Video: Spengle's 3-Spoke Carbon Wheels

Feb 3, 2019 at 15:11
by Mike Levy  


Remember those wild looking, three-spoke carbon fiber wheels that were all over the internet a few months back? The ones with the funny name that had all the old-timers reminiscing about how they saved their paper route money for a set of Spin wheels a hundred-ish years ago? Well, Spengle's 1,490 EUR wheels have gone into production, and I have a set of them to review.

It's still early days - I've just got them on a bike now - but the Swiss company is saying things like how they're ''aiming for people to look at spokes and consider them to be the odd-looking wheels,'' in a few years time. Optimistic? Yeah, probably, and judging by the vibe in the comment section, ya'll agree...


n a


Not that I expected - or wanted - you guys to hold anything back because that'd be boring. Anyway, looking at the numbers kinda makes me want to type out my own snarky comment; a 24mm internal width, 1,750 grams, and 1,490 EUR. That's somewhere around $1,700 USD, and we all know there are lighter, wider, and less expensive wheels out there, so who the hell is gonna pony up for these funky looking things?

Someone who likes funky looking things, obviously.


Spengle Wheels Photo by Jason Lucas
Different? Yup. Better? I'm not sure yet, but we'll know soon.


But maybe there's more to these wheels than numbers and spec? Spengle says that the tri-spoke design isn't driven by appearance, but rather by performance: ''Effectively what we are saying is that when a spoked wheel interacts with the ground, it is passing that force straight back up to the rider, but by using the tri-blade monocoque we are spreading that force away from the rider, giving them a smoother, more comfortable ride.

Using the black stuff to engineer-in a degree of forgiveness isn't anything new, and we all know that smart people can do smart neat things with carbon fiber. So while it's obvious that doubt is high in the average reader's mind - which is understandable - they're interesting enough to warrant more than dentist jokes and throwbacks to similar looking wheels from more than twenty years ago.

Or maybe not, but at least we'll have some fun finding out. Stay tuned.


276 Comments

  • + 1409
 It makes total sense. Finally, a set of wheels with room for water bottle mounts.
  • + 354
 You win.
  • - 44
flag nojzilla (Feb 5, 2019 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 How is this not the top comment?! Big Grin
  • + 133
 @mikelevy: Please tell me you have these on that Giant with the trust fork installed. What a sight to see!
  • + 34
 "In two years time, we are aiming for people to look at spokes and consider them to be odd looking wheels". What are these guys smoking?! And where can we get some?
  • + 15
 These would go great on this
www.redalp.com/EN/index.php
  • + 8
 Spin + Eagle = Spengle
  • + 9
 Comment of the year. And it’s only February.
  • + 13
 @theedon: It makes me uncomfortable that these bikes exist somewhere
  • + 5
 @Mattin: yeh, 2 years is way too ambitious. I quite like them though, but I'm guessing that's not the general consensus.
  • + 11
 @Mattin: You live in Amsterdam bro, I reckon the place to get what they're smoking must be no more than a short walk away, right next to the place that serves broodje kroket.
  • + 7
 @mikelevy: made to take some abuse? Prove it, give em to Danny...
  • + 5
 @SlodownU: Funny enough it are typically the tourists who keep asking for the coffeeshops and the red light district (and are impressively bad at riding their rental bikes). We've got other stuff too you know. We've got the worlds first and only micro zoo. Pretty unique. Microbiologists from all over the world come to visit it, yet oddly enough few tourists.
  • + 0
 @SlodownU:You mean,next to a wall?
  • + 1
 @Mattin: Um, you're from Amsterdam, shouldn't be too hard to find.
  • + 3
 @vinay: I used to live there, Just send the tourists to the Bulldog.
  • + 7
 @theedon: I can’t un see that
  • + 2
 @vinay: I also enjoyed sending people to the “other” Redlight district.
  • + 4
 @Mattin: Of course spokes will go out in 2 years time, just look at Off Road Motorcycles including tourers - Oh wait...... ))
  • + 2
 Probably laughing at this more than anything on PB ever. Well. Done.
  • + 3
 @TheBearDen: Spengle + Trust Message + Syncros Hixon bar/stem combo + ST stumpy 275 would actually be the sickest carbon showoff bike....
  • + 13
 A wheel set only an ellsworth could love
  • + 4
 I've never laughed so hard at a comment. Thank you. You officially win comment of the year. At this point the review won't even be worth reading.
  • + 2
 LETS BREAK A THOUSAND!!!!^^^^^^^
  • + 2
 Wonder if you can true them by putting them in an oven to "soften'em up a bit"?
  • + 2
 don’t even need to shake your iso drink anymore ????
  • + 1
 @thinkbike: Win and after Superbowl win!!!!
  • + 3
 @theedon: I like how the promo for that hideous bike is someone who participates in ice skating events
  • + 1
 @me2menow: or the yet to be named forbidden hpp
  • + 0
 Literally lol at that. Tears. Pure gold. Salute
  • + 3
 @theedon: wow those things are still around? According to their website:

"Redalp Bikes are therefore faster over rocks, roots and square bums."

www.redalp.com/EN/technology.php
  • + 1
 water? you mean "weed"
  • + 2
 @theedon: I hadn't that the 90's were still producing bikes!
  • + 1
 Bulldog, good times ????????????@SlodownU:
  • + 3
 @theedon: funny you should say that - www.pinkbike.com/photo/5343113
  • + 2
 And plenty of room for sticks to send you over the bars..
  • + 2
 @theedon: That looks amazingly like an S-Bike
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: these only come in 27.5 for now though
  • + 1
 I've never seen a comment get so many props so quickly lol
  • + 239
 Can’t wait for Guerilla Gravity to produce a 300% stronger version for 60$.
  • + 53
 Except it’ll be carbon spokes with an aluminum rim.
  • + 80
 They are going to use the exact same mold for all rim sizes.
  • - 8
flag likehell (Feb 5, 2019 at 13:09) (Below Threshold)
 @ninjatarian: for 1500 usd
  • + 1
 Tougher. It was 300% tougher. Whatever that means.
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: Perfect, just like the Mavic R-Sys road wheels.... which were all recalled for exploding carbon spokes.
  • + 164
 at least now it'll be a lot easier to spot the biggest douche on the trails
  • + 3
 I want them! (In 29")
  • + 25
 @megatryn: stuff that, I want one 29" and one 26" so I can really send the bike-snobs apoplectic. Might even stick the big 'un on the back. That'd send 'em over the edge as quick as me OTB.
  • + 73
 @kookseverywhere So you're saying that Spengle is sponsoring Brian Lopes?
  • - 7
flag Twowheelsjunkie (Feb 5, 2019 at 10:00) (Below Threshold)
 @megaold: well, that was mean
  • + 15
 @AlexSplode: I want a pair to put on my Slingshot or Softride. Will pair perfectly with my 130mm stem.
  • + 12
 @Twowheelsjunkie:
But it's official though...

Once taken there, Lopes wins the prize despite throughout the entire episode yelling "I am not a douche!"—beating a variety of aliens including one that is literally a giant douche.
  • + 3
 I want them to create my titanium/carbon-project from years ago, but with "up-to-date" parts like a Lauf fork up front, dropperpost and 29" wheels.

The titanium/carbon build I built from oldschool parts: www.pinkbike.com/photo/16784179
  • + 71
 Oooh nice Fidget Spinners....

Wait WHAT!?
  • + 22
 How am I going to fight off all the girls on the trail now!!!
  • + 2
 @noweyout: ur gonna have to beat them off with a stick.
  • + 2
 @savagelake: Ouch! Splinters down there?
  • + 43
 Traditionally spoked wheels have a consistent compliance around the full wheel, no matter where you take a strike.

Curious how these feel when they take a hit right on one of the 3 "spokes"? They have to be more jaring than traditional spokes which provide zero "pushing" support (traditional spokes only pull) and allow a rim to flex. I would think these wheels would feel inconsistent - more compliant between 3 spokes and ultra stiff at the 3 spokes. Given complaints people have already about the stiffness of some carbon hoops, I'm curious what people will think of these.
  • + 24
 "traditional spokes which provide zero "pushing" support"

You have obviously never argued with Jobst Brandt.
  • + 4
 Shouldn’t the angle and shape of the spokes mean it acts constant all the way round?
  • + 7
 @SJP: can you tell me the argument? Or point me to it? Always happy to stand corrected!

Spokes directly at site of impact are unloaded, zero pushing support. I think that is hard to dispute.
  • + 57
 @privateer-wbc:

It is a bit involved, and please keep in mind that my statement was somewhat tongue-in-cheek.

Take a conventional spoked wheel with no load. All of the spokes have equal tension. Now load the wheel (i.e put it on a bike and sit on the bike). You will find that the only change is that a few of the spokes at the bottom of the wheel have compressed. Thus, it is correct to say that the hub is support by standing on the bottom spokes. The reason it works this way is that the rim is actually relatively flexible compared to the spokes, so it flattens slightly at the bottom, leading to a shortening of the bottom spokes. The rest of the spokes are pretty much unaffected. You can see this yourself by plucking the spokes before and after someone sits on the bike.

The above statements are correct in engineering terms. It leads to much wailing and gnashing of teeth, however, because many people really hate thinking of the shortening of the few spokes at the bottom as "compression" (it is a reduction in absolute tension, and people don't like to think of that as compression). But, if you get away from the mindset that the hub hangs from the top spokes, a bunch of other things become clearer. When wheels are overloaded and collapse, it happens because the absolute tension of the spokes at the point of impact goes to zero, and thus the rim is no longer supported laterally, so it buckles. Furthermore, this means that thinner, not thicker, spokes result in a stronger wheel (at least when it comes to resisting tacoing and going out of true), because once the wheel is built they can compress more before their absolute tension goes to zero.

The reference to Jobst Brandt is a bit of an inside joke for us older guys, because he spent years on rec.bikes explaining this over and over again, and he could be pretty haughty and abrasive about it. It was really important to him that other people accepted not just that only the few spokes at the bottom were affected (which most people did), but also the "compression" terminology (which many people didn't). He wrote the book on this (The Bicycle Wheel), and he was right about it. He was, however, wrong about a some other things, and was just as haughty and abrasive in arguing for the things he was wrong about. It made for some amusing threads.

So, for the TL;DR version: Jobst Brandt would argue that traditional spokes provide plenty of "pushing" support, right up to the moment their absolute tension goes to zero.

Hat tip to the 8 middle-aged guys who gave me the thumbs-up.
  • + 9
 @SJP: I follow, and I didn't take your initial reply as a forceful application of JB's theory.

I think it's pretty apartment which every way you want to come at it - on heavy impacts, spokes directly at the impact site unload to some degree - call it compression, or shirnkage - tension decreases at the site and surrounding spokes pickup additional load. The entire wheel works the same way, all the way around - difference inch by inch should be minimal on a 32 spoke wheel.

With the three spokes, you will get most compliant ride between the spokes. Impacts at the spoke, I would *think*, or speculate, would be more harsh as there is a rigid structure right at that location. I can't imagine they're would be consistent feel all the way around. But, again, that's just my own theory and it very well may not be correct.
  • + 7
 @privateer-wbc: I also am in the call-it-whatever-you-want camp, and agree with your analysis. Cheers.
  • + 4
 @SJP: you as well - cheers Smile
  • + 3
 @SJP: Oh man, you gave me a mixture of nostalgia and usenet PTSD.
  • + 2
 @SJP: I was relived to see you thought Brandt haughty and abrasive . Couple years ago I was trying to learn wheel building and bought both his book and Gerd Schraner's. Brandt seems useful on better core principles, but on practical/applied it was so riddled with confirmation and subjective bias (e.g. soldering section*) the book seemed almost counterproductive.

*It was kind of surreal to open Schraner book and on page 30 he discusses his career highlights of making a two cross, 28 spoked, soldered wheelset that Ivan Gotti used to win the 97 Giro to anecdotally refuting Brandt's inadequate testing methodology on why soldering doesn't work.
  • + 3
 @SJP: 30 of us now. I owned a copy of Brandt’s book back in the day.
  • + 1
 @SJP: I would say that flattening or the more extreme tacoing or bending a rim is a result of a rims inherent strength and resistance to deformation from direct blows. Yes the lower spokes bend (compress) but the force to bend the lower spokes is much less than force you have to overcome to stretch the upper spokes. In other words, the upper spokes are suspending the hub and hence supporting the bike and rider weight. Metals are stronger in tension as compared to concrete that holds up better to compressive forces. Try taking a spoke on its own and compressing it 1mm. You can get the ends 1mm closer together very easily because the spoke bend slightly. Try and stretch a spoke 1mm... Can't be done by hand!
  • + 1
 @aintnorunt: you're confusing your terms here. Majority of metals are stronger in compression than tension. What you're talking about is deflection. Look up terms tensile, shear, compressive, ultimate, and yield strength.

Then some statics and dynamics (beam bending, force distribution, etc).
Combining all of that will help understand what @SJP is talking about
  • + 0
 @SJP:
Spoked wheels only work in tension ,compression = loosening spoke tension
  • + 3
 @SJP: love to see a actual discussion and explanation in the comments rather than just two people rudely telling the other they are wrong, probably not as good at them at riding and that they know nothing about bikes
  • + 5
 @aintnorunt: "Try taking a spoke on its own and compressing it 1mm. "

Hi aintnorunt,
The difference is that in a built wheel, the spokes are tensioned before you use the wheel. So, a lone spoke sitting on the bench is very near its buckling point - a very small compressive load will cause it to buckle (bend so it isn't straight any more). However, in a built wheel, the spokes are all under quite a bit of tension, and the rim itself can be thought of as a column in compression wrapped into a circle. Once the wheel is built, the spokes are far from their buckling point (so they can be shortened quite a bit before buckling), and the rim itself is close to its buckling point, because the tension from the spokes puts the rim under large compression. Thus, a spoke in the built wheel can compress significantly before it buckles as the wheel is loaded. Since the rim is near its buckling instability, as soon as it loses support from the spokes, it buckles. The mechanical stiffness of the built wheel thus is very close to what you would calculate for steel spokes in pure elastic compression with no buckling instability (modified only by the little support the rim can still provide before it reaches its buckling point).

@nick1957, @aintnorunt,
I wryly note that there are always people who object to the "compression" terminology. Try this thought experiment:
How does the tire keep the rim off the ground? Is the tire at the bottom compressed?

www.pinkbike.com/news/field-test-12-bikes-hucked-to-flat-in-gratuitous-slow-motion.html

Just like the mechanical analysis of the wheel is very different from the analysis of its individual parts, the mechanical analysis of a mounted, inflated tire is very different from the analysis of a tire alone.
  • + 1
 If the rim is stiff enough, and the three fidget spinner arms are stiff enough in flexion, and supple enough in compression (they arn't straight), there shouldn't be issue of feeling not being consistent.
But you need a really (ie too much) stiff rim to archieve that,
  • + 1
 @g-42: Ah, the good old days.

Remember that guy who thought all mountain biking should be banned because he saw a dead snake once?
  • + 1
 @SJP: a compressive force at any point on the tyre increases the air pressure evenly in the tyre
  • + 2
 @SJP: I imagine a spoke in a wheel it is only captive in tension ,there is nothing holding the nipple to the rim other than in tension
  • + 0
 @SJP: "You will find that the only change is that a few of the spokes at the bottom of the wheel have compressed. Thus, it is correct to say that the hub is support by standing on the bottom spokes." This is what an engineer would say who is trying to appear smart by confusing his listener. I refer you to new analysis: github.com/dashdotrobot/phd-thesis/releases/download/v1.0/Ford_BicycleWheelThesis_v1.0.pdf
  • + 1
 The truth is that it is the rim that is in compression on a wire spoke wheel. The spokes are never in compression and this can be shown by the fact that they have zero resistance to buckling.
  • + 1
 @JohanG:

Hi Johan,
I try not to assume ill will.
Did you read past that sentence?
Have a look at the images here:
www.pinkbike.com/news/field-test-12-bikes-hucked-to-flat-in-gratuitous-slow-motion.html

Would it be reasonable to say that the tire between the rim and the ground is being compressed? I think so, and I am not trying to confuse anyone when I say that.
  • + 1
 Seems to me that’s why the three “spokes” on this wheel are s shaped. In order to provide some type of compliance at the spoke mounting point. If we take away the fact that they look “weird”, and resemble the 1990’s spinergy wheels they may have actually reinvented a better wheel. Time will tell. I’ll stay in the spoke camp at this point and wait for the verdict.
  • + 1
 @fattyheadshok: They are still rigid structures. Much much more so than the traditional wire spoke.
  • + 1
 One question, is the terrain "consistent"? Are all the hits from equal rocks, from equal roots, from equal dirt irregularities, and never from a mix of all of the above? You need rim consistency to know what you are hitting at any point in time? Is that important information? Let's say that you hit two rocks, one right at the spoke and another between spokes. You feel different impacts and get the impression that one of the rocks was softer than the other, or maybe it was not a rock. Now what? Or maybe you finish your ride and you are confused because at one point you chose a line over two rocks of the same size and it felt like you hit two rocks of different sizes. Is that the scenario you fear?
  • + 1
 @DavidGuerra: not so concerned about trail feedback - trails are by nature uneven. Rock number two will feel different from rock number one pending where you are in your suspension travel, if they are one right after the other. If I could negate that and have suspension react better or in a more ideal fashion, or magically be fully extended for every hit, that would be great - but I can't control that.

What I don't want is uneven and unpredictable feel from my wheels. I don't want every third, fourth, or fifth rock feedback through the handle bars as a stronger impact because it was against one of the bracing spokes. I can control that by opting for wheels with spokes that don't push back against rocks at the sight of impact, and allow the rim to flex/comply to the extent it can.
  • + 0
 @SJP: Maybe you should go back to school before posting overly long posts that are plain wrong.
  • + 0
 @SJP: that is stark, publishing-worthy clarity of technical writing. Even if one takes issue with the theory -- for once it is articulated with such spare, eloquent simplicity that it can be clearly seen and considered on its own merit, without need of threshing through convolutions of bias and ego. Very much appreciate your contributing!
  • + 1
 @SJP: It certainly isn't ill will, but there are many dweebs in my industry who find a good amount of success by being confusing on purpose. This impresses uneducated people like the pot addled brains of most of the readership here. Jobst Brandt's style has been long superceded with more clear explanations. To be even more clear: No spoke in a wire spoke wheel is EVER in compression. Anyone who doubts this can consider if buckling is a possible failure mode.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: well said sir.
  • + 41
 Spengle: Oh good, PB is posted their review of our "new" rims. (2 min later) GOOD GOD, pull the video, PULL THE VIDEO! CALL THE LAWYERS, Yann you're fired.
  • + 18
 Actual conversation the Athertons had after that awful logo design video was posted.
  • + 27
 "when a spoked wheel interacts with the ground, it is passing that force straight back up to the rider"
Starts out strong with a fundamental misunderstanding of how wire spoke wheels work (in tension) this is looking good
  • + 6
 PB did the huck test for a reason. I saw compression of the tire, we saw multidimensional compliance of the fork but I didn't notice any deformation of the actual wheel. Sure it deforms but considering it was much less noticeable than the other contributors, I suppose it doesn't really matter one bit in vertical direction. In lateral direction, sure. (Fabio Wibmer did some demonstrations in his Out of Mind video). But radially? I'd like to see numbers Smile !
  • + 28
 If your spokes are interacting with the ground,you did something wrong during your build up.
  • + 26
 Imagine crashing and your leg or arm going through one of those wheels!
  • + 112
 Imaging not crashing and having to be seen with those things on your bike.
  • + 10
 why trispokes are banned in mass start racing
  • + 7
 That's actually the reason why you don't see such designs in road cycling. UCI has a minimum spoke number for mass start races.
  • + 2
 @shinook: LMFAO HOLD THIS W
  • + 3
 Imagine running over the end of a branch that flips up into your wheels and sends you into a big crash
  • + 24
 Real hard to open a beer with those spokes...
  • + 23
 You can trap bigger animals though...
  • + 2
 biggest marketing issue yet I recon
  • + 21
 My 96 Zaskar has a pair of Spin wheels and for avoidance of doubt they are still terrible 20 years later.
  • + 1
 It is a looker though. In a retro vibe type way.
  • + 18
 Grabs popcorn and a beer and starts looking for a Proflex 756 for sale.
Closet opens and Canadian tuxedo is dusted off.
Flowbee plugged in and set to "mullet". Good to see you old friend
Checks bank account......damn. First 3 still apply at least
  • + 16
 I want to hate them.

They make no sense.

I love them.

I think they look so damn cool!

(got into MTB in the late 80's, these things were made for people like me!)
  • + 6
 They go against everything I stand for but yet I want them. I feel like bull bars should be mandatory.
  • + 4
 I would love them, but BikeAhead Biturbos already exist and they look better, are lighter and are even more ludicrously expensive. So they beat these at every possible turn.
  • + 1
 Even as a biker who wasn't even born when these were around, they do look fun ngl
  • + 12
 I'd like to the the Field Test slo-mo drop to flat on these, once landing aligned with a spoke and once landing aligned with the center of one of those 120-degree gaps. I'll bet there is a huge, visible difference in compliance.
  • + 7
 Billy Maaaayes here!!! the new Spengle shredder wheels are amaaaazing... they are spathe age materialthz designed by serious rocket science engineers who KNOW rockets! In testing these wheels here at "as seen on TV" labs we've discovered other amazthin things they can do ... These wheels slice, dice, chop, julienne, peel, shred, mince, scallop and otherwise filet your favorite trails AND veggies! They are earth friendly, vegan and nearly always have a minty freshness to them.... I Billy Maaaaayes highly endorse spengles for all your wicker MTB adventureths...
  • + 10
 Break a spoke - break a leg
  • + 10
 Are we not entertained?! I am. Diggin' the sense of humour Levy Smile
  • + 4
 Someone in my riding group is running Spengle wheels. It looked weird for the 1st couple of rides out but up close they look well built. Can't inform you of the ride quality but they are damn easy for her to clean afterwards.
tup
  • + 16
 "easy to clean" is priority number 48,362 on the list of why I buy any mountain biking product
  • + 16
 @gumbytex: Come and ride in Wales for a bit. it will move up your list.
lol
  • + 8
 The new Spinergy. A set of these and a man bun and you are gollden.
  • + 4
 'Effectively what we are saying is that when a spoked wheel interacts with the ground, it is passing that force straight back up to the rider, but by using the tri-blade monocoque we are spreading that force away from the rider, giving them a smoother, more comfortable ride' Effectively what they are saying is the exact opposite of what is actually happening. A normal spoked wheel transfers the forces from the hub into the spokes above, meaning the bike 'hangs' by those spokes, which provides a slight but noticeable spring, depending on how tight the wheel is built. These will simply spike forces from the ground directly up to the rider's hands.
  • + 2
 agreed. these are going to be stiff as a poker and crack like an egg during hard riding or just buck the rider straight off the bike. bad f'n idea. preposterous marketing. looking forward to the review!
  • + 2
 Exactly what I am getting at above. Impact around the base of the spokes will be harsher - that's my prediction.
  • - 1
 Check out SJP’s succinct post further up the thread. Spoked wheels do not “hang” loads from the upper spokes, they support a load in compression through the few spokes and the section of rim that’s loaded (aka load-affected zone.) I’ll be an old one this time pointing to Jobst Brandt for an exhaustive explanation.
  • + 1
 @t0mislav: check out the post where SJP agreed with my analysis. Point of impact is unloaded. Hard enough impact, and the 2-4 spokes in that zone go full slack. Hard enough to flat spot the rim and those spokes can lose tension for good
  • + 1
 @privateer-wbc: I did see your post, after I hit submit haha. It is bang on.

With these, you'll get either a super-harsh spike near the spoke base, as you say, but if there's a hard enough impact on one of the long sections away from the spokes the wheel will either a) flex like crazy, but only in that area, or b) fail catastrophically.

IMHO the humble spoked bicycle wheel is a beautiful invention, and very hard to improve upon.
  • + 2
 @Franziskaner: you said it. The modern spoked bicycle is more advanced in terms of performance than these one piece wheels.
  • + 1
 Radial stiffness isn't dependent on spoke tension as long as they are not slack. This has been proven over and over.
  • + 1
 @t0mislav: This compression fallacy continues thanks to people like you.
  • + 3
 @JohanG: compression is a definite misnomer/fallacy. More like contraction. A spoke will contract until it it back to its original relaxed untensioned state. Spokes provide zero pushing value - and they have nothing to push agains (until they hit tape/tube/tire). Pull spokes, versus "push" spokes is another misnomer, in my opinion. There are only pulling spokes. Leading and trailing, is more appropriate imho.
  • + 2
 @t0mislav: Terminology is debatable but normal bike wheels aren't supported by the spokes between the hub and the ground being under compression. Nipples aren't attached to the rim so once tension goes to zero, any further compressiony force just moves nipple away from the rim.
  • + 4
 So these goofs simultaneously reinvented the wheel and changed physics? It's still a rim, hub, and spokes LoL Who believes this hors3 sh1t?

Cool. I guess? I mean, wheels like this have been around for 30 years...
  • + 4
 [holding wheel in shop with scale on wall behind him] "THEY SAY these are around 1800 grams...."

No comments on hub internals, poe, or quality.

No actual measurements of rim dimensions.

Weak sauce.
  • + 3
 I want hub info, like yourself. Internal rim measurements have me put off a little. Only 24mm, they are on the more narrow side.
  • + 5
 I would put blades on the spokes to cut salami, bread and vegetables while bike camping.
  • + 6
 Even the name 'Spengle' sucks
  • + 0
 Do NOT look up Spengle in the urban dictionary... just saying
  • + 2
 I love it! Hope they can get the price and weight down a bit. Funny how everybody said the same naysayer nonsense about carbon frames, and handle bars, and forks. I'd ride them just so all the "I hate change" Nancy's will stay home arguing. I'm no Red Bull rider but at my mediocre skill level I think they would be sweet. Flame on +urds...
  • + 3
 no idea if its the same backing company, but Spengle produced trispoke wheels in the late 90s... not my bike, just a pic
1.bp.blogspot.com/_HYwqH0yAYHA/SeubGxiMYAI/AAAAAAAAAf8/aF1KO19poEA/s320/Ibis.jpg
  • + 1
 Came here to say the same thing, I remember seeing those on the magazines at the time.
  • + 3
 Looks like 20 years of R&D & they just look the same, so maybe in 200 years they may be popular?
  • + 4
 Y'all is a contraction of you and all. Ya'll is a misspelling of y'all. Even bicycle journalism is journalism and should value the proper use of contractions.
  • + 2
 What is the point of expensive wheels for MTB that are not light weight ?
A compliant ride ? It would have to be more compliant than my '92 Cadillac to be worth the money and that wouldn't be fun for trail riding.
  • - 6
flag getsomesy (Feb 5, 2019 at 9:25) (Below Threshold)
 Aerodynamics
  • + 4
 As one who rode a set of HED tri-spoke wheels for a while, I wouldn't mind slapping these on my frame.
  • + 1
 well my old tuff 2 bmx wheels sure rocked and that was 1983 and then the uci banned this type of wheel from road racing because it was to fast so...…. like the dude said these will work great for gravel grinders/bike packers/adventure racers as a great way to carry more water
  • + 1
 I would like to try them if they were wider, if they lasted forever the extra weight would be worth it for some riders. I also had mag wheels as a kid and am not concerned about the looks.

Are there any aerodynamic advantages? That would absolutely make it worth it for racing if everything else was equal.
  • + 1
 A mate has just shown me this, these look really cool. I also ride track (velodrome) and road, are you releasing versions for these types of riding too? They look like they'd be super fast in a sprint, when can I get my hands on a pair!? Is love to get them on my track bike and race them around the Velodrome.
  • + 1
 On instagram they claimed that they will send new wheels if you crash your non replaceable rim without any problems. Will they? Way to early to tell by now but it seems that sentimentalism is the next standard in bike industry so lets se reborn Tioga tension wheels Smile
  • + 1
 SPENGLE how Swiss are you? You‘re always saying you‘re Swiss - in this article, on your website and especially in your latest Facebook promotion.

All I can see is a Swiss adresse... Your whole pics, videos are on UK trails...

Are you really as Swiss are you‘re saying or are you just taking advantage of the excellent reputation of Swiss products? Smile

Thanks for bringing some light in the dark! Smile Smile
  • + 2
 I want some in 29" too Well right not you can not!
but if you want I can build you a set with bamboo spokes, or better yet DIY it?
  • + 2
 Pair these wheels with a Trust Message fork and you'll be able to maintain your image while biking without having to wear a sweater vest or carry a latte.
  • + 2
 "when a spoked wheel interacts with the ground, it is passing that force straight back up to the rider..."

and what about tyres and suspension?
  • + 3
 Can Skyway just make their Tuff Wheels in 26, 27.5, and 29 already so us cool guys can have mags too, not just the nerds?
  • + 3
 maybe turn them on their sides and attach a hub motor courtesy of the UCI, and you have a manned bicycle drone copter.
  • + 1
 The coolest thing I remember about my Spin wheels were the whoosh-whoosh-whoosh sound the big spokes made riding fast on the road...all that air getting displaced between the fork legs. I wonder if these sound the same.
  • + 1
 They been listening to much to Spongle? Only Saab Turbo and Mercedes SEC coupes looks good with a tre spoked wheel. Good luck when you catch a fat good old branch in the front wheel. Hardest OTB ever...
  • + 0
 "Effectively what we are saying is that when a spoked wheel interacts with the ground, it is passing that force straight back up to the rider"

This sounds wrong, The tension is on the spokes above the hub, the bike is effectively "hanging" from the top of the rim, meaning there'd be way more compliance with a traditional spoked setup than these rigid wheels. Am I wrong?
  • + 3
 Reported to be sold in sets of 20 so you can replace them after every send.
  • + 1
 well...lets be honest...they look the balls ! They did it 100years ago and still do. I would grab one in a haertbeat if I could affort it....way better than this Enve crap for double the cash.
  • + 1
 If you have a set there, why not give us an actual weight, rather than Spengle's claimed weight? The set I've had a look at weighed over 2.1kg...

Also - no mention that it's Shimano driver body only, no XD option yet...
  • + 4
 Now put these wheels on an Ellsworth for the perfect combo.
  • + 1
 On a rainy Friday in the UK whilst on the turbo trainer I was sat looking at my set of Spin wheels and my Evil insurgent ... and wondered what if .........

m.pinkbike.com/photo/16844394
  • + 2
 If you've got 32 spokes you can break 1 and ride the other 31. If you've got 3 spokes, you break 1 and you're mashed potatoes.
  • + 11
 If you have 32 spokes and you break 4 though, that's engineered compliance
  • + 3
 @ianmp: ^^^Haha still within tolerance!
  • + 2
 I would be genuinely interested to see them being ridden by some riders on the world cup DH circuit. It would be a good test imo
  • + 0
 so for 1700 good ol' US dollars (cant be arsed converting to pounds) you get a wheel that makes you look like your taking your trail bike to a velodrome, it also looks so ugly and outlandish that I would be truly embarrassed to be seen rocking one of these monstrosities on the trail
  • + 4
 I'm taking you are too young to remember Pacific Blue...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_yAhne7jFo

C'mon, retro is cool! (said nobody).
  • + 5
 Is it April 1st already?
  • + 2
 I'll concede two trivial benefits:
1) they would be easier to clean
2) easier to pack into a cramped flight case or shipping box
  • + 9
 3. When leaned up against your other bikes, their pedals won't get stuck in these spokes
  • + 13
 4. never going to be stolen.
  • + 1
 I find the biggest issue with packing a bike is the pedals hitting on the spokes, which this would appear to be perfect for. Then I remembered what would happen if one of my nice grippy pedal pins hits the carbon...
  • + 0
 You fools are totally overlooking the aerodynamic benifits.

Also if you crash and come off the bike, but fall onto it the wheel would not have enough friction & momentum to break a arm or leg that goes through it. Maybe it woukd break a finger, but so could a spoked wheel.
  • + 14
 Aerodynamic benefits for riding 15mph through the woods?
  • + 0
 you are not talking about the situation when the bike is still moving with some of your weight on it while you put your leg thru, are you?
  • + 2
 The Matrix called and Neo wants his wheels back.. I wonder how much they cost in the Matrix?
  • + 3
 I just don't see what problem is being solved with these.
  • - 1
 Aerodynamics
  • + 7
 @getsomesy: Right, right. So, this product is aimed at the mountain bike time trialists?Wink
  • - 1
 @chezotron:
there are plenty of applicable benifits.
people sometimes do a number of things to decrease aerodynamic drag, and lots of people spend a lot of money on small performance gains, weight decrease and for no real performance reason

there are plenty of places there would be a realizable advantage:
xc racing
gravle riding
mtb touring
commuting
megaavalanche type events
ashland mountain challenge
dh racing
enduro

besides ascent rough terrain and soft surfaces, aerodynamic drag is the bulk of where your energy goes while rolling downhill or pedaling flat.

also theres perhaps an advantage in not needing to build and maintain spoke tention trueness
  • + 1
 @getsomesy:
slideplayer.com/slide/5922261

They compared several different wheels. Including the HED TriSpoke. Not much difference between the TriSpoke and an Aero spoked wheel.

If you want a big aerodynamic improvement switch to drop bars.

If I was going to ride the Isle of Mann I would absolutely want a set.
  • + 1
 @getsomesy: Actually it's been proven years ago already that 3-spoke wheels have more aero drag than (modern waterdrop-shaped) deep carbon rims with "normal" spokes. This is the reason you don't see and 3-spokes anymore on road bikes either

They are trying to sell us something that's been proven wrong in the road bike industry quite a while ago already.

Add all the BS stories they are telling like that in 2 years time people will think normal spoked wheels look strange, that these have improved flex (have fun hitting a bump directly at a spoke), etc, you can see these guys have no clue at all of what they are doing, have not done any proper research (neither for aero or market research) and have unrealistic stories. I'm always pro-improvements for bikes, quite a nerd myself when it comes to marginal gains from products, but these guys and their wheels are a joke.

But yes, I totally agree more aero would also benefit in racing at other riding styles for more speed. The biggest downside of more aero bikes and parts though are less comfort and that they are less fun to ride if you live in a windy place like me.
  • + 1
 @Mattin: i didnt know that. but a deep carbon rim on a mtb would suck too, so... options dont really hurt.
  • + 1
 @getsomesy: Yeah you'll lose comfort for sure. But I do think that deep carbon rims would really benefit to for example professional DH riders who can save seconds with this. Aero definitely helps there, which is why they banned lycra as riders wanted to start wearing that for more speed.
Apparently tests show that aero wheels and frames are beneficial until a climb gets steeper than 6%. Any climb that's less steep, flat or descent, they benefit kn speed. Maybe the lack of comfort is not worth it for the average Joe, but I'm sure the pro DH riders for example could benefit.
  • + 1
 ...especially on the faster tracks like Fort William.
  • + 3
 SKYWAYS, Worked, but still never took over Spoked Wheals, : )
  • + 1
 No SRAM XD freehub body ? too bad...........their shimano freehub body is in aluminium, no steel version. That's a no go for me
  • + 1
 Don't fall and get your leg or arm caught inside while it's spinning with some torque. I don't even want to picture what would happen.
  • + 2
 The 80’s want their wheels back.
It’s true what they say,everything does come full circle
  • + 2
 Reminds me of the rims that come on one of the Mongoose bikes they sell at Walmart
  • + 3
 Definitely for ENDURO...

www.pinkbike.com/photo/16836917
  • + 2
 I would really like to see this, with the trust message fork on the Specialized Turbo Levo
  • + 2
 Can I build them with King hubs ? Do they come in super mega uber redonkaboost spacing ?
  • + 2
 Put these on that bike with the frame bolted together and it will be serious throwback
  • + 2
 So if you end up lunching your freehub you have to buy a new wheel instead of just a hub? Think that's a big nope.
  • + 0
 You’d probably be able to buy spares or get spares under warranty.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic:
What they say is
"For the original owner we WILL cover ALL structural damage to the CARBON BODY or HUB caused from riding."
Yeah, right! I have broken lots of hubs...

And I was thinking they might be really cool on the tandem but...
"we recommend a total weight of 120kg, that’s rider, bike, and kit."
Well, that covers me and the bike. Not the luggage or my wife. Boy, is she going to be pissed off when I tell her she has to walk.

But if they would make a set of wheels for my Jaguar they would be great for snow tires.
  • + 2
 More than a passing resemblance to the movie Krull?!

movieposters2.com/Krull-movie-poster_756412.html
  • + 4
 I like em.
  • + 3
 Spengle eliminated spokes, and the squirrels rejoiced!
  • + 2
 So the questions is where would you like your flex? On your bike or on your wheel?
  • + 2
 I’d like mine with sour cream and onions please......oh wait, I thought the headings read Pringles. Damnnn.....
  • + 2
 Oh, I remember these... Why would anyone bring this 20 year old shit back again??
  • + 3
 @mikelevy PLEASE pair them with the Trust fork to complete the look!
  • + 2
 With a frame that has the R3ACT suspension platform... It might become so ugly that it starts looking good again.
  • + 2
 Wait so if there's no hooks on the rim bead, how am I supposed to throw fat cutties without ripping the tire off??
  • + 2
 "we made these wheels for in 2* years"

*30 years ago when people didn't know what the frick was going on
  • + 3
 Did you have any otbs yet thanks to a stick.
  • + 2
 Can I just buy the front and throw it on my bike? Like fixie dudes do?
  • + 2
 Send a bunch to some pros and let them give us their take.
  • + 2
 How to make your MTB look like a BMX!
  • + 2
 No BMX rider has used wheels like these in 25 years
  • + 2
 Coming back to a paper route near you.
  • + 2
 How easily you put your hand/leg thru while crash please?
  • + 2
 Maybe for drag racing....
  • + 2
 I’d ride them on my road bike, do they make a track set?
  • + 1
 Bring 80,s disc wheels back I say, like the ones you used to get on the back wheel of a 5 spd Raleigh mustang
  • + 2
 Spin wants their wheels back
  • + 2
 I've been riding Spengel wheels since the late 90s... on my Saab 900 Turbo
  • + 2
 what about hub engagement? sealed cartridge or? etc etc
  • - 2
 My thoughts are on the side to side flex patern. Inherently stiffer near the spoke, and softer away from the spoke. If you're pushing hard in an off camper, a corner, or through a rough spot. It would be possible to feel this oscilation in the flex. Could result in a weird shimy type sensation. Similar to riding an out of true wheel. The precision is taken away.

And to those that may say "youll never feel it". Step it up. You're just not riding hard enough. Wink
  • + 2
 You don t need to spengle that much bro.
  • + 2
 Spinergy called. They like
  • + 2
 Nice one on the riding location in the vid at Froggatt Edge in the Peaks
  • + 1
 Like oneill wave of the winter we have to organize comment of the year. This entry by DGthree looks strong!!
  • + 2
 Do these wheels come with a set of pit vipers? If not, no can do brah
  • + 1
 Laugh as you will, all of you, but I hear these come stock on the new Surly Straggler, so they ain't going anywhere
  • + 1
 in 2 years time they will not be any more 27.5
  • + 1
 Spins were okay in 90's but everyone really aspired to Spinergys
  • + 1
 came here to read comment Big Grin
  • + 0
 Dentist must be behind this laughing
  • + 1
 Monocoque?!
  • + 0
 True douchebagedness. Might see a few up in the Surrey hills ...
  • + 1
 Uh no.
  • + 0
 The people who buy these are indeed 'high on carbon fiber'
  • + 0
 Not even for down country use.
  • + 0
 Whoa! That Trek has like 50 chainrings!
  • + 1
 Spend-giggles?
  • + 0
 Unno + Trust + These = Many strained necks
  • + 0
 Looks like they will pair a Trust fork perfectly!
  • + 1
 These are 26" right...?
  • + 0
 Yeah, nope.
  • - 2
 Be real easy to pull the ol' Indiana jones and toss a sick in the spokes...
  • + 0
 this oughta be good
  • - 1
 But will they fit my new dentist Linkage forks?
  • + 19
 No, not yet. The Message is 29er only (right now) and Spengle's wheels are 27.5 only (right now). But I bet next year you'll be able to build the ultimate dentist bike.
  • + 9
 @mikelevy: An UNNO fitted with The Message and a set of Spengle's it is, then!
  • + 3
 @johnski:

Congratulations, You have achieved Ultimate Dentist status
Salute
  • + 0
 1 spoke wheel anyone?
  • + 2
 Nah mate. Zero. I want steel rims floating on magnet hubs.
  • + 0
 @Bob-Agg: One day maybe but I am probably not going to be around. That would be cool.
  • + 2
 @Bob-Agg: now that I could live with. you wouldn't even need a shock because the hub could move within the wheel. drive trains could be a bit funky though...
  • - 1
 FAKE NEWS!!! You all got trolled by Pinkbike.
  • + 0
 Dentists rejoice.
  • - 1
 Who is funding this cr*p!!!! And what are they smoking. I want some!
  • + 0
 What a mincer! Wink
  • + 0
 Nope
  • - 1
 Video out
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