BREW Nitro Shox - Sea Otter 2016

Apr 14, 2016 at 14:04
by Mike Levy  
Sea Otter 2016


BREW Nitro Shox


BREW Nitro Shox

We first showed you BREW's interesting Nitro Shox at last year's Eurobike tradeshow, and since then the UK company has been working away to get the shock ready for production. That includes some internal fine-tuning, a change from the anodized blue shock body shown here to a black finish that won't stand out as much, and some added adjustments. BREW is aiming to launch the production version this coming September, sometime after the Interbike tradeshow, and they told me that pricing should be similar to high-end offerings from established brands.

Nitro Shox Details:

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro / DH
• Oleo damper design
• Nitrogen spring
• Three spring rates from factory
• Adjustment dial to tune spring rate
• Adjustable rebound and compression
• Weight: TBA
• Availability: September
• MSRP: TBA
What's not similar, however, is how the Nitro Shox goes about doing its job.



What's Different?

The Nitro Shox's oleo damper is relatively simple compared to a run of the mill mountain bike shock. To start with, there's a nitrogen pressurized chamber that's separated from the damping oil by a piston that we'd usually refer to as an IFP (internal floating piston). This nitrogen charge acts as the spring, whereas the pressurized chamber on the opposite side of the IFP is used to provide back-pressure and room for oil displacement within a traditional shock.


BREW Nitro Shox


When the BREW shock is compressed, the damping oil pushes on the IFP and the nitrogen charge is compressed - this gives you your spring rate. On the opposite end of the shock is a tapered metering pin that aligns with a bleed hole on the metering / damping orifice, and this is what determines the amount of pressure that's applied to the IFP and the nitrogen charge. This means that it's able to supply as much spring force as required when there's a massive impact, but then also bleed off that pressure as needed. In short, it provides both a non-linear spring rate and non-linear damping force that allows it to react in a way that a standard shock would never be able to, and, according to BREW's Joe Hunter, in a way that gives the rider more control.

BREW actually sets the shock's nitrogen pressure, which they say is a bit higher than the pressure used in the latest high-volume air shocks, at the factory before shipping the shock out to the customer. This means that, for the most part, the shock's spring rate is set because this nitrogen charge is your spring.

Some adjustment is built-in via a rotary dial that will be on the production shock's piggyback, the turning of which will move nitrogen either in or out from the piggyback into the main chamber. It's clear that one of BREW's main challenges will be convincing riders that they don't need to adjust anything on the Nitro Shox, which won't be an easy task given that the more-is-better attitude is prevalent when it comes to suspension adjustments.
Eurobike 2015

BREW Nitro Shox


Hunter says that because the damper is velocity dependent, it's able to match the forces put into the shock and self-adjust, meaning that riders shouldn't have to turn any dials. In fact, they had originally considered offering a shock with basically zero damper and spring adjustment but have since softened that stance. The production shock will now sport two dials, one to adjust rebound and the other compression, that will allow for some manual tuning on top of the shock's self-adjusting nature.

I'll be spending a few days on BREW's Nitro Shox while in the Whistler Bike Park when they bring over a production sample this coming September, so stay tuned for ride impressions.


173 Comments

  • 545 8
 I was going to say this has the potential to be either the best or worst new product of 2016, but then I remembered crank brothers is releasing a new seat post... So congratulations on a guaranteed not worst
  • 78 26
 hahahaha this ^^

I always wanted to like crank bros, but they're kinda the Apple of the mtb accessory world. Their multitools are bomb though
  • 79 10
 @trialsracer: I would disagree on the Apple thing, while I personally would never own one they do produce very well designed and premium products. Crank Brothers doesn't.
  • 22 0
 www.pinkbike.com/news/brew-nitro-shox-eurobike-2015.html

it's much further ahead now. The graphics are bangin!
  • 17 1
 I wish someone would ride this and give it a review - this same exact post was made last year. Guessing it's a bust....
  • 67 0
 @makripper: At least it's not in Comic Sans?

It would be super funny to see the public reaction if this a) turns out to be a total revolution in suspension and b) stays looking as shitty as it does now. I'd love to see the amount of people torn between being fast and having a cool looking bike.
  • 2 0
 best comment of sea otter and we just started
  • 2 0
 @nicolai12: Mike says that he's planning on testing it in September.
  • 1 0
 @MmmBones: Thanks - missed that. Seemed odd to do two product expos and not test it?
  • 3 1
 @makripper: this comment deserves more than just my upvote.

nitro taking a lesson from X-Fusion and their Revel X!
  • 6 1
 @MTBradshaw: Crank Brothers are the Tandy of bike components.

BTW Tandy used to be the store brand computer sold at radioshack, and were absolutely horrible.
  • 3 0
 @nicolai12: I think Brew is run by one dude, which could explain the yearlong development. Perhaps he was shopping the tech around to major manufacturers first?
  • 2 12
flag fattyreryder (Apr 14, 2016 at 17:19) (Below Threshold)
 @MTBradshaw: you are probably too young to know what @trailracer is talking about... Apple always had good ideas but never could compete in the 80's and 90's .... Always put out awkward products until mid 2000's ... The iPod brought them to where they are now... I grew up in a IBM household (dad worked there) .... Now everything I own is Apple ,.... I have like 8+ Apple products .....
  • 23 14
 @MTBradshaw: As a computer engineer i feel exactly the opposite... crapple goes to great lengths to make sure they are not compatible with the rest of the computer industry, and their software is trash...

crankbrothers is highly compatible with every bike on the market, and offers better than stock features.
  • 22 3
 Why on god's green earth would Crank brothers try to produce a dropper post when it seems that making quality pedals has them stumped.
  • 2 0
 I really wanna try this shock.
  • 3 0
 @trialsracer: great multitool.
  • 3 3
 @Ziral: I completely agree lol don't let the neg votes get to you. Well almost completely I like how lightweight mac os is compared to windows but paying 4K for a comp I could build for 1-1.5K is just full retard. Also I tend to avoid anywhere fanbois congregate . Also dat 12.9" ipad blech, who needs that lol. Also computer engineers unite!
  • 1 0
 Retracted
  • 2 2
 Well lightweight was a poor choice of words lol. I haven't spent much time with mac os, in reality it just feels so high level it almost as if apple doesn't trust it's user base. Too streamlined is a terrible thing. I love the low level control of Linux but deal with windows for gaming. If I know how every component functions in unison in the computer I've built I'd like to be able to control them thinly. Now if a computer is a magic box that so many people believe it is...that kind of control is unnecessary. It's really just like biking I guess...different strokes for different folks.
  • 4 0
 I said it before i will say it again... It looks like a 5 dollar marijuana pipe
  • 3 1
 Think of social media as real life. Now picture how your friends would react if you talked about laptops on a mountain bike website. In other words, don't do that.
  • 1 0
 @chrisingrassia: Could you elaborate that Chris?
Personaly I find the Revel fork even more interesting then this shock..
  • 2 0
 @simsburner:
The Revel fork is never coming out. XFU brought it to trade shows for like 3 or 4 years, hyping the product and then never released it. It's vaporware.
  • 1 0
 @chrisingrassia: afak it have been produced and delivered in a limited number. Wierd its so quiet. It really don't help to raise the reputation of x-fusion. Maybe the have run into som patent issues or longterm test issues. Or just had to conclude the market is not ready to accept usd forks can be made to work very well. Which the following link is a sign to the opposite. .
www.mtb-news.de/news/2016/01/15/test-intend-sc166-upside-down-federgabel
  • 107 0
 It looks so cute and tiny on that V10! Awwww!
  • 10 2
 its definetely tiny, for the v10, its the wrong overall length it seems, look at how raked the bike is and it looks like its already sitting into its travel a decent amount.
  • 8 0
 Must be plush as fuck. Haha
  • 3 1
 Yeap, just like the small-penis-syndrome in body-builders...Smile
  • 59 0
 Metric? Imperial? Can I install it in my dog?
  • 11 0
 10/10 comment
  • 6 0
 Depends which side of the ruler you use, yes and yes but animal welfare might have something to say.
  • 50 1
 The oleo method has been used reliably for over 75 years in aircraft. It is reliable, light, and I've seen people flying on an oleo strut that was built back in the 40's with no issue. I'm excited that these guys are offering something that is innovative and I hope it's as good as I want it to be!
  • 9 0
 with that said the use case of an oleo strut could not be more different than on an MTB. Compressed once on landing, and rebound speed doesn't matter on takeoff. aircraft don't really use their struts as "shocks" as a car or bike would while taxiing.
  • 11 1
 @parallaxid: Yes, that's for sure, but oleos have a reputation for being very strong, and rebound is just as important in a plane as it is in biking because you don't want to bounce a landing. And taxiing in a backcountry environment is tough on suspension. Granted, it's at lower speed in this case, but the main goals are very similar: keep it lightweight, soak up bumps in a controlled manner, and don't bounce all over the place.
  • 23 0
 @parallaxid: oleo struts are capable of absorbing massive landing impacts followed by a mile of washboard dirt runway under a heavy military transport. I make internal parts for one of the biggest landing gear manufacturers in the world. Sometime i make fifty different versions of a metering pin during testing and development. Oleos are capable of so much more than flimsy shim stacks.
  • 9 1
 @parallaxid: oleo dampeners are used on tanks as well.. you know, those 50t+ objects that can fly along rough ground at 60kph.

I am so stoked that they are making these for mtb. I have been trying to get hold of one of these shocks since the millyard dh bike came out.

that thing felt like a 200mm travel bike even though it only was running 140mm.
  • 2 1
 @MrZ32: and you rode one of the two or three that were made?
  • 3 0
 @iamsx: you are going to bounce an airplane regardless what suspension you have on there. Flaring too early or landing too flat will cause you to bounce, not the suspension. I am a pilot and have bounced landings and it was never because of the suspension.
  • 2 1
 @Waldon83: I wish, that was what the review from Steve from Dirt magazine said after he broke his 1.04 track record on the bike... it was only later on that he found out that it was the shorter travel.. may have been 150mm actually.
  • 3 4
 I'd like to try it out, but they have some clearly whack ideas here. Preset spring rate? So my 200lbs gets the same spring rate as my 120lbs girlfriend? Makes sense.

This is one of those things where people are prone to being like "oh it works well in other completely different applications, it'll work great here too". Planes aren't bikes. Tanks aren't bikes. Elevator safety systems (what oleo dampers are widely used for), quite clearly aren't bikes. Reserve judgment til you ride it, sure, but this is definitely something worthy of skepticism.
  • 2 0
 pretty sure they meant set it for you before its shipped. the one other thing i potentially like about this idea (besides how easily it might fit in Commencal frames), is the qualities of nitrogen itself. higher end car companies have been nitrogen filling tires for a while now. the molecules are bigger in a way that there is less psi loss over a period of time than straight air. if you could have consistantly the same psi ride after ride after ride, without even having to check the pressure or volume, that would be a nice bonus in itself.
  • 3 0
 It reminds me of that shock that Millyard built for his prototype bikes. This is in the UK, are they related?
  • 2 0
 @theman554: Oh, I definitely recognize that. I'm also a pilot, and the suspension definitely makes a difference. Look up a "Just SuperStol" for reference. No suspension will save a botched landing, but it's a lot easier to fake it with oleos as compared to a spring gear.
  • 5 0
 @Socket: wait wait wait, what do you mean by Elevator Safety Systems aren't bikes?
You lost me there
  • 1 0
 @theman554: This is Mountain biking, the problem is always the bike not the rider
  • 2 1
 @parallaxid: Yeah Cos the Landing gear on an SU-25 Frog foot doesn't have to cope with extremely rocky unprepared runways while trying to get to a 150kt take off speed , or the SAAB Vigan landing on unprepared landing sites for the Swedish air-force . Military aircraft of most nations are designed to land on grass fields , rocky terrain (the SU-25 has almost 2 foot of suspension travel to cope with rocky terrain ) or damaged airstrips and normal roads. Just look up the trials for the A400m taking off in the desert . What you don't get is the sense of scale . Deserts are full of large rocks , compressions and sand stone slabs . Or C-130's that do beach landings .
  • 2 1
 @CliffRacer: Millyard used the same type of shock. From memory he was a tank engineer. From the reviews I have read on the Millyard bike (and similar shock) it has the potential to blow everything currently on the market away. We could all be riding 150mm travel bikes that work as well as 200mm bikes.

I am definitely keeping an eye out for this.
  • 3 0
 @NaToED: I think the point everyone misses when they compare any kind of vehicles to bikes is that the rigid sprung mass of planes, tanks, cars, motorbikes etc is FAR FAR higher relative to the unsprung mass than that of a bike. The inertial stability of the vehicle is much higher as a result - bikes have about a 1:1 ratio of rigid sprung mass (note the word "rigid", ie not the rider since the rider is essentially what we are trying to isolate from the ground) to unsprung mass, which means that the inertial damping effect on a bike is far lower. End result is that the bike's suspension has to deal with large amplitude low speed inputs with very high (relative) mass of the rider, and high speed, smaller amplitude inputs where the mass of the rider is effectively much smaller. No other vehicle sees this kind of phenomenon so simply saying it works well in another application doesn't mean anything for bikes. It MIGHT be great but the fact that it works for preventing elevators killing people doesn't NECESSARILY mean it will be good on a bike. Again, skepticism is warranted until it's actually proven to work, and that means convincing more than just Steve Jones.
  • 2 1
 @Socket: just watch a video of the millyard and you can see plain as day how effective it is.
  • 2 0
 @mberrevoets: I've watched videos of it. You can't tell anything from those, even the slo-mo ones Dirt put out. There is a reason suspension tuners use dataloggers not video cameras. I've also seen it in the flesh and talked to Allen Millyard himself about the thing, and none of it was very convincing - except I haven't ridden it so I can't actually offer anything more than "what he said didn't make much sense".
  • 35 0
 Judge not, lest ye be judged. Said no one ever on PB.
  • 29 1
 Isn't pretty much every damper ever velocity dependent? Isn't that day 1 differential equations?
  • 17 1
 This.
  • 2 0
 i thought the whole point of the oleo damper is adding more position dependency through the tapered needle. but i ain't engineer.
  • 5 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT : why you no blog anymore? This fact only makes you more disappointing.
  • 11 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: This is not the last time I will disappoint you. It only gets worse.
  • 2 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: you couldn't get any worse. What has been seen can not be unseen...
  • 1 0
 I think he meant both the shox spring rate and damping when referring to "the damper", since it's basically a damper and the ifp charge effects spring rate and vice versa... he probably wanted to say "dampenator" but is waiting on the trademark.
  • 1 0
 Except for Boost Valve , we know how well that worked
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: Yes, but not spring rates.
  • 13 0
 I believe this is a version of the shock used on the Millyard DH bike, plenty of info about it on PB...

www.pinkbike.com/news/allen-millyard-part-1-2008.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/Millyard-racing-bike-2007.html
  • 1 0
 What he said^^
  • 2 1
 I'd say that is spot on. Also, the bike in your link looks really similar at a glance to the Hope DH proto that was modelled in another article here today...
  • 3 0
 in the article it says the shock gets very hot, so I thought this new shock would have cooling fins on it. that dh bike was so far ahead of its time
  • 14 0
 Oh good, I was wondering what happened to this. Looking forward to seeing if it's as magical as last year's article suggested.
  • 9 0
 *spends half a decade designing a shock that could revolutionize the industry. Not designed for "metric" sizing and completely fails.
  • 7 0
 Dude has been showing this revolutionary shock for years but until more than about 3 people get to ride it it's a little hard to take him seriously. Throw it on a DH World Cup or EWS privateers bike and show us some results.
  • 5 0
 Imagine this shock is $200 and blows every shock on earth to the next galaxy..
  • 4 0
 @theminsta: would be nice but at the moment imagination is all anymore has to go on.
  • 2 0
 @theminsta: may the lord hear your words.
  • 1 0
 The thing is, those 3 people are rather reputable people in this industry and at the time of testing obviously had nothing to gain from hyping the product as there was never a production run planned.
So, i´m not one to believe anything bike journalists say, as most times they just repeat some marketing scheme or are deep in the industries pockets, but in this case there´s literally nothing that would point to the assumption the reviews can not be trusted. Ok, maybe the fact Steve Jones likes to hype all things made in Britain Wink
  • 14 4
 I thought this was a late April Fool's joke...
  • 6 0
 I feel like they need to make the spring rate tune-able at least. Maybe not rider tune-able but certainly dealer tuneable. nitrogen isn't particularly expensive or hard to come by so it should be do-able
  • 6 1
 I'm interested on how it will feel on different suspension designs. A VPP bike won't feel the same as a Single Pivot
  • 3 0
 @kleinblake: That was the main reason I thought it needed to have an adjustable spring rate, even if you need nitrogen or a dealer once I get it dialed I rarely tweak the pressure
  • 6 0
 @j12j: If I understand it correctly the bike and thus pivot wont matter. The damping is solely dependent on the amount of force placed on the shock through the leverage. may or may not have just come out of my ass
  • 2 1
 @kleinblake: The original article about the Oleo damper is worth reading, if you can find it. Current shocks we're used to work better or worse on different designs as you know. i.e. VPP is best with multi-stage compression/rebound. single pivots dont necessarily need it. The Oleo design is infinitely adjusting so in other words could be considered infinite-stage compression and rebound. It should work incredibly well regardless of suspension design and rider style I just hope they offer one with a lockout.
  • 1 0
 @Shredthenoob: Isn't that different than spring pressure though? My understanding is that the damping only effects feel as it moves through the stroke and spring rate and suspension design will effect sag
  • 1 2
 @Shredthenoob: that's what she said
  • 1 0
 @cthorpe: even then, different suspension designs will be prone to different sag even with the same size shock and pressure. Still very interested. The shock looks like shit, but if it rips then it's rad
  • 6 1
 I rode the first generation of this shock on a Millyard. A multiple World Champion (French) also tested the shock. The feedback was it was a game changer. A large suspension manufacturer tested it, couldn't believe the results so re-calibrated and re-set the test rig. Same amazing results. Who cares what it looks like, it's the performance that counts and this will perform.
  • 6 0
 So why the large suspension manufacturer haven't made they own shock yet? If this technology is so good, how come the big players don't try it?
  • 1 1
 Form does follow function. It can always be made to look "sexier" if that's what the market demands. From all accounts (yours and Steve Jones') this will be a game changer when released.
  • 6 0
 I don't doubt for a second it's capabilities, but if 'a large suspension company' couldn't believe their eyes, why for the last 8 or so years have they not replicated it?
Especially for the MTB World Cup, where winning is EVERYTHING for a brand?
  • 2 3
 @Waldon83: because they are not intetested at disrupting their business. If they can keep selling the stuff coming out of their actual production lines with minir tweaks every year (metric) it means less costs. And the idea of competitipn is a joke. They mever step on each other's toes. So they wont do revolutionary innovation if mobody threatens them. Fck spelling
  • 3 0
 @Sontator:
True that.
However i think there´s also another reason, namely the development cost. That demo unit they had to test may have put out incredible data, but that was on a testing machine and a test bike with lots of work involved to set up the shock. Like the things allready stated in the article, Nitro still is working on adjustability and setting of different "spring"-weights. In todays mtb-suspension market adjustability is king, period. So even if this rides better, people most likely would not buy it as entusiastic as they buy shocks with 4way adjustments.

They most likely would have to figure out a way to make the concept attractive to 90% of their customer base in order to not piss of any customers, too.
Like, say if you can make it work in a downhill application, but there´s no way to fit a lockout or uphill switch of some sorts, enderpo riders will be pissed they do not get the best tech. As a business you need to make sure the lower end customers or those who require things for different applications also get their share of the new tech you develop, otherwise they will feel left out and loose brand loyalty.
I guess that would be a hard thing to accomplish with this design without massive R&D.

Nonetheless, this looks like a possible game changer if the adjustability requirements can be implemented in a way so consumers can utilize it to maximum efficiency without the need for a personal mechanic.
I´m certainly looking forward to the production unit and how it´ll do on a standard frame.
  • 1 0
 @Loki87: Sure Loki, if it comes to market it should be mature, as you say, cover todays standards. What I was getting at though is that it is shock tech from the 60's. If you had the best possible product in mind surely you could have a look at it. Then as a major company I don't believe the r&d to put a lockout on it or some form of adjustability would bankrupt you. But if the market does not demand it you just churn out the old tech with minor investment in your lines. Even worse if the new tech results being cheaper: less margin! If there is only one orifice in the shock and a couple of seals how can you charge so much for it! Do you remember when the small canadian tuner introduced the corset sleeve for fox air shocks? A couple months later suddenly fox was offering the evol can because someone was threatening their business. So: they don't innovate if it does not somehow diminish their margin. BTW: i am not hating but I believe a bit of transparency would do everyone good. We are being treated as children and spoon fed whatever.
  • 1 0
 @Sontator:
Totally true. The industry is doing just as you said.
What i was getting at with the technological and development side, is just that tech as "simple" (i can´t judge that, i´m no engineer) as this is sometimes harder to adapt due to exactly that simplicity. Just like Nitro apparently had trouble fitting acceptable external tuning options which are something that may even be detrimental to the core principle and benefits the shock offers, yet the market demands. So sometimes it´s easier to stick to the flamboyant option that offers less performance but can be sold easier without as much R&D needed. Pretty much what you allready said. Why innovate if you can still sell old crap with fancy new stickers Wink
  • 6 2
 Maybe it's just the fact that i'm in the art/design industry but If this shock is going to have a chance of getting a foothold in the market it's going to need a lot better than a microsoft word stock font slapped on the side. Hire a graphic designer, trust me Smile
  • 1 0
 I don't think the font will be the biggest issue in the mtb industry. The anodizing though will have to be made a lot better though
  • 7 0
 Yeah, I only bought my CCDBairCS because of its font...... And it's lengthy abbreviation
  • 1 1
 @Waldon83: I wasn't suggesting that people would buy the shock based on looks alone. But anyone who says looks don't matter is joking themselves. Take a scroll to any of the "sexiest" forum threads,
  • 2 0
 @IsaacO:
To be fair, this shock won´t be one for the masses. At least in it´s early days.
Small boutique manufacturers do play by different rules than the big corporations. Take a look at the PUSH Ind Shock for example. That thing looks kinda factory style, yet that´s most likely a acharacteristic the clientel of PUSH is looking for. There are quite a few small companys which do pretty well with this "raw-engineering" approach as some customers value just that. There are other examples that even use this to their advantage to this day, like HOPE Tech.
I for one would rock that thing on my bike in a heartbeat, even though (or because of) it´s prototype looks and mismatched colours. To be honest, i´m even kinda sceptical of most small production run products that sport a perfect finish, as those scream "underengineered and overdesigned".
So i´m not saying good design is detrimental or unnecessary, but sometimes an honest and down to earth appearance can be just as valuable. It just depends on the market segment you are operating in.
I for one can appreciate the garage tinkering approach Nitro is showing us here.

However, we are talking about a prototype here. And one that hasn´t changed that much for quite some time now. I guess they haven´t even looked at possible production facilities yet, so i think the end result will most definitely look quite a bit different from what we can see here.
  • 1 0
 @Loki87: Well put sir! Chiller font is still funny, you're right tho, as i said as a designer myself its hard for that to not jump out.
  • 7 1
 Isn´t air more simple and consists of nearly 4/5 nitrogen.
  • 2 0
 Also note Stephen Millyard rode the original shock at Bike Park Wales BDS. No disrespect he was off the racing scene for a while and came back with a reasonable race time. Yet through the speed trap he had the second fastest speed (including all the Elites). What does that tell you?
  • 1 0
 If the Millyard bike is as good as the single-digit amount of people who've ridden it say, why was it never produced?
  • 1 0
 Hey @si-paton

Any update on this Brew Shock? Was meant to get tested in Whistler last crankworx and there has been nothing on PB on it.
Just really interested, cheers
  • 2 1
 I think they are going to need to make a fork damper as well to match the shox performance. Seems like the oleo damper could be less expensive, lighter and easier to set up than most suspension on the market. Looking forward to hearing more.
  • 1 0
 If it's a lot more simple than the current rear shocks, does that mean it won't need to be serviced as often? Seems like you'd at least have to replace the oil occasionally, and it sounds like you'd have to send it back to the company to have that done.

Interesting stuff either way. Can't wait to see some current videos of it in action.
  • 1 0
 f it does what it says above, it will be a great piece of kit. Yes, it looks like dog shit now but wait until they polish the design and get some graphics on it. If you took the stickers and colourful bits off any current air shock it'd look shit too!
  • 2 0
 Keep an eye on www.StarlingCycles.com. I have a prototype Nitroshox coming soon for testing. Can't wait to give it a try. If all is good, they should be available on my builds shortly after.
  • 6 2
 One of the ugliest V10 builds I have ever seen... (don't take it personal)
  • 3 0
 This should be an exciting review that many people here on PB will be looking forward to!
  • 4 0
 Graphics brought to you by ms paint
  • 1 0
 As far as I can see there're two ways: it can be a VERY interesting product or total shiiit Smile I'm waiting for some serious test and info about possibility to service this thing.
  • 2 0
 if I don't need to spend time adjusting settings to get it to work as good if not better than other shocks on the market then I couldn't careless what it looks like..
  • 2 0
 I don't care if it's fuzzy and has a smiley face on it if it works. The "looks are as important as performance" argument may work for some... like Delorean owners.
  • 3 0
 OH NO @makripper please don't look at this!lol!
  • 4 0
 jesus. I think they are doing it on purpose! lol
  • 1 0
 @makripper: feckin feckers ha ha ha
  • 2 0
 if it caches on id love to see what frame builders could do with the space it frees up .. love the low profile look
  • 1 0
 "...it's able to match the forces put into the shock and self-adjust, meaning that riders shouldn't have to turn any dials"
heeeelloooooo
  • 1 0
 Send me one for my Yeti SB66, I'll do some testing and write a review, put it on here and Amazon and iTunes, where reviews are obviously 100% correct
  • 1 0
 I want to see it tested on the Redalp...sorry for bringing back memories of horror...

www.pinkbike.com/news/Redalp-Downhill-Bikes-2012.html
  • 1 0
 the tech is proven. Could use a face lift for production, but if it performs well, and is reliable, I am all ears. The more options, the better!
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy So did you test it? The article says you were supposed to in September.
  • 2 0
 Nope. They've had a delay in production, so we haven't had a chance to try one yet.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: What about now? Still looking forward to a real test of this shock.
Has the development stopped/ is it ever going to hit the market?
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: What about now? Any updates?
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: I've got one and Ive tested it!
  • 1 0
 @jordanchaos: nonsense
No photo no proof

otherwise, I'm listening
  • 1 0
 For everybody who's interested in reading a short review in german, mtb-news.de just posted a test of it. www.mtb-news.de/news/2017/09/20/nitro-shox-daempfer-test
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: Thanks ! Used Translator, but it's a very ordinary small review..... hardly makes sense in translation.
Keen to keep on hearing more about it though, looks interesting for sure
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: a short translation of the review: very positiv first impression, feels very different from everything else out there, very sensitiv, a lot of support in corners
  • 3 1
 ...So darling. Whose a good little shock..
  • 7 1
 who's*
  • 1 0
 @jaycubzz: thank you:-)
  • 2 0
 Nice to see something different, can't wait for some reviews of it Smile
  • 5 4
 "Hey there little shiny chrome shock shaft, the 90's just called and, well, you know... "
  • 2 0
 Did Hannebrink change it's name to BREW?
  • 1 0
 Imagine; these ENVE wheels combined with the full Hope purple groupe .... jizzzzzzzzzz
  • 1 0
 Any news around this interesting concept? Is the project stil moving forward?
  • 2 0
 non-metric sizes?
  • 1 0
 Well duh! How else are they gonna get everyone to buy it twice...
  • 1 0
 @diego-b: you guinea first to flat! hehe
  • 1 0
 Nothing like a good brew!
  • 2 1
 will it come in black? wesley snipes demands it to be!
  • 3 0
 lol who doesn't like Passenger 57? that's like down voting a video about puppies... or Point Break... what are you some kinda terrorist?
  • 1 1
 The original version of this shock apparently offered unparalleled performance. Really hope this one is as good
  • 1 0
 V10s have zerk fittings on the linkage?!?!
  • 2 0
 All Santa Cruz bikes do. They come with the grease and grease gun as well.
  • 1 0
 Blahahahahahaha that thing is hoopty!
  • 1 0
 Id be willing to try anything once
  • 4 0
 Don't say that at a gay bar
  • 1 1
 That's what she said
  • 1 0
 it will be perfect with a 888 vf
  • 1 0
 Naaa next one i will try will be the Fox X2
  • 2 0
 IS THIS 1991?
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy
Do you know what bike it will be attached to when you ride it?
  • 1 0
 How do I get in contact with these guys?
  • 1 0
 Cane Creek AD-5/10/12/Cloud 9 anyone?
  • 1 0
 Didn't Stratos Suspension use this technology over 17 years ago?
  • 1 0
 HURRY UP!!! were's the goods?
  • 1 0
 Any news here @mikelevy ?
  • 2 1
 I'd love to try one.
  • 2 2
 Good lord that is ugly and cheap looking
  • 1 0
 looks straight outa 1998
  • 2 2
 Soooooo Uglyyyyyyy
  • 2 1
 Yeah, like 90s suspension tech ugly.
  • 2 3
 are we supposed to take this thing seriously?
  • 3 4
 looks like junk
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