Custom Specialized S-Works Enduro Carbon - Preview

Nov 29, 2009 at 20:42
by Mike Levy  

2010 Specialized Enduro S-Works

Our custom S-Works Enduro ready for action
Our custom S-Works Enduro ready for action

The idea of the all-mountain bike has caught on like gangbusters over the past few years and the category has been refined so much that it is truly amazing what a rider can get away with aboard some of the latest mid-travel machines, and have more fun doing it. I've had the chance to ride a number of different do-it-all steeds throughout the last couple of seasons and have always come away impressed with what was possible on a properly spec'd bike, which got me thinking about how I would put together the ideal bike for my ideal ride. After throwing some ideas around the office, it seemed we all were looking for the same thing: lighter, slacker, more forgiving, all while being more capable no matter the terrain or which direction you were going. Enter from stage left our latest test bike, the Specialized Enduro S-Works.

The smooth carbon lines nearly hide the tapered head tube...
The smooth carbon lines nearly hide the tapered head tube...

The Enduro S-Works frame is stunning in person. The carbon front triangles, immense tubes and smooth lines bely it's light weight. One expects such a large object to require some effort to hoist, but at only 5 lbs 10 oz there isn't that much there to lift. While there are a few frames to choose from that close in on the Enduro's travel/weight ratio, it's the Specialized's angles that get me excited. Most frames this light, even with similar travel, are distinctly steeper. Bike manufacturers have been forcing us to choose between travel and geometry for years, forcing those who wanted a mid travel machine to ride steeper bikes than a lot would prefer. The Enduro is a 6" travel platform with a 66.5 degree head angle (slightly slacker than the '09's 67 degrees) that should be a confidence inspiring package under the right sort of rider. While only half a degree more relaxed than some of the competition, it can make all the difference. Tyler had a chance earlier this season to jump aboard the new mid and long travel bikes from Specialized so I was looking forward to spending some time on the Enduro myself.

...But it's a bit more obvious from this angle
...But it's a bit more obvious from this angle

For 2010 Specialized has revised their entire Enduro lineup, keeping their proven Horst Link suspension but with a slightly differing lay out. Gone is the '09's vertical shock mounting, replaced by a damper that is in line with the bike's top tube. A diminutive swing link activates the Fox RP23 and controls the leverage, while a clever two piece coupling replaces the sometimes troublesome rearmost DU bushing on the damper with two sealed bearings. Say goodbye to perpetually worn out and knocking bushings, with the added benefit of suspension that should be slightly freer moving.

Where the action happens, controlled via a Fox RP23
Where the action happens, controlled via a Fox RP23

Frame Details

• Carbon front triangle, aluminum rear end
• 6" of travel via a Fox RP23 w/ Boost Valve
• Tapered head tube accepts both standard 1.125 and tapered steerer tubes
• Removable ISCG adapter for guides or HammerSchmidt use
• Built in cable routing for remote controlled adjustable post
• Frame weight of 5 lb. 10 oz
• Frame kit USD $2800 msrp

The Enduro's pivot hardware is quite nice
The Enduro's pivot hardware is quite nice

Geometry for a medium Specialized Enduro

Head angle66.5
EFF Seat Angle75
EFF Top Tube562 mm
Chainstay419 mm
Bottom Bracket350 mm
Wheelbase1151 mm
Actual Frame Size (seatube length)444 mm
Standover761 mm

Reach: 431 mm
Stack: 587 mm

Want to know what the reach and stack measurements mean?

Specialized offers the Enduro in four sizes. Available are small, medium, large, and extra-large sizes. Have a look at their geometry chart to see which would suit you best!

Sagotron: here to make setting sag even easier, for those who don't understand an O-ring
Sagotron: here to make setting sag even easier, for those who don't understand an O-ring

The aluminum shock bolt threads into a replaceable aluminum insert on the opposite side
The aluminum shock bolt threads into a replaceable aluminum insert on the opposite side

The Fox RP23 has 3 different levels of ProPedal available
The Fox RP23 has 3 different levels of ProPedal available

The Specs

Frame and SizeSpecialized S-Works Enduro, carbon fiber
•medium Frame
Rear ShockFox RP23
ForkFox 36 Float RC2
•160 mm travel
HeadsetCane Creek
CrankarmsTruvativ Hammerschmidt, 170 mm
ChainringTruvativ Hammerschmidt, 22t
Bottom BracketTruvativ Hammerschmidt AM
PedalsWellgo MG1
ChainWipperman 904
CassetteSRAM PG990 11-34
Rear DerailleurSRAM X9, short cage
ShiftersSRAM X0, Hammerschmidt
HandlebarTruvativ Stylo WC
StemThomson, 50 mm
GripsODI Ruffian
BrakesAvid Elixir's, 7" front/6" rear
Front WheelSpecialized Roval Traverse EL, 20 mm
Rear WheelSpecialized Roval Traverse EL
TiresFront, Kenda Excavator 2.35 folding
•Rear, Kenda KOT 2.35 folding
SaddleFizik Aliante
SeatpostSpecialized Command Post (4" drop) w/ remote

A threaded aluminum insert is used at the BB shell
A threaded aluminum insert is used at the BB shell

While this will primarily be a test of the Specialized's Enduro S-Works frame, we obviously took the opportunity to throw some premium AM oriented parts at it. I had a goal in my head of assembling a sub 30 lb. bike with 6" of quality travel while still taking advantage of Truvativ's HammerSchmidt crankset and a remotely operated Command Post adjustable height seatpost. Both of these additions to the build should add some great benefits (and maybe drawbacks - we'll see in the review) to the overall "trail-ability" of the entire package. Keeping the weight down is Specialized's own Roval Traverse EL wheelset, a light AM option that fits in perfectly with the Enduro's intention. Have a look at our Traverse preview. So did we manage to hit our target weight, or maybe even come in well under it? You'll have to wait for the full test to find out!

Continuing with the robot trend, here is the Adaptatron, which allows you to use a guide or HammerSchmidt
Continuing with the robot trend, here is the Adaptatron, which allows you to use a guide or HammerSchmidt

The Adaptatron fits snugly onto splines around the BB shell
The Adaptatron fits snugly onto splines around the BB shell

The Specialized Enduro lineup spans four bikes (two carbon and two aluminum models) that all use a front derailleur combined with two rings and a bash guard for protection and security, but the designers of the Enduro know full well that some users may want to bolt on a single ring and guide, or even a HammerSchmidt crank system. The two aluminum Enduros come equipped with built in ISCG tabs, but the carbon Enduro required a more cunning approach to the problem, one that wouldn't rotate under the H/S system's torque. The answer is the Adaptatron, an aluminum adapter that mates snugly onto the splined surface around the drive side bottom bracket shell. While not the first company to use a system like this, it is clean and simple nonetheless.

A bonded aluminum shim prevents damage to the carbon from the seat collar
A bonded aluminum shim prevents damage to the carbon from the seat collar

Specialized Command Post
Specialized Command Post

With bikes like this capable machine, among many others, it is pretty easy to get a smug grim on your face and forget that it was not that long ago that we were happily installing foot long purple stems (to match our purple seatposts, naturally) on our bikes, blissfully unaware of the horrible consequences to the handling of an already skittish bike. My, how times have changed! Today a rider is able to pick from a field of bikes that are all designed to do the same task, albeit with slight deviations that may let said bike excel over another on your local mountain. We are both blessed and cursed to be able to chose the exact tool for the job, sometimes it can be overwhelming but it's nice to have the opportunity to make that choice. This particular machine is a perfect example of that. Lighter, slacker, and hopefully even more capable than it looks.

Stay tuned for the full test in the near future!


Specialized.com

Mike Levy


127 Comments

  • + 3
 I have an 07 Sworks that I beat the crap out of on climbs and fr/light dh and it truly is a kick ass do it all bike. If these new ones are supposedly better at everything than I wanna try one and possibly trade up.

As blackdot posted, PLEASE beat the crap out of one of these and really try it at everything us normal aggressive riders do (xc, rocks, drops, jumps, etc...)to their all mtn. rigs. If its such a quiver killer it should be able to take it. Too many supposed all mtn. machines I see tested on xc only trails, that doesn't cut it for the rest of us. You guys are in the NW, c'mon ... show it some real love!!
  • + 0
 Quiver killer for sure. It was between this and my Commencal... This thing sure is lighter.
  • + 1
 I was creep'n on some picture of your Commy, that thing looks sick!
  • + 7
 i want one
  • + 6
 that thing is beautiful !!

love the fact that they offer/use ISCG adapters!!

but that thing is gonna be expensive 4 sure !
  • + 7
 Thank god they stopped using the spesh shocks/forks... they sucked real bad
  • + 1
 10.7kgs, without pedals, checked it out in the local store ;D
  • + 0
 Very nice bike with hammershmidt (will be hope for poeople who looking for the adapter for diffrent [maybe my old kona] frame Razz )i think that bike will be perfect if they fit matchmaker.:P
  • + 1
 they didnt stop using their own forks and schocks, they still exist..if u buy an complete S-works its going to have a Spesh fork..
  • - 1
 pretty sick gotta have it. not to stoked about the HammerShmidt but it'll work better on this ride than other cranks I'm sure. Wink
  • + 0
 sorry if this was in the article, but it's 2800 for a frame KIT, what's in the kit? Or do they just mean frame?
  • - 5
flag who8mycrayon (Dec 4, 2009 at 17:58) (Below Threshold)
 looks like a cannondale judge
  • + 1
 I love how they used the giant brand bike stand and put a strap over the symbol
  • + 2
 So excited for this review! I can't decide if the enduro or the sx trail will be my next bike.....Do I want to get a burly bike and set it up for A.M. use too, or get an A.M. bike and set it up for some burly abuse also.. Decisions, Decisions, can't wait for the write up. Please push this bike to the limits so we all can know what it can take, I don't want to be fooled by the six inches of travel.
  • + 0
 you can buy my sx trail... i bought one of these to replace it...
  • + 0
 YA.... I think I'm leaning towards the new Enduro too.
  • - 1
 The question is: do you want to rebuild an air shock all the time? I guarantee you that the air shock won't stand up to any type of burly abuse. Don't be fooled by six inches of travel. Seems like a sick bike, but the A.M. bikes are more for XC riders that like to ride A.M. too and be able to have some stability when going back down the mountain. Depends on what type of riding you do.
  • - 1
 Good point, I myself have not had much experience with air shocks, but from what I hear they are getting better. I would even consider getting it PUSHED(I think they will service the RP23)
to make it more reliable.
  • + 4
 dualsuspensiondave,

I have to disagree a bit with that =) I have had lots of saddle time on both coil and air sprung 5-6" bikes and I'm of the opinion that there is a lot more to it than if it is spec'd w/ one or the other. One of the most disappointing bikes (suspension wise) that I spent a lot of time on was a coil sprung Prophet. The bike's rate (which was falling), combined with a coil shock w/ stock tuning was a nightmare when pushed real hard. On the other end of the scale is the Trek Remedy which I tested early this season. Six inches of travel with a wee little RP2 that absolutely killed in everywhere. From simple trail to techy gnar, to senders that I should not have done on that bike, that was one of the most confidence inspiring bikes I've ever been on.... DH bikes included. A well thought suspension design that is combined with a damper for that particular job, throw in some killer geo, and you should have a winner. Air shocks be damned!

I have a handful of rides on the Speshy so far, I'm impressed but I'm still tinkering w/ dials and pressures for now.
  • + 2
 There is nearly no difference in durability between coils and airs (take both apart and you will see why) As long as one services his shock on a regular basis there is never going to be a problem. It is actualy easier and a bit faster to service an air shock than a coil shock, and it is a cleaner job. Furthermore only few ride their bikes so often that they need a service more often than half a year and rebuild once every two years.

The only way to go wrong with an air shock is to put it into some older frames multilinkage frames like pre 2009 Nomad, where the shock rate curve goes down&up like a maniac. Most of the new bikes are have more linear rate and they work well with air shocks.
  • + 2
 There is a huge difference in reliability between a coil and an air shock. They ride nice when they are not blown out. It is alot faster to service an air shock, that is true. My experience with blowing out two rp23's in a month, as well as countless x-fusion air shocks in a season shows that they blow out easier than a coil. My dhx4 coil needed service once in three years with alot more abuse on it. Air shocks use only air as the damper, coil shocks can use nitrogen or air along with the coil to assist it. Coils will always be more reliable than air shocks. The new bikes with a more linear rate will help with reliability, however the reliability of a coil shock will continue to be superior. The ability for the air shocks to perform well are not in question. It's the reliability that should not be confused to the consumers who speak of putting the bike through more abuse than the bike was intended for. I would have been real upset if I would have ended up with an Enduro instead of my Sx Trail. It never would have lasted. The new enduro looks like an amazing bike and I'm sure that it will continue to deliver at a high level Kakah. Again, it's not the performance that I question.
  • + 1
 "Air shocks use only air as the damper, coil shocks can use nitrogen or air along with the coil to assist it. Coils will always be more reliable than air shocks."

Dave,

It sounds like you've had some bad times with air shocks, sorry to hear that! I've actually had the opposite experience regarding coil and air dampers so I have a hard time simply blaming it on what sort of spring they use, there are simply sometimes duds from both. A coil and air sprung shock can actually use the same damping, its just the spring that is different, so one should not be more prone to "blowing" at all.
  • + 1
 reliabilty of coil over air - yes here you are deifnitely right, but it's not like a huge difference in reliability (at least for "normal" people, there are specimens able to destroy anything) Then the price you pay for this reliability is at least 550g (which in an AM bike is a ton) with single can shocks and at least 300g with air shocks with reservoirs. That is compared to Fox DHX models which come around 850g for 220eye to eye with steel spring. When you now take big boys like Manitou Swinger, RS Vivid or even worse Marzocchi Roco we are speaking of a 1000g+ against 250g Rp23!

Now as long as you have a frame "compatible" with air shocks (so it's quite linear) then comparing to coils, you loose a tiny bit of downhill performance (airs dive too easily into mid travel, but again - U can get used to it) The tuning possibility of air exceeds coils pretty much.

I wish my Nomad was compatible with air shocks, unfortunately I am forced to use coil. With the dampers I see no probs, it's a pity though that all companies struggle with bringing a lightweight, RELIABLE air sprung with travel adjust.
  • + 1
 Kakah has it right. Both coil and air shocks can use the same dampers. Coil sprung shocks do not use nitrogen or air as springing agents. Nitrogen is used to charge the IFP in air shocks or coil shocks without piggy backs. In a piggy back system, regular air is used. But this is in the damper, not the spring.
  • + 1
 That was exactly my point. You must be confused on what I said. Actually piggyback systems do sometimes use nitrogen (dxh series on a sx trail). They use the same damper, however a coil shock uses the coil to assist. Hence, why a coil is more durable than an air shock.
  • + 1
 Yes but when talking about AM/trail/lightFR bikes the weight issue is "the issue" too. The durability issue as the "main issue" in todays gravity oriented riding is "the issue" only for the noobs. Refering to my previous reply: the last stand of coil sprung suspension is the front fork with travel adjustment. Air systems in that segment are still unreliable.
  • + 2
 Any bike with between 4 and 7 inches of travel DESERVES to have an adjustable-height seatpost. Absolutely indispensable. It is a MUST. If you are going downhill with your seat up high enough to pedal you are suffering needlessly. Drop it and you will discover new speed and new control. Pop to pedal -- drop to shred.
  • + 0
 i have a joplin sitting in the garage with my Blur LTc... and am unsure....Guess I'll have to try it.
  • + 1
 Adj. height posts are here to stay. I've had a couple Joplins and now this Command Post and I couldn't imagine riding w/o one. My local haunt is mostly a big climb followed by a big descent to the trail head but I still find places to use it. When riding out of town, especially somewhere I'm not familiar with, it is very handy.
  • + 0
 I'm sorry but until the price on height-adjust posts comes down via ensuing trickle-down-technology in a couple of years, it just can't be mainstream in the aftermarket, at least for now. However, if you're in the market for an S-works, you're hardly a mainstream consumer, so props to you! The rest of us are just jealous
  • + 0
 super sweet build and bike by the way. Go tear that thing up!
  • + 3
 Whats wrong with a QR? No weight penalty, nothing extra to go wrong, no extra cost. Surely thats a no brainer?
  • + 1
 I totally agree
  • + 1
 Kinda how I'm feelin...
  • + 1
 Love everything about it exept for damn fox not offering a talas in anything but that DOES NOT GO WITH ANYTHING color grey! Really takes away from the sick look of an already sick build! Lets get with the times fox and give us some choices
  • + 1
 Ya, I've noticed that on so many bikes..... Black or white matches up with tons of stuff, but that grey doesn't match anything.
  • + 1
 I had one of these with the stock build for a few weeks. They ditched the rear shock, but kept a specialized fork, its no longer a DC though, and it feels and holds up a ton better than the old E150. I love this bike compared to my 2008 enduro, slakcer, lower, and with the assistance of the command post, I could probably have this bike as my one bike and be happy. I was noticably faster on this than my 2008 enduro, and the XX that was on the one I had was wicked light (each lever is approx. 75 grams lighter than an elixir CR). And the command post is a 3 position. I actually rode most stuff in the middle, but put it up for smooth long climbs then put it low for long rough descents. The only complaint I had was the shock developed a notch feel about 20% into the stroke. we rebuilt the shock and found nothing, but it wasnt noticable while riding
  • + 0
 I have to agree it is ugly. Sure it might be great to ride but looks must count for something.That thing would be really pricey and at that cost i want to look good when I'm riding and you can get way sexier bikes that perform really well way cheaper. Maybe it is just that I'm not a Specialized fan boy.
  • + 0
 Interesting build, but don't you think that Float having no travel adjust limits the bikes climbing abilities?

It's nice to have such a low weight but on technical climbs it's quite annoying with such a slack head angle to be forced to concentrate and plan every move 10 meters ahead so you just don't fall over to the side with your bike (especially when your heartrate goes over 190)
  • + 0
 WAKI, you make good points. Not running the Talas internals was a conscious decision on my part. I spent time on a Talas equipped 36 and really wasn't pleased with the forks performance. Most of our climbs in the valley are long fire road pitches that don't require lowering the fork so I went w/ the standard Float internals. Even when out of town on tighter singletrack switchbacks I rarely used the Talas feature, just a lot of body english and some different line choices. Having said that, when I did use the Talas I had a easier time on some sections but I feel that it's not worth the tradeoff for where and how I ride.
  • + 1
 Yea if you uphill it mostly on fire roads it's not worth the additional 400g and reliability issues. Great build then!
  • + 0
 I rode one of these around the mountiains in Japan a few weeks ago with MTB Japan. Felt a really nice ride but the forks are wierd, seemed to work well once moving but they have a strange bump start feel to them which makes them feel harsh at first.

Nice bike but mega bucks, personally I would but the Al version and save a load of cash, spend a few quid on some decent forks and get a heck of a good bike :oD
  • + 0
 whats bad is i was hangin out with some friends near the local bike shop, and some rich ass guy came in and asked one thing "whats the most expensive bike you have to purchase i would like to test ride it." the guy had no idea how to ride the bike it was like watching a kid ride a bike for the first time. the ironic thing is he was complaining that it was to bouncy and the brakes where sticking.

Great bike i love the thing but only problem i have with it is that unless you can afford it then its out of your reach sadly.
  • + 0
 I'm definatley not a Spec-Ed fan boy but that is a sexy looking bike. My problems with Spec's is the feel of the cockpit. Just too short on the medium and just too long on the large. Currently have a Diamondback Mission 1 AM machine that has pretty much seen a complete rebuild. Round 4-5lbs heavier than this lightweight beauty but a great AM machine in it's own respects.
  • + 1
 this medium has a reach of 430mm, that's long, it's more or less the same as saying it's got a 25" top tube - for a MEDIUM.

crazy, crazy long.

i'd need a large, only the cranks and handlebars would be in different time zones.
  • - 1
 Unfortunately I heard the specialized suspension did not hold up the greatest, it had problems the year they brought them out then they replaced it with refurbished ones. Props to them for doing that, but still i wouldn't trust it anymore then the rest of you would. This looks like a really fun bike that you could spend hours on until you've literally rode every trail twice, backwards. Sweet build.
  • + 1
 Hey Nightmareterror. The spechs has an issue with the remote brain shock on the EPIC lineup not the enduro so non-issue here.
  • + 0
 I have a stock 2010 s-works enduro. It's really amazing all around. Except that i blew the air cartridge on the E160 fork and it's taking a couple of weeks to get a new one. Other than that...bad ass!
  • + 0
 I just went to my local dealer to see if they had one in stock so I could get a look at one in person. Didn't have it on the floor though. So different looking, I'd love to try one out.
  • - 1
 real boring frame, looks like it's not fast at all, I'd rather have an old 90's FSR... before Specialized became just a big corporate compagny that is all about profits instead of a real fun and high performance system
  • + 0
 Fantastic build. I love it. Two questions: How will the new carbon frames hold up to serious beatings and Why'd you go with the Joplin?

Cheers!
  • + 0
 Its actually a Specialized Command Post, not a Joplin. The CP has a 4" total drop w/ a middle cruiser setting and is mechanical/air, as opposed to the Joplin's oil/air system.
  • + 1
 Special-ed ripped-off CBrothers Joplins system.
  • + 1
 Trekbro,

Having used both companies posts I can assure you they are very different to one another. Just because they look similar on the outside does not mean that they are mechanically similar. The Joplin uses a hydraulic oil system to hold it place and air for the "spring", the Command Post uses a mechanical collet to hold it in place combined with an air spring. The Joplin has 3" of total drop with the ability to stop it at any point in its travel, the Command Post has 4" total drop with a midway cruiser position that is set.

I'm not sure how you could think that Specialized "ripped-off" the Joplin's design, do some homework and look into it first. Again, similar on the outside, very different on the inside.
  • + 0
 The only one thing which is worring me is that alloy chainstay (I can pretty much figure out in my head hundreds of ways to break it).
  • + 1
 Spectacular Spectacular Spectacular Spectacular santa claus, puts an equal in my garage this Christmas
  • + 0
 a reach of 430mm for a medium?! - that's insane!

Speccy make some very nice bikes, but they're always about an inch too long.
  • + 0
 Totaly agree. Comparing to other companies you seriously need to opt for one size down. I just got a 2006 Spec P.AM in M size and the top tube is nearly as on a XL crosscountry bike... 585mm WTF...
  • + 0
 thats because the p all mountain, is a slacker, longer, more stable machine than an xc bike
  • + 0
 Hmmm..., its the opposite on my 09' sx trail, the reach feels too short for me, but then again I have long arms and there is a 35mm stem on the sxt
  • + 1
 dmrchris: P.AM has a 69 Head angle with 150mm fork - there is no stability in it. a regular XC bike is far more stable with 120 fork than P.AM. It sucks big time.
Chornbeak: SX Trail is indeed short as hell.
  • + 1
 a slack head angle = a more stable ride mate!
  • + 1
 how can you use a word slack when talking about 69 degreeshead angle...
  • + 1
 WAKI,

I think you and me are on the same page! I have an older Balfa DH bike in the shop right now and sitting the Enduro up next to it reveals that the Specialized is actually slacker...

I'd personally love to see a AM bike w/ a 64-65 degree head angle, then I might take advantage of a travel adjust fork to steepen it a few degrees for the climbing. Right now at 66-67 I can't justify a Talas-type fork on it.
  • + 1
 But yea I'm thinking of getting a 70mm stem for my bike, the 35mm stock stem just doesn't work well with my arms
  • + 1
 Well with head angle I believe it all comes down to "consiciously driven" preferences. I am an average rider so 64-65 is just too "PRO" for me. One must be well skilled to ride fast enough to truly enjoy it, or at least hit the steep, very technical stuff (as on Nortshore I guess).

On the other hand 69 is just... you ride barely 20k's per hour and you feel like warp5 with the bike eagerly pointing you to every single tree on the side of the trail. It's all skills says my very good DH racing friend - well I have a job, marriage and 3 hours a week to enjoy my ride, I'm not against through PAIN to glory, but demn! bikes are supposed to be fun Smile

I have my SC Nomad at around 66 with 66SL from 2006 (what a coincidence Big Grin ), and it feels superb on downhills, I never felt I need more travel. Still, I can't do any XC (i mean the XC on proper XCracing-like trails, not fire road commutingSmile )or tech uphilling as the bike just falls over to the side. Now Im buying Lyrik so Im going to get 67/69. I sacrifice this DH vital degree but... it's do it all bike and I want this all to be more Smile

I hope RS will make 125/170 Uturn Lyrik with motion control DH for 2011 Smile
  • + 1
 Chornbeak - I had a 40mm stem on my Nomad which is I think only 5mm longer than your SX. Bike size suits me well in terms of height. Then I tried a 50mm and it felt much much better. Recently I tried 80mm and it feels even better, slightly worse on downhills, but for allround use its better. Now Im just buying 70mm with 760 bars cuz Im tired of swapping stems all the time whenever I change my mind to go for xc/trails or technical downhills/bikepark
  • + 1
 Yea I figure that I will get a 70mm stem for all around use, I figure it will make climbing on the sxt much more comfortable yet not suck as much as say a 90mm on the downhills. Does changing the stack height make climbing a bit more comfortable too (the little spacers between stem and headset)?
  • + 1
 Im not speaking of general, just for the specific case of bikes like ours (Nomad, SXT) As low you can get the better it is for climbing, and the DH performance is going to be only slightly compromised. BUT! Make sure that your handlebar and more specificaly your shifters with brake levers don't hit the upper tube! It's all cool with flat-bar-new-school but only for DC forks or few of these who have very low stepover on their frames while using SCs.

My suggestion is to go for a fork with a reliable travel adjust (what I see as marzocchi ETA, RS Uturn/Uturn air. (with all the respect but TALAS and even worse-> 2step have bad time with brake bumps in bike parks)
  • + 1
 this build isnt right either. Comes with an XT Crank and a Specialized E160 Futureshock.
  • + 1
 my bad, says custom build
  • + 1
 Right up their with the Ibis Mojo as one of the most incredible all around bikes ever built.
  • + 1
 I think i would prefer this as it has room for a bottle cage and slacker geo
  • + 1
 ditch the hammerSHIT and this bike is a winner!
  • + 1
 I hate dhing. bmx is the only way to go
  • + 1
 yeah no hammerSHIT and ditch the piece of crap kendas
  • + 1
 I was not a fan of anything Kenda until early this season when I put on a pair of Excavators... they are unbelievable! The 2.5" is rad but what is amazing is the 2.35". Same goes for the KOT on the back, in the slop/soft stuff there is nothing like it.
  • - 1
 It's good to see specialized going back to letting the suspension companys do what they do best and staying out of it.Looks like a dam nice bike
  • + 0
 This bike will crush Super D races. Maybe we need a 'non-carbon' category now.
  • + 0
 this bike almost makes me want to ride all mountain...almost but not haha. killer ride though
  • + 1
 Wow! must have been carrying alot of speed to do that while climbing
  • + 1
 i think that this bike could make it to crank works 2010
  • + 1
 in what event? The SX is their Slope bike. This is an all mountain machine
  • + 1
 I want one, where can I get one from?
How much will it cost me?
Adrian
  • + 1
 First step would be to hit up your local bike shop, even if they don't sell specialized they may be able to point you in the right direction.
  • + 1
 Perhaps if you had a Talas you could actually ride your bike to the Den.
  • + 1
 From the guy who flipped over the bars CLIMBING UP to the Den!
  • - 1
 i dont get why they put water bottle cage eyelets into the frame. whens the last time you saw an AM bike with a water bottle cage?
  • + 1
 Lots of rides last longer than a 3L bladder does... It's nice to have that option at at least. I have not fitted a cage/bottle yet but it does look like it may be a bit tight for full sized bottles, we'll have to see.
  • + 3
 I like to put a bottle of poweraid on the bike to supplement my hydro pack if i'm going on a really long ride. Or I'll just put a water bottle on if i'm going for a short ride and don't want the hydropack making my back all sweaty.
  • + 0
 All I hear when I see this is the sound of a cash register. Beautiful ride!
  • + 1
 is this the people who have won the lottery and/or remortgaged theres houses to be able to afford one!
  • + 1
 12mm thru axle rear?
  • + 1
 No, its standard. Specialized doesn't even put a 12mm on their DH bike
  • + 2
 12mm x 150 for the twenty ten Demo 8 per the feed back from team Monster riders Fairclough and the one and only SAM HILL
  • + 1
 Actually its still a 10x135. they claim that may happen in 2011. Sam hills has it because he has to run a 12x150 for sponsorship agreements
  • + 1
 ki me la regala?
  • + 1
 i want it !
  • + 0
 Best looking bike you guys have ever tested.
  • + 0
 This may be the first and maybe last time I say this, but AGREED. These are incredible looking bikes, especially in person. The web pics don't do justice.
  • + 0
 What does the cable attached to the seatpost do?
  • + 0
 Raises and lowers the seatpost height - it's a remote adjustable seatpost so you'll have a "shifter" on your bars for that Smile
  • - 2
 I don't understand what benefit that gives other than a cushy ride for ppl with big arses.
  • + 0
 Are you kidding me? Have you ever climbed a hill then gone down it? Seatpost up for climbing, then push it down to head down. Just easier than hopping off and using a QR
  • + 0
 Svard75, this is not a suspension seatpost.
  • + 2
 I don't really do DH just XC and Singletrack but I do enjoy technical just haven't really tried any fast DH runs so I guess that's why I didn't know. So it's not really a suspension seatpost just a height adjustable. Cool. You learn something every day! CHEERS!
  • + 0
 ive gotten to build and ride one! those things are super BITCHIN!!
  • + 0
 i suppose specialized is still sticking to their "innovate or die!" moddo
  • + 0
 great am bike ,love the set up
  • + 0
 thats sleek
  • + 0
 beautiful
  • + 0
 aspire 2
  • - 3
 THIS BIKE IS UGLY!!!!!
  • - 5
flag trekbro (Dec 4, 2009 at 18:20) (Below Threshold)
 second to that, ugly POS
  • + 2
 Compared to what? It's pretty sick to most ppl. When did you check your prescription last?
  • + 0
 True, but UGLY is not enough!
  • - 2
 compared to my bike, zpecialEd is ugly and shitty, expensive and overrated.
  • + 0
 Strong words Trekbro, why do you feel that way? Ugly, expensive, and overrated are all valid opinions, but I'd love to hear why you think that it is "shitty" =)
  • + 1
 is shitty because next year they will redesign the whole bike once again and make something else because all special-ed bikes are like that. they are shitty designs that "look cool" but don't work
  • + 1
 The basic design of the Demo has been around for many years now, with tweaks as the seasons have gone by. Some of those redesigns that you've seen are not all that drastic to begin with. Correct me if I'm wrong but the bikes, with the exception of the single pivot BigHit, have in recent history always used 4 bar/horst link suspension, just with slightly differing layouts. What you see as complete redesigns may not be that drastic. Each year things are tweaked and moved around, as they have to be to stay competitive and sell bikes.

Should they have just stopped making changes and designing new bikes a decade ago? I mean, things were pretty dialed back then and those bikes could easily compare to current models.... right?
  • - 2
 I wonder who's design they are coping this time...
  • + 1
 They aren't copying anyone's design. Specialized has used he FSR for their bikes for a very long time.
  • - 1
 damn thats sexy
  • - 1
 Pretty slick
  • - 1
 Man that looks awesome
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