Pinkbike Product Picks

Feb 11, 2013 at 8:48
by Mike Levy  

Dakine Shield jacket

Dakine uses a ''2.5 layer waterproof / breathable DK DRY membrane system'' for their new Shield jacket that, just in case you couldn't deduce from the description, is designed to keep the rain out while still allowing for a level of breathability. Vents span the back of the jacket, and along with large zippered pit openings, encourage air flow while you are huffing and puffing your way up climbs. The jacket's two front zippers - both the main closure and the zipper for the breast pocket - are water resistant, and the Shield's hood is large enough to fit over a standard helmet should Mother Nature unleash her fury upon you. Clever zippered hand pockets each sport an open mesh inner that lets the wearer warm his or her paws up against their body. Color choices include the flashy blue shown here or a more subdued black option, and small through extra-large sizes are available. MSRP $125.00 USD. www.dakine.com

Dakine
Going for the Cookie Monster look? Dakine's blue (it also comes in black) Shield jacket is just the ticket while also keeping you dry in the worst weather.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesCompared to Dakine's lighter weight, $80 USD Breaker jacket, the Shield is a serious piece of clothing intended for a trail assault in conditions nearing a typhoon. No matter how heavy the deluge, we never sprung a leak, and it was during those monsoon-like conditions when we most appreciated the helmet-encompassing hood. Bringing along a second (or even third) pair of gloves is one trick that many riders here in rain-prone British Columbia use to keep morale high, and the two mesh pockets inside of the Shield proved to be an ideal place to keep them dry and warm until it was time to swap out the soaked pair on our hands. Dakine says that the Shield has a ''DH/Freeride'' fit, but we just found it to be overly baggy, although we admit it makes more sense if you wear upper body armour. Either way, our medium jacket fit more like an extra-large on our average frame, and we'd likely go down to a size small if we didn't plan to wear any padding underneath. As much as we liked the Shield when the heavens opened up on us, it felt like overkill when it wasn't truly pouring. Opening the pit vents helped to keep the sauna effect to a minimum, but we still stuffed the Shield into our pack as soon as the serious rain stopped. Given that it is designed as a full-on rain coat, though, this doesn't come as a surprise. Do you often head out regardless of the pouring rain? If so, the Shield is a solid option. Just make sure that the fit is correct before paying up, and consider purchasing a size down if you are picking it up online. - Mike Levy




Zoic Torrid fleece hoodie

Zoic offers a truly massive range of clothing that covers pretty much any and every cycling discipline, but it is their casual Torrid fleece hoodie that we've been using the most over the last few months. The Torrid is manufactured with fleece fabric that features a soft waffle pattern exterior and a smoother interior that looks to put comfort high up on the list of priorities, and a full-length zipper means that you don't have to pull it over your head to get it off after the ride is finished. Then again, its casual look means that you might not feel like you need to take it off before heading into the local pub for a post-ride brew, unlike most other pieces of cycling clothing. The relaxed appearance belies Zoic's nod to function, with the Torrid sporting a proper zippered jersey pocket out back, along with a breast pocket intended for an iPhone or other multimedia device. Color choices include either grey, black, or the blue shown here, and sizes run from small through to double extra-large. MSRP $75.00 USD. www.zoic.com

Zoic
Supremely comfortable and toasty warm, the Torrid hoodie from Zoic is near perfect in our books.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe have to confess that the Torrid hoodie wasn't exactly at the top of the clothes pile when it came to choosing something for our chilly winter rides. Maybe it was the semi-casual appearance or the fleece's waffle texture, but it just didn't seem like something that we'd picture ourselves wearing... and then we wore it. Zoic has managed to design a piece of riding gear that is not only functional, but is also akin to curling up in front of a roaring fire with a Snuggie on (minus the whole ''I'm wearing a Snuggie'' feeling) - it's that comfortable. The fleece fabric is supremely soft against bare skin, meaning that you can wear the Torrid sans under-jersey, and the sleeve and torso length are spot on for an 'in the saddle' position. Yes, you obviously would want to choose something else as an outer layer if it is pouring, but the Torrid proved to be impressively warm on those dry but nippy winter morning rides. With a proper zippered rear jersey pocket, the practicality is also there (why don't more tops have discreet jersey pockets these days? Is it not 'cool' anymore?). The only change that we'd like to see is to the zippered breast pocket. We like the headphone port, but an iPhone in a slim case is a very tight squeeze to get in, and we aren't about to remove the phone from its protective case. Worse than that, though, is that the pocket's position puts it directly in line of where we prefer to run our backpack's sternum strap, making for a bit of an awkward feeling. Zoic, increase the size of the breast pocket while also moving it down a touch and the Torrid hoodie would be absolutely perfect in our books. - Mike Levy





Bontrager Preset torque wrench

Bontrager's compact Preset torque wrench isn't intended to take the place of a full-sized version that you'd find on the workbench in a good shop, but rather to be used by the home mechanic who does some wrenching and doesn't want to second guess their work, especially with carbon fiber components. Rather than employing a needle gauge or any torque adjustments, the red tool is a simple unit that emits a click while ratcheting once when the pre-set 5Nm torque is reached, letting the user know that there is no need to keep applying pressure. Two different versions are available, with either a 4mm or T25 torx bit fitted (bits are not interchangeable). MSRP $20.99. www.bontrager.com

Bontrager preset torque wrench
Bontrager's handy preset torque wrench has a permanent place on our workbench.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesNot a fan of explaining to your local shop exactly why your carbon fiber steerer tube splintered? Nervous about snugging up your new expensive carbon fiber handlebar? Or maybe you simply pride yourself in being bang-on when it comes to your wrenching. Whatever the reason, Bontrager's little red torque wrench makes a lot of sense for anyone who does some or all of their own wrenching. The tool is non-adjustable, with a pre-set torque of 5Nm that conveniently matches a lot of bar and stem torque recommendations, and is ultra-simple in that there is no needle gauge to monitor: simply turn until you hear the tool click. Unlike some pricier torque wrenches, it is possible to continue tightening the bolt after the tool clicks, although you likely shouldn't be allowed to use any tools (or drive, or cook, etc...) if you manage to do that. We're not sure why Bontrager bonded the T25 torx and 4mm bits into each tool as it means that you can't tighten 5 or 6mm bolts (although the bits do come out if you really want them to) but, in Bontrager's defense, it is usually the smaller hardware that requires a 5Nm spec, including their own stems. The other point to keep in mind is that, in the long run, the tool will likely lose some of its accuracy. For this reason it may not be the best for constant use in a shop setting, but it is ideal for the home mechanic. Given that many of us spend over $20 a month (or week?) on fizzy energy drinks or overpriced to-go coffees, this little torque wrench doesn't seem like a bad investment, especially if your bike is equipped with torque sensitive parts, like a fork that uses a carbon steerer, or has a carbon bar, stem, or seat post. - Mike Levy




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74 Comments

  • + 28
 looking at the torque wrench whay did they not make it interchangeable?? if they were worried somone would use a 6mm to torque up to 5nm they could have produced there own special allen heads surly...
come on sort it out...
for $42 dollars i can get a really good adjustable torque wrench with multiple bits...
  • + 27
 Or at harbor freight you can pick up a good-enough torque wrench for $10, and buy the allen sockets for another 5.
  • + 19
 The problem is there are fools out there that'll actually pay for a non-interchangeable one that has completely limited use
  • + 1
 Yeah, but on my GT 3/4 of the bolts are the same(size,head) So I can't really justify going out and getting multiple wrenches
  • + 0
 The reason that it is not interchangeable is that changing the allen heads actually throws off the 5 nm torque calibration - due to the different head and screw diameters. This thing is very accurate for a given a head size and at a given torque. But if you want an interchangeable head you have to go with a torque wrench with variable gauge, which as you know costs a hell of a lot more money and lot bulkier.
  • + 1
 that 5 dollars for the allen sockets is some of the best bike money you'll ever spend, torque wrench or no. I almost use them more than I do standard allen wrenches. good to have torx ones as well.
  • + 1
 Instead of buying a “Bike Specific" or "One Torque Specific" wrench, just get a normal torque wrench, it will cost a little more, but trust me it will be way more useful.
  • - 7
flag whatwhat2208 (Feb 22, 2013 at 8:38) (Below Threshold)
 and,way,heavier... this,is,obviously,for,out,travelling,or,on,the,trails
  • + 11
 Is your spacebar broken or was that for serious emphasis?

I feel like only one torque setting is quite limited. There are so many different torques on the average bike.
  • + 2
 I see them in shops, and advertised as shop tools, all the time, so I don't think they're intended as trail tools.
  • + 2
 We had one at the shop I worked at and it was just so doggone handy. We had a normal torque wrench as well, but having one set and ready to go was awesome.
  • + 3
 Ritchey has been making the exact same product for like the last 10 years, its whats in the majority of shops: www.amazon.com/Ritchey-M4-Bicycle-Torque-Key/dp/B005U7E2E8
Way to copy Ritchey, Bontrager
  • + 5
 @ ampa bollocks 5nm torque is 5nm torque, when you chang ethe socket on the end of a torque wrench the torque gauge doesn't change for a good reason, that reason is the torque doesn't change.
  • + 2
 I bet it is handy if you are doing a dozen stems a day. Otherwise I have room in the shed for a torque wrench. Especially when I have other stuff that uses it, like my bearings, crankset, and anything aluminum on my car.
  • + 1
 I think is a good and easy solution to have a preset torque wrench, for the torque mostly applied on bolts for stem, bar, etc. Just grab the tool and use it.
I just saw Specialized is coming up with a family of preset torque tools as well, looking very good, definitely not as clunky like the Bontrager,
www.specialized.com/us/en/ftr/bagstools/tools/sbc-torque-wrench
  • + 2
 @silverback @ampa Remember torque changes with the change in distance between point of applied force and the center! of rotation (Cross Product of vectors r and f.). So yeah the torque will be same for the different sizes but the forces on the actually bolt head will differ with size. Those though, don't usually matter and aren't measured. Anyone else think math is fun?
  • + 1
 The other concern is that (as a rule) torque measures are for a DRY thread contact. Most bike mechanics (correctly) use grease or threadlock, depending on the application, and that throws torque settings way out.
  • + 1
 Unless you use a torque sheet that has torques for both dry and lubed
  • + 1
 @silverback1 sorry bro, physics doesn't work that way. It's only an accurate 5Nm as long as the screw diameter is kept constant. What we are measuring amount of force applied perpendicular to the axis of rotation multiplied by its distance to it. The "effective" distance that the force is applied changes with a different diameter Allen head. On a torque wrench with a long crank that change in difference is negligible because the relative diameter of the hex screw is small compared to the crank arm. However, with a wrench with such tiny arm on which you are applying the torque with, than small changes in screw diameter start throwing it off quite a bit. This is obviously designed for carbon components which are warrantied if they torqued up to spec. It is probably not even that accurate within 5 Nm to begin with. Start throwing in different screw diameters, and you are going be riding on the margin of error and risking messing up your shit.

@VFreehd that is the point. The torque on the bolt head will be different (the force is applied at its out diameter). These bolts we are talking about have a spec based on how much they end up squeezing something, which itself is based on thread pitch (which is different with different bolt heads). They are not putting the torque spec for the benefit of the bolt, but for what is it is tightening up. If you torque a 5mm diameter screw and a 1cm diameter screw up to the exact same torque spec, you are NOT putting the same pressure on the parts that are being tightened.
  • + 1
 ^^ This guy knows his shit!
  • + 1
 Canyon Torque wrench is simplier and generally better allowing to torque 2-12 Nm for half the price of bontrager.
  • + 1
 They used to include those torque-wrenches with every Trek we got in our shop, so we have 20 or so just floating around the shop. Just like guitar picks, you can never keep track of them. They work for what they are, and they're really handy when you need them.
  • + 4
 Having used the Bontrager preset wrench I can say a HUGE +1 for it if you have any carbon parts.

Shame the Zoic piece doesn't have any wind resistant fleece...course if it did it would $100+ msrp. Really one of the best things for chilly non soaking bike riding is a hooded fleece that is constructed with something like Polartec Wind Pro fleece. Stupid high levels of breathability and doesn't let the wind howl through you like normal fleece, hell with the DWR on it even repels ligh drizzles.
  • + 2
 Plus one on the bont tool. I have one for work and its an awesome bit of kit. Also with the hoody, looks similar to the mammut kit. Take a look at the mammut ultimate hoody 100% windstop with fleeced lining
  • + 1
 the mammut stuff doesn't look very cycle cut
  • + 2
 It's not a special cut but pit zips and the adjustment around the base and neck make it a comfortable fit just no bum protector really
  • + 1
 i was wondering from an arms length point of view, i'm a lanky bean
  • + 1
 The most important thing you will find then is it sits well on you so doesn't raise but normally there's an arm inseam length on the website
  • + 1
 radatabs...too bad the mammut ultimate hoody is in a completely different class of jacket (even though it kicks the crap out this jacket Razz ). It's like comparing a hyndai to a BMW
  • + 3
 Concerning rain gloves I highly recommend paddling gloves, similar to these:

www.mec.ca/AST/ShopMEC/Paddling/MensWatersportsClothing/HandwearHeadwear/PRD~5023-634/mec-power-phase-ii-gloves-unisex.jsp

I have a prior generation to the ones, above, and they keep your hands relatively warm, do NOT get soggy, and have excellent grip. I can't believe you BC riders don't know about this?!
  • + 2
 I don't really get those 2.5 layer waterproofs. Just go full 3 layer, you'll be a lot warmer and maybe you can do without bringing the extra insulation layer for sitting still in the cold. You may want to check out wiggle, they have storm jackets at a lot lower price (check their DHB brand).
  • + 1
 What's a 2.5 layer? It doesn't make sense to have a half layer, either that or I'm confused
  • + 1
 p-vdh unfortunately not everyone has the cash to bump up to a 3 layer WPB fabric jacket. Finn rambo you have to a real good understanding of the different layers of a WPB fabric to get the 2.5. But it's essentially a 2 layer but with another layer or material without being a full on inner fabric layer...
  • + 1
 so like a perforated layer?
  • + 1
 kinda, technically the "third" layer is a woven or knit fabric layer, so anything short of a fabric layer the protects the membrane. Mostly it's a perforated non woven, or printed pattern.
  • + 1
 @NorCalNomad: cash shouldn't be a showstopper. As I said: You may want to check out wiggle, their DHB stormjackets are much cheaper. Downside, they don't look as fancy. But when it comes to gear, I prefer function over looks.
  • + 2
 p-vdh I'm not talking about me, I have plenty of outdoor outerwear. (full 3 layer shell, multiple rain shells, windproof soft shell, tons of fleece, down...etc). For most people spending 300+ msrp on a good 3 layer shell isn't really an option nor in the price point.

Also there is not much R rating difference between a 2/2.5 and 3 layer jacket, mostly increases in durability and breathability. If you are talking about the dhb Sync jacket being a good option, LOLOLOLOLOL look at the price of that and say an REI or Stoic jacket.(both "house" brands) There is a reason it is cheaper, you can't cheat when it comes to fabric prices and performance. "Knock off" / lesser WBP fabrics never works as well as Gore/ eVent/ Polartec options, plenty of proof out there to support that.
  • + 1
 Yes you can't cheat the 'true' fabrics, but dhb have gotten damn close. If you want the real deal, you have to pay for it. Pricewise, think I'll stick to my Sync jacket, works good enough for me.
  • + 1
 Not to personally attack you but and honest question.

Have you ever had a true 3 layer Gore/ eVent/ Polartec jacket to compare it to?
  • + 1
 Not owned, but used, yes. Conditions weren't bad then. So if you claim there's a huge difference, I'll admit that the conditions weren't tough enough to get a really decent impression of the jackets capabilities.
Util the point where we're having this conversation, I'm convinced that my 'knock off' jacket, to use your words, is just as good. It appears to be I'm wrong. I don't like to be wrong, so let me have this one: it still is a damn good jacket and yes, I'm also one of the guys who hasn't the cash to buy whatever I desire.
  • + 1
 I bought one of the bontrager torque wrenches. Unfortunately it doesn't work. It operates as a normal allen wrench and doesn't make the clicking noise ever. For $24 it wasn't worth the hassle of returning etc. So I just tightened bolts as I always have. All my carbon bits are still intact.
  • + 1
 I'm a really big fan of the Bontrager's Preset Torque Wrench. IF you have 4mm Allen bolts on your bike that need special care, then these are great.

The bike shop in which I work, all 4 mechanics have one. So easy to use and actually very good value!

Most manufacturers use 4mm for their stem and bolted seat clamps anyway - except Thomson with their 3mm bolts (bad idea!!).
  • + 1
 Working at a Trek store, I have a dozen of the torque wrenches laying around the house and in my various tool boxes, even in my truck. I just always seem to be collecting them. Between the shop and my own bikes, I use one of those wrenches several times a day and haven't had a single problem or a single stem/bar/whatever come loose. Must have item.
  • + 1
 WTF!?

"(bits are not interchangeable)"

I have enough tools already, but not an adjustable torque wrench yet.

And "Bontrager Preset torque wrench" certainly won't be considered as a cheep option, cause I might just want to change bits.
  • + 1
 While the torque wrenches like the Bontrager and Ritchey are nice, another and better option in my opinion is the CDI torque wrenches. They are available in 4,5,6 nM and have interchangeable bits. Once you reach the desired torque the will no all you to tighten any more. They should be available at any bike shop.
  • + 5
 Im starting to think this is a fashion website.
  • + 1
 Yup. Too much flannel
  • + 2
 Torque wrench ! Just keep turning them allen bolts till you hear them squeal
  • + 3
 bits not interchangeables ? why ? Frown
  • + 3
 Put the bit into a vice and see the magic.
  • + 1
 Ritchey preset torque wrench for the win, it has interchangeable bits. Although the bont one looks like it fits nicer in the hand
  • + 2
 Bontrager torque wrench forsure have a few at work 100% worth the money
  • + 2
 move to Chile, there's no need of rain jackets, hahaha
  • + 3
 Sorted, on my way! Smile
  • + 1
 iPhone is a tight squeeze? What about a galaxy s3??? Put bigger pockets on these things people.
  • + 1
 i'd pick all from this weeks product pics
  • - 2
 everybody should know that the mobilephone, in that pocket, is not good for the heart for the electromagnetic waves. Thats all.
  • + 4
 Got any REAL research to back up that claim?
  • - 3
 Chenette - Got any REAL research that doesn't?
  • + 10
 did you know that two mobile phones can cook an egg - rolls eyes...... The radiation coming from you phone in close proximity is no more intense or harmful than the ambient radiation we experience at any given time. may I take that you're also someone who thinks vaccines cause autism
  • + 0
 Its not primary peer reviewed literature but they are at least evidence based articles.
consults.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/12/is-it-safe-to-carry-a-cellphone-in-your-shirt-pocket
For this one look at the pros and cons section which all have decent citations: cellphones.procon.org
  • + 0
 @frista, electromagnetic waves and radio waves are completely different entities.

Your comment is like saying "ive made a sandcastle..... out of gear cables"

thats right... its bollocks. thats all.
  • + 0
 Here we go folks, I'm young but being born into the tech age I've been exposed to electronics my whole life and I'm still here so cut your radiation crap and realize you're stupid because you didn't pay attention in school and because you're gullible, not because your cellphone was in your pocket giving you radiation.
  • + 1
 Uhhh... He never mentioned radiation. Anyway. My point was that your snide comment was both pointless (and unless primary peer-reviewed, articles don't get published. Let's see the 'evidence' these articles are based off of) and rude. There's one thing to 'calling out' someone or something: you'd better be damn sure you know what you're talking about before you attack someone's comment. Smile But thanks for the neg props on a very valid point... Does anyone have any evidence that electromagnetic pulses DON'T affect the heart? Anyone? Buehler? Buehler?
  • + 0
 "do you know any REAL people who have suffered heart issues specifically because of smartphones?" try that
  • + 1
 No, but I've also never seen diabetes and high fructose corn syrup directly linked in anything but study mice... We also don't have any direct evidence that leftover toxic ground water from fracking (surface fracture drilling) can cause problems from birth defects to cancer. However, studies suggest that both the electromagnetic fields and high fructose corn syrup can, in the long run, affect the rhythms and responses of the human body and that fracking has not only dangerous immediate consequences (such as toxic gaseous emissions), but terrible long range effects as well. Believe everything you're told and everything you hear and you turn into a sheep. However, life is dangerous. Stay informed to live longer, live longer to ride your bike longer. See where I'm going with this? Smile
  • + 1
 Also, you may be too young to remember this, but do you see those commercials from lawyers for asbestos exposure? Twenty years ago, no one could definitely link asbestos and lung cancer, heart palpitations, intestinal dissolution and bone marrow disease. Yet here we are, decades later, finally realizing the consequences of careless ignorance.
  • + 0
 My point is this - If your going to make a claim like that, you better be able to back it up with SOMETHING. Otherwise whats the point of bringing it up. And personally I don't think you need an extensive background in anything to call BS on something. Thats the whole point of science - Question everything.
  • + 0
 @ ambatt, Primary peer reviewed literature does in fact get published in scientific journals, so i'm not sure what your are actually talking about. After some more digging, here is a peer reviewed article which tested the effects of EMF's on rat hearts: www.scielo.cl/pdf/ijmorphol/v29n3/art50.pdf
And for further reading on the effects of cellphones in general:
www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs193/en
  • + 1
 @chenette, your reading comprehension sucks. I said (as it sill clearly states above): "And unless primary-peer reviewed, articles don't get published." As in, unless the articles are reviewed by primary peers, they don't get published. And more digging for 'proof' that electromagnetic charges DON'T affect the human body? Just to attempt to prove some random chick on a bike site wrong about POSSIBLE effects of SLIGHT rhythm changes? Dude. Get a f*cking life already.

'Question everything' was my original point. You've reached the level where dead horses are being beaten. Let it go, bud.
  • + 1
 woo
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