But on the other hand I bet 99.99 percent of dog owners are lazy a**'s. Dogs cause so many problems on the trails. But it's not their fault. It's the real b*tch l*zay ass owners. Yes. 99.99 percent of them. So if your reading this and you own a dog, this is probably you. To be honest, I consider myself a very good dog trainer. Just because I'm not a lazy ass. Any dog I'm with will shit when I point my finger and snap. Just because I'm not "LAZY" and know how to train a dog. If your dog does not shit at the spot you snap and point your finger at. You are a lazy dog owner and are torturing your dogs with not enough stimulus. Just the truth.
  • 3 0
 who ever posts this stuff must enjoy reading the back and forth bs of the pinkbike population. its a topic based on opinion... therefore you are all correct, and all wrong, it just depends on who your asking. thats what ive learned from this, o yea and pb mods are f@gs
  • 4 2
 I love my dog which is why I personally don't take her on the trail. In Arizona we have rocky terrain that is cactus laden and I simply won't take my dog on the trail whether it be hiking or biking. I see other people take their dogs while hiking and most of the time they get in the way, are off-leash, and end up getting hurt. I think in secluded areas it might be ok to have your dog, but in most places I would like to have me, my bike, and occasionally another human to ride with! Again, love my dog, but in Arizona it's a bad idea.
  • 3 4
 What has happened to our animals when they are less equipped to deal with weather than we are? Do you have to domesticate a coyote to have a trail dog in AZ?
  • 3 0
 I don't think it's the dog as much as it's the people who take a dog on busy, cactus laden trails. The dog doesn't know not to run in front of a biker.
  • 3 1
 It's not the dog, it's the owner. Dogs do what dogs are born to do. It's the a-hole owners who allow them to behave offensively, not considering others. I have seen trail dogs with more aplomb than most XC riders. I have seen dogs stop, and let others go by before. And I have been licked by really cool dogs while taking a break. Never had a dog, cut me off, or make snide comments about me or my equipment. Or heard them slam my DH rig while I push it uphill.

But the best thing about trained trail dog? They don't wear spandex!

Just my .02.
  • 1 0
 infinity7, I both agree and disagree: the owners should have the dogs trained but if they don't get common exposure to cyclists they won't know how to behave and as you said, "Dogs do what dogs are born to do". A prime example is when I passed some walkers and was approaching their dog (border collie a.k.a sheep dog) when the owner called it back. Being a respectable (I like to think) rider I slowed slightly so as not to spook the dog as it came towards me on the opposite side of a fireroad when, as I drew level, it dashed across towards me and stopped dangerously close. If my RH pedal had been at the bottom of its stroke it would most likely have clipped the dogs nose. Needless to say the owner barked a command when it dashed but there was nothing the owner could have really done - if he had run towards the dog it may have mistaken the act as a game and run off.

I blame neither the dog, the owner nor myself as it was the Collie's natural reaction but not all incidents of dogs getting in the way is the owners fault. The day you "de-dog" a dog it's just a lump of meat with legs, surely?!
  • 3 1
 There is something about hitting the trails with your dog that is difficult to capture with words. Feels almost like this primal link is established, putting both of you on same grounds as far as physical mastery of the environment goes. Two animals flying through the woods together Wink I can't imagine not having my four legged riding buddy with me on the daily after-work rides. We had a close call or two as we were beginning to shred togehter, but now we are a fairly synchronized team. We do make the effort to pick the local trails that are practically empty during the week while over the weekend we always head to my parent's place and mountains where we are free to roam and where we are often joined by a friend and his four legged shredder. To me it just doesn't get much better than that.
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  • 4 2
 I own a Mastiff that hunts bikers down, no joke. He loves bikes and people so if he is in the area and see's a biker he will chase after them, my partner proved this point whilst thinking it was a good idea to pop up and say hello whilst I was riding with friends at our local trail. I don't let my dog ride with me or take him to trail areas because I don't want him injured and hurt. I want him to be able to enjoy the great outdoors with no fear and reduced risk of a collision with a bike or vehicle so I chose carefully where I take him.

I have come off my bike because of a couple who were walking their Labrador on the trail, as I came off a blind step down I had to "attempt" to bail so I did not land and collide with the dog. It is one of the very few times I have spoken to someone without thinking about how to compose myself, needless to say I made my point. Dog's on trails are a risk, even well trained ones. It is just a matter of time before a incident will happen, could be weeks, months, a year.. But it will happen. I care for my dog to much to put him at extra risk on top of the other hazards out there. Just my 2c.
  • 2 0
 I've been chased by a horny dog before. I was riding along at a fair speed and it jumped out of nowhere and straight in amongst my pedals.

Before I knew it I had ran straight over its paws and I'm sure it probably got clipped with a pedal (no flat pins), but it still kept chasing me for a leg hump. I had to stop and kick it away before it got tangled up in the spokes or something. It was the most persistent dog ever.

Still haven't seen the owner anywhere.
  • 6 4
 dogs don't belong on mountain bike trails and they should be on a lead if there are other people around. I'm a dog owner BTW.

its not just the risk they pose to themselves and riders but what do owners do with any poo their dogs leave on the trail?
  • 4 0
 So many people ride with dogs in my area trailheads become excrement depots. Super annoying to deal with, especially when you hit a landmine and find shrapnel on your face
  • 3 1
 I Love dogs but just thinking of the chance of one dog being hurt because a crash should aware us that they shouldn't be there. No matter your experience or your dog experience, there is always another person in whom we cannot trust 100% of time.
  • 3 1
 One of the biggest things that annoys me is dogs on trails. Trails are for mountain bikes and not dogs it's bloody dangerous. When I was in practice at a DH race a couple I years ago I hit a dog while landing a jump. I nearly had a massive crash but luckily I rode it out. Dog was ok too luckily for both of us. They should not be anywhere near mountain bike trail/areas unless on a lead and out of harms way.
  • 3 0
 Its off-putting having a dog running about when you're trying to ride because you don't know how well trained that particular dog is so I find myself constantly having to check where the dog is.
  • 3 1
 No dogs unless you are on your own private property. There are so many dogs at the public trail center in my town. I can't count how many times I have ridden through their shit or had to stop they because they are blocking the trail and on leash. It is not safe for the dogs or other trail users. What about people that 're afraid of dogs or have been bitten? Don't they have a right to use public trails without fear? Dog owners need to look outside the box and take responsibility. I like DOGS and own 2 but they don't belong on public trails.
  • 2 3
 dogs are a part of our society. fuck people who are scared of dogs, they need to quit being a bunch of pussies and blame the shitty owners for not picking up the dog crap or at least kicking it off the trail.
  • 2 0
 @OP, I completely agree. You can't reason with most dog lovers though. I feel the same way about people who carry dogs into places of business. Just because they enjoy their animal they assume that you MUST love their animal. There's no courtesy or consideration for people at all.

To Hatton: Dude, have a heart. I've never been victimized by a dog, but I know people with lifelong scars on their faces as a result of a dog attack. Some people have very good reason to be afraid of dogs, whether you agree or not. Also, dogs are unpredictable (and stupid). Most dogs that force me off the trail are barking mad because they don't understand this thing that is a person on a bike. Generally they don't calm down until I get of the bike and take off my helmet and sunglasses- then it registers that I'm just another person.
  • 2 0
 I was just bitten by a dog yesterday. I stopped to let the lady go by and the cheeky dog bit my calf when I was clipping back in to my pedals. I never had a problem with dogs on trails before...now I'm thinking leave them at home.
  • 2 0
 I ride with my dog about 25% of the time. He is well trained and super friendly.
I only ride with him on trails that are dog/bike friendly.

When I do come across another rider:
- I get him to the side so the rider can pass in either direction.
- Tell the other rider he is SUPER friendly.
- If the other rider loves dogs... we have a HOWDY session!
- If the rider looks worried or pissed I keep the dog clear.

As for poop? I agree but I have SPRAYED racoon and other poops across my legs, bike and back. We are in the woods right? That being said... I don't let him poop right on the trail.

Problems I have had with dogs:
-Other dog owners with aggressive dogs that make NO OFFER to warn me that their dog wants to kill my dog. Not cool at all.
-Dogs that are spooked by bikes.

Just a side note. When everyone gets uptight about something "fun" gets taken away. Thats why trails can close because equestrians and hikers might not like cyclists.

Gotta share responsibly. Smile
  • 1 0
 Cerealkilla... What breeds would you say are well suited to trails? I'm buying property soon and I'm already planning on trail building and getting a dog to ride/build with, but I'm not familiar with what breeds are most appropriate. any advice on the matter would be greatly appreciated.
  • 3 1
 I've had dogs since I was a kid. My wife and I have two now. As a dog owner and a biker though, dogs belong on leashes. I just started riding again this month since an off-leash dog caused me to crash and break a finger back in August. Surgery, five weeks in a cast, and three months of physical therapy till I had 100% range of motion and strength back. Not too mention the $4000 of medical bills that I would have much rather spent on a new ride. Dog owners, be aware that if there are leash laws, you can be held liable for not only the medical bills if your dog causes someone to crash, but also lost wages if they can't work. That can add up real fast.
  • 1 0
 I couldn't agree more with you. If I am injured by the action someone's off-leash dog on a trail that is designated leash-only, I will sue them - and win. And I LOVE dogs! Owned many of them. But riding trails and dogs don't mix well. Yes, there are dogs that are well trained, but how do I know that when I come upon them suddenly? No predictability.
  • 2 0
 I've crashed due to someone else's dog and mine for that matter. Dog owner is responsible for what happens. No law saying yeah or neah to dogs on the trail but with stunts and and as fast as some people like to go......ain't no tellin what kinda carnage you could have. However there is a place for them called a back yard and hiking trails, dog parks for that matter.
  • 2 0
 LuLu -- shop mascot, is great around bikes --- she had a few close calls early on so she gets it --- it being, she's gotta keep her distance. and she doesn't have a mean or aggressive bone in her body so we're all good there. true, when there's a lot of people around doing stunts (drops, gaps, berms, etc), sometimes she'll get overwhelmed and not know which way to go.

riding solo with her, she's totally fine and man does she love it, l swear she dreams about it.

www.pinkbike.com/video/339778
  • 2 0
 You know what the rules are about dogs on the trail/pumptrack/bike park? They do whatever they want. If a person can't deal with dogs on the trail, they are too uptight to be riding mountain bikes in the first place. That being said, if you have an annoying ass dog (same goes for boyfriend/girlfriend/human associate) then be polite and keep that thing on the chain. Note: trail cats are banned under all conditions.
  • 4 0
 People that are complaining about dog waste in the trails obviously don't have to ride on multiuse trails shared with horses.
  • 2 0
 Dogs are fine on the trail as long as they don't want to play in my spokes or make angry faces at me while I ride. Or sit at the bottom of landings. Or come crashing through the woods unannounced. Or belong to hikers who have not trained their dog. Or who crap all over the trail. Wait, maybe dogs running loose on trails isn't so great after all.
  • 2 0
 I've lost count of the times I've been chased by dogs in multi-use parks, off the leash and completely out of control. The owners stand there and watch. The problem is that anytime anyone regards something as a right, not a privilege, they assume no responsibility. Dog owners need reminding that they're using these parks by way of an agreement, contingent on their playing their part as responsible owners.
  • 2 0
 I found my dog Gorc...in Gorce mountains - Poland. He was small and used to live in mountains. I learned him how to behave with riders and bikes. On commend " ZDUPCAJ" he is going off from the trail.

I am responsible not only for him but riding with dog I am taking full responsibilty for other riders. If there will be crash ...Thats my issue. If somebody have to stop because of dog...That my issue.

RESPONSIBILTY. Thats the key word! I love to ride with Gorc. He also! But firstly I am thing about other riders. I would be very un happy if I have to make emergency stop on trial because of other dog.

So people please ,thing about others first. Not everybody loves dog! Especialy on triaals!

Gorc says Yeah for IT!
  • 2 0
 If its a bike trail and your dog cant ride a bike leave it home. Most bikers are there to ride and not deal with your unleashed mutt. I hate lose dogs on trail. Next time I'm injured by unleashed dog on trail its gona be a lawsuit.
  • 2 0
 Fav video on PB to date. On most trail rides, have smiled at the thought of my dog running alongside freely. Then, thoughts of the risks of her getting hurt kick in: other bikers, snakes, poisonous insects, thorns, the terrain… and other dogs. Or, she could get hurt by my bike, or get lost. Bottom-line: love trail riding + love my dog. However, trail riding + dog = higher risk. Because, by nature, trail riding = riding at your own risk. With a dog, one should have to pay some attention to her/him. Which means you cannot/should not go all out. However, other riders (or trail runners), may not share the same mind set, particularly if they are trying to be KOM or chasing a personal best.

Guess there are many good reasons why one should not ride trails with an unleashed dog. But "Lily Shreds Trailside" is such a kick-ass and awesome video, it makes me think hard. Thanks, Rossimo37 and Mike Levy. Well, maybe someday. In the meantime, we'll do that hill on foot with a leash...
  • 4 0
 Speaking of trail dogs...hey everyone with a trail dog come check out the trail dog owners thread!!
  • 2 1
 Trail dogs are rad. Away from the trail I don't like dogs at all, but a good trail dog is awesome to ride with. The fastest and most crazed trail dog I've ridden with is some kind of Mexican beach mutt chihuahua cross (serious)... total beast, faster then bikes and has taken on bears (more than once) and chased a cougar going uphill.
  • 2 1
 It just depends on the dog. I ride with my two springer's all the time. They have natural trail manners. Always have. If they get in front of a rider they will pull off the side of the trail and then take off again when the rider has passed. It's quality. I would not bring them to a busy trail centre, but never ride natural trails without them. My mates two beagles on the other hand are wholesale dangerous on the track. It just depends on the dog.
  • 1 0
 my pooch is the same.....Gets off the trail if he's in the way. It's pretty awesome because dogs that just run along the trail going slow chasing their owners suck to ride with. Strange that dogs don't understand the concept of something fast coming get out of the way.
  • 2 1
 I guess that the concept of "trail" (a line that you have to follow through nature) doesn't mean anything for a dog.. :-/
  • 1 0
 I take my springer out all the same and he's exactly the same, but I avoid uplift days when I know it's busy. It all comes down to responsibility, my dog is well trained and has excellent recall, he also loves people, but is so obsessed with me that he wouldn't be distracted from the trail that I am riding. They're good for pace keeping on the climbs too!
  • 1 0
 It depends on the trail and how busy it is. If the dog is properly trained it will always follow the owner, decreasing the chances of a collision.

Why has nobody mentioned how annoying it is when one runs off and gets lost... In the dark... As my mate's did when we were out on a group ride. We spent an hour looking for that ****. :-)
  • 2 1
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTbE_h0fc4o

Love taking my dog biking. take with large groups of friends too, and she never gets in the way, and my mates love having her along. I make sure she has water, and she only comes when we are out for short rides, but she adores it. Makes me happy, keeps her happy and my mates love her too...
  • 1 0
 Super cool vid mate Smile
  • 1 0
 Get on Facebook and find Volatile Visions. Then scroll to a vid uploaded in 2010 from the 90s. If you watch that you would never again let a dog anywhere near serious MTBing was taking place. Sorry I can't find a way to link it.
  • 2 0
 I don't mind dogs on the trail providing they don't leave you any fresh logs to avoid! we have all had that time on the trail looking for that perfect stick to clean off your tyres.
  • 1 0
 Trained my dog to poop off trail only!
  • 1 0
 I love to ride with my dog Thomas,when friends are lazy or busy,I always ride with him and he does enjoy it as much as I do..It is like "I cant wait to run again,cmon man !" He is ten years old now but he still runs after me 15km every day !..love him !
  • 5 0
 The dogs of non riders can be problematic.
  • 3 0
 it all depends on the situation. like dont take your dog to a busy trail on a saturday morning but a less crowded local trail is great. people just need to use judgment
  • 1 0
 There are too many variables on this like the dogs temper, whether there's other people riding, what kind of trails etc. There are the exceptions in every case but I think it all boils down to the owner. A good dog owner will not put themselves or their dog at risk in any situation and they also will not put their dog in a situation where the dog could, by the dogs fault or not, injure someone else. It has too be a call made by the dog owner. I fostered several American Pitbulls and I am well aware of the decision making required to keep a dog, and yourself, out of trouble and harms way.
  • 1 0
 I have no problem with dogs on the trail, but for Gods sake keep them on a leash or TRAIN them to "heel". I grew up with 3 dogs and they were all trained very well. And if your dog is a little nervous around strangers or bikes its all the more reason to have them on a leash.

I was out for a ride this summer and on my way back there was a group of people with their Rotwieller. I saw the dog had a muzzle on so I knew what was going to happen. Sure enough as I passed them the dog flipped out and lunged for me. Good thing the owner was responsible or I would have been an afternoon snack.
  • 2 1
 A dog is another trail feature to learn how to deal with. When you see a dog you should stop and either face it down or befriend it. Then be nice to the owner so they feel embarrassed their beast got away.
If you run it will follow you and possibly get lost and chase ten more people before it gets back to its owner who will leash it when they realize it got out of control. If it is an irish wolf hound it might grab your stupid self and rip you off the bike. Don't make yourself prey!
People have dogs and people have bikes and people have both. Who are you to say one can't come on the trail? Half the reason for most trails so people have a wilderness space to walk with or without their dogs!
Bikes are a nuisance too, ask any horseback rider.
  • 1 0
 at my local trails people walk their dogs all the time and i have had dogs come right up to my front wheel (while riding). It's funny because the dogs are supposed to be on leashes where I ride, but the people who keep their dogs off their leashes are the same ones trying to push mountain biking out. It's really sad. It's a shame people try to stop others from enjoying their lives.
  • 1 0
 When I walk my dogs off leash, I drive an extra 10 min to a non mtb friendly park. It is a good reason to keep some parks from having trail access.
  • 1 0
 I ride with my dogs all the time. 2 100lb German shepherd wolf hybrids. I never have any trouble, one just stays off the trail doing his own thing orbiting me like a satellite wondering why it takes me so long to get up the hill. The other is such a magnet that every time my pedal goes around my heel bumps him in the chin. If there is someone coming I pull off and they follow. Its how you train your dog.
  • 1 0
 one time I was at a race and we were warming up on one of the trails one of the guy's dogs was chasing me as I jumped a table top as I left the ground the dog went under my bike I was afraid I was going to land of the dog and hurt it or myself, luckliy the dog sped up and go out of the way.
  • 1 0
 I've crashed because a dog on the trail jumped in front of me before. I was more worried about the dog though. I'd really like to take my dog on the trail but I don't want someone to hit her or get a ticket for her not being on a lead.
  • 1 0
 with proper training riding with a dog is sometimes better than riding with other people!! I have an aussie and he understands that if you are gonna be slow, and due to his training he moves off the trail behind someone who is going faster than him which due to old age is more times than now. I have also rode with another Aussie that with a little help and encouragement will hit every berm, drop, rock garden or jump that his owner hits, sometimes going bigger than any human on a bike. I agree with it being a great thing for people to take their with them, but make sure you take the time to train with them for your safety and everyone elses.
  • 1 0
 unleashed dogs ruined my strava time...nothing like feeling the flow on your favorite section of trail only to have to come to a stop so some lady can wrangle up her 5 off-leash rat dogs..

Our trails are all hiking trails so there is allot of foot traffic and allot of people walking with dogs..we use cow bells so we dont kill somebody when coming around a corner at 30mph....most times people are cool and get out of the way but some people are clueless..

I do occasionally take my dog with me..as fast as she is (Australian Shepard) I always drop her on the high speed stuff so she usually stays at home..our trails are also super rocky so I get worried for her when shes pinning it over jagged rocks for 6miles..
  • 1 0
 No accidents or close calls for me but... Split second fear its wolves or coyotes I have just run up on. No joke. I have had a dog or two scare the pop out of me!! Coming out of a turn or coming up on top of a berm. No fear of crashing just a big animal in the middle of what i think is no ware.
  • 1 0
 I think Mike has it right here. If you are talking about uncrowded trail rides, I have no problem with it. I see people with dogs at my local XC loops and its fine because even on a 'crowded' day you might only see a couple other people on a 2 hour ride. But I think anything more than that can be a danger to other people on the trails and the dogs themselves. I see people brings dogs along in many situations that they don't belong. And to be honest, I worry about the dog more than the people. The idiot who brings the dogs should know better (so I don't feel bad for them). The dog had no choice in putting itself in the situation. Its a dog.
  • 1 0
 I don't want hiker's dogs on the trails because they are the problem dogs. They are untrained around mountain bikers and are rarely off leash. I have no problem with mountain bikers having dogs that run along with them on the ride, because those dogs are trained as to how to act around mountain bikes and never cause a problem because they just follow their owners down the trail and don't get in the way.
  • 1 0
 If you encounter a dog on a trail, there is a simple thing you can do to avoid danger to both you and the dog. Just brake. The dog will disengage its attack mode and return to its owner. I encounter dogs at least once a month and in the 25 years of riding, I only had one accident (this was a dog that came rushing out of the bushes and into my front wheel). Once a dog ran besides me for a few miles so I decided to make a big loop and and up with the owner. They were very pleased with that and the dog got a good exercise.
  • 1 0
 I know there are more than a few people in here that were outraged over ebikes because of safety issues but are totally fine with dogs running up and down the trails. Anecdotally I know way more people taken out by dogs, and come to think of it, don't know anyone taken out by an ebikes. In fact I once saw two dudes fight it out at a trail head because dude ones dog got way to familiar with dude two's dog. As for me, whatever man, judo please pick up your poo...
  • 1 0
 Like others here, I trained my dog from a pup to be a good trail dog. He knows to stay away from bike tires/rotors, and once that initial 10 minute excitement wears off, he happily trots alon behind me happy as can me. Since we only ever walk him on our left side I know that if he IS going to pass me, it will always be on the left. So if I see someone coming, it's easy for me to steer a bit to the left and not worry about him getting to any people before I do.

I almost never have an issue with him on trails when it comes to people, either hikers or other bikers. The only issues I've ever had are trying to deal with other riders with off-leash dogs that are more aggressive to other dogs. Had three times in the alst 5 years where my dog was correctly waiting at my side while we let another rider and pooch pass, and the other dog tried to go after mine while the owner did all they could to actually reign in the dog before it got bad.

So I would say that not only do you need a well-trained dog that knows how to act around bikes, but you should also consider that you might not be the only one out there with dog on an early morning weekday ride. If the dog isn't friendly with ALL other dogs, keep it on leash.
  • 1 0
 i have 2 very energetic terriers that come with me sometimes, i don't take them out with me when its busy as they want to go say hello to everyone and have no road sense at all! so i have to have them on leads all the time we anywhere near a road.
once rolling there great, chasing after me and on occasion getting in my way but they love it and anyone that see's them coming always has a smile on their face (even if the dogs are caked in mud)
I only take them on short rides and don't go too fast as you get worried about if all the running is going to cause any health problems but as long as common sense is used i don't see a problem with taking dogs out with you riding
  • 1 0
 Where I live, you NEVER go out into the woods without a dog! Weather it's riding, hiking, trail building, or what have you. I live where there are wild animals that will eat you if they feel inclined to do so. I love my dog dearly but she serves a purpose. Protector and bait if a bear, wolf or cougar decides to get brave. To have a good trail dog takes practice and training on your part as the owner. not all dogs adapt to this role easy. But most do with the right training. So in short I never go without my dog and that is a rule. If you go without one you are dumb and asking for trouble in my neck of the woods.
  • 1 0
 There is a HUGE difference between dogs on trial and TRAIL DOGS. Latter are typically well trained by the owner who are aware of what dogs ought to and ought not to do on trail. Random dogs on trail, particularly near urban areas, typically off leash, sometimes with owners clueless and their ears plugged with headphones, SUCK.
  • 2 1
 What a stupid poll. The title led me to believe it was a poll that would give people a chance to vote on whether or not dogs should be on trails. Instead it's just a have you had a bad experience with dog on trail and who hasn't been chased by an off leash dog before? Why not ask who has had a bad experience with a hiker, biker, runner, motos, rangers, etc... and if those belong on trails.

Mountainbikers, especially those that are prone to going fast downhill and building ileagal trails need to be as welcoming and understanding as possible with all other user groups. I don't take my dog for rides because I know she is not qualified for it, but I'm not going to hold all dog owners accountable for a few bad apples, just like I don't cuss out every hiker just because a few are jerks.
  • 1 0
 Dogs on the trail I have no problem with so long as the owner has control over them and can trust them not to chase other bikes. However I do have problems with some owners, launching a tennis ball using one of those throwing sticks at a rider is unacceptable and could have caused serious injury. No doubt accidents can happen however 99% of incidents are due to the owners lack of responsibility.
  • 1 0
 I've had close calls with dog's on the trail and I've also had close calls with other bikers, hikers, and equestrians. There are well behaved and not so well behaved trail users of all types...

I have rubbed the butt of my dog with my front tire enough times that he works very hard to stay at the rear of the pack. Did that sound dirty?
  • 1 0
 Its not the same riding without my buddy Gus, he's an australian shepherd-border collie cross so he can run for days and loves it. Theres nothing like ripping down your favourite trail with your best friend on your back wheel. He totally knows when i do ride without him and he gets mad at me later!
  • 2 0
 The only time my two Siberian Huskies are anywhere near my bike is when there attached to it for training runs they are never off lead. Last time they were off lead they came back with a hare that they had cought.
  • 2 0
 See this GoPro video with Aaron Chase, Brian Lopes, and Chris Van Dine and try count the dogs: youtu.be/cN-YTcSnE6c

In Chile, there's no people who have not been a victim of a dog sometime... Including Me :/
  • 1 0
 I take my dog out with me, she loves it.
She is way better than 99% or riders, does not talk sh!t about how good she is, how far she can ride or what she used to ride....
Whe wags her tail, chases the deer away and just loves the day out.
Saying that, I would never take her to a busy tail center, not enough people up here to have one, so not an issue I am gonna face.
I take my 9 year old son out too, since he was 5 he has been coming out.... if he is too slow or cant ride certain bits and you pro's wanna pass.... tough toots, he has the same rights as you. As for my dog.... she is just too cute to shout at. Smile
  • 1 0
 its the humans fault because i also watch parents let their 3 year olds get on the dh tracks and ive nearly hit them! like keep your kid on a leash. literally and stay off the trails that are bike only and for trail dogs that go with you when you stop make sure you have them somewhere safe or train them to sit at the bike until you are ready to go. it doesnt always work but 99% of the time it does.
  • 1 0
 My last dog was an unbelievable trail dog that was smart, fast and never got in the way. She was always aware of the bikes whether with just me or in groups. My buddies enjoyed her on the trail every ride. She is too old for trails now, but hangs out in garage before and after rides to socialize. My new puppy in being groomed for trails right now with me, and is already great on rides. She will soon be allowed to be on full rides at speed when she is a bit stronger as she is only 10 months. I have been on rides where people have dogs that do not listen ( which means they always get in the way), and don't know their place on the trail. I had a friend whose dog constantly came on rides and ALWAYS got in the way, biting at wheels etc. We warned her that one day it would get hurt and sadly it did- by her. Biting at her tire one day it got its tail caught in the rotor and cut it clean off. The dog never came out again. I do not think those dogs should be out on trails with riders any more than I would want to ride with an idiot on trails who rides blindly and recklessly. Know your dog, train your dog and have the most fun ever with your best friend- every ride!!
  • 1 0
 Had one experience where after the fastest section of the trail I came over a jump and there's a dog and its owner stood in the middle of the trail. I narrowly avoided them and my buddy behind did too but the owner of the dog tried dragging my buddy off his bike so I stopped and told him that bikers come down here fast and there's no avoiding the jump there so it was a bit stupid to stand in the middle of the trail. He went on about "Bikers shouldn't ride in these woods anyway" when in fact it is public land with cycle paths and trails running through it, and he had obviously gotten lost and stumbled onto one of our trails. He walked off with his dog mumbling something about "disrespectful kids riding their bikes dangerously, blah blah blah".
Safe to say I've never seen him there again. Maybe the message got through his thick head. Or maybe someone who is faster than me and has worse brakes taught him the hard way...
  • 1 0
 personally never had a prob with riders dogs but walkers an dog i have had a couple of close calls, mainly whith people how ar new to the area or to dog walking so letting them run and heading up trails other wise its nice to rid with something other than a human some times.
  • 1 0
 reasonable people, bikers and dog owners, who know the trails are shared and that dogs can endanger others when off leash don't need to read this stuff, they just walk the talk. the rest of them who do need some input and information on how to share, probably never will
  • 1 0
 There's a time and place for everything. It's up to the owner to use "common sense". I took my dog out today for a ride and only passed puddles, not people. Did hit a squirrel though, the dog didn't care, just kept boping along.
  • 1 0
 This poll is on the owners common sense:
The trail I go on is usually busy has high traffic of fast riders should I leave dog at home or bring him with me?

Is he a hyper people loving mutt or a well behaved tied to my ass kind of dog what won't leave my side unless I give it the ok?

this poll is tough I see some really well behaved dogs what won't chase owner down the trail but off the trail on the side won't get in anyones way then you go the dogs what don't listen worth shit and chases anyone and everyone down barking/howling down to the shuttle zone. (my dog does this very annoying or I take him to a bike/walk trail and people call him over then I get pissed off and then he jumps up then they get mad don't call him over idiots.)
  • 4 0
 Public trail= no dog
Private trail= have at it

it's as much about the dogs safety as people safety.
  • 1 0
 Do you really believe a mt. biker (at any ability level) with their dog is going to stop, go back / up the trail and clean up the dog's crap?
No because the dog is following it's owner, not the other way around.
Shred the trails with dogs and shred the crap removal as well.
Then everyone benefits.
  • 2 1
 Everytime I see a biker out on the trail with their dog, I feel sorry for the dog. Most dogs are sprinters, not marathoners; they're not built for running miles of trails. Running your dog while you ride your bike is a form of abuse.
  • 1 0
 Glad someone pointed it out. The author clearly missed it on the article. Us humans are bipedal, so we dominate on the endurance side of things. Best thing is to show your dog this, and they will never disobey you again. The fact that so many dogs do not listen just highlights the fact, most humans are to lazy to want to train their dogs with a endurance challenge. So they remain stupid dogs/stupid owners.
  • 1 0
 I love riding with my dog. I cant beat him, just when i think i have dropped him, he is right on my wheel. Being a sighthound (a whippet) he is genetically fast, agile, but a bit delicate. I have had to carry him home a couple of times after the callouses came off his paw pads and he started slowing down. A couple of times I though I had lost him when he saw a hare/rabbit/fox/snake/kangaroo near the trail and took off after it, its like he is in pet mode, then predator mode, wanting to bring me home something to grill for dinner. As a result, he doesnt come out much any more. I know it upsets him a bit, especially when im out the front of the house practicing wheelies or whatever, i hear him inside crying :*(
  • 1 0
 I don't have any issue at all but I do agree with some of the comments about "over-running" your dogs. I learned the hard way like some other people on here. Not sure it is always the case - but I had issues with my last Aussie Shepard as he got older. He had a severely enlarged heart and arthritis to boot. He had to be put down at 11 1/2 due to complications with his enlarged heart. He averaged about 25-30 mile weeks for 8 years at least and some weeks could have been closer to 40-50. He was supremely fit but at a cost. Doctor blamed heart issues on "excessive endurance exercise. So, like anything, I suggest to moderate activities. My current dog is on a much less stressful endurance schedule and now gets most of her exercise at dog parks.
  • 2 0
 Personally I think its the dog walkers, when ever we try to build a track or set of jumps, wherever it is there is always a dog walker that complains and gets us into trouble for criminal damage!
  • 1 0
 Living in Chicago, we have to share our trails with horses, so you'll rarely see a trail dog. My kids allergic to dogs, but I was thinking about a 'trail' porcupine. That would be cool. I thought those going down yield to those going up... But, here on PB there seems to be a consensus that it's the people or animals are at fault if they get bombed from above. Not sure I agree.
  • 1 0
 I watched a guy and his dog both shred Semper Dirticus at Duthie Hill when I lived back there. It was awesome, the dog followed him, leaping all the gap jumps about 3 bike lengths behind his rider.

Meanwhile, my dog has the attention span of a hummingbird on meth; no way I can let her off leash anywhere we're not fenced in.
  • 1 0
 My girl is to old to run any more , but we had some great times riding trails , building trails and hanging post ride with friends . I learned to think about who was with us, how long we were riding , where , and what the weather was like , available water . And definately have to be willing to adjust your ride for the sale of your animal . I think it's a great experience just be super responsible about it !
  • 1 0
 It was actually a dog that got me back into mountain biking after a decade or so away. Having taken a recue dog he put a lot a weight on and due to my knackered knees ( I ride flat pedals) I was not able to run the dog for the distance or intensity needed for what I now to be working dog( aussie kelpie). I dusted my old fuji nevada down and started taking the dog round my local woods. Soon the weight fell of the dog and eventually off me too. Sure we had a few scrapes and near misses but never involving anybody else. When out with groups he would take point and wait at every hidden turn until the last of the group caught up (always off the side of the trail , out of the way of any quicker riders or groups) keeping the group ( or pack in the dogs eyes ) together , then shoot backup up to the next turn. So as long as you clear up after your furry chum and they are under control ( whether on a lead or not) and friendly then I am all for them. I personally have more problems with horses and some very snooty horseriders and the damage they do to the trails and the "mess" they leave behind which is always on my local trails and is much more difficult to avoid due to it bein as wide as the trails !!!
  • 1 0
 My trail dog 'Crosby' is a 4 year old golden retriever, weighs 106 lbs and in top shape. We've been riding together 2-3 times a week for about the last 3 years. I've had to invest a lot of time training him not to take the lead, stay behind the last rider in the group, stay beside me whenever we encounter other dogs, wild life or people are on the trail, jump into the back of the truck, etc. Cros knows all the trails and spots to take on water. One thing he just naturally does is go off trail to drop a deuce. Smart dog. When we ride we are a 'pack' and dogs love that. We stick together no matter what and he knows who's Alpha - not him Smile I met a guy on the trail that had a dog that loved to pick up sticks on the run and then pull up beside him and jam it into his front spokes. Another guys dog would bite your rear tire if you slowed down. Bottom line folks, it's pretty easy to blame the dog but at the end of the day it is the owners responsibility to train the dog how to behave around bikes, people and on the trails.
  • 1 0
 While I think sharing the trails with dogs can be dangerous at times (yes, I have rolled over one myself), I think it pales in comparison to sharing the trails with horses. Damn creatures shit everywhere and the owners seem to think they can just ignore it, and they shy at their own shadow causing all sorts of grief for riders and equestrians alike. Oh, and they destroy the trails! PB - how about a poll regarding sharing the trail with horses?
  • 1 0
 I like dogs but the number of dog incidents is too damn high. If you haven't noticed dogs love to chase stuff. One thing stands out are shepparding dogs or dogs with a high prey drive. Mtb riders aren't actual sheep, though if you own a 650b then it is a close call eh? Wink

Follow local bylaw and wishes of landowner. Dogs(your dog) can and eventually will cause problems(straight up attacks, triggering serious crashes, drowning themselves, eating porqupines or rotten stuff and then there is the poop) this stuff happens because people who own them let them. One more issue. If you are riding in a consrvation area be aware letting your animal romp into the bush is poor form. It isn't a coarsing ground, this is an area set aside for wildlife. Trying to get into natural setting i'd rather see deer and other animals than some guys dog goin nuts even though that can be entertaining as well. Anyway, be responsible!!
  • 1 0
 I love dogs and they will be on the trail regardless of all the complaining. Dogs in many states in the US require leashes, but most people don't walk them that way. In most instances I have had some close call with hikers and their dogs not on leashes. We have to share the trail though, and we don't own the woods as much as me might like to think so. Just like with horses, when you see them stop and let them pass. People that ride with their dogs need to have them properly trained. Even when they are properly trained odd situations can arise. It is fun to ride along with them. Regardless of opinions, we are more likely to be restricted from trails than dog owners. If you ride with your dog bring a leash and think about putting them on it when other riders, hikers, horses, etc. pass. That is what I do, but its just one more self righteous opinion.

Everyone hates poop. Regardless of dog or horse. Some places do have laws supposedly to discourage this, but its going to happen. Lighten up. We all have to share unless you have 100+ private acres to tell the world to go to hell.
  • 1 0
 I may not be the first person to say this here, but I have no problem with dogs on trails. I do however have problems with dog walkers themselves. Whether it's their pompous attitudes or the fact that they think they own the trails, or have the right of way. I do love seeing dogs on MTB trails especially when their unleashed
  • 1 0
 Good poll, a very contentious issue. Our trails are legal and our club has been asked to post "no dogs" on the trail head maps. We are on crown land that we share with other range users(ranchers) and the primary argument against dogs is the potential conflict with cows. As a club, we are in no position for enforcement, and personally, i do not agree with no dogs on the trail, they have as much right to run free as we do to ride free. Funny thing is, that if the dog is off the trail, there is no issue with range and enforcement, it is only an infraction when they are on the legal trail.
  • 1 0
 Look you guys, this is sexy, sorry sexist. I've come across a few dogs in the woods and had a bit of a scare, she wore open face helmet, but all women should be able to ride the trail no matter what they look like. Being a Dog is not their fault. It's the parents. Blame them.
  • 1 0
 We have no trail dogs here in the Philippines. Just some stray dogs. A friend of mine during a DH race hit a dog right before the final big gap...Of course he cased, the mangy mutt had a swollen ankle, bruised ribs and twisted wrist, but the dog got out ok.
  • 1 0
 firstly, my dog shits in the woods not on the trail. it doesnt take much to train that. second, my dog outruns anybody on an xc local trail. our dh trails are only known by those who maintain it. if the.terrain is to tretorous I wouldnt take my dog. also it would be unsafe for me and the dog to be leashed together while riding. train your dog people.
  • 1 0
 Remote trails that aren't heavily used can be a great place to take a dog. The owner has to make sure that the dog is trained well enough to be under voice command or have a way of getting the dog's attention such as a collar with an audible tone to keep the dog from interfering with other trail users. It is a good idea to have a leash handy as well.
  • 1 0
 My dog almost always accompanies me on my rides. I taught him when he was 2 and everybody always loves him on the trails. He stays right behind me on my wheel, he has never gotten in anybodies way. Everybody has a bad experience with a dog while riding, its the owners fault not the dogs. Their are idiot riders just like there are idiot dog owners. If a dog is in your way talk to the owners, some of them will be ignorant but who are we to decide who uses the trails? We don't own the trails. I have had deer, rabbits, squirrels and trees get in my way but I don't tell them to get out of the forest. I get what people are saying, dogs can be annoying, but mountain biking is about the ride and companionship and sometimes that companion is a dog. I will keep bringing my dog on my rides and if he bothers you I apologize, but you will just have to deal with it . Also , as far as the poop thing.... I trained my dog to shit off trail. Shouldn't we be getting after the people who wreck the trails, leave garbage behind and give nothing back?
  • 1 0
 I ride with my dog whenever I can. Never had any problems with her and other trail users. She rides with me at the local bike park and in the backcountry. She will stay on my back tire, but is also very wary of other bikes and horses. She does everything you would want from a trail dog, except the occasional ruining of a berm while i'm digging

www.pinkbike.com/video/315122
  • 1 0
 got the super Loud mp3 on handlebars. got a list of songs that encourage people to. 'move b®tch get out the way' also super loud bell. if slow People don't move they gonna feel me blow past then inches away. i also can whistle hands free ear piercing dogs freak and freeze while i pass
  • 3 0
 Trail dogs are great mine is ,just be responsible and pick up its eggs and everybody's happy
  • 2 1
 I miss taking my boy Ghost out on trails. he loves it! he is retired now. we shredded Moab twice and over 100 trails all over the west coast, from Colorado to California and in just about every state
  • 2 1
 My Shiba Inu goes off and on road with me but is ALWAYS leashed and our riding styles aren't vod worthy but fun none the less. He enjoys it but I get the real riding in without him.
  • 1 0
 The other problem I found is that she's a tick magnet (no, not a chick magnet). Even if she's on the trail, not wandering in the bush, in less than 100 yards she's already got 5 ticks. Not good.
  • 1 0
 Garlic oil on her collar non toxic and ticks hate it
  • 1 0
 Its so bad. I took my two small dogs for a walk on the trail and I would say each had at least 15 ticks on them after about an hour. Luckily they have short hair and the ticks are easy to find and remove.
  • 2 0
 Can't have dogs on most trails in Oz due native animals. Kangaroos can be freaky when a mob hear you and scatter all over the place cross trails
  • 2 2
 Dogs are OK if your riding solo, but on group rides not so much. We have a couple of riders who insist on bring their dog along on our regular group rides. Dogs are pack animals and if they are not properly trained they will try to lead the pack. Very seldom do these dogs know their place in line. also the dog owner should know to also take their place at the back of the pack and keep their dog behind them. All to often we be this guy who brings his Shepard and just has to ride in front so of course the dog wants to run with his owner. So the dog is always trying trying to pass other riders on single track. We have also had dogs take off and the ride turns into a search party. Not fun So no f***ing dogs on group rides and if they poop on the trail pick it up! I HATE DOG SHIT!!
  • 3 3
 My trail dog is a 60lb Airedale/ Old English sheepdog mix, and he is bat shit crazy. I purchased a Dogtra electronic training collar this spring and things are better for both of us now. I get the obedience of having a leash and the freedom of being off-leash. An electronic training collar is a powerful tool when used properly, but it must never be abused. 99% of the time I use the pager/vibrate button and he comes right back and sits waiting for a command.
  • 1 0
 My Vizsala loves his DH and XC. I'd only take him to a centre or an uplift mid week when it's quiet. Too many variables to control esp when the speeds go up on the downs with other riders about.
  • 3 0
 ha!just wake n baked and that first song on the video!was not expecting that!
  • 1 0
 I just wet myself laughing!
  • 2 2
 On a leash in bikeparks and official bike trails where is a lot of people, free everywhere else. Guys...you know you are doing your sport in nature? Nature includes animals, not only bikers. Doesn´t matter if it is your mate´s dog, wild deer or a lost kid, you are in nature/wild so keep your eyes open. World is not only Yours. Better dog than wild boar. And the other fact is that you are probably a bit more clever than a dog, so when it sits in your way, run alongside with you getting you in danger or whatever else, just slow down.

And here in Czech most of the trails we ride is illegal, for example you are not allowed to ride in forrest on unsigned paths. Due to this fact I believe the right of the dog to run free is the same like the bikers right to ride free (forbbiden there for both).
Of course if situation gets busy on trail (or the trail centers some users talks about upper), the leash is necessarry. Anyway still on eyes
  • 4 0
 I think dogs should stay off if busy trails!
  • 1 0
 agree --- l would never take LuLu on a busy trail unless she was on a leash.

www.pinkbike.com/video/340371
  • 1 0
 its terrible when some random know it all lets his bad behaved dog run rampant on a trail but if the rider has a dog and is trained well and actually understands the dangers of the trail/getting in the way of bikes is okaySmile
  • 4 0
 Even Pro's ride with my doggie Wink
www.pinkbike.com/photo/10402972
  • 1 0
 i take my wippet out all the time, trying to train her to stay behind and follow, but still makes a ryte lauh watch my dog cutting me up, and absaloutly blitzing on infront haa, love it,
  • 1 1
 I was riding mt 7 one day with my dog just from 5k and lost her half way down! we walked up fro a while calling her and couldn't find her. finally we decided to do another run for a sweep and as soon as we parked at the trail head she had just got there! riding with a dog is fun tho!
  • 1 0
 This is a touchy subject. "Trail Dogs" are glorified in magazines as the ultimate riding partner. I don't have a dog and have no positive trail experience with dogs to get on that band-wagon.
  • 1 0
 ha ha everyone that has a problem with trail dogs is just a leisure slow ass rider that gets passed by k 9's who don't have the advantage of wheels! pussy ass slow poke posers!
  • 4 0
 Hikers are worse than dogs
  • 1 0
 Since I build my own trail I take my dog up there and have no issues. Since most of the pussies on here are scrubs and do not build their own trail they need to keep their dogs at home.
  • 1 0
 nothing pisses me off more than waiting for a buddy all friggin' day long,that's trying to retrieve his dog after its gone running after another dog or a frigging squirrel....frig!
  • 1 0
 I was thinking of training my dog to be a trail dog but I thought that if something happened to her at the track I would blame myself and if she hurt herself bad enough and had to get put down it would kill me
  • 4 1
 LIKE Dog......................
  • 1 0
 I guess just a solution for keeping the dog in a suitable distance from the bike can help. Maybe a sensor can do that? Lol, another good product is about the come out
  • 3 0
 dog see wheel turnin, dog hatin
  • 2 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/10492082

The only way to Ride! Kramer the 110# Schnauzer.
  • 4 1
 It's usually the owners, not the dogs, who are the problem.
  • 1 0
 I own two fast hounds that love to run. But being brought up in a family of Vets I keep them to .5hr rides or skis. All that running can shorten a dogs life.
  • 3 0
 once i killed a mouse on trail, lol
  • 2 0
 I'd be too worried about my dog running into me! Dogs can be quite thick at times.
  • 2 0
 People think their dogs are special (like their kids) in reality, both suck.
  • 1 0
 Well trained dog on moderate paced local single track= RaD. Poorly trained dog on fast paced shuttle/dh trails= dangerous for dog and rider, seen some very close calls!
  • 1 0
 More people wrote about dag stuff then the Bear claw live Q and A. Dags in Mt trail yes bike park no! And pls pick up the Shit guys.
  • 1 0
 If they grew up around bikes, they know how to get out of the way. That being said, if your dog cant keep up with you on the descent, get a faster dog.
  • 1 0
 My friend has 3 staffs and they are all bike and trail trained they will only stick with us and only follow us. Not all dogs are crazy.. Down to the owner
  • 2 0
 DJ action with my Schnauzer.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10492083

Good Times!
  • 1 0
 Remember if you have a problems with your dog or your dog doesn't like to run on the trail with you....Call Cesar Millian to help you. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 I love riding with my dogs and they love it too......here's a short vid from a couple years ago when I had one pup...http://vimeo.com/35869372
  • 2 0
 Trail days are the best with dogs around.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10496474
  • 2 0
 Nothing like getting out on the trails with a dog

m.pinkbike.com/photo/10494700
  • 1 0
 I was doing photography at an urban downhill race and a dog ran onto the course during a race run... Rider managed not to crash somehow.
  • 2 0
 Damn, Lily gets more airtime than I do :-)
  • 2 0
 Like dogs, dislike dogs on "groomed" trails & trail centers.
  • 1 0
 never with a dog, but had an issue with a reindeer on the trail in Ylläs bike-park. Nearly crashed into his ass Big Grin
  • 1 1
 Dunno if anyone has really crashed as a result of a dogs actions. They're f*cking dogs. As a result of the owners actions; maybe.
  • 2 0
 i wanna see a dog hit the oakley sender
  • 1 2
 My dog is with me most of the trail time. He is trail savy and know how to stay away from bikes (if he is not out front). People who dont like them on trails are wimpy douch bags!
  • 1 0
 I can remember Zoe, Jason Carpenter of Goldtec & Dragon DH being a and awesome trail dog
  • 4 2
 i stopped riding with a group because of the dogs
  • 1 0
 ya me too. what a pain in the ass.
  • 1 0
 If you can't make your dog stop whatever it is doing with one word, then stick to quiet trails.
  • 1 0
 that is the happiest dog right there Big Grin
love how the dog jumps the tables instead of running across them.
awesome video!
  • 1 0
 I had a dog try and attack while I was riding up difficult section. Dogs should not be on trails.
  • 1 0
 I dont think you should take them to busy parks/trails but if its a trail not many people go on it would be fine.
  • 1 0
 i got dog shit all over me and my bike whilst riding the other week, thanks...
  • 1 0
 Only problem I've had, and it's happened a few times, is newbies stopping on the trail to say hello to trail dogs.
  • 1 0
 this is the funniest thing i have ever seen
  • 1 0
 its depends what your dogs like
  • 2 1
 This is sick. life doesn't get much better than that cool as f@*k man
  • 1 0
 The dog in that video has to be on crack.....
  • 1 0
 Looks like she need to spend some energy
  • 1 0
 umm, my sweater wearing pug shreds trail...
  • 1 0
 My kenda tires love dag shiz like Barnacles love ships !!
  • 1 0
 I just dont like the poop in my tires and shoes and mouth...
  • 1 0
 my dog is way to stupid to run on the trail
  • 1 0
 The dog slept well that day, i guess!
  • 1 0
 @SORTAH Thats so out of line, not his fault at all.
  • 1 0
 Looks like Lilly cased it at 1:44......
  • 1 0
 the dog on video looks like sam hill, doing the inside line on turns Smile Smile
  • 1 0
 A "harmless" dog ripped my leg open once
  • 1 0
 It's not the dog folks, responsibility is on the owner.
  • 1 0
 the dog has the faster line;D, badass video and ride!!
  • 1 0
 Damned copy n paste :-/
  • 1 1
 double post.
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