Field Test: Yeti SB115 - The One That Wants to Be a Trail Bike

Aug 10, 2020 at 18:32
by Mike Levy  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

YETI SB115



Words by Mike Levy, photography by Margus Riga



Do you remember the SB100? It was a cross-country-ish short-travel bike that Yeti debuted back in 2018, and I was a big fan when I reviewed it. Now the Colorado brand has something (kinda) new, the SB115 that you see here. Can you guess how much travel it has?

Yeti has put a 130mm Fox 34 on the other end, and they've installed things like a 50mm stem and 780mm-wide handlebar, and 30mm wide aluminum rims from DT Swiss. In stock trim, you'll also find a 2.5” wide Maxxis Minion DHF on the front and a 2.35” Aggressor on the back, both with an EXO casing. While Cannondale and Specialized take a racier, maybe Lycra, maybe post-ride beer approach, it's Transition, Revel, and obviously Yeti who come to the ride in baggies and already maybe a few beers deep.

SB115 Details

• Travel: 115mm rear / 130mm front
• Carbon frame
• Wheel size: 29"
• Head angle: 67.6°
• Seat tube angle: 74°
• Reach: 450mm (large)
• Chainstay length: 436mm
• Sizes: SM, MED, LRG (tested), XLRG
• Weight: 27.17lb / 12.3kg
• Price: $6,900 USD
www.yeticycles.com

Once you've bolted on all that stuff, the bike comes in at a hair over 27lb, making it the chunkiest one at the Field Test. A medium-sized frame and shock are said to weight 5.8lbs, so I'm sure you could put together a lighter one - it's only money!

The SB115 name is new and, given the bike’s travel, makes all the sense in the world. But neither the front nor rear triangles are new - those are the same as what Yeti used for the SB100. What is new, though, are the linkage pieces that drive the shock, and the shock itself also has a slightly longer stroke to deliver more travel. As for the SB100, it’ll eventually be retired to make room for this bike. Now that you know that, you won't be surprised to see that the SB115's geo is damn close to the SB100's numbers.

Back in 2018, I said that the SB100’s 67.8-degree head angle was “out there” for being a cross-country bike, but it’s certainly more the norm these days, especially if we’re talking cross-country bikes made to party. On the SB115, you get a 67.6-degree head angle with the 130mm-travel fork, and my large-sized test bike has a 74-degree seat angle and 450mm reach. That last number could be considered conservative, but don't forget that this frame comes out of the same mold that made the SB100 back in 2018.

On to frame details, specifically those tiny, funny-looking Kashima-coated shocks by the bottom bracket. Just joking, those are essentially stanchions or rails, and the black carrier that the swingarm is attached to slides up and down on them. Yeti says that this 'Switch Infinity' system allows them to control the axle path and that initially, as the bike goes through its travel, the carrier moves upwards to provide a rearward path for improved pedaling efficiency. Then, as the rear wheel goes deeper into its travel, the carrier moves downwards to reduce the amount of chain tension so the design can better deal with hard impacts.

Other frame details include a two-bolt ISCG tab setup around the BB92 bottom bracket, and the internally routed cables are fed through internal guides within the frame. That means that you can just push a new line in when needed, and it's how every bike with internal routing should be - this is the horse I'm gonna ride for a while because it's how it should be done. Speaking of doing it properly, the newer Switch Infinity layout provides plenty of room for a large water bottle inside the front triangle.




Yeti SB115 review Margus Riga photo.
Yeti SB115 review Margus Riga photo.

Climbing

I'm pretty sure that Kazimer thinks I spend way too much time thinking about how these bikes climb, and maybe he's right, but it seems to me that's what we spend most of the ride doing, isn't it? I mean, if you're out there for a three-hour lap, I bet 70-percent of that time is spent working hard to get up so you can enjoy coming back down. So yeah, I definitely want my cross-country-ish bike to make me look better than I actually am as I pedal up something that he dabs on. Thankfully, the SB115 is pretty good at exactly that.

Much like the Scalpel SE 1 (review incoming), the Yeti is quite adept at finding traction where the other bikes came up empty-handed. I might have considered the Yeti lucky if it weren't for the matching tires and pressure all-around that made it a fair fight during back-to-back laps. Back when I reviewed the SB100, I said that it ''pedals with nearly all of the enthusiasm of a race bike,'' but I don't get quite the same sense of urgency from the SB115 when I'm on the gas. It's not exactly slow - not many bikes in this travel bracket are - and Yeti's Switch Infinity suspension system has a well-deserved rep for being well-rounded, but I definitely got the trail bike vibe from it rather than the up-sized cross-country enthusiasm. The 130mm-travel fork plays a part in that, no doubt, but the upshot is that the SB115 has great technical climbing manners.

One side note: Back in 2018 when I reviewed the SB100, I did moan for a few sentences about its performance on tricky climbs, and now I seem to be doing the opposite about the SB115. What gives? Well, the SB100 was released two years ago, and the SB115 sports very similar geometry, while some brands have taken their numbers even further. So yeah, it's no surprise that the Yeti feels more manageable than the Spur and some others on super tight trails due to its shorter wheelbase.

I'd still give the nod to the Scalpel, though, as it seemed to have more enthusiasm for hard efforts than the Yeti. The clock agreed as well, and I had my slowest timed loop result on the SB115, 5.58-percent back from the Epic EVO's winning time. A lot of that came from Yeti being second-to-last over the full climb, just ahead of the Revel Ranger.

With the longest-travel fork and active, traction-aiding suspension, it's not a surprise to find that the SB115 climbs like the trail bike that it really wants to be. If all you read was 'It feels slow,' don't forget that the SB115 is pretty much a climbing rocketship compared to the over-forked, 150mm trail bike in your garage.


Yeti SB115 review Margus Riga photo.

Yeti SB115 review Margus Riga photo.
Yeti SB115 review Margus Riga photo.

Descending

The descent that we chose for our test loop has a handful of medium-steep rock rolls that any good cross-country machine should be able to tackle, even while high-posting in the slimiest of conditions. But while those rocks are best rolled slowly, the rest of the trail is a high-speed mix of small and medium-sized impacts; nothing crazy, but enough to easily upset a short-travel bike if you're not paying attention. The SB115's rear-suspension does an impressive job of dealing with all of it, and I'd go so far as to say that it offers the 'deepest' feel of the bunch, despite having 5mm less travel in the back than some others.

It doesn't erase the roots and rocks under you like a bigger bike would, of course, but with all five set to bang-on 30-percent sag, the Yeti's suspension was the least upset by the kind of stuff that doesn't make you take a different line, but does require some sort of rider input.
Timed Testing

Our timed lap for the trail bikes was just shy of 20 minutes long and split into three sections. First, we powered up a smooth section of switchbacks before starting up a more technical, twisty section of trail that tested the bike's slow-speed handling and traction with tired legs. After that, we evaluated how the bikes maintained speed on a short bumpy traverse before the main descent, comprising of a small rock roll before a series of rough, suspension-testing corners and straightaways. Nothing too rowdy, but representative of the terrain the trails these modern cross-country bikes were intended to see.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Mike Levy: "I had my slowest total loop time aboard the SB115, 5.58-percent back from the Epic EVO that won. My best time on the descent while riding the Yeti was 3.79% behind the Spur, putting it in fourth place ahead of the Scalpel."

Having a 130mm-travel fork, 10mm more than the other bikes, lead the charge into rough sections is surely a helping factor as well, and there were times when the SB115 felt like the trail bike it really wants to be...

But I think a trail bike has to offer a clear step forward in descending capability over a whatever-country bike. The SB115 didn't tick that box for me, but then why should it? After all, it's the same frame as the SB100, which is definitely not a trail bike. They have added 15mm more squish, a 130mm fork, and Yeti's 'Lunch Ride' flavoring that includes stuff like a wider handlebar and stouter tires, but the geometry remains close to unchanged.

I spent a ton of time on the SB100, and I loved that it was a fun-loving precision instrument. All those people who say things like, ''I hate XC, its laaaame,'' need to go for a spin on an SB100; it'll change their tune. But the slightly longer-travel SB115 feels muted, not just in comparison to its predecessor, but to the other four bikes as well. The good: Its 130mm fork and very impressive rear-suspension will trick you into thinking you have more travel than you actually do. The bad: The conservative length means that you don't get the same stability as you would from a bike with a longer footprint. So while the suspension is ready for your dumb line choices, it can't keep up with more contemporary bikes when the speeds rise and/or it gets rough.

The SB115 is a good bike, but it's hard to argue with back-to-back laps over and over again around the same loop - my best time on the descent while riding the Yeti was 3.79% behind the Spur, although it was still faster than the Scalpel SE 1.


Yeti SB115 Margus Riga photo


Am I crazy for wishing this bike had less travel? My thinking is that sure, it has an additional 15mm out back and a 130mm fork, but because it sports the same geometry, the SB115 isn't any more capable than the SB100, regardless of the parts hung off it. Since I wasn't going any quicker, or inspired to attempt more challenging terrain when I was on it, I have a hard time finding a place for it in my riding. Bottom line: It isn't any better than its predecessor, but it is different.

The ideal SB115 owner is probably someone who rides cross-country but wants no part of that firm, what-have-I-done-to-deserve-this suspension action. And they probably doesn't chase those downhill KOMs, or any KOMs, but they're out there all damn day and riding everything they come across.


Pros

+ Impressive suspension action
+ Great technical climber

Cons

- If you want progressive geo, this isn't your bike
- Relatively heavy compared to other bikes on test





The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with clothing, protection, and support from Giro. Control tires provided by Schwalbe, and power meters provided by SRM. Filming took place at The Backyard pub in Squamish.




Photos: Margus Riga
Video: Jason Lucas, Cole Nelson, Max Barron



238 Comments

  • 240 1
 Yeti: it's a race bike
PB: it's not a race bike
Yeti: it's a new bike
PB: it's not a new bike
  • 211 0
 Yeti: It's an expensive bike
S-Works: Hello
  • 22 1
 SB100 owners..
Am I dedicated SB100 Guy or 115 Bikurious..?
Maybe go for the “DownCountry XC bike Route” SB100 & Just add the 130fork Best of both
Keep the good pedaling Of the “old”.. add the extra fork PlushNess Of the “New”

Middle Earth Country Riders Rejoice
  • 21 0
 @Jaybirdy: don’t even start bringing hobbits and orcs into this....
  • 7 1
 Yeti-It does everything the SB100 does. Us-Just not as well Yeti-It does everything our SB130 does. Us-....
  • 15 0
 @usedbikestuff: It will leave you Legolas on the climbs...
  • 6 1
 @dubod22: People will certainly think it will be their precious.
  • 9 0
 @usedbikestuff: That's just what a Sackville-Baggins would say.
  • 11 0
 @dubod22: won't bore-o-mire on the climbs, let's you catch some air-o-gorn when you gand-off the drops. You'll have a Merry old time pippen this ride.
  • 2 1
 @Jaybirdy: Bikurious....love it!
  • 4 0
 @usedbikestuff: No-one wants to bring an orc to a yeti fight.
  • 1 1
 Yeti: Anybody can ride it
PB: Only dentists can afford it
  • 2 0
 @johnnyswinger: sry I downvoted you.. i meant to upvote ya for the love!
  • 106 0
 Mid-model refresh never fails to not impress ....
  • 48 6
 This. I waited for weeks for them to finally release this bike, and what a disappointment it was... It's amazing how some manufacturers are hitting the nail on the head when designing their new bikes while Yeti is over here like "let's polish up that turd and see if we can't sell a few more before we scrap the molds".
  • 4 7
 Agreed. However on one hand it's nice that they are updating the bike after only 2 years, when I'd say an average bike model lifecycle is about 3 years, but on the other hand, it will probably mean they don't completely refresh the bike for another 2+ years. Either way, it's a very dated bike simply due to the huge shift in longer/lower/slacker geo we've seen on all bikes over the past few years.
  • 24 2
 Given the quality issues that a lot of companies have in the first production run of a new frame, mid-models refreshes might have something going for them.
  • 54 0
 @DaneL: You mean polishing that TURQ...
  • 5 0
 So it does impress? Triple negatives get confusing
  • 21 1
 @DaneL: let’s not forget they have another bike in the lineup with only 15mm more travel and a super progressive geo. They have to separate their models somehow.. also, not everyone lives on the west coast or in whistler. A shit ton of terrain across the US where this geo works very very well! Having lived in Texas for a while, mountain biking is huge there and this will sale like hot cakes.
  • 8 0
 @utley06: The SB130 is a far different bike. They could have updated geometry for this model without making it ride like the 130.

I agree that this will work well in the flat lands, but so will a ton of bikes from 2-4 years ago. Why pay for a cutting edge bike when this is what you're getting?

Regardless, you're right. They'll sell like hot cakes because they're Yetis.
  • 4 1
 @DaneL: You could probably DC an SB130 and have a better bike. Replace the Fox 36 150mm with a Fox 34 130mm, travel limiter in rear shock to 120mm, lighter 25-27mm ID wheels and lighter tires... lighter everything should get an SB130 down to the 27lbs of the SB115.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. You'd end up with some weird geo and suspension characteristics, and the end result would just be an odd trail bike not a 'DC' bike. There's a reason most manufacturers don't try to make multiple bikes with a single frame. Yeti designed the 130 planning to overstroke the shock, not understroke it.

Also, I'm not entirely sure why anyone would understroke a shock. Why not just run less sag and more volume spacers so you would theoretically never use the extra travel? That way if you have an 'oh shit' moment, you won't bottom out.
  • 2 2
 @DaneL: No doubt the geo wouldn't be an SB130... but it doesn't mean the geo would be bad. HT would be closer to these DC bikes, BB would be a bit lower, a little more reach, the 130mm rear shock is really a 137.5 but uses a limiter from the factory... really you could just roll 130/130 or 140/130, but use a 34 to get to that 27lb range.

The SB130 and Spur geo are very close... the larges SB130/Spur: Reach 480/480, WB 1230/1219, HTA 65.5/66.0, STA 76.9/75.9, BBH 337.7/335.0, CL 433/435.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756: i already did this without playing with rear shock.. Ran a 130mm pike and a super light weight wheel build.. High roller and ardent race outback... Ks carbon lev dropper.. Thing was a rocket ship but the pedal strikes were bordering on ridiculous..
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: but the SB 130 pedals like a slug.
  • 1 0
 @utley06: they shouldve just kept it 100 then so they can put the ultralight sid 120mm on there
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: That's exactly how I have my SB100 set up. It rides so well.
  • 1 0
 @An-Undocumented-Worker: except it doesn't.. It pedals lighter and more efficiently than weight would suggest.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: It's funny though, because Levy looks like he is having a lot of fun riding it and he sounds like it when discussing it, but the actual words of the review don't match. It was mentioned elsewhere though, this may be the perfect east coast short travel bike.
  • 2 0
 @Gdg1: I have fun riding just about anything as long as I didn't pay for it. It's when the bike doesn't live up to expectations and I paid a ton of money for it that I get frustrated.

I'm sure it's a great bike compared to just about anything in the same class from 3 years ago. The issue is that other bikes have come a long way in that time.
  • 1 0
 @utley06: YES! Here in the upper Great Lakes region, a long, low bike with 66 head angle bike with steep seat tube is just stupid.
  • 69 0
 Watching Levy ride these XC DC bikes at mach chicken and a little bit out of control makes my day
  • 13 0
 Just the right amount of sketch.
  • 51 1
 @roma258: It's important to have the right amount of sketchy. More fun that way.
  • 4 0
 Its a tight loose kind of riding. I love it.
  • 2 0
 agreed. but it's why i ride an enduro sled on these kinda trails. i'd be on my face in the weeds rather than saving these.
  • 54 0
 Now I realize that we are talking about Yeti here, but I find 2nd tier aluminum wheelsets on bikes that cost almost 7 grand a bit of a pisser.
  • 5 0
 This is a bit strange. A set of XM1501 would have been right at home.
  • 13 0
 They're the top tier aluminum wheels now (they use XM481 rims). I don't feel like the wheels are out of place considering the rest of the spec. But yeah... it's pretty overpriced, especially considering they didn't have to create new molds for the frame.
  • 6 0
 @DaneL: Are they? The last gen XM1501 wheels (using the XM481 rims) used the 240 hubs while the M1700 series while upgrading to the welding join stil use the 350 hubs. Not to say anything bad about them, they are bulletproof.
  • 3 0
 @Maestroman87: Yeah, they changed the name to XM1700 to indicate that they use the welded rims. They still use 350 hubs, but that honestly makes more sense for most people (240s are far more expensive for a ~70g savings). The 1501 series wheels are now carbon.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: love my XM481's w/ 350's hammered and still true!
  • 3 3
 better than the raceface crap you see on rocky mountains 7k bikes.
  • 6 0
 @zanda23: rocky just released the new Slayer builds for 2021 and they use a DT 370 hub on the ~$7000 XT model. Absolutely trash hub on a dentist priced bike
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: Mea Culpa. I forgot the new line up has been announced. but yeah, I guess I am on the fence about a 350 hub here, 240 would be nice, but hardly realistic for anyone except the direct to consumer brands.
  • 2 0
 @thedirtyburritto: I've run 350 hubs and 240 hubs, and honestly I don't think it's worth the cost difference to get 240s unless you're making a super light build. You can upgrade the bearings in the 350 hubs, and at that point all you're really missing out on is the minuscule weight savings.

Another point is that for the 240 (exp) hubs, it is now going to be more of a pain to clean/service/upgrade the ratchets because one half is now part of the drive ring (which I've nearly broken a bench vise trying to remove). I'd rather just have the old design unless there's some huge hidden benefit that I'm not aware of.
  • 29 0
 @mikelevy clips that rock with the front wheel at 10:23 - That could have been a Friday Fail for sure. Lucky bro
  • 43 0
 Dude, that was nose bonk on purpose... yeah...
  • 1 0
 He was going to land on that rock one way or another, seemed like the smarter thing to do than nail it head on.
  • 1 0
 @ConstructiveEngineering: Oh, so what you are saying is the @Mikelev performed critical calculations in his head to determine the best way to hit that rock. Oh, OK. Maybe your are thinking like and engineer.
  • 1 0
 @zerort: Heh split second decision. Some of us are capable and some are not I guess.
  • 1 0
 @ConstructiveEngineering: And apparently some of us, like you, are telepathic and know what other people are thinking.
  • 41 13
 I'll wait for the SB107.5
  • 73 23
 I’ll wait for a new joke
  • 4 0
 Don't give them any ideas mate, they'll do it! Smile
  • 24 0
 The SB afternoon tea
  • 5 0
 You're just a couple travel spacers, 60mm stem, and hacksaw for the handlebars away from realizing your dream!
  • 7 0
 @sewer-rat: SB Elevensies has a better ring to it.
  • 1 0
 @Vulhelm: isn't that a radio station?
  • 3 0
 @boozed: "SB107.5 - All your dentist-office smoooth hits!"
  • 1 0
 @hi-dr-nick: do you mean a new yoke? That might be all it needs
  • 1 0
 sb107.99999
  • 22 3
 Given most dentists (here anyway) haven't worked since February, I think we have going to need to find a new profession to take the piss out off.
Perfect bike for an Amazon executive?
  • 18 1
 Yeti, perhaps unintentionally, made a killer east coast trail bike. Thanks?!
  • 5 0
 Exactly what I was thinking too. It sounds like a good technical climber that's a bit more stout than a typical XC bike, has the same front end travel that I like on my hardtail but with some back end give for the rock garden descents and small jumps around here, but is a bit lighter than a typical trail bike. I already see a fair number of SB4.5s and SB100s around, maybe the SB115 will take their place.
  • 2 0
 Reminds me quite a bit of my Ripley, which does happen to be a killer east coast trail bike ????
  • 1 0
 Yeah that's what I thought when I watched Levy's review too...
  • 1 0
 I think I would rather have a hardtail if I was going to ride the smooth trails near the coast but you do you It might be good in Appalachia, though.
  • 16 0
 I wish all bike reviews in the site get this format, is easier to see the pros and cons comparing different bikes in the same segment, good job Pinkbike!!!
  • 23 0
 All Field Test reviews will look like this, and they'll be many more of them Smile
  • 12 0
 Agree. This reviews are fantastic. Control tires and PSI. Perfect.
  • 8 0
 @garrettstories: Yeah, control tires are huge. I've long felt like most bike reviews are just tire reviews, since tires are far, far and away the most noticeable part of any bike.
  • 2 1
 @mikelevy: It's interesting seeing the Specialized s-works compared to a Transition that retails for nearly half, but when doing straight up timed and efficiency tests, with 1st-5th place, would it be more appropriate to have bikes in the same price range compared? Kudos for including the $12k Cannondale race bike, and then a $5.5k Cannondale DC bike.
  • 13 2
 Could be a cool bike that would fit perfectly into my need for a downcountry high-alpine bike, but with other great options from brands without notorious quality issues, I don't see why anyone would ever buy this. Especially over a Spur or Revel Ranger.
  • 6 0
 Plus if you do want a Yeti (that SI suspension is no joke), then I think there are better arguments to make in favour of the more xc-ish SB100 or the more big-mountain-friendly SB130 depending on your riding. It honestly seems like a shorter, poppier setup on an SB130 frame would be more in line with something like the Spur.
  • 5 0
 @big-red: I think the SB100 is being phased out because people want more travel than 100mm, especially since their target market isn't XC racers. Yeti is all about big mountain riding given that their HQ is in Colorado, and a lot of our trails have long, technical-ish descents -- even the ones with 6-7k feet of climbing. 100mm is definitely XC race travel -- 115 is easier to market to endurbros looking for a lighter rig alongside their 150 for high country missions.
  • 2 0
 @fullendurbro: That's actually a really good point. I guess the regular SB100 is a good 4 lbs heavier than a lot of similar-specced bikes in the xc category.
  • 2 2
 Yeah, his bike is kind of a mash up, increased travel but conservative geo.

When Levy says this bike is for "tighter and slower riding", I get the sense that what he's really saying is "slower riders on non technical terrain".

There are a bunch of bikes in this category that are far better suited for trail riding, including an SB130.
  • 1 1
 @fullendurbro: Yeah 100mm is not enough for aggressive riding on even semi-technical trails, the SB100 could handle a good amount though. My buddy put a 140mm 36 on his because the 34 felt undergunned compared to the rear. Going the route of something more setup for longer days/more precise riding is where I am heading for a 2nd bike but when there are much lighter bikes with more agro geo it is hard to think about the SB115.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: "slower, less steep, less open terrain" might be more accurate. From my arm chair, my hunch is I'd prefer this vs Spur in VT, which is jank AF.
  • 2 0
 I bought the Spur. I rode the Spur. I'm now selling the Spur for a SB115. I find that I'm much more comfortable, and for much longer days in the saddle. That's why someone would buy a SB115. I ride in CO.
  • 2 0
 @big-red: I rode the SB100 back to back with a SB115. There isn't that much difference between the two, especially considering the front and rear triangles are the same. Also the SB130 and Spur feel aboslutely nothing alike. The Yeti is very tight, and racey whereas the Spur is much more playful and fun loving. Between the two, the Spur is more poppy for sure. You can boing off of whatever you want, where the SB130 you need to be a little more... selective in your line choice.
  • 3 2
 @stillclimbing: I find it hard to believe you've already bought, taken delivery of, and had enough time on the spur to decide you want to sell it. This sounds like someone wanting to be an expert so badly they make stuff up.
  • 5 0
 @fullendurbro: A month isn't long enough? I've spent the last 2 years on various bikes. With enough experience, you really don't need more than a few rides on a bike before you understand what it is. Regardless, it's listed in the Pinkbike Buy/Sell, so see for yourself.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: the colour of the yeti will match his jeep better Wink
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: haha.. right? truth be told, the Spur is closer in color (its super close!). I almost went with that new "Blanco" SB115, but decided on the classic yeti turquoise instead. that, and the blanco is out until like Oct or something?
  • 1 0
 @stillclimbing: haha i'm not sure but either bike will be sweet on the back of that (jealous of the jeep tbh) I can't wait to get one myself. The blanco will show dirt easy. Also how to you find the AXS system? I work in electronics engineering (essentially programming that stuff) but I'm apprehensive having electrical components on a bike.
  • 5 1
 @monkeybizz: So.. I was super analytical about going with AXS. I compared bikes with XT/XTR and then others with X01/XX1/AXS. Part of me really didn't like the idea of having anything requiring a battery on a damn mountain bike. To me, there's somethign wrong about that. It's a pedal machine after all.. but.. in the end, it turned out to be a really, really good experience. To be honest, I probably won't ever go back to a cabled derailleur after experiencing the AXS one. It is *extremely* precise shifting every. single. time. you shift. I also like the shifter controller itself. You just rock your thumb a little bit and it clicks the deraileur into place lightning fast. Honestly, its amazing tech. That said, is it really worth its (expensive) price tag? ehhh.. It's definitely a luxury item, albeit a really good one at that. Oh, and I like how you can program it. I set mine to move 3 gears if I hold up or down on the controller, but otherwise it just fires off a single shift with a quick flick of your thumb. One downside I'm still getting used to is on switchbacks or really tight corners where I can accidentally cause a shift to happen because the controller sometimes comes into contact with my knee (again, on sharp turns)

The AXS dropper... Mechanically (and electronically?) it's rock solid and precise. I really like the tension of the movement. There is a very solid thunk as it moves quickly to the top of its travel and hits the stop. That said, I won't be mirroring this seatpost onto the SB115. Number one reason is because it won't fit, lol... but more to the point, the AXS dropper is a lot heavier than the 2021 Fox Transfer, and the SB115 is already a little porkier than my Spur, so i'm trying to save every bit of weight I can. Do I enjoy using the AXS dropper? Yeah, I really do. I honestly can't complain about any aspect of it other than weight. There is one cool thing about it that I think is *really* nice if you travel with your bike on a plane, and that is you can just pop it out and bring it with you. No dealing with cables on a dropper. That's a really cool thing (again, if you travel with your bike on a plane).

Oh. and a word about the batteries. They last longer than you think they do. People hear 23 hours of time and they think they're going to have to charge them often. No.. that's 23 hours of IN-USE time. They can stand-by basically forever. I still haven't charged them again since their initial charging, and they still show green when you hit the button to turn them on / check battery. I was impressed by that. Oh, and the battery status shows up in the AXS app, which I thought was pretty clever.
  • 1 0
 @stillclimbing: That's awesome! thanks for the thorough explanation Smile . Unfortunately it is currently a luxury item but hopefully in the near future prices will come down enough that I can afford one! Plus the fact you don't have to deal with cables too.
  • 4 0
 @stillclimbing: I thought the Spur only started shipping last week. That makes sense then. Month is plenty long if you know what you like.
  • 14 3
 Yeti get's a lot of flack for being the "dentist" bike (from me as well) but it seems like every other high end manufacturer are raising prices quickly while Yeti has been more stable. Santa Cruz and Pivot, high end Specialized, and almost every other brand has similar prices when comparing top spec builds.
  • 12 0
 Since you guys have already tested the 2020 Trek Top Fuel, it would be cool to get your impressions of that bike vs these current bikes on test.
  • 9 0
 I must go to the wrong dentist... my dentist likes to do short jogs and eat lots of candy. I tell him I ride mountain bikes and drink lots of craft beers. He says I must be a big fan of the Tour de France. ??? This dentist knows no Yeti... haha
  • 8 0
 Great review, and this is almost exactly what the comments section pointed out on the first ride article. Dated geo (because it's a 2 year old bike) so it's not going to be fastest downhill, heavy so it's not going to be fastest uphill, and feels like more of a trail bike but probably not in a good way.
  • 5 0
 After reading this review, the Spur review, and looking at the geo numbers...I’d really like to get @mikelevy impression of a medium Spur. I know he mentioned the logic, but since he brought it up in this review, the geo differences btwn an L Sb115 and a L Spur are significant. Are they significant enough to make the Spur more manageable on the ups???
  • 7 0
 I think you know the answer, get the medium spur
  • 1 0
 @anothermtnbiker: Well, yeah. Wink

It just seems odd that they'd put all this effort into this huge comparison/shoot out...then one of the bikes is just completely different (geo wise) to all of the others. Would a M Spur (comparable to the other brands L) climbed a bunch better and still nailed the downs...or: maybe it is only a marginally better climber, but loses its stability when descending. Mr. Owl: The world may never know!

Longer/slacker: more stable on descent/more of a chore climbing. Most of us don't need a professional reviewer to figure out that model rocket science.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'1 with a 33inch inseam. I'm a little more torso than leg. I bought my Spur in size Large. I find it to be almost perfect for my dimensions. That said, I'm going with an XL for the SB115 because in L I think it just feels too cramped and its not just the reach/stack. In other words, I think the Spur is sized correctly in comparison with the rest of the bikes out there in the industry, and the SB100/SB115 feels a little small for its given size.
  • 1 0
 I've talked to few people on the Spur and they have all "sized down." In other words, if their enduro/DH bike is an XL, they are on a Large Spur. Granted most of these people are in between sizes but they felt that sizing it like their enduro/dh bike took away some of the sporty feel you get with shorter travel bike.
  • 1 0
 @stillclimbing: I dunno man. Look at the geo on today's Scalpel review. The M Spur has longer reach and wheelbase and on 1mm shorter stack and chainstays. It's easy to argue that an M Spur is actually larger than a L Scalpel. There's plenty of other bikes that fit this mold too: A L 429 Trail is appx = M Spur in geo; a L EpicEVO is more comparable to M Spur than a M EVO....I could go on and on (some might say I already have Smile ).

I hate to keep harping on this, but, once again, the more compact (albeit heavier) Scalpel climbs better...but descends worse.
  • 6 1
 Hi can I please have a short-travel, playful bike? But can you please put a bit more travel on it? And can you design the linkage so it feels like there is a little more travel please? - Yeti owners, probably
  • 7 0
 I have seen a lot of SB100s for sale. It was kinda a weird inbetweener. Too much bike for the XC crowd and not enough bike for, well, everyone else.
  • 5 1
 @Paddock22: Actually SB100 is plenty of bike despite its short travel in the back. I have an SB 5.5 and it's been sitting in the garage for a while now because Sb100 is a much better all around bike. Clearly SB100 climbs a lot better than 5.5, but it's also a very capable descender.
  • 5 4
 @alati:

That just sounds like you don't ride the 5.5 hard enough.
  • 4 0
 @alati: For sure the SB100 is capable under the right rider but 100mm of travel isn't a whole lot at the end of the day. It's doesn't leave a lot of room for mistakes for the average Joe, which is probably why the end up with the SB130.
  • 2 0
 @Paddock22: Yeah, you are right! Also a lot depends on the trails you ride and what you are really into. Personally, I've come to like the sharpness and nimbleness of the SB100. I can cover a lot of ground on it. Yes, it can get sketchy over the rough stuff. However, on the trails I ride the sketchy stuff is fairly short so I’m more than happy to make that compromise and stick with the SB100.
  • 3 1
 @alati: same boat, 100 is my go to for almost everything, it rips down scary steep shit with a little attention to line choice and climbs like a goat. Park and chunky stuff gets the 5.5. It’s like a chisel vs a hammer
  • 4 0
 Looks like I will just keep my SB100 as is. I was considering converting my 100 to 115 with the new sb115 switch link, swing link, and longer stroke shock, but probably not worth it. Im sure this Yeti 115 might not last in the Yeti line up too long. Maybe in 1 to 2 years the frame will be updated with the longer, slacker HA, and steeper STA treatment.
  • 1 0
 Have you confirmed with Yeti that this is possible? It would require both a switch link and swing link as well? I have a friend who just got a SB100 and wouldn't mind adding some travel as she was coming from an SB5.
  • 2 0
 @tgent: I have sb100 and confirmed with Yeti. They say you need a new link, shock, AND a new switch infinity. Also running longer travel, they suggest 130mm fork as well. That’s like close to $2000 to convert. I’ll keep my sb100 as is 120/100mm.
  • 9 1
 I'd honestly rather stay with the 100. Either that or swap the entire bike to a SB130. The 115 seems like the worst of both worlds.
  • 1 0
 @big-red: Just got an SB100 (Review on Youtube Bike Somm) was also considering swapping some parts to convert into a 115..

tho I jumped the Gun.. Threw a 130mm 34 Grip2 fork on and I’m pretty happy just leaving it alone now!
  • 5 0
 I’m a burly bike type of boy, but I changed my tune after riding a Rocky Mountain Element. So now this field test has me interested and my bank account getting nervous.
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy: Where do you think the Hei Hei would fit into this group?
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Maybe next year's XC field test will have an updated Element. 2021's are out and it looks like they just made it more golder :-(
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy: I found the Element to be less twitchy and more stable than my Canfield Balance. Obviously a bike cannot be judged by its head angle anymore.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: i love my element. Is it still relevant in 2020 compared to these other bikes?
  • 5 0
 @beardi: do you enjoy riding it? If so, then yes. Smile
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: yeah but what if i could be riding something more betterer? I read too many bike reviews
  • 3 0
 Cool that 100 owners can just change the link and shock for a different bike feel. That frame is a pig though. The previous generation was a lot lighter and more compliant. They might want to take that into consideration with the next generation. The SB 4.5 could be built up super light and still rip down hill. Hell my XL 5.5 Turq is 27.4# with normal components. I want to try out that new Spur.
  • 3 2
 @sbrdude1 - It sounds to me like you haven't actually ridden a SB100 or SB115. Calling it a pig just a trolling and misleading bit of misinformation. As anyone who's ridden it knows, it doesn't feel (at all) like the weight numbers suggest it should. Speaking of weight, you can easily build one to just under 26lbs, and considering my Spur is built to just under 25lbs, I'd say that's pretty damn close. The very different frame layups and suspension also play into the effect here, which means the SB115 has the typical Yeti feel of Racey & Fast while the Spur's more party-time (read: uses its travel much more frequently) frame and suspension means they feel dramatically different than one-another. I'm not going to time-trial numbers posted in the review, but suffice it to say that neither bike is trying to be an actual XC race bike.
  • 1 0
 @stillclimbing: I've spent plenty of time on the 100. Thanks for assuming what you clearly do not know.
  • 4 0
 How does the Ibis Ripley V4 compare to the DC bikes you are testing? Mike you tested it and Sarah you raced it the BC Bike Race. While it is a little over a year old now it seems like it would do well with this group.
  • 2 0
 Also what are your thoughts of the Ripley with a 120mm fork?
  • 4 1
 @Mikelevy One of the reasons that PB is such a valuable news source for MTB is the sheer number of bikes you, Mike and Sarah ride. Are there any bikes in these tests that stand out as being such a great ride that it’s made you put one in your garage? It’s also interesting to see the progressive geo changes even in the XC market make those bikes unarguably better. I might not have guessed we’d be here 5 years ago.
  • 3 0
 This is a good question, and I'm sure would make a good article. Show the current bike stables for the main PB testers with a description of why the bike was chosen and how/where it gets ridden. @mikelevy @mikekazimer @sarahmoore and anyone else who test rides all the cool stuff. It's rare to be able to throw a leg over so many bikes like you all do.
  • 3 0
 Please publish all the times in the round up. Really interested to see how the fasted climbers in this category compare to the pure XC bikes. Yeah they'll be slower... but by how much. And how far off the "Downcountry" bikes is the Scalpel XC bike. Really helpful to weight up the pure XC vs. something a bit more fun. Thanks
  • 3 0
 After having the SB 100 for over a year (and making some stabs at true XC racing and realizing it wasn’t for me) I was elated when I heard the 115 platform was coming into play. We still have a 100 my wife rips on tho and she’s stoked on it.
So I’ve spent the last month + on the 115. Lots of laps here in Cave creek, Sedona, and flagstaff Arizona. A week in Bend and a week riding post in Hood River, both in Oregon. I’ll be clear, I wanted the same 100 geo. I wanted that ripping quick BMX feel. I love to rip jibby jumps and berms. The 115 just has that increased ability to drop into a more aggressive riding style Immediately. . Quick, stable, planted, and “sendable” are the words I would use to describe the bike in ALL the above mentioned locations. I bought the T2 build and put on my old Reynolds wheels and run a 2.6 recon on the front with a 2.3 aggressor on the back. I also switched the fork to a Fox 34 grip 2 140 lowered to 130. (Huge difference)
I mean @#$& guys you have to look at the geo and know what you want. The bike is a sick ass Big BMX bike.
If I’m going down vert all day I go with a slacker bike and smash thru everything. 85% of my rides these days is on this115 bike.
And I’m not a dentist I just kinda go old school and work more when I want nice shit........
  • 2 0
 Hey Mike, I wish I was pink bike tester like you. You have an awesome routine testing bikes and living in the woods. What we call fun moments is your daily routine. I know, I know, not a ton of money. But fun comes before money, right ?
  • 4 0
 I just want to know if the hand tattoos came before being a journalist or after.
  • 4 1
 Bahahahaha. All you idiots who mocked me for saying the yeti would be the slowest climber, trying to say it would be fastest, how do you feel now? (I WAS wrong, with it being second slowest, but I digress).
  • 6 0
 Looking at the numbers this is literally just like my 2017 trail bike XD
  • 2 0
 Can someone help me out on dissecting the huck to flat? I am seeing some bikes move through their rear suspension smoothly while other get hung up half way through then continue on. Most apparent here. Is it riding technique/fork changing the weight distribution/HA/ or is it in the rear with suspension linkage design/shock tune/shifting body position? Seems like something we would notice out on the trail. I've ridden the SB100 through some very rough and rooty trails where most people had 140mm+ bikes and it seemed to have great mid stroke support and bottom out resistance.
  • 2 1
 Interesting thought.. In regards to the topic of hucking to flat, let me give you an example of a 4ft staircase drop that I've taken the Spur and SB115 through for comparison. The Spur is very smooth and velvety going through its suspension, and it really feels like you're using the suspension. Of course you can bottom it out if you *really* try, but for the most part it just swallows up junk going through impacts, leveraging that suspension platform. The Yeti on the other hand feels very different. Its more like skimming the top of things, and only using the travel when it really needs it. There is a helluva lot more anti-squat built into the Yeti than the Spur as well. That equates into feeling like you're much more "on top" of the Yeti, whereas you're "in" the Spur if that makes sense. FWIW - I bought and am currently riding the Spur now, but I'm transitioning (pun intended) to the SB115 here in about a week or so. STA issues on the Spur for me.

I share your thoughts on SB vs. rough and rooty trails as well.. Its just a very different platform than what most bikes are using. I could probably say that about the Spur as well though..
  • 2 0
 @stillclimbing: seems like that anti-squat “on top” feeling has been part of their desired ride characteristics going back at least to SB66. Works great when you are on the gas and engaged.
  • 2 0
 "Does more travel mean more better?" - Indisputably. That is why I'm buying a gravel bike in September )) On a serious note, how can "relatively heavy" bike be a "great climber" is beyond any logic. I guess that is some magic or money involved.
  • 6 0
 Nice unique paint ...
  • 1 0
 Levy, have you ever spent time aboard the Pivot Mach 4sl? I’ve been looking closely at that bike for a while and actually held off on purchasing to see what this Field Test would show. This bike - and the 100 before it - seems to come closest to the Pivot in terms of approach and everything I’ve read suggests the Pivot does what the 100 did but better. Any thoughts on whether that’s still the case with the new bike?
  • 1 1
 I was *extremely* interested in the Mach 4SL. Then I rode one. Here's the thing about the 4SL... It's on a very different end of the spectrum than how the SB115 (or even SB100) turned out to be. I didn't like it. The 4SL felt like a straight up XC bike with a tiny bit burlier build, whereas the SB and Spur felt much more like a true XC/Trail blend. I'm not saying the 4SL is bad in any way shape or form (it's a great bike in its own right) but it just didn't *feel* like SB at all. Hopefully that makes sense. FWIW - The 4SL was definitely a more efficient pedaling platform than either the Spur or SB. I think that's due mostly to DW-Link (it's damn good) but also the suspension.
  • 5 0
 Its a pig at that weight.
  • 2 0
 I can't see why you would buy this over an SB100, other than the fact that the SB100 isn't on Yeti's website anymore. Which seems like a shame, since the SB100 is probably the better bike...
  • 1 0
 This maybe weird because it's supposed to be an XC bike, but I found the SB100 super fun for flow trail jumps. It's poppier and easier to boost and whip around than an enduro bike, yet still slack enough to take a bad landing without being too sketchy.
  • 2 0
 @smooresmoore @mikelevy you both have extensive time Ibis Ripley V4 and curious how you think it would compare to the down country bikes with the standard 130mm fork or with a 120mm fork?
  • 1 0
 So for those who currently own the Yeti sb100 (who bought the Sb100 frame only for $3,400 plus tax) and want to convert to their 100 to 115 you will need the new 115 switch infinity link/hardware ($320), new 115 swing link with 30mm spacing conversion (probably $120), new longer stroke fox rear shock 190 x 45 ($459). That's about $ 4,299 (frame + new 115 parts) and that's without a new 130 mm fork or 130 mm airshaft swap. Is the money worth it to upgrade your current 100 to 115 with an outdated geometry?
  • 1 0
 "but with all five set to bang-on 30-percent sag"

That's just silly. Sag is a starting point, not "the" setting for everyone. Just setting a sag percent and calling it done is _not_ a proper suspension setup.

Does that even match all the manufacturers' recommended sags? Are they even all the same shock on all the bikes? For bikes with the same shock, were all the clickers set the same? Did they all have the same volume spacers installed?
  • 4 0
 Can we reduce a SB115 to a SB100?
  • 2 0
 I'm sure there are SB100 owners out there willing to swap linkages and shocks.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely! Buy sb115, and I’ll swap my link, shock, infinity switch, and fork. I’m looking to convert my sb100 to 115 anyway....
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: I'd make that trade in a heartbeat! I love my hundo with aggressive tires and cushcore and I'm pretty sure I'd love it even more w/a bit more squish.
  • 1 0
 @laksboy: I spoke with Yeti a couple of days ago. It’s a lot to convert. New link, shock, switch infinity, and new fork. Almost $2000usd. No Tks
  • 1 0
 @fredro: I know I asked them a month ago. Once the hundo stock runs out, I'd love to find someone who'd trade me SB115 hardware for my 100 hardware.
  • 2 2
 The switch does not need to change, they just refined the interface with the switch and frame. The updated version should make the rear stiffer and reduce the loosening of the hardware that happens on 2nd gen sb100s. There is an upgrade kit for sb100 as opposed to full switch swap.
  • 1 1
 @fredro: Wouldn't it just be a new airshaft? Not a new fork? so $40 vs $1000
  • 2 0
 @bobthestapler: The SB100 came with the Step Cast 34 fork, no 130mm option in the SC34. So you have to switch to the standard 34 to get 130mm of travel.
  • 1 1
 @connriverdesign: Bro I have the emails to prove. I spoke with them on the phone and through emails. But hey... I guess you know more than yeti does....
  • 1 1
 @bobthestapler: Incorrect. I confirmed with yeti via phone and emails. You would need new link, shock, switch infinity, and a 130mm fork to keep geo numbers appropriate. Call yourself to get the same answer...
  • 2 0
 @Zippy7: I see. Would have made that upgrade path quite a bit more enticing if the SC 34 was able to go to 130. Thanks for the info.
  • 6 2
 loving these light trail bike tests
  • 4 0
 So it doesn't not not impress, that's for sure
  • 1 1
 Yeti should give this bike the long slack treatment but not the low part which sucks to pedal, sell it with fast rolling tires and sell it as a rapid all around trail bike meant for average riders on average trails.

Yeti factory spec dudes - I know that the DHF/ Aggr combo is tried and true but putting the exact same tires on your entire lineup is absurd when the bikes are clearly meant for different trails and riding styles. The result is many riders say things like 'the SB150 pedals just as well as the SB130 so I might as well buy the SB150 for trail riding' when if both models had tires appropriate for their usage the SB130 in fact would pedal much easier.
  • 4 0
 So is this basically just a Trance Advanced 29 for a lot more money?
  • 2 0
 From what I can find online the Trance Advanced frameset even weighs less. The SB115 is definitely a trail bike.
  • 3 0
 @icthus13: Frameset weight for mine w/out shock, major hardware was 4lbs 10oz.

Trance is slacker in the HA and steeper in the ST, to boot. Most build kits come a little on the burly side, especially the upper trim levels.
Most review outlets quote high 26lb range for the middle and top carbon spec, which generally includes 1000-gram tires and piggyback shocks.

The trance 29er 3 in alu starts at $2150 w/deore/fox/marzocchi.
  • 1 0
 @parkourfan: I think I could buy a Trance Advanced frame for $3k and spec it out like a weight weenie and come out lighter than the Yeti. Possibly cheaper, but maybe not.
  • 2 0
 @icthus13:
You could buy the frame only for cheaper than that at just about any shop if you ask nicely. Or, buying the lowest-priced spec last year at $3350 and stripping it for parts for sale would make sense as well. Either way, you'd get a better warranty. Love mine as a NE daily driver. Starts to run into trouble in the chunky stuff, or huge hucks to flat. Flow, moderate tech, or crawling up nasty climbs and its a ton of fun.

Lots of decent options in the short-travel trail category, the yeti may not be one of them. Seems like we should be seeing more of the sid-equipped short travel bikes and fewer of the 34/pike/piggyback options like what the trance is, tbh.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy Do you think an SB130 reduced to 120mm have been a better option?
  • 2 0
 Con: Yeti recognised the need for a down tube pad for protection from rock strikes but forgot that the cables exit from the same point.
  • 1 1
 Yeti you are blowing it. Your bike line up can be cut in half.
I am still riding my trusty 2014 sb66 carbon rear and it rips.
From here on out it’s simple hardtail, 100, 130, 150, 170 and a
DH sled that made your brand in the first place get back to it.
Jeeeeeeezzzzzz this Could easily be a Friday fail.
  • 3 0
 I love the 10:37 turned-bar nose bonker @mikelevy!
  • 1 0
 er.. 10:22
  • 3 3
 What was the reason not to include the YT Izzo in this test? The PB review was a little unclear in the final verdict, but generally described the Izzo as a bike that would fit the "downcountry" definition.
  • 7 0
 I know the Izzo would have fit well, but so would many other bikes. And since it was already covered, we chose not to include it Smile
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy:

Including a few sentences about the Top Fuel, Izzo, etc in the wrap-up would be awesome, although you probably have it all in the can by now...
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: I understand, but it would still make a lot of sense to have the comparative aspect - especially for us who are not fortunate enough to have all of the bikes available for demo locally. Maybe the suggestion by @Auto-XFil could be incorporated in the final conclusion?
  • 1 0
 @Auto-XFil: @mikelevy And maybe the non-RC Scott Spark.
  • 3 0
 The lycra adds so much to the slomo huck to flat
  • 1 0
 All I can say - I wish I could ride like Levy... damn that looks like a blast. I can climb like a super fit roadie - but ain't got the flow as seen in these videos.
  • 2 1
 Was so close to selling my SB5 for this and this review just made me realize what a good decision it was to not sell my 5 for the 115
  • 2 1
 Levy's clearly an experienced rider, but his body position seems a bit off (elbows down, chest behind the bars). Or am I looking at this wrong?
  • 1 0
 Levy is just loose AF. Channeling Jesse Melamed, but on an XC bike. :'D
  • 1 0
 He's also probably riding a loaner bike from the company so he can't cut the bars down. And he's not doing a long-term review of these bikes, so it doesn't make sense to swap the whole cockpit out, even though it's easy.
  • 1 0
 I remember when the SB 4.5 was my dream bike. This new iteration doesn’t look nearly as appealing especially next to bikes like the Spur (and it’s price tag).
  • 2 2
 Thank you to all the bike companies who have threaded bottom brackets! I have always had bikes with them...and will continue to buy bikes that have a threaded bottom bracket.
PF92 - You suck and will always suck Smile
  • 2 0
 Someone was clearly on a "Friends" binge when they were writing this article.
  • 2 2
 Oh look its another “made in china boutique” with identity problem
interested why this cost more than made in house UNNO?
Or its just business, and fanboys going to pay anything to get new china bike?
  • 1 0
 XCish geo with a bit more comfort via increased travel. Looks like a good option for multi day marathon events. Not much technical terrain, but very long hours in the saddle.
  • 3 0
 is mike levy related to the guy off linus tech tips
  • 2 1
 So... can a SB100 owners buy a longer shock and the new linkage to convert their now outdated bike?
  • 1 0
 sounds like this is already outdated by the geometry...
  • 1 1
 You would also need a new switch infinity as well, and a 130mm fork. I confirmed with yeti.
  • 1 0
 Just out the 130 fork on.. that’s what I did And lowered the stem a tad & bam! SB100/130 the Downcountry’s XC Bike!
  • 1 3
 @fredro: that’s not true, it’s just a slider on rails. Or does have a better frame interface but that’s just a perk. Thay said, the update is well worth the $150 even if keeping it 100
  • 1 1
 @connriverdesign: lol I CONFIRMED WITH YETI! Call yourself if you like to hear the same thing....
  • 5 3
 Suggested product re-name:

Yeti SB-40110W1NG (v1)
Yeti SM-UGG13R (v1)
  • 6 6
 Seems like the right bike for 90% of trails. Long and slack isn't really needed for most riders, and the 100's geometry was raved about... how is it not now?
  • 3 2
 The SB100 2 years ago was one of the longest and slackest XC and short travel bikes on the market, that's why the geometry was raved about and it was dubbed one of the "original downcountry bikes." Now everyone else has continued that trend past the SB100 and now SB115 and shown that there are very few downsides to longer slacker bikes even on XC bikes.
  • 7 1
 That SB100 was a bit ahead of its time, and the even shorter amount of travel just suits the angles better than it does with an extra bit of squish.
  • 4 3
 @GregorHayes this might be the "right" bike for 90% of trails in Texas but def not the right bike for the rocky mountains where I live, and other places with actual mountains Smile
  • 1 2
 @mikelevy: I love my hundo w/aggressive tires and cushcore and ride it like a trailbike. I bet if you put an Assegai and Dissector combo on it, it would ride exactly like the trail bike you seem to think it wanted to be. I for one would love another 15mm of margin for DH idiocy on my Hundo w/o losing the ability to clean the impossible climbs. Unfortunately the conversion price is prohibitive.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: So do you reckon if the SB100 was in this Field Test instead of the SB115 the result and your thoughts about the bike in comparison to the others might be different? Or simply, if it was the SB100 in this FT, having ridden it, how do you think it'd compare, given that you preferred it to the SB115? [EDIT: there was no simple way of typing this]
  • 2 0
 @Monsterman156: I loved mine back when I lived in Golden and Colorado Springs. It wasn't great at Trestle or DH trails but a majority of trails it was perfect. (I do have a 36 on mine because "downcountry")
  • 2 0
 @Monsterman156: I think the SB100 does just fine in "actual mountains" it doesn't get much more actual than the Colorado Trail between Molas Pass and Durango, CO. I was on a demo SB100 size LG (It was undersized as I need an XL but that was all the shop had) and had only ridden the bike 6 miles the day before with my dog- alloy wheels, alloy bar, lots of trail users and this was the result: www.strava.com/activities/3889962090
I know that we are living in a pretty sweet time for bikes, bike geometry and I think the great thing is this all comes down to personal choice. This demo on this stretch of trail convinced me to order a SB115 and I can't wait to set more PR's on the trails here in Western Colorado as well as come back for some more time on the Colorado Trail- I never felt under or over biked and I never felt like the SB100 was holding me back or slowing me down. It would have been great to be on an XL, but I made due.
  • 2 0
 @Sparkula: couldnt agree more. Back in 2018 I demoed one in Park City. Lifts, gnar and all, that thing was a beast. It just didnt like the insane braking bumps Razz
  • 2 0
 @OLDGHOST: Maybe it is because I have been riding since the days of 26" hard-tails and had the very first generation of Rock Shox fork and SPDs but I think bikes are such an individual thing- especially now that we are spoiled for choice! I just sold my SB150- I loved that bike and I could just straight-line whatever was in my way and climb everything to get to those downs- some of those rides were 40-50 miles long- but I am an endurance junkie at heart and I wanted something that i could spend all day on, several days in a row- the SB115 fits the bill and since I am a bigger guy I don't mind if my bike has a little extra heft to it, especially on the downs! The Switch Infinity is a great suspension system *fingers crossed I will be racing the Breck Epic next year if the COVID is under control.

Also, it should be noted, I am NOT a dentist! Haha! I had the lowest end build of the SB150 and I am buying the SB115 as a frame and building it up on a budget.
  • 1 2
 As the numbers talk, long and slack is exactly what most ppl need. What we also need, globally, is ppl to understand what they see and read. That would be a stept forward for the human kind.
  • 1 0
 @domino0: "Would the SB100 have rated better than the SB115 in this field test." I think.
  • 1 0
 @tgent: wait longer and slacker han Nicolai saturn 11??
i just don't believe you
  • 2 0
 Yeti should have made an SB100 F.R.O.
  • 1 1
 This is one sweet looking bike with what I see as lust worthy as I do not race. Ticks most boxes sans the slack issue but it is worth 7K
  • 1 0
 It's not a race bike? Geoff Kabush might have something to say about that?
  • 2 0
 I’m more like Lycra and 3 beers guy so which bike is for me??
  • 2 0
 Seems like people wanted a SB130 minus and got a SB100 plus.
  • 1 1
 With the right tires, it's probably a SB130 minus.
  • 2 0
 I’d probably keep the SC 120mm fork on it rather than the 130.
  • 3 1
 So... It's a Transition Smuggler from 2016? Got it.
  • 1 0
 Looks like, yep.
  • 1 0
 This bike really reminds me of my 2017 Santa Cruz Tallboy. Pretty much exact same geometry. Similar weight.
  • 2 1
 I'd rather get an Orange Stage Evo
  • 1 0
 "Scalpel SE 1 (review incoming)" okayWink
  • 2 0
 At least this Super Scalpel Fan is consistent. How many posts are you going to have on the Scalpel SE field test? I’m guessing 16.
  • 1 0
 My computer blew up when it recognized the spandex shorts.
  • 1 0
 SB100 is no more as of yesterday
  • 1 0
 7k with aluminum wheel set...
  • 2 3
 Shouldn’t it be way cheaper without the Tribe!
  • 1 2
 This bike needs a 60-70mm stem
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