Field Trip: Is Buying a Used Mountain Bike Worth It?

Apr 14, 2020 at 11:18
by Mike Levy  
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PINKBIKE FIELD TRIP

How to buy a used mountain bike



Words by Mike Levy


You don't need to be a penny pincher to know that, if you're smart about it, buying used can save you some serious coin. Trust me, you probably don't want to go the secondhand route if you're looking for underwear or a toothbrush but, when it comes to mountain bikes, you might be able to find your dream machine on the buy and sell for a fraction of its original - and ridiculous - asking price. New-to-you sounds pretty good, doesn't it? Totally... Until the warranty-less chainstays decide to separate into three pieces. Or you're looking at a bill to replace the entire drivetrain. Or to replace the fork.

Buying a used mountain bike might be one of the smartest things you've ever done, but it could also be one of the worst. Today's Field Trip video is all about how to examine a used bike so you don't accidentally trade your Xbox for a lemon.




The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible by support from: Smith, 7mesh, and Over The Edge Sedona.




Photos: Anthony Smith
Additional footage: Lear Miller



417 Comments

  • 371 19
 It is, but only at certain price points/discounts. Some people think their bikes are the next coming of jesus. The prices they try and charge after 2 years of use is absurd.....**cough**....Yeti owners...**cough**.
  • 115 17
 Truth. Plus buying a used Yeti is riskier than strolling unprotected through a red light district. It may be a good time and work out well, but there’s a good chance you’ll be paying a high price down the road...I always laugh at the number of “new triangle” or “new frame” listings for sale.
  • 29 3
 Don't forget Motobecane owners.
  • 72 88
flag nyles (Apr 20, 2020 at 7:24) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, it's like selling a toyota tacoma/4runner/tundra, you may not think it's worth it but a hell of a lot of people do. They wouldn't command a premium if they didn't actually sell at said premium haha
  • 193 28
 @nyles: that's a terrible analogy. Used Toyotas are pricy because they are known for having exceptional reliability, longevity, and serviceability. The carbon yetis are pretty much the opposite of that.
  • 38 88
flag nyles (Apr 20, 2020 at 7:35) (Below Threshold)
 @thegoodflow: is it really that terrible? The end result is the same. They command the premium because people pay the premium. rabble rabble rabble
  • 88 8
 @nyles: a better car comparison would be Land Rover. Bought mainly for status but still has some cool technology. Unfortunately durability is lacking for both brands. Toyota is more like Trek. They are both kind of boring but you’ll rarely have a quality issue. I’m a huge Toyota fanboy btw.
  • 88 2
 I always chuckle at the "I paid _____ for it." How does that matter? If you are selling something it will sell for only what people are willing to pay for it. That's what it's actually worth.
  • 22 1
 True. Selling bikes is a little bit difference compared to say game consoles. You can’t exactly bundle it up and call it amazing.

I notice nomad v4 were going anywhere from 3500-4500 with 2 years of park riding. Priced it at 3500 I got 3 hit. But they were international. And I don’t trust PayPal enough. I said f*ck it at this point, I just wanted the bike gone. So I sold it on Facebook and marked it for $2500 (without the reserve rims). I got like 20 hit from people saying they can meet today. So even driving a 8-10 trip just to see the bike.

People need to understand, there is your perceived value and there’s the apparent actual value.

I ended up selling the reserve wheels separately.
  • 40 5
 And ***cough*** Pivot owners ***cough***
  • 52 16
 There you go: another commercial for the industry!!!!!!!!!! Buy new! your fellow mountain bikers are just out there trying to sell you a lemon! Bravo!
  • 14 1
 @duzzi: exactly. In fact many people are selling pretty good bikes. As someone who sells his cube, i can say that the bike is pretty good, im just bored with it already and want to size up. Im not promoting it since i dont sell it here. And there is the other kind of people who sell their bike because it is trashed or it has a hidden crack somewhere..
  • 25 44
flag Here (Apr 20, 2020 at 8:10) (Below Threshold)
 Im a yeti owner.
  • 51 1
 @Here: How many cavities did it cost you?
  • 6 0
 @duzzi: the used bikes I bought were in great shape and a great deal. After I rode them for a few years and and the expensive bits wore out I would either just keep it as a backup bike or sell for literally 5% of MSRP. The bike I sold for 5% was a lemon, but it was priced accordingly.
  • 9 0
 @ryan83: At least used Land Rovers are cheap so when the air suspension inevitably needs to be replaced and the power seats get stuck in the recline position you can fix it and still come out dollars ahead. Replace the front triangle on your used Yeti and you’re likely into it for more than original MSRP.
  • 11 2
 @Here: you have a generous bank account hidden in.... Switzerland? :-)
  • 24 0
 Some used deals, especially buying demo bikes from the shop can be a great deal and have been serviced appropriately. However, buying used means you are probably buying the last generation of design and geometry and often it’s better to buy a blowout of an older model from your local shop or online. Often, last years models can be found for the same price as a used bike and won’t have any hidden repair costs. Even if the last years model off the sales floor is a little more expensive, parts are new and you get a full warranty.
  • 24 14
 @thegoodflow: What evidence do we have that Yetis are the opposite of reliable? Or is this just Pinkbike hearsay and bro lore?
  • 17 6
 @TheR: is that a serious question?
  • 4 0
 @Happypanda1337: What do you not trust about Paypal, It is like a 6 month warranty any where in the world?
  • 5 1
 Well ya mtb depreciates very fast..last years $8k retail bike is only gna get $5k max...usually more like $4k.
  • 10 4
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Yes. Please present the evidence.
  • 9 0
 @ryan83: Lol. "lightly ridden" but has a new shock and rear triangle...
  • 6 2
 @whambat: yeah I bought my bike mid/end of season (before new models announced) and got it as cheap as people were listing it used. Got free tune-ups and 10% off accessories too.

Demo models were super cheap but you have to time it right (when they sell is pretty random and it's first come first serve).

Another lbs will give you 15% off any bike they order in. Seems weird to me (that they value their floor stock higher), but maybe that type of client is better?

Anyhow, no need to pay MSRP on a new bike.
  • 6 1
 @softsteel: actually saved some money. ???? nobody cool with that?
  • 1 1
 @bigtim: aaa one setence and everyone goes off ????
  • 19 7
 @ryan83: Well Trek may not be the best comparison. I have a few friends on Trek and *every single one* frame cracked, their bontrager hubs fail on a regular basis, Trek's more like Ford than a Toyota.
  • 1 0
 They don't try.... they do.
  • 11 0
 And from a sellers POV, there’s always some people who are just looking for the satisfaction of lowering a listed price, no matter how good the deal was in the first place.
  • 1 0
 @Jparker164: Lady Driven!!
  • 17 1
 @joedave: whats with all the coughing around here?
You guys should be worried about dying, not used bikes
  • 38 12
 @TheR: Yeah, it's pretty funny the bandwagon shade that a lot of pb commenters throw on yeti. I'm old and have been riding a long time, but in that time I've owned Canfields, Commencals, GT's, Specializeds, a Deity, Giant, Yeti, Whyte, and a Trek. Guess what the only p.o.s that fell apart with a cracked frame was? The Trek. The same one compared to a reliable Toyota above. Yeti will continue to get the hate here until they offer an aluminum option with 2nd rate components like Santa Cruz does. Those two brands are selling to the same market, but SC gets the fanbois and Yeti gets the "dentist" hate because they don't offer the AL version which makes them unattainable to a fair share of pb-commenting riders, many of whom have yet to ride one, but choose to comment on their reliability regardless.
  • 26 3
 @ranke: ha ha -- the HATE for SC began when they moved production to China and didn't change the prices -- they clearly moved to China for better production costs but, that was never passed onto the dealer or the consumer. Prices remained the same -- I was a SC dealer during that phase and I didn't hear one peep outta my rep when they moved. I would have liked to know: "hey Mike, we're moving our plant to China and you'll get better margins because of it".....NOPE.... I found out when I saw the "MADE IN ROC" sticker on the BB shell.. 2006ish, I think. I carried that brand because of the MADE IN USA factor. SC's are still pretty nice, no doubt, but, whoa, had some serious damage control to do for some. People were willing to pay extra for that MADE IN USA marketing.
  • 26 2
 @ranke: I don't think it's necessarily unique to Pinkbike. People hear or read something that may or may not have happened once, and it then becomes universally true. That one guy snapped his head tube off an Intense, therefore, all Intense bikes have a problem with the head tube. Pinkbike reviewed a Yeti 10 years ago that saw the rear triangle crack, therefore all Yetis forevermore have problems with their rear triangle. Same with the recent flap with Pole and Rocky Mountain.

I don't have a problem with a guy saying, "I owned a Yeti and the rear triangle cracked." I'm just dubious of dozens of people who have never been within 300 feet of a yet on a trail passing on a narrative they have no experience with. I'd also question a guy who said he had five Yetis and they all cracked. Then you're just dumb for buying the same thing over and over expecting different results.
  • 5 2
 @TheR: people act as if they’re the only brand that has had a few issues. Brands wouldn’t have a warranty if problems never occurred, and yet, every brand has one! Haha
  • 4 0
 @TheR:

hey it'd be cool to know how many frames their sponsored athletes go through right? Does Richie's frame last all season? How about Nate Hills?
  • 13 3
 @TheR: sorry, my dog ate my spreadsheet of yeti failure rates that I was saving for proof in case of an internet argument
  • 6 1
 Bike companies making PB to post this.
  • 7 0
 @WasatchEnduro: That would definitely be interesting. My guess is Richie and the others have more than a few bikes at their disposal. They probably actual bike they race goes untouched except for races. Then they probably have a couple other bikes they ride daily. I wouldn't be surprised if they had to replace bikes once or twice a season. Richie puts some serious power down, and his bike is his life, so he's probably on it more than most people.. But then I also wouldn't be surprised if they don't have to replace them as much as we think they might.
  • 3 1
 @thegoodflow: No personal experience/anecdotes?
  • 9 0
 @ranke: actually, I owned an aluminum sb95 for 5 years. It was a great bike. Bought the frame used off mtbr, sold the frame here on pinkbike, and as far as I know the new owner is still stoked on it. But, comparing the new carbon yetis to a Toyota is just silly. Obviously they're reliable enough that people keep buying them, but they're among the most expensive frames available, the suspension is expensive to service, the resale value actually isn't very good for anything but the most current models, and they're definitely not built to be on the tough/burly end of the weight/reliability spectrum. Some people see the value in them and buy them for various reasons, but they certainly aren't known for being exceptionally practical/reliable/durable/servicable like a Toyota. It was an absurd comparison.
  • 3 0
 @TheR:

ah good point. keep race bike mint for race day. plus the sb150 frame is built stronger than the sb130 so (hopefully) it has fewer failures. Richie rides like an f'n freight train.

I demoed a 130 and really liked it, just out of my price range. Had one shop guy say they tend to get squeaky, heard the same about Evil. Anyway, I'd only buy a Yeti with a warranty and of course they don't offer a model below $5k so it's ripmoAF FTW this year.
  • 1 1
 @Here: nine envious downvoters?
  • 7 1
 @Here: me too. Saved almost $2000 off msrp on my 19’ sb130. I would never pay msrp on any new bike. Just wait till the next year comes out and buy old new stock.
  • 4 0
 @WasatchEnduro: I demoed an SB 5.5 and SB 6 a few years ago. They were very nice, and I can see why people would like them, but I didn't like them enough to buy them. I haven't tried the new batch of 150s and 130s. They look really nice, though.

A shop here in town has carried them for years. If they were consistently a huge problem, I'm not sure a shop would stick with them for as long as this one has.
  • 5 1
 @WasatchEnduro: sb130 with a push coil rides like a dream mate.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: waay back when... when MTB's were still very young, cantilver brakes were the only option.. Cdale had a life time warranty on their frames ---- under normal riding, I cracked three ---
each time I got the replacement frame, it had a different headtube spec: it started at threaded 1" to threaded 1-1/4" then to threadless 1-1/8" had to buy all different hardware to accommodate the new headtube spec...at frame three, I gave up.. never bought Cdale again. ... during those days, they also had serious corrosion issues but, I never had one long enough for corrosion to set in.
  • 6 0
 and then there are amazing bikes, with great components, well cared for and serviced, and the used market expects you're going to give it away. i recently sold a Tranny Patrol with Vorsprung tractive tuned shock, factory Fox 36 and custom wheelset with DT Swiss rims and Hope hubs. a new equivalent bike would sell for about 6k and i had it for sale for 3 grand, had to sell it for 2100. bike was in mint shape. what a joke (on me). the kid who bought it knew the deal he got and emailed me the next day to say he didn't even know a bike could be so good. i got hosed.
  • 3 2
 @chyu: bike companies make pb post everything. pb is essentially sustained by advertizing
  • 2 0
 @TheR:

I'll avoid an (insert profession) joke now about how Yeti owners only hang them in the garage and pull them out once a month which is why the shop may not see many issues.

Also the Yeti owners i know all ride hard... but don't tend to keep bikes too long... hmmm.

Last off, at the rate I ride I'd anticipate needing to replace the lower sliding rail annually (I'd score the sh*t out of that pretty ka$hima thing going from snow to mud to moon dust and everything in between each year) and i hear that costs a pretty penny.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow:

i rode that bike once. climbed like a demon even with that alu frame and not so light build (but felt overdamped)... now why can't yeti get away from linkage designs that are high maintenance? interesting that alchemy is using the old switch design now.
  • 11 7
 @ranke: Agreed. I'm a Yeti fanboy and not a dentist or surgeon at all. Actually, I don't make lots of money but Yetis are highly addictive pieces of engineering. When you get one, you may stay in the tribe longer than you think. Sure, they are pretty expensive, but not more than SC or high-end bikes from Specialized and Trek, for example. As for me, I've been buying used (my first Yeti) and got a new warrantied frame for my second one for a good price. Even if you break a rear triangle or even the main triangle, you can get a crash replacement for a decent amount of money or have it repaired for a few hundred bucks. I think that most people who badmouth Yetis are the ones who never rode one but hey, to each his own.
  • 6 0
 Donno. Some of the best used deals I've seen are on high-end Yeti builds that have been ridden for a single season. A bike that was $8-9K for $4-5K is a pretty significant chunk of change saved. And the guys I ride with that have done this have had really good experiences with warranty issues, even working through our local non-Yeti bike shops.

In my experience, the more expensive the bike, the bigger the potential savings. Lower end bikes seen to only drop 20-30% after a year. But 40-50% seems more normal on the high end.

Also, the advice I always give people when looking at PB classifieds is to only pay attention to the prices on the newest listing. Anything non-obscure that's been sitting there for more than a few days is likely overpriced.
  • 5 1
 Absolutely. People overvalue their used bikes to an absurd degree.

New bikes can be purchased for 25-35% off during year end sales - the kind of sales that would attract a value shopper like someone who, I dunno, might be buying a used bike. So that should be the starting point. Not MSRP. A year old bike should be at least 40% off, imo. In fact, I just listed/sold a year-old, excellent condition bike for around half of MSRP, which is what I felt was fair value.
  • 6 5
 @WasatchEnduro: Because Switch Infinity works, period. And it does not need more maintenance than other systems, if you take care of your bike.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: yeah, it was a very efficient climber, responded really well to climbing out of the saddle, sprinting, etc. It did have a lot of pedal feedback though, when climbing rough and ledgy trail, which started to bother me after I owner it for a while. Idk about it being overdamped, but I do remember it being very linear and would wallow into the midstroke, so i stuffed the db-inline full of volume spacers which solved that.

I didn't know that alchemy was using the switch link... interesting.
  • 2 0
 @kingbike2:

So you sold the equivalent of a $10k bike for $500?
  • 1 0
 @dsmdan18: uh... might want to check your math!
  • 5 6
 @cool3:

b.s. -> you have an exposed sliding rail in an area of high contamination. it looks cool so Yeti won't design a way to cleanly cover it up and thus improve the service interval. i recall a review with pictures of the kashima already showing signs of wear after a few (probably hard) months of riding.

IMMV and to be fair i'm not on one but have also read feedback from owners that it's an 'expensive' annual fix. compare to a santa cruz who will just send you new bearings for your links each year for free.

I know it works and it works damn well. Just high maintenance. Let's be honest who's wiping their kashima between every ride? (wait, wut?)
  • 2 0
 @thegoodflow:

yeah i ran into cody kelley's dad up at DV last summer and he said they ride great, but need an X2 or air shock w/ a large negative air chamber which makes sense as a dual link bike with what i assume is a lot of antisquat. no surprise said they climb great, no switches needed. Said they're not for lazy riders and work best when you're pinning it and pressing down on the pedals. Anyway the Alchemy frames look great and are on sale right now.
  • 3 0
 @cool3: So as a Yeti Fanboy, have you ever broken a rear triangle? Know anyone who has? If so, was it like once, or is it a regular occurrence?
  • 2 0
 @dsmdan18: not much better than 50, is it? Still questionable.
  • 1 0
 What do you expect? A fool and his money are easily parted.
  • 2 1
 @Uchwmdr: Yep, Pinkbike is getting very shameless in its thinly disguised commercials for the industry!

There is nothing wrong with buying a used bike and you can get some very good deals in the process ... plenty one/two years old bikes out there, and they arguably represent the best possible buy, exactly like for a car or a motorcycle. Older than a couple of years you can steal away some incredible good deals.
  • 3 0
 @WasatchEnduro: I've been on the Yeti owners FB page for 3 years and that's not what I've heard from actual owners. I had the previous "Switch" (not Infinity) system on my SB66c and did one maintenance in 4 seasons of riding and one bearing change.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Never. I know several Yeti owners who broke a triangle or even a frame, but not more than any high end brand that makes carbon frames...
  • 2 1
 @cool3:

shut your cake hole coolio, i'm running out of things to gripe about.

no aluminum and starting price of $5.4k?
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: We can make that for you... Wink
  • 2 0
 girlfriends bike. mechanic owned... www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2733488
  • 1 0
 @Thustlewhumber I don't get that... a Motobecane owner got a killer deal. Why not pass it along? Bad form! Frown
  • 4 2
 @TheR: I get it, all the forum posts of SB100 issues, just fake accounts that have been members for years, just waiting for the time to bad mouth Yeti. Same with SB150 issues.

All the complaints years ago about warranty replacements taking months to get- all just a giant conspiracy against Yeti.
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: There you go. Was that so tough?
  • 1 0
 So true..lol
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: My Evil was squeaky, after a tear down it would go away, then come back. Lame.
  • 1 0
 I agree, has to be the right price and I think it's important that you can check the bike out in person...can't trust people online these day. That being said my brother's first bike was a Stumpjumper Elite for a steal that was in fantastic condition purchased off Pinkbike...but it just of easily could have needed a suspension service, dropper service, new drivetrain, etc.
  • 6 2
 @Arcadyus: it just shows how bitter people are. I mean whats the problem. I wanted to provoke with my initial " im a yeti owner". And see what we get. -13. hahaha
Lets just move on and ride our bikes and have some fun in life. Hang loose
  • 2 2
 @nyles: nope. My brand new tundra was 40k out the door. Cheaper than any domestic with the same build.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: alchemy are ridiculous bikes
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: i am. I give my bike a clean after every single ride. Even if it is everyday. Especially the shock. I bet my ass that everybody who gives a few thousand bucks for a bike must do it. Im disgusted with people who neglect their bike maintenance and then complain how they dont last. Another thing is that if you get a bike for 8k then you most probably dont give a shit about yearly maintenance.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: look good? You mean XL frame with 518 ST, 73 degree sta, 448 reach and 1212 wheelbase looking good? No thanks
  • 1 3
 @TheR: carbon is fragile, regardless of the marketing bullshit that the industry forcefeeds us. In fact ive seen more santa cruz cracked frames than yetis...
  • 2 1
 Former Yeti owner here, I can honestly say that my 575 was the worst FS bike I have ever owned. It was an aluminum frame, so no issues there. But the rear just constantly gave out no matter how much psi I put in shock or how much fiddling I did to it. This thing was an absolute nightmare. Sold it after 6 months for and got me a Lapierre Zesty of the same year, the difference was incredible. The Lapierre was lightyears ahead of the Yeti in suspension technology, but unfortunatly lightyears behind in marketing...
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I'm about to take my Yeti to the shop for a second opinion on a suspicious line on the rear triangle...
  • 3 1
 @ranke: Yeti frames are press fit. Santa Cruz are threaded BB . Press fit on a 3000 dollar frame. Lmao.
  • 7 1
 @Here: Don’t worry man. 90 percent of the Yeti hate comes from people who are just mad they can’t afford one. Petty jealousy. Another 9 percent are from people allergic to Pepto blue. 1 percent from actual experience/legitimate gripes and bad experiences.
  • 2 0
 @kaihollenberg: Bummer. Hope it works out for you. If it is cracked, how many times will you give it a chance before you say screw it and go with another bike?
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I used to race dh and had a 303 dent upon itself. It happened to all the factory guys as well. They told me at a race that all of their bikes were doing it and the factory was going to thicken the metal where it was dented. When I called yeti he said it wasn’t a design flaw.
  • 2 0
 @meathooker: 303? Why you always bringing up old sh@T?
  • 2 0
 @Uchwmdr:

Looks good in person at least and I’m ok w the suspension design. But yeah the geo is whack and it’s behind it’s peers in that category. After experiencing modern geo I don’t even want to throw a leg over anything ‘outdated’.
  • 1 0
 @Uchwmdr:

I also shake my head and make an angry turtle face of disgust when I hear a neglected drivetrain on the trails, which is often. And I wipe my stanchions often.
  • 3 0
 @cool3: Yeti is not a tribe, just branding.
  • 4 2
 People baggin on Yeti's reliabilty are poor ass busta's who can't afford one; eos.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: I bought it used from someone who shelled out big bucks but never rode it. If it is cracked, I'll be SOL (and in the market for a new bike brand). I wouldn't buy a brand new yeti anyway, although I do like being different from the stereotypical Yeti owner. Once had a guy tell me I shouldn't ride my Yeti near mud so I told him I'd be sure to hang it on my wall in a temperature-controlled glass case.
  • 2 1
 @OCryder: these are the comments that give yeti riders the reputation of being snobby douchebags that buy them as status symbols
  • 2 0
 @thegoodflow: It's like a bunch of 5 year olds. I love the you're jealous cause you can't afford one comments.
They can't grasp that if a company charges premium prices for their product, people expect premium service, something which Yeti has yet to prove itself as doing.
  • 2 0
 @ryan83: I don't agree with you about Trek. Cracked twice the chainstay over 4 seasons on a Fuel EX 9 2013. Had it brand new. I had echos of 2 other lads exepriencing the same thing. I would not call that a manufacturing quality issue but more a design quality issue.
  • 1 0
 @ryan83: I second that.
We had a Defender as a company car.
Every single time we took it to the carwash we ended up picking up parts from the ground afterwards. ????
  • 3 2
 @thegoodflow: Maybe get a job that pays more?
  • 1 0
 @OCryder: that's really not the point, or the problem. I already own my dream bike. It's that you bike a bike as a status symbol, and when others aren't impressed, you get defensive and act like a snobby tool. It's pathetic.
  • 1 0
 @OCryder: @OCryder: that's really not the point, or the problem. I already own my dream bike. It's that you bought a bike as a status symbol, and when others aren't impressed, you get defensive and act like a snobby tool. It's pathetic.
  • 3 2
 @OCryder: just noticed your username....OC as in Orange County CA? Wow, talk about fitting a stereotype. It's like you think that everyone would ride a yeti, if only they could afford one. There's better bikes for less money, if you actually ride.
  • 3 2
 @thegoodflow @OCryder : alright both of you f*ckers, I made some dumb comments at the top of this post and now I have to keep getting notifications for your bitch match. Take it to your inbox.
  • 2 1
 @nyles: you'll think twice before you make a dumb comment again, eh?
  • 3 2
 @OCryder: Haha! Too easy to trigger these fools. I forgot another group of haters — the 20 percent who had their girls stolen by dudes riding Yetis. Gotta adjust my numbers.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: yep, the yeti tribe definitelely got triggered, that's for sure
  • 1 0
 So True. I had a person selling a Liv that was 4 yrs old with blemishes selling it for $400 less than a new '20 model that had new tech. When I heard "I love the bike" I didnt have the heart to tell the person that the asking price was $1200 too much.
  • 3 0
 @thegoodflow: They’re not mad — they’re living the life. Sweet bike, filet mignon, Dom Perrignon, and your girl. All while filling your cavities, peasant.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: lol, ok
  • 1 1
 @C0yotekid: Two separate categories here, son. There are apparently loser Yeti owners, and then there’s me, a goof. We are mutually exclusive, as I do not own a Yeti. Nor do I want a Yeti, but I do think they are nice bikes, and I do think most of the hate comes from envy rather than actual experience with the bike itself.
  • 1 1
 @TheR: Decided I just have a suspicious scratch in a weird spot - no crack. I was more distraught over the possibility of a cracked rear triangle than any breakup in the past couple of years. But hey, what about the ppl who had their girls/guys stolen by girls riding Yetis? You never know, there's a few of us around, it's not all dudes
  • 1 1
 @kaihollenberg: Good news! Now get that Yeti out on some trails and steal a guy/girl/rock/tree/goat -- whatever floats your boat -- from the haters out there.
  • 171 6
 I worked as a mechanic in shops for many years. I'd usually cringe when a customer told me the great deal they got on a used full suspension bike and asked for a quote to get it ready to go. Often the recommended service would include:

Tune ~$100
Bearing service ~$150
Brake pads and rotors ~$100
Fork service ~$75
Rear shock damper and air can rebuild ~$150
New tires front and rear~$150

Prices are hazy guesses, it has been a couple years since I worked as a mechanic. Adding chainring, chain, cassette, spoke replacement, dropper service, etc. adds up quickly. Sometimes the total cost of purchase and repair would exceed a solidly spec'd new bike.

The last shop I worked at was pretty awesome, we would allow potential used buyers and sellers to meet at the shop and provide a free inspection and service quote. We would generally refrain from appraising the bike and only provide a repair bill to get the bike running well. This usually worked out well for all three parties, especially when the seller was honest and aware of their bikes condition.

My recommendations for buying used:
If you are mechanically inclined and can properly repair/maintain the bike yourself-send it. Get that deal on Pinbike.
If you rely on a shop for service, buy local, have a mechanic inspect the bike and get you an honest quote for repairs before purchasing.
Reputable shops will service their demo fleets before sale. Ask about the shop's pre-sale procedures before buying a demo bike.
Don't get too hung up on high end componentry. I'd ride SLX or GX in good condition before worn out XTR or XX any day.

Be safe folks.
  • 10 0
 @gowing unfortunately I can only upvote you once. Fantastic reply, thanks.
  • 4 0
 Well said. People seriously underestimate maintenance and repair costs. I suspect these people don't ride. Not to mention when you buy used you're missing out on new geo and improved components.
  • 25 0
 I buy a "new" used bike every year and as long as you're patient you can find 1-3 year old bikes that have barely been ridden and are essentially brand new. You're not trying very hard if you can't find a good deal between all the bike industry bros flipping their pro deals and rich people making space for the new model they won't ride.
  • 8 0
 @dthomp325: exactly! best deal i ever got was a like new sworks enduro with pike, db air, full xx1 for 2700 instead of 6000 mrsp from a shop owner. it was the last 26" version they did, what a cool bike that was.
  • 19 4
 I doubt that a lot of bikes really needed all those things immediately before they could be ridden. Personally, if I bought a used bike, I'd ride it right away and do one thing at a time. Could prolly stretch all those repairs over a few months. What's a "Tune," anyway, if you're doing all that other stuff?
  • 13 3
 No offense, but this is like the worst case scenario.... as if every bike is sold at the exact moment its beat to hell. More often, its rubes making room for another brand new bike by ditching their previous MY that has 500 miles on it. I’ve bought several used bikes without issue, you’d have to be an idiot to get ripped off like that. Its pretty easy to spot a lemon if you’ve got half a brain, these aren’t cars.....
  • 4 3
 @jl1984: Your right, they aren't cars, they are much more like race cars. They push the limit of performance and weight. A shop can't "tune" a bike and have it skip cogs, have a squishy poorly performing suspension and sub optimal braking when it leaves the shop. As a rule customers expect a "tuned" bike to ride like it was new.
  • 4 0
 Agree with every word you said! As one that's been on all sides of the equation and bought dozes of used bikes. One caveat regarding buying from a shop - some shops indeed service 2nd hand bikes well before selling. But many times they just invest enough to make them look clean, give them a nice wash and a new chain and that's it. Those bikes end up looking clean but often ride like crap. In that respect, buying someone's personal bike, sometimes means getting a bike that was actually maintained in good riding condition. I'd add - A bike that was ridden last weekend often rides much better than a bargain that's just been sitting idle for a full season.
  • 5 3
 @jl1984: I have bought many used bikes with very little issues. And any issue it had, I've been able to sort out myself. For the most part, bikes are not that complicated.

If you don’t know your way around a bike then maybe buying used isn’t for you. If you do, buying used is a great way to go.

Just remember, if you do buy used, always pay friends and family, so you save 3%!
  • 4 0
 What gowing says +100. It pays dividends to fully understand how to maintain your own bike. I'm sure most people in the early days have crosstheaded a crank-pedal thread or crushed a bearing whilst seating. Buying your first 'proper' bike second hand and making these mistakes makes sense to me.

Also most modern full suss big hitters need some serious abuse to break them.
  • 5 1
 @Harry-O: hardly like race cars. You don’t need an engineering degree to understand and do the majority of service/repairs at home. It’s not rocket science, sorry.
  • 1 1
 @funkzander: yeah ... but it's a 26in bike.
  • 1 0
 @jordanrh: yeah but i bought it when 26" was still a thing and that bike was probably 6 months old
  • 1 0
 I agree with your conclusions. Just want to add that a cheap $35 bike toolset from PricePoint about 16 years ago was the best biking investment I ever made. Learning to do all my own work (except for the very rare exception) has made biking so much more affordable and fun. Of course I added tools along the way, but that first kit got me started and gave me the confidence to tackle bigger projects.
  • 67 1
 Yes it is, someone buy mine
  • 10 0
 well put
  • 14 0
 "0 ITEMS FOR SALE"
Already?!!
  • 55 0
 Yes! Bought an Enduro elite with MRP ribbon coil fork for 2900 Also bought a specialized camber for my son 27.5 that was a formal rental for $1000. I'm two for two 100% satisfied and both bikes were found on pinkbike.
  • 22 0
 I share a similar opinion with my son's new bike... Purchased here on PB and nothing but a positive experience overall, I would definitely do it again.
  • 10 0
 Absolutely! Got a 2018 Pole with brand new high end everything (except frame and shock 1 season old) for $2500. That wouldn't even get me the wheels and fork at retail.
  • 38 0
 former rental in good shape is like winning the lotery
  • 4 0
 @spaced: Couldn't agree more, even though rentals are regularly maintained they're still subject to a lot of different people and skillsets riding them. I rolled the dice once and bought one, won't make that mistake again. Whilst I got a DH bike for 60% of new that was less than 6 months old, I ended up spending way more on it than I thought I would need to.
  • 10 0
 @schooledrider totally agree. Buying used on pb, selling it for the same amount a year later, taking that money and rolling $1k more into the purchase of my next used bike, was how I ended up being able to reach the pinnacle of actually buying awesome overpriced new bikes finally. Every used rig I bought was in exactly the condition the seller said it would be. Short on cash? Way better to get a used rig with epic components at a low price than a new rig with crap components.
  • 5 0
 I have had excellent experiences so far from purchasing used bikes right here off of Pinkbike. I sell whatever bike I am on after a year or two and pick up another used bike. Just got a Carbon G2 Kona Process and couldn't be happier. Just need to take the time to feel out the seller and ask as many questions as possible. Most legit sellers have no problem chatting about details.
  • 1 0
 2020 enduro or previous model year?
  • 1 0
 @spaced: I bought an ex rental Fury from Whistler last year. 1500 for the bike + 300 in parts and repairs and the bike was running great. Used for the season last year and then sold it. I am a heavy rider, and had zero issues. The bike does make you look like a Joey tho lol
  • 1 0
 @jordanrh: 2018, bought late 2018 and still using and abusing it!
  • 3 0
 @Blackers: yeah. The problem is age doesn't mean shit. What matters is mileage. It's not even the skill level. It's that those bikes are ridden A LOT. Way more than any bike you own. Also since they are not ridden by the people who are tasked with servicing them a lot of damage goes unnoticed way longer than on your own bike which creates extra problems. It's not bad will on anyones part. Simply the way rental bikes are used makes it impossible for a large % of them to be in good shape.

Also as someone who sometimes rides rental when I go someone on a non bike trip and want to pull 1 day of riding - I'm yet to ride a rental bike where everything is perfectly fine..
  • 2 0
 @Caiokv: you can get lucky. Also it depends on what you expect from the bike. I want my bike to be in perfect condition not just good condition. $300 in parts and repairs is nothing. 150$ is a simple overhaul repair bill even in poor ass Poland. So you were lucky no suspension problems, no bearing problems were arising. Also no brake issues since those sometimes result in the service guys telling you to GTFO and get new ones.
  • 3 2
 @bishopsmike: A used Pole on sale? Nooo! These are the best bikes, who dares to sell the best bike ever?! Why would you sell the the best bike ever? So unreasonable!
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I can`t answer your existential question but someone sells a Pole frame nearby where I live: size M, 10 rides, 2000€ : www.leboncoin.fr/velos/1759761747.htm
  • 1 2
 @softsteel: makes no sense. Such thing As used Pole on sale should Not exist In this universe. @Mondbiker you have to explain this to me! Why do people sell the most woke bike out there? So perfect geo, so perfect kinematics!
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I don`t know why he sells it. I could ask him, he lives 100m from my house. He`s probably scared of breaking it...
  • 1 2
 @softsteel: it cannot be too long and handle like a fricking cow for anyone under 190 is it? No way!
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: WTF have I to do with pole??? It´s geometron or nothing for me and pole is behind them in every way lol. Still would buy it over any SC, Yeti or other overpriced pos.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: Looks like you made a name for yourself here. Big Grin
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: lol! I am digging the sarcasm. Wonder what model it was? I think it is possible to sell a used Evolink with the purpose of getting the new Stamina or the new Nicolai G1!
  • 3 0
 @spaced: no such thing as a former rental in good shape! Unless it’s an XL or XS size. The rentals I’ve seen and ridden are ridden hard and put away wet. The same reason I wouldn’t buy a used car from a rental agency.
  • 1 2
 @Mondbiker: I have seen a few Geometrons on ebay. People send links to auctions to me. They are in as much disbelief as I am. Every purchase of a Pole and Geometron is a second coming of Christ to the buyer, so how can one refuse the love and blessing of the Lord. Unless... they just found out that they need 3.5mm longer reach.
  • 1 1
 @SintraFreeride: There's been already two Pole Machines and one Stamina for sale on Swedish biggest classifieds site. Again. Surely 2mm too short chainstay or head angle was 0.25 degree off and it was messing with rationale of the owner. He needed something even more suitable to his riding style and physique. I believe both Pole and Geometron should release stems in 2mm length increments, as well as smaller air spring tokens (like 1/3rd of the size of a regular air spring token), some 350$ shock pump, not to mention coil springs with different levels of progressivity and 5lbs increments.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes, people sell Geometrons to get another one typically, that´s how I got my g16, seller was getting G1 and the one I have now was his second g16 with prototype seatstays for longer CS and long shock option...You absolutely can say that people who used to ride Geometrons don´t go back to lesser bike. Ever. And no, you don´t need any air pump either, 25lb increment in coil rate is fine, just like 35-40mm stem for 99% of owners Wink
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: If you put a spring on a Pole you get a Pogo Stick, just saying.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I will be selling my Pole Evolink 176 frame before the year is out to get a Nicolai G1 because I want the extra 15mm of reach, the +2º steeper seat angle and the way better EXT Storia shock not to mention that I'll be able to run a 200mm dropper on it.
  • 1 3
 @SintraFreeride: I'm only ocupied wih getting a flat pancake flying sideways, then whips then scrubs, manual landings, and that bloody tuck no hander. Bike length is not helping...
  • 1 0
 @spaced: A lot may depend on the culture as well, in some places, more people will be careful with things even if they don't own them.
  • 1 2
 @Ian713: nah, even from nicest people will ruin the brakes and wheels on a rental. I rode a 2019 rental Giant Reign in May 2019 and it was already fkd. I was in car rental pool for two years and while in general people didn't drive them like rentals (since you had to have a membership so many people shared cars and treated them a bit like theirs) but clutches and gearboxes were fkd regularly. If we had big mountain passes around, the brakes would be regularly fkd.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns:
You're telling me there are NO differences among groups with regard to how they treat belongings which aren't theirs?

Wheels, I can understand people getting in over their heads but brakes, (dumb question incoming) well, how does a person manage to ruin the brakes on a rental?
  • 1 1
 @Ian713: they boil the brake system and fry the rotors
  • 1 0
 @rivercitycycles: I bought 2 ex-rental bikes from a shop in Whistler. The dude showed me the trip logs and these bikes have been out less than 6 times. They literally looked like new and still have the factory warantee. Payed less than half retail and couldn't be happier.
  • 2 0
 @Skooks: I definitely agree there are some good deals to be had with rentals but I think it’s not the general rule. I saw a shop selling some rentals here on PB they were asking 10-15% of retail.......sure it often includes the warranty but 3 months before the “model year” change you can get new bikes 20%+ of retail.
  • 54 8
 I think it's work considering the environmental impact too. A used bike will have a tiny fraction of the impact of a new one.
  • 23 68
flag pbfan08 (Apr 20, 2020 at 7:14) (Below Threshold)
 Eh, IMO that might be the lamest reason to buy used.

I've heard that "green" argument for a number of goods and the logic just doesn't hold up, your still supporting the industry, and thus creating demand. I could make the argument that buy buying used, your creating a secondary market which helps uphold the value and thus making these bikes more "disposable" for the initial buyer which leads to more overall purchases and thus more environmental impact..
  • 34 6
 @pbfan08:

Nope not really. You buying used means you are not buying new. Fewer people buying new = lower production. The argument that higher demand on the used market increases demand on new market BY THE SAME AMOUNT As if those people bought new is absurd. A 1:1 ratio is the maximum possible outcome and you assume it. Also the argument has been used in relation to other markets as clothing. So nice try being a contrarian.
  • 1 0
 sorry, double post
  • 7 0
 @pbfan08: Let's try to take this argument at face value. Do you think that the impossibility of selling your current bike will prevent you from buying another one? There are many people who keep buying new bikes without getting rid of the old ones (and other consumer goods). Why is storage such a growing business in the US? Why are people hoarding unnecesary stuff? Selling your used bikes may give you an incentive to buy new ones but on the other hand sb won't buy a new bike. Also the logic of the bike industry (but also electronic and other goods) is to replace rather than to repair, Shimano brakes being the case in point. When you have a leaking seal in the lever/caliper the only solution they offer is to replace a faulty one.
  • 2 10
flag BikesNBites (Apr 20, 2020 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 @spaced: ha -- same applies to every single product sold --- someone's always going to be the first buyer. not having a first buyer doesn't actually work. question is, the resell value.. it's pretty bad in the bike biz, just as bad as the auto industry -- roll that puppy out of the shop... BOOM, it's worth 50% less unless it's something extremely special or rare. I think, in general, titanium frames are the only bikes that hold any resale value
  • 6 0
 @BikesNBites:
I never said it's possible to "not have the first buyer". It's simply possible to satisfy a bigger amount of possible customers with a smaller volume of produced units - be it cars, bikes or clothes.

As for TI bikes - only in some weird circles. For a while you got more for specific old road bikes but I think that collectors ship has sailed and hipsters now just buy expensive Cinelli stuff.

As for cars going up in value it's a relatively new trend. For years most even super rare cars were not that expensive. My father owned (and totaled unfortunatelly) a lot of currently cult and expensive cars.
  • 35 1
 I don't think I'll ever buy a new bike...but I'm just glad there are a lot of people out there who only buy new things and barely use them so they can sell them to the rest of us for cheap later, and for people with pro deals who buy and sell after a season. thank you!
  • 30 0
 I'm all for buying used if you know what you're doing, but I think that the price difference is often exaggerated as people compare used prices to MSRP. Just buying end of seasons closeouts is going to get you a good way closer to used bike pricing than buying at full retail.

My current rule of thumb is to look at a used bike and think: Would I rather than this than a Ripmo AF?
  • 9 6
 YT set the standard for me. I got my 2018 Capra 29 brand new for $2600 shipped. Lyrik, Super Deluxe, Code, DT Swiss, Maxxis DHR. Sure they were the lowest spec of the lineup, but parts are available and trustworthy.
  • 1 1
 You also have to consider tax tacking on an extra 300 bucks, even if you find a good deal at a shop.
  • 2 0
 @bridgermurray: not if you buy in Oregom
  • 1 0
 I managed to get a new decently spec'd bike for $1300 on closeout because I was willing to ride a bike that says "Rossignol" on it. If you are smart in your shopping and have time to do the research, the deals are there to be had.
  • 4 0
 @jojotherider1977:

I wasn't gonna chime in but I was thinking I’ve been buying brand new YTs for 3-year-old used Yeti prices for 5 years.
  • 2 0
 @C0yotekid: Ha, okay. Far from being a shitty bike, and plenty of people on this site have agreed. I have fun riding it, so your opinion doesn't really matter.
  • 31 2
 Is this a joke? Of course its worth it if your intelligent about it.. or go ahead.. buy new (at retail price) and lose 25% the moment you wheel it out of the shop. Same goes for cars / trucks / motorcycles etc. Buying a lightly used 'demo' at a discount from a shop.. with warranty intact... well that's the cat's ass if you can find it...
  • 20 0
 It's especially true if you are your own bike mechanic. Honing my wrenching skills when I was starting out and spending a few hundies on tools has saved me thousands upon thousands over 25 years of riding.
  • 14 0
 Is a cat's ass supposed to be something sought after? Never heard that one before! Pimp
  • 8 0
 A "lightly used demo". Certainly not the ones I demoed lol.
  • 9 0
 @noisette: i believe what he was trying to say.....You can get a good look at a butcher's ass by sticking your head up there. But, wouldn't you rather to take his word for it? no wait No, I mean is, you can get a good look at a T-bone by sticking your head up a butcher's ass...
  • 4 0
 With all the demo tours canceled, this is the year to pick one up with low mileage.
  • 5 0
 Resale value is less important to me IF i plan on keeping the bike a while. Currently i'm on about a 3-year plan per bike and generally buy new on sale. I know after 3 years i'll be selling for 50% of rrp or less. i value factory warranty and would definitely buy shop demo tho not a shop in a resort/destination town. In fact a local shop is selling their demo fleet right now as they aren't offering demos due to covid.

Also though prices are generally highAF there are lots of great bikes now new in the $3k range.

And sell to a friend, family member, anyone else you know getting into the sport so you don't have to faff w/ the buy/sell which can be brutal.

And keep your premium parts (e.g. carbon wheels) and carry from bike to bike. Keep those stock parts around that you upgraded.
  • 1 0
 @splitlit:

brahahaha! rode a gen1 Bronson down in Moab yrs ago with a literal hole in the downtube from a rock strike. i could see the next layer of carbon underneath. it was for sale and the shop said they'd knock another couple hundred off bc of the crack/hole.

i was shocked they wouldn't knock a thousand off the sale price. to be fair the bike rode fine and frame was stiff as a poker. anyway, i'd buy a demo bike from a local shop here in northern utah but no f'n way down south.
  • 2 0
 Amen.... the amount of people spending hundreds to have simple things like brake bleeds and derailleur adjustments done is mind blowing.
  • 2 0
 @noisette: according to Alf it's supposed to be the best part.
  • 1 0
 @noisette: got to put your tea towels somewhere I suppose.
  • 24 0
 Word of advice for buying used. If on Ebay and looking to purchase from "TheProsCloset" call them first about the bike your interested in. Ask them questions about the condition.

Ordered a Santa Cruz Nomad from them and the condition was much worse then they had posted. I complained and they ended up paying for all the necessary repairs (good on them!). But the repairs took almost 2 months all together and I missed the best part of the season that year.
  • 11 2
 Luckily with ebay purchases, ebay 99% of the time sides with the buyer so you have a lot of protection. Sellers usually want to fix issues because if they don't and you cause a big enough of a ruckus, it can seriously hurt how they operate on ebay.
  • 11 0
 They’re a terrible shop, I ordered some hubs from them and they arrived with completely seized bearings, despite the description saying they were in perfect condition. They did refund my money but it was a total hassle and waste of time, would not buy from them again.
  • 5 1
 Agreed, I've gotten a fork from them that way almost unusable and needed parts+damper bleed to be usable. I've also tried to sell parts through them and their offered price is about half of what they're listing similar parts for.
  • 7 0
 I got a frame from them that they said was heavily used. It was almost unused. My experience was great!
  • 4 0
 To be fair, they do need to make a profit - if they're buying your stuff to resell it, of course they're going to offer you significantly less than what they want to sell it for. That's no excuse for selling blown forks or hubs with seized bearings though.
  • 2 0
 @laerz: I am lucky, their warehouse is 30 min from my house (smaller one only 15 min away). I have only purchased a few components from them, not a full bike. That said, any issues and I can show up to their office and sort it out.
  • 1 0
 I'm in the minority here. I bought a wheelset from them and it was in perfect condition. Looked like it had never been used. My only issue was that the packaging was terrible. One of the wheels broke through the box. Glad there was no damage
  • 1 0
 @bman33: for sure, I’m all about buying used stuff even if it needs some repair. I love to refurbish old parts and bikes, that being said, I like to know what I’m buying and the issue they have seems to come from their misleading online descriptions. Had I known the hubs where seized I would not have paid the asking price or even bothered as I was looking for a quick replacement and not a major overhaul and another project at the time. It’s always better to buy used stuff in person and I always do if It’s possible.
  • 1 0
 I have also only had positive experience with pro’s closet. I bought new parts but everything came as described and good customer service
  • 1 0
 @grugged: Same here. I bought a couple seats from them for a nice price. But they were brand new seats so there wasn't much that could go wrong.
  • 2 0
 @Jclaa: I needed to rebuild my rear wheel and wanted to upgrade to XTR 12.
The rim wheel build and microspline driver would have cost me $900.

Theproscloset had a enve dt240 wheelset that had micro spline, 36 tooth ratchet and torque caps for $750.

Now I'll sell my CK huns and offset the cost even more.
  • 3 0
 I've gotten some great deals from ProsCloset, but I also live down the street so I can check the stuff out before committing. One thing to watch out for is that some of their new stuff is actually product that failed factory QC if you read the fine print. Usually minor finish details, but it's not always obvious why.
  • 17 2
 It can also be good for the environment to buy second hand! If everyone only bought new bikes, every time a person buys a new bike to upgrade, their old one would sit in a garage for an eternity and then get thrown out. This applies for buying most things. Next time you're looking at buying a coffee machine or dog leash or whatever, check your local second hand listings before you go buy at a store!
  • 16 0
 Yes, would a mechanic buy a new car if he knows how to fix and look for a good used car at a fraction of the price?
  • 16 2
 used bike or new bike you're going to have to fix some parts at some point... a new bike is a used bike after you ride it.
  • 14 0
 True, and with used bikes, you're less worried about that "first scratch" and more likely to just ride hard and enjoy it right away.
  • 2 0
 Sometimes right after you buy it. Some new ones are built by monkeys and I don't even mean the great dry RS Boxxer debacle of 2010. My GF recently got a Canyon road bike. Overall rather good but her front derail has been setup by someone who must have been doing it for the first time in their life. It was setup so bad and in so mnay places I was literally confused as where to start
  • 4 0
 That part of the video made me shake my head a bit. If the used bike you're buying needs some maintenance, that's normal. That should impact the price, but it shouldn't make you walk away.
  • 3 0
 @rrolly: if it needs maintenance, that's normal. If it's way, way overdue on maintenance, it's a bad idea to buy it.
  • 2 1
 @bishopsmike: ha ha tru dat.... I had a brand new Zoke 66 on a bike of mine --- it was on the bike, riding, for less than 10 minutes. I tried to wheel huck -to-flat with the bike, tire got stuck in a rut I didn't see, laned weird and slammed into a small brick wall, scuffing the fork in the process --- FFFFF UUUU________K!!! sold the fork at cost and just bought another.. the buyer didn't give a hoot since it was purely cosmetic ....... around the same time, my 2ish year old kid tipped over a brand new Kona I had at my house, I was in the basement, he was up stairs... I heard a loud PING!!!! followed by the pitter-patter of little feet running into the other room... awe snap, I know what that crash noise was.... there's the bike, on it's side.. it struck a chair on the way down and picked up a nice ding in the center of the top tube... I used that bike maybe for 3 rides... I tried to just suck it up and slap a Band-Aid on it for comic relief but, it bugged me too much. Ended up selling it at cost, just like the 66.. just bought another one just like it. **** P.S.at 3ish, same kid drove my shop van through my garage door when he climbed into the driver seat while I was loading up the van, slapped the van into drive and it slowly moved FWD, driving through the door, with my FIXED GEAR in it's way --- I was able to stop the van just before my bike got hit
  • 3 0
 @spaceofades: Doesn't matter if the price reflects it. Let's say the fork is shot. No problem, Price = the going rate of the bike - the cost of the fork - the trouble for replacing it. Done deal.
  • 3 0
 Yep, this is what I never understand. Absent a major wreck, a bike with 25 hours on it is basically new. Thats about how much a weekend warrior puts on a bike in 3 months.... i will be happy to buy that bike for 65% of retail and no sales tax.
  • 1 1
 @rrolly: Good luck getting someone to drop $600+ on a used sale because the fork is cooked. They'll just pass on your offer and get the next poor schmuck who doesn't ask about service for full price.
  • 1 0
 @BikesNBites: Just wait till he is 16, if you think you have trouble now.
  • 1 0
 @lake-st: He's 18 now --- along with his two brothers.... yeah, a triplet. He and his brothers bought a car together....aaaaaaand killed it. it was a 2005 with only 135k on it, needed just a little work. new brakes, one tire had a slow leak, light engine tune. one day, he and his girl friend leave the windows and the sunroof open. 40 minutes later it pours .... heavy down pour. the car hasnt started since. all the electrical stuff is in the floor board which was about 5 inches of water for a few hours
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: Then no deal. Not a problem. Those of us that know a little more about bikes help those that don't so they won't become schmucks.
  • 12 0
 most of the bikes I've owned were purchased "USED", but nothing compares to getting a new bike box delivered to your door and building up that fresh bike for the first time - which you only get if you're buying "NEW".
  • 10 0
 Sold my previous generation Pivot Switchblade to a local buyer on facebook marketplace. Had the bike posted for a month with no bites, but then lowered the price a bit and got about 10 offers in a week. I met the buyer at a bike shop so he could get it "checked out". The bike posting was accurate and honest -- I wasn't trying to hide anything. Turned out the buyer was psyched on the condition the bike was in and didn't even bother getting it checked out in the bike shop. Moral of the story, sell the bike at a reasonable price for the condition its in and be transparent about everything. You'll leave the sale feeling good about selling a sick bike and spreading the stoke.
  • 10 1
 Yes. Cheapest way to get literally last year's best stuff. Just ask any second-hand Yeti and SC owner. Even better if the previous owners didn't register it. You wouldn't believe how often people change bikes. Once a new model drops, they're wanting to sell their bike rack queen for the next one.
  • 8 0
 Just wait till a big brand drops a new E-Bike: Lot of people sell their Stumpjumpers or Remedys etc for 40% off.
Most often the bikes have 100km on them also lol.

Maybe some SC bikes will come in cheap now
  • 4 0
 @NotNamed: yes the best deals are the following: people who buy a blinged out super enduro bike, realize it's too heavy for their fitness and buy an ebike instead.
  • 2 0
 Especially if the model hasn't changed much. Got a slightly used Trek 9.8 for $2500 from a mechanic when the new model was $5500.
  • 9 1
 I've always had good experiences buying used bikes and I know I've sold quite a few bikes that were in exceptionally good condition for well below what they would've cost new. In general, it's a pretty good way to go but, like any online transaction, you gotta do your due diligence.
  • 12 2
 Why would anybody with half a brain buy a new bike when they can get barely ridden "last year" colorways for half the price?
  • 7 0
 Check your hubs! A new set of wheels will take away any of the savings from a used bike. Take the wheels off and spin the cassette feeling and listening for issues in the freehub. Feel for worn bearings. Check the threads on the rear axle. Damage to these can sometimes be an indicator that there is extra wear on their triangle. If that axle backs out the torsional flexion that we're triangle can be extremely damaging.
  • 7 0
 Reading through comments it’s pretty basic. If you know what you’re doing you can pull a great deal. If you’re not knowledgeable then things can suck. If you thrash your bike 5 days a week all year a warranty is probably worth the extra coin. If you ride weekends and just like to take it easy buy used.
  • 6 0
 Loving the new value oriented consumer journalism. Keep it going! How about a new regular, "Mike on a reasonably priced bike"?

Anoher idea: how about articles covering truly classic models of yesteryears? Bikes that you're likely to find used but that're still rad. Those that were forming the trends. Like some Transitions or Konas. (How is the old process 153 holding up these days?)
  • 1 0
 Here's your answer to the Kona Question: Yes, they're still solid
  • 1 0
 Kona’s holding up very well
  • 3 0
 I recently bought a used kona 153 2014 and it is the bomb. I had one years before and I was missing it so bought another one… Thats how sick the bike is!
  • 1 0
 @voltagerider: I used to have a Process 153. Much better bike than people give it credit.
  • 1 0
 I literally just bought a well used full aluminum 2015 process 153 three days ago with XT components and wheels monarch rp3 and Pike for 1300$ shit is still sick! Fork stanchions lightly scuffed (tailgate protector wear?) with a small 1/8" long mostly horizontal scratch that looks like a pebble hit it, may or may not leak air but it's pretty high up on the stanchion. The stays and linkages on this thing are insanely burly though that's what really counts. Paint's all worn out and hella scratched with some custom two tone colorway on the top tube. sram cranks are basic with not the cleanest 1x conversion but with a thick enough spindle. 11x1 outdated drive train. Nearly gone rear pads but high pressure brake hose. Chain was dragged across the hollow dropout more than the recommended amount but it's fine *knock on wood*. PNW dropper can be repressurized at home. Freehub has a whole lot of slack on it on the reverse side that's probably not due to use. Idk what the metal wear is like from years of cyclical loading of an aluminum frame but the holes are still round and it's probably strong enough for me to send a few more 30ft table top jumps between floating over rocks and roots. I was smiling before I bought it, still smiling after so it was probably worth it. I rode my BMX down TNT at keystone once though so my standards for full suspension are pretty low XD my last full suspension was a 7 year old dawg primo from 2007 and I sent that one hard and passed hella average riders in 2015 on that bike, too. Currently have a friend in Utah sending bigger doubles than most riders on a 2008 dawg. Decent suspension, wheels and a tapered head tube are all that really matter.
  • 5 0
 I have never owned anything but used bikes. Out of 10+ bikes, I have only had one bad experience and it wasn't a disaster. Even though you can't inspect an "online" bike, typically you have purchase protection via PayPal or your credit card.

As the original comment mentioned, probably 98 out of 100 bikes are way overpriced. It takes time to find the one or two gems.
  • 3 0
 This all day. Usually I buy frames, since I can maintain my suspension, brakes, drivetrain and wheels. It's not too difficult to find good deals, just need to be patient. Also when I sell my stuff I'm honest and don't overprice...
  • 5 0
 I've bought 2 used bikes from PB and sold 3. All transactions worked out great.
However I will reiterate what others have said - 90% of the asking prices on PB are from sellers high on crack.
I sometimes think there are a lot of people who just automatically list the bike they own at a high price just in case they can get it and then springboard to something newer.
I put good realistic prices on my used bikes and they sell quickly and everyone's happy.
  • 4 0
 Used is always a great way to go, IF you have time, knowledge, mechanical skills, can identify the suspect components and understand the replacement costs associated with them. Last purchase was from a Pinkbike ad in 2018, used the geographic search for bikes in my area. Found a '17 Santa Cruz Hightower C for $2500, and could not have had more than 200 miles and in excellent condition w/ XT Pedals. I NEED TO SEE IT IN PERSON, unless its new old stock deeply discounted.
  • 4 0
 I bought a used Scott gambler and it was the best decision I've ever made. The frame, shock, and drivetrain were used but the rest of the parts I bought brand new. I basically built a $8000 bike for $3500. If you're curious you can see the bike in my gallery.
  • 1 0
 Nice, i have the same 710 2015 frame bought it new for nothing. Spent 2000 euros in 2015 for the fox 40 + Rc4 + frame + shimano saint + x9 transmission. Love this bike, super reliable and bulletproof. The frame has so many adjustments, but the paint job has to be protected with some plastic film.

In my case, i fully service my bike since Volksprung f*cked up my fox 40 because they didn't properly put the seals and damaged the Kashima. Put a 380 r2c2 and it is way better than the fox 40/ Rockshox boxxer WC i used to have.
  • 2 0
 @Ba1rog: that's awesome! I love my gambler too. The geometry and tech are ahead of it's time. I have no reason to replace it. Sucks about your fork. My float x2 had some issues but were fixed for free from fox.
  • 4 0
 i've been selling some bikes the last couple years. i ONLY sell the ones i haven't put much time on. my transition patrol will be getting binned when i'm done with it - too many crashes. i wonder how some people sell shite they know is shite.
  • 5 1
 So a couple of thoughts here:

1. I buy a bike to ride , not sell.

2. Since the bike industry went crazy with making bikes obsolete EVERY year by inventing the micro standard, I now only buy close out on last years model( from and serviced by local bike shops).

3. Yeti gets hate because they charge super high prices and then give you a GX chain on a 8k, “XO1” bike.

P.s. Buying used is a great option when you know the seller.
  • 3 0
 Hell yeah it's a good idea. I got brand spanking Yeti SB95 for £1500. Just follow your intuition - good quality and multiple photos, a coherent description, and check it out it person beforehand. Although having said that, I did sell a carbon Enduro sight unseen so it can work both ways...
  • 5 1
 I get 69% of my bike parts used. Especially on expensive items like forks, cranks and dropper posts. Had a used Carbine 29 frame, it had some problems but served me well for a few years.
  • 3 0
 I have bought new lowers and a fork with bad bushings and a set of seals and o-rings, and come out of it with a fork that rode like brand new. Total cost? $300. That was for a rock shocks lyrik.
A little bit of creativity can go a long ways towards saving money.
  • 3 0
 Found myself a perfect condition Transition Sentinel on PB last February. I Got that store demo for an unbelievable price. Defenitly a smart move. However, keeping our LBS alive and buying new once in a while might also be a good move...
  • 5 0
 And now they all are 20% off brand new Wink
  • 3 0
 If you like fixing things, I love it, buying used bikes and cars is the way to go. It’s on me to make sure I’m not getting screwed. I buy my cars from auction and my bikes 2nd hand. Even if I have too rnr it’s better. Then I know where I stand with the bike and the car. Stock suspension tunes suck for me at 215. Why buy new then send it off to get set up?
  • 3 0
 you often cant replace JUST a chain if there's issues there.... the cassette and chainring/s often wear out at the same rate of the chain so, if you slap just a new chain on a use cassette, you'll often have problems that are worse. and chains dont actually "stretch" that much, it's the inner hardware that wears out


on the price --- bicyclebluebook.com is just like KBB but, I do not agree with the prices they somehow come up with -- and, just for kicks, I checked on something I sold a while ago. the low ball haggler used BBB as a reference point for the super low price he offered on a blingy bike I was selling ($2300 MSRP in neat mint condition, they claimed $550)

--- 2-1/2 years later, BBB is still showing the same price. How's that possible?
  • 1 0
 You are right. My solution is to buy three or four chains and swap them over regularly. When I sell my bike after a year, the new owner gets all the chains and I tell him to keep swapping them too. When all four chains are cactus it is time to replace the ring and cassette too. I buy my bikes and keep the next owner in mind. Some have been happy enough to call me a year later to get my next bike.
  • 5 1
 PSA to used bike sellers: "Custom" is not a selling point. As a used bike buyer, anytime I see "custom" in the listing I mentally add $500 to account for all the wonky parts that will need swapping.
  • 3 0
 People frequently want more money for their bikes because they were picky about touch points and tires and shocks etc and so they call them “upgrades”, but that was them that was picky not the buyer. I way prefer when picky owners take off what they don’t like when it is new, and then put it all back on when they sell the bike. That way they keep their “upgraded” parts, and I get the stuff they didn’t want in good condition.
  • 2 2
 "Custom" either means they don't know what they're talking about, or the bike is over-priced. Usually both.
  • 3 0
 I'd have a hard time buying used personally when it comes to mtn bikes. There are SO many leftovers out there that are deeply discounted. You can get a "brand new" bike for often times 20-30% off retail when the bikes aren't even 12 months "old". Used maybe if you are new to the sport and want to just try out a beater bike to see if you like riding.
  • 3 0
 Pre-season orders or post-season sell outs you can always get very good deals, 30-40% off regular price. No need to go used. Still amazed you can get post-season Giant Reign for 2K EUR, used they are selling for 1700 EUR. For that little difference - always go new Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Bought a used M9 a couple of years ago for $1100. It was the deal of the century I thought. Guy lied about a bunch of stuff. I had to spend $350 bucks before I could throw a leg over it. It was a learning experience. I would ask 100 more questions knowing what I know now.

Get a second opinion it may no be what you want to hear but it could save some money and headache.

As always, you get what you pay for. I still not afraid of buying used. Just more cautious.
  • 3 0
 I bought my first bike off Pinkbike in 2008 when I was 14, and have continued to by and sell 12 bikes through the years. I just bought my first ever brand new bike this year after slowly trading up every year. If done right you can make used bikes work great
  • 3 0
 I bought a year old used Trek, the seatstay broke, replacement from the Trek dealer was around $350. If I bought the bike new it would have been around $3000 more, so even without a warranty I still saved $2650.

So while not having a warranty is a risk you have to look at how much it would cost if the frame had a failure, make sure you are saving enough money that you can replace the frame and at least come out even if you bought new. Dont do something stupid and buy a 2nd hand bike for 5% off MSRP because it has "only been ridden around the neighborhood"

Another benefit with used is that when you sell the bike it doesnt depreciate very fast (you could even make a profit depending on the deal you got and how soon you sell it). After 3 years I sold the Trek for around 25% less than what I paid for it.
  • 8 1
 I think the bigger questions is are new bikes worth it?!
  • 3 0
 Buying used has been great in my experience, definitely a great option for MTB value.

Bought 10 used bikes over the past 15 years, 8 frame-only, 2 complete, from Pinkbike, eBay, and from friends. I've only bought 4 new bikes/frames in my lifetime. Overall I've been happy with buying used; almost all came as-advertised or the seller worked out a return (wrong size once). Of the 2 used frames that broke, both companies offered to crash replace the frame at an attractive price so I wasn't SOL. Banshee and Ibis have great customer service.

YMMV. Buyer beware with used stuff, as it's up to the seller to disclose faults and the manufacturer to decide on a crash replacement option.
  • 4 1
 Having recently sold a used bike, here is a tip for someone trying to buy a used bike: no I can't reduce the price by $1,000 of my asking price. I've done my research as to what similar bikes are going for, so if I missed the mark by $1k then I have no business selling anything.
  • 3 0
 I've had nothing but good luck buying used bikes. A friend had another experience entirely. A pinkbike ad from a bike shop north of Vancouver had a Devinci Wilson with only "10 rides" on it. When he received it it was a total disaster. 26" Trek Fox 40, trashed bearings, brakes needed bled, just a POS. Bike shop stated some BS excuse. He sent it back and had to cover shipping which the bike shop didn't refund. I'll be leaving a nice present on their doorstep if I ever travel past their shop in the future. Total D-bags.
  • 3 0
 Only If you know what you are buying. Don’t buy from idiots who don’t even know when was the last time shock or fork was serviced. The number of naive, oblivious folks who cannot tell a functioning damper from run down crap, is rather high
  • 3 0
 Long story short.. got a ex shop demo yeti,cracked frame and got a brand new frame and hardware(sold hardware from cracked frame as yeti didn’t want it..shock.switch..etc) built bike back under warranty, sold it for more than I paid for it and bought a second hand Transition over a year ago and it’s been faultless...do your homework and there’s some great buys out there
  • 3 0
 How long do people keep bikes??? It seems people are not keeping bikes for very long. I just replaced a 20 year old bike that was completely still useable. The bike I just bought I expect to last at least 10 years.
And here is a reason to buy new. You get the bike you want, not a bike that is available.
  • 6 2
 There you go: another commercial for the industry!!!!!!!!!! Buy new! your fellow mountain bikers are just trying to sell you a lemon!!!!!!!!
  • 5 0
 Don't forget to check your local police registry to make sure it's not stolen!
  • 2 0
 I would say mtb is higher risk activity, especially park, dh riding etc;
So when you buying equipment, you must be confident in it (new or used)

I prefer buying new, just because it is easy, more enjoyable and provide confidence for me
  • 2 0
 Not anymore unless you are looking for used bikes with top spec parts. For $4000-5000 CAD now you can by a new Ripmo AF or Aluminum Devinci’s. All new but lower spec parts. Go with what’s more important to you. Used bike better parts, new bike but lower spec’d parts.
  • 2 0
 I always but my bikes second hand and about 2 years old. It's easy to give a bike a good look over and see what's wrong inline a car and you get them less than half of the original price and usually not much has changed. Unless I didn't have the money and was buing with finance or had loads of spare cash I can't see myself ever buying new.
  • 2 0
 I confess, i am a bit of a bike junkie. Owned about 20 plus bikes or so in as many years. Only 2 of them have been bought new. Buy as smart as you can. Yeah I've had one or two lemons but so you learn. The last ten years or so, new bikes have been completely out of reach for my wallet.
  • 2 0
 If you know how to build up a bike and take advantage of closeout sales, building up a “nos” frame can save you some money. I built up my “new” 2007 Marin Quake into a capable park bike for under $1200. Brand new the bike would have cost over $4500. Plus it doesn’t “look like a session.” Lol
  • 2 0
 It's to each their own, but I like buying used. Part of it has to do with the actual hunt for the bike you want, and in most cases there is a little bit of wiggle room for bargaining price or some form of fork or shock service if your buying a bike from a shops demo fleet. If you know what you want and you don't mind replacing your contact points and doing a little bit of repair work, used bikes make alot of sense for the majority of people.
  • 3 0
 Another PSA to sellers: I don’t care if you paid $3000 for it in 2011. It’s not worth $1500 now !!!!!

Ok, rant mode off. This is mostly for Craigslist sellers, not Pinkbike
  • 5 0
 WHY DOES PB NOT HAVE A FEEDBACK SECTION (iTRADER on some other message boards I've been on)
  • 1 0
 That's what I wanted to ask
  • 2 0
 These days, is it worth buying new? The amount of standards that the industry force on us means you can find a mint bike that's barely even a year or two old all cause someone wants a 0.3 degree slacker steerer, it's a crazy time we live in. We buy used cars, don't think you need a brand new bike.
  • 2 0
 Tip for buying a used bike (or used anything) on Pinkbike: be suspicious when item is described as being in "great" condition. "Great" it often used by the dishonest to describe their abused and damaged shit. Please describe your shit honestly and don't ruin a wonderful free service for everyone!
  • 4 0
 Carbon repair these days can be top top notch, so yea it’s worth the gamble.
  • 2 0
 No joke. There's a shop in my home town that's doing some crazy good carbon work.
  • 2 0
 Let me put it subtly....Hell yeah! Just look at the persons garage, and the condition of certain things on the bike. If it's a Franken bike, I walk, but there are a lot of gently used, well priced bikes out there.
  • 5 0
 so the real question for you is, when does a custom bike become a franken bike?
  • 5 0
 Usually the second I wrench on it
  • 1 1
 @nyles:Mismatched wheels, brakes,etc. I think it's like the definition of pornography, or what constitutes "snug" when tightening a bolt. You just know when it is.
  • 4 0
 If you can get them, demo bikes present a high value since they include factory frame warranty.
  • 1 0
 Legit. Bought a demo bike this last year and was surprised to know that it comes with full warranty as if the bike was used at all.
  • 3 0
 I haven't owned a "New" bike after riding for 4 years. This last year I bought a "New" bike which was a shop demo at a pretty steep discount. Used bikes are worth it.
  • 2 0
 Buying used can turn out great if you are lucky but will always be a bit of a risk. Looking for last-year outlets when the new released stuff gets in the stores is still the best strategy to me.
  • 4 3
 All depends on the rider. Some people are totally fine with riding a clapped out bike. For them, yeah buy used and get a rad deal. For people who expect their bike to be working just like it was when new, no way. Buy previous season models on sale and sell them after two years. Trying to keep a worn bike in tip top shape is not worth the cost. Cheaper to replace her every two season.
  • 3 1
 How much do you figure you're getting for 2 year old bikes as a percentage of what you paid (not msrp unless you paid that).

I'm still on a 2014 giant trance and my friends give me shit all the time because I spend about 1k a year keeping it running and upgrading parts but the common line is "you can get a whole new bike for 3 grand". The reality is I can't get a bike for less than 6k with the level of kit I have.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe:

Yes, I agree with you. I recently sold an 2015 EVIL Following with ENVE, Chris King and XX1 everything. 10k new. I ended up getting 3500 for it and it was dialed. Well used but dialed. All new bearings, BB, Push rebuild fork, Avalanche rebuild shock... the list goes on and on. Bikes with that sort of build depreciate too much and you'll always lose with buying/selling them.

In my opinion a new bike (previous model year, on sale) with a mid grade build (3000-3500) is the best option if you ride hard. Beat on it for two seasons and put nothing more that a new chain and a new set of tires on it and you should be able to sell it for about 1000-1500 less than what you paid. With two seasons of riding on it and not rebuilding anything, it should be a wash. Not gaining anything with this method, but not losing either. Hard to ask for more.
  • 1 0
 You know you've been on a lot of mountain biking road trips when while watching this, you have an irresistible urge to look through the T-shirt rack on the left. You know, just in case they have a really cool shirt in your size/color.
  • 2 0
 Life Hack:

Every fall shops sell their Demo bikes. A shop with a large fleet will likely have something very lightly used in your size. Will be offering it at Cost. Maintained by them. With a warranty. Boom.
  • 1 0
 Depends also where this used bike comes from and who used it.
Sometimes I see adds in France from true``adventurers`` who bought the latest premium 160mm enduro bike whereas they live near by Paris or in the flat north and it`s written: ``this bike has never seen a mountain``.
But it can be tricky with that sort of wankers: they often spend more time at the high pressure cleaning station that at riding, and you can be sure that bearings are wrecked.
One more detail: those hardcore riders worship carbon `cos on flat lands they climb better against the wind Smile
  • 1 0
 You have to be prepared to change everything disposable, chain, bearings etc and service the suspension but can still get a top bike cheaper than its new counterpart, particularly if you go for a bike ahead of it's time geometry wise. Reading the raww review earlier made me realise it's not really any better than my nicolai that's a few years old. Hopefully things have calmed down enough again now that bikes can be relevant as long as later 26ers were and we can love our bikes like we used to
  • 1 0
 Definitely completely depends on the bike, the owner of the bike and your budget.

Some people are shady and some people are not. The guy that got my bike got a stupid good deal. Carbon everything. Fresh tune up the week before he bought it. I let the dude take the bike for a weekend and ride it. Almost brand new suspension. Etc. There is no way he could have gotten remotely close to that bike paying retail or even clearance prices.

not even close. He basically bought a frameset and got a 29lb 150/160 carbon bike.
  • 2 1
 If you're a weekend warrior or interested in trying a different discipline, yes it can be a great $ saver if purchased from someone that didn't abuse it and halfway maintained it. If not, a warranty and support of a new rig is worth the price difference imo
  • 2 0
 I think this is the only time that being short works in my favor. Over the years, I have had great deals from barely ridden frames/bikes because it was a dude's girlfriend or wife's bike that never got ridden.
  • 2 1
 Also, size small used bikes are just simply less of a risk than L and XL since the riders weigh so much less. I’m pretty weary of buying used XL bikes that someone has “ridden lightly” for a season in whistler.
  • 2 0
 Ive bought two used bikes on Pinkbike and it has worked great for me. Last season I bought a 10k bike for 4k. You have to know what you are doing just like buying a used car or house. Fall is the best time to buy.
  • 5 0
 Shock for sale. 2 years old. Asking 80% of msrp. Needs a service.
  • 1 0
 The problem with the used market, is that you cannot find niche mtbikes like Nikolai for example. I ve bought my 2007 commencal mini dh for very low price with the frame in immaculate condition. But the money i ve spent to bring it in decent condition, I don't think that deserved it....
  • 2 0
 You absolutely can buy nicolai if you know where to look for it. Not that long ago there were few in B/S as well.
  • 1 0
 I bet if you look in “Enduro/All Mountain Frames,” you just might find one.
Totally agree though, quite rare to find such high demand bikes - people keep them. Even rarer to find one that wasn’t ridden hard, but at least Nicolai aren’t fragile like many/most other bikes. Good thing to consider when you’re shopping for used bikes (how long they actually last when ridden consistently).
  • 2 0
 @erikkellison: there's currently 2 G16s, a G19, and 2 old helius, in the north america pinkbike classifieds
  • 1 0
 Bought a used bike of the PB Buy/Sell, turned out to have a broken frame and needed a full suspension teardown to run right.

Best decision I've ever made in my life, this bike is absolutely rad now, my LBS was able to make a '2014' bike turn into a $3000 sex machine that comprehensively dunks on any 2020 model year bike with an MSRP south of $6k, and many even beyond that point.

With the right plan in mind, buying used is going to work great - but failing to plan or budget around the required effort to get the bike working for you is going to be problematic.
  • 1 0
 I think it really depends on who you are. If you’re someone who doesn’t care about racing, or is new to mountain biking, go used all day. If you are a racer, you might want to buy new, but as long as you keep up with the latest trends & changes, used is just fine.
  • 1 0
 Where I live, good used mountain bikes in the $500-$100 range are almost impossible to find through CL or FB Marketplace. It's universally ancient hardtails with elastomer forks or a custom carbon whatever at $2000+. EBay has some good stuff, but not many deals. Pinkbike B&S is promising, though sellers tend to be less responsive than other venues. It's much easier to find a decent road bike (mostly because they didn't change much for 20 years in the pre-disc era) than anything fit for bumps. And people don't service bikes generally, so unless you know what you're looking for, the first purchase after a helmet could be $200 in deferred maintenance.
  • 1 0
 I just finished a one season long overhaul of a 14 Nomad 3 CC XO-1 for $2000 and it is now in like new condition. Bought leftover in 15 for 6k out the door. How much was it worth a year ago? I say be careful out there used buyers.
  • 2 1
 Just be prepared to do your own service. Don't buy a bike and hope to just drop it off at the "shop" when it has an issue. Get the tools, learn how to bleed brakes for your specific bike and get the right fluids and tools. Learn how to tear down your bike, and regrease and build it back up. Even if you buy new, you best plan on buyin tools to service it. Some NEW bikes need service before the first ride. If you ride a lot, ou gonna be buyin tires and remounting tubeless more often than you can imagine. Pads and brake service coming your way also. Cant stand the creaks and clicks when climbing? Dont ask a shop to chase that bunk down. NEVER buy a bike sight unseen. Your chances the wheelset is how it should be are zero. That fork service 3 hours ago? Cmon guys.
  • 4 1
 If you're not a bike mechanic or super handy, you're rolling the dice when you buy second hand. Not saying there aren't bargains out there. But there's also some lemons.
  • 1 0
 I just bought a "used" 2020 XTR V4 Ripley with upgrades in emmaculate condition for $5200. So yeah, it's worth it to buy used. I'm not sure I see a reason to buy new when you can save thousands because a bike has a couple cosmetic scratches.
  • 1 0
 Flip the bike over and look at the down tube and bottom bracket area. This falls in with checking for cracks but I cant emphasize looking in this area enough. I got burned on a purchase on here buy a guy. Bottom of the frame was crushed under the rubber down tube pad I didn't notice it till a few months later and chasing what I thought was a creaking bottom bracket or cranks.
  • 1 0
 It is a tricky question. The usual half a new rate is a pretty fare deal usually but like that low spec'd trek for $1800. That's trickier. Like they said if it is in need of significant maintenance at all there goes the $1000 you saved in a hurry. Plus with a new bike purchase not only do you get excellent warranties on frames but also a couple of years on suspension components, brakes and such.
  • 1 0
 I bought a used 2005 Cannondale Prophet frame. 4 years later it's specced better than some mid to top tier boutique bikes and rides better too. I'll never sell it whole. The frame will be wall art. The rest will be off to other bikes or sold individually.
  • 1 0
 After forking over lots of money on new bikes I have opted to go used. You can tell a lot about a bike and its owner with a phone conversation, at least that has been my experience. Managed to get my last two bikes for $2500 less than new and both have lasted 2 plus years with no issues
  • 1 0
 I always check the pre owned section at a few local bike shops. The price is going to be market value which could be 50% off of new. The shop usually goes through and fixes the minimal stuff to make it rideable. If I don't see anything that I think is a good deal, I keep looking, but admit to being impatient. After a few stops, I may end up getting a new one, if I don't see anything. Never been one to drive to owners houses. Don't like going to unfamiliar places, seeing a bike that's not as advertised, (which is uncomfortable) and feeling like you wasted your time. All this goes into a damn bike decision.
  • 1 0
 I've bought several used bikes and haven't had to sink much money into them. The cost of a new bike can be immense, and it can be a hefty barrier to cross for people getting into the sport. If a used bike is your only feasible option, giver. I'd much rather have a used bike than no bike.
  • 1 0
 The trouble with buying used is the amount of maintenance the bikes need these days is way more than most people ever with actually do. So buying used is a total minefield. I personally will never buy used again, had way too many bad experiences (mostly with parts), the hassle and time wasted trying to sort them out just negate the saving. Every time without fail that I buy used there is always a massive issue of some kind. It's hilarious the amount of adverts that claim "hardly been used" or "just serviced". When you ask for documentation for the service they give you a 9 month old invoice for a brake bleed.
  • 2 1
 Sorry guys, this is really poor advise. Except for maybe the bring it to a shop part, if you know nothing about good bikes/

Rule #1 Never buy used $2000+ especially If it's 2 years or older. It's usually going to need a new drive train, new bearings, new brakes, and no warranty. That's about $1500 shop time.

Rule #2 Never buy used. Buy a new frame set only, and build your own dream machine. That means you can eliminate the Sram garbage all together, for a much more enjoyable ride.
  • 1 0
 It's totally a buyers market especially in New Zealand. I always groan/laugh/roll my eyes when some guy is selling his 2 year old NZD$6,000 (when new) bike with "heaps of wicked upgrades" for $6,250. A year later that same guy is still trying to sell his "heaps of wicked upgrades" bike though he has dropped the price by $50.00.
  • 1 0
 I've worked enough summer jobs at a bike shop to see people come in to have a year-old bike serviced, which they had just bought used and thought of as the bargain of the century, just to get quoted ~500€ to fully fix the lemon they just bought.

Stuff like the fork needing to be rebuilt, the rear shock needing a full service, replacement of internally cracked rims, replacement of the completely shot frame bearings, replacement for the worn out casette and chain, the mech cage being bent out of shape and needing replacement, etc quickly adds up if you're unlucky.
  • 1 0
 First time I bought used I had no idea what I was doing. I actually traded a 2017 Trek X-caliber 7 for a 2010 Stumpjumper carbon. Let's just say when I brought it for a tune it needed literally everything replaced.. $1100 later I ended up riding it once and parted it out and got close to what I paid total back. I was still in the hole though.

I also bought a DH bike that was claimed to be ridden 10 times, It was shipped to me as it was not local. I assure you this bike saw multiple seasons. I ended up filing a complaint with PayPal and got some money back. Again rode it a couple times and parted it out.

Bike I have now was bought new. I don't think I will buy used again unless it is flawless and barely ridden. I'd especially never buy a used park bike.

Also a tip for people selling their bikes, keep any service receipts for proof for future buyers if you decide to sell down the road. And for buyers, if someone tells you they "wrench" on their bikes themselves or that they're a "bike mechanic", have it inspected by an actual bike mechanic before buying. Lesson learned!
  • 1 0
 Not every home mechanic is ignorant, nor every seller dishonest. In my experience, “disproportionately cheap“ and “desperate youngin’s” are the two biggest risk factors for a bad purchase. There are some good people out there.
  • 1 0
 I have a riding buddy who's a serial bike whore. He treats bikes like Lego. The joy for him seems mainly in building the bike from scratch, using his choice of bits. Yt/giant/yeti/pivot/evilx2/SC/geomotronx3/kingdom/Stanton/pipedream/orbea/rocky mountain/That kiwi gearbox bike brand. Some bikes literally had 3 rides max, he's quite careful aswell. The orbea did 1 after work xc loop at cwmcarn trail centre then he sold it. If I was the same size as him I'd be laughing. There are some mega deals to be had. I've not bought second hand but the bikes, I have sold have always been treated well, with no nasties hidden ender tape or stickers.
  • 1 0
 I got my last bike used off the PB buy n sell, nerve racking a bit but thankfully turned out great without anything weird going on. Good communication and good pics help. I have also bought new from the old LBS and that works too, warranties are nice. Is this snow friggin melted yet!!
  • 1 0
 Buying a Yeti is like buying a BMW. If you buy one you are aware you are paying a premium price for a product with a strong racing heritage but is also likely to cost alot more if it breaks. You will get alot of looks at the trailhead and many people will want to ask you about it.
Buying a Toyota is like buying a giant. Cheap, no frills, quality product, dime a dozen on the trail or highway. You're Giant/ toyota isn't gonna impress anyone, but it probably won't break and cost an arm and a leg to fix.
  • 1 0
 Where are you riding where people think Yetis are intriguing and want to ask questions about them like they’re special or rare??
  • 1 0
 Easier said than done. I've been mountain biking for over 25 years and have never owned a new bike. I had to make a contract with my mom when I was 13 for my first bike and she had a hard time lending me the $500 for a used P3. Since then I usually have to get a bike between 4-7 years old. Being 6'3 I don't get my full pick on used bikes, so I have to out in a price range I can barely afford and hope I see a bike that catches my eye. I did the stupid thing in November and demoed a new Decoy, now all I can think about is getting an ebike and I don't see me being able to fork over 5-8k for a bike ever. So I just have to look at my bike and pretend it's what I wanted and that it makes me happy because picking out and speccing my own bike is something that will never happen coming from a middle income household.
  • 1 0
 Been on my used Bucksaw going on 4 years now. Cracked a chainstay and paid $160 for a replacement including 4 new pivot bearings. Bike was only down for a week as well since there was no warranty claim to approve.
How much are Yeti replacement parts?
  • 1 0
 Wish I had watched this video first, lol. I bought a used Ibis and it turns out the rear sram gx cassette 12 speed has 2 broken teeth. I wonder what horrors await me. Razz


Parts spec includes MRP Ribbon 160 fork, Fox DPX2 Shock, new Ibis aluminum bar, GX Eagle drivetrain, new KS e30i dropper, new SRAM Level T brakes, new Fulcrum wheelset, new Ibis stem, and matching green Chromag seat. Bike looks great, is shiny and performs without issue. Fork was serviced recently. There are paint chips that are pictured.
  • 1 0
 Im from southamerica and years ago bougth a XC frame from USA posted here.
Regret not to get the fork (an RS SID XX WC) in the same purchase but i was fear about customs.
Frame was mint, like in the photos, and pay 50% of the price new.
Even I bougth a pair of syncros wheels posted here, a showcase ones.

A complete bike its another thing, drivetrain and wheels bearings wear out a lot, considering off-road bikes.
  • 4 0
 To All You guys : "New bike".
  • 3 0
 Only if you buy it from a friend who can get it warrantied in case it breaks.
  • 2 1
 Take a look in PB buy and sell. Hundreds if not thousands of affordable used parts. You can buy new bikes with inferior parts that will need replacing . New or used it's up to the buyer to be aware .
  • 2 0
 Couldn't afford this sport if the used market didn't exist. Be smart, know what to look for and be patient and you'll end up with a banger ride for a sweet price.
  • 2 0
 I’m surprised they didn’t mention checking the downtube and bb area for damage,that’s the first thing I want to see especially on a carbon bike.
  • 2 0
 A used bike ? Sure , as long as the frame is in good condition , one could always replace or add new components that suit your individual tastes .
  • 2 0
 The funny for sale ads are the people who are new to MTB and bought a base model something for $4-5K Aud 5yrs ago and still want $3-4K for it.
  • 1 0
 People should be encouraged to by 2nd hand decent mtbs rather than spending money on new "Toyworld" bikes. A $1000 decent brand secondhand Hartail would be better than a $1000 new shit brand hardtail.
  • 1 0
 I bought mine knolly podium (full susp.) for 1100$ ( not even sure what year ) and im loving it. Id buy a new one if they still make them now. I have to admint there were some issues I didnt notice / found out later after riding real trail not just around car park....
  • 1 0
 Is it me or have many second hand mtbs gone back up in price? I’ve seen yeti sb66s fetching 1800-2k I sold mine in 2016 for £1400 and specialized enduros and many others doing the same. WHY??
  • 1 0
 Never look back dude
  • 1 1
 This is totally going to get buried and probably mentioned already (I don’t have time to read all these nonsense comments) but seriously...not even mentioning checking the wheels and hub bearings??? That’s literally the most abused part of a bike that can cost a fortune to fix or replace if you aren’t mechanically inclined. Just my two cents, but that’s the second thing I’m checking after the frame.
  • 1 0
 I've purchased two hardtails off of pinkbike with zero problems, but would not buy a used full squish without inspecting it in person.
  • 4 5
 Let me remind all of you used bikes do not come with a warranty...that’s the extra cost, plus knowing it’s in perfect condition. I had a Kona process and cracked the frame, luckily as the original owner I had lifetime warranty on the frame. If bought used I would have been out lots of $$$$. So yes used is a good deal sometimes, but of you’re spending >$2k you should look at last years models from the shop. Warranty is gold!!!!
  • 4 1
 Buy new, wait for the sales, peace of mind.
  • 2 0
 really cool video! Would be nice to hear some more details about the shock testings.
  • 1 2
 I don't have access to pro deals but it just seems wrong to me when people sell used bikes for more than pro deal pricing. When I look at the PB ads it never seems like much savings to go used unless the bike is a good 3 or more years old.
  • 1 0
 What kills me more is when pros sell their bikes for more than new ones go for. There is currently a pros bike for sale and is the same price as this years pro model except it has the worst suspension and brakes known to man and was obviously beat to shit over the year
  • 1 1
 @M3doty: lol, I mean I get it, sell for what the market will pay. With ski gear it is easy to find pro deals, with bikes they seem a lot scarcer.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else notice the Jenson bike sale banner on pink bikes front page immediately after this article was published?.... getting out my tin foil hat now.????
  • 1 1
 @ryan83: not accurate at all, at the end of the day there's a reason people pay a premium for Yeti's just like they do for Toyota, Trek would be more like a well used GMC pickup - good but not incredible ;-)
  • 1 0
 I hate to be immature, but @pinkbikeaudience, is there a reason for the 42.0 %off merch? I am from California, so you know what that looks like...
  • 1 2
 I never buy a new bike off the show room floor of a bike shop waste of money. I own a Yeti its one of four bikes in my garage, don't really ride it I just like showing up to the trails with it on my vehicle. Then after enough people have walked buy with their mouths open I get in my care and leave makes me feel good.
  • 1 0
 Ridden on hometrails only, no bike park. Ridden only on weekends. Then you check that guy's photo albums and see that bike flying through Whistler.......!
  • 2 0
 one thing is clear: our planet would be happier if we bought more second hand.
  • 3 0
 And use parts till they really die.
  • 1 0
 Always check the bearings! Bottom bracket, headset and hubs. If the bike has seen a pressure washer a lot they might seize anytime.
  • 13 13
 Absolutely worth it, with two caveats. 1: Only below a certain price point. And 2: Not carbon unless you know the seller personally.
  • 11 4
 you got your second point exactly wrong - if your alloy chainstay cracks, the frame is toast. A carbon chainstay can be easily repaired and made even stronger than the original.
  • 1 0
 “I’ll trade you an Xbox 360 4 games and one controller for your DH bike” haha
  • 1 0
 Why did my reply to Gowing end up down here? I was saying thanks to the mechanic way up there
  • 1 0
 His comment about a head-tube snapping seems a little ominously. . .



‘GRIM.’
  • 2 0
 Wow. Still no mention of creaky CSUs. #nowarranty
  • 2 0
 Buying bikes can take more skill then riding them.
  • 1 0
 They should have gone through the Pinkbike listing and give examples of good and bad deals.
  • 1 1
 I’d love to get a new bike but your looking at 3000 plus tax long term you’ll might put that into a used bike but slot of people don’t have that
  • 1 0
 It's a Trek, so the first thing you should check is if the frame is cracked.
  • 1 0
 Forget the bike, Levy what have you got on your feet?
  • 2 2
 Yes, if it wasn’t a good idea, pro’s closet wouldn’t be growing when shops are shrinking
  • 1 2
 I'm always happy to wait for the dentist selling last years bike for a song... I can't understand buying a NEW bike these days.
  • 1 1
 PB where everyone has more than an enough money to spend thousands on a new bike....... it grows on tree's here at PB!
  • 1 0
 Funny... parents made me trade my Xbox for a bike.
  • 2 1
 Only buy second hand road bikes/hardtails, problems solved! Wink
  • 1 0
 Over the Edge Sedona!! shout out
  • 2 1
 Bought used Transition TR450, brick s***-house, damn good purchase
  • 1 1
 26 is not dead! It’s still well sought off bike size on the secondary market when everyone’s dumping 27.5 and 29ers!
  • 1 1
 Yes. I've only ever bought used bikes and had no bad experiences whatsoever
  • 1 1
 Yup, just tried to buy a used Santa cuz megatower for 2300! The seller would not sell due to PayPal fee.
  • 1 0
 Yes! But trust the dude who's selling it or move on.
  • 1 0
 I find that you should bank on another $1000 on any used bike you buy.
  • 1 0
 I've never bought a new bike. I've had 6 bikes.
  • 2 1
 Yes
  • 3 4
 with several new bikes available under $2000 it seems foolish to spend $1300 on something used.
  • 6 2
 Listing price is very different from buying price. I found a used Transition scout for a friend for $1500, 2 years old. I can tell you right now, the build quality and spec is much better than anything you can get for $2000 on the brand new market at the moment.
  • 1 6
flag BikesNBites (Apr 20, 2020 at 8:14) (Below Threshold)
 @Ajorda: yeah -- local guy here.. he just bought a new Trek Fuel 9.7 -- $4k MSRP built with some pretty entry level parts -- too much house brand and Bontrager crap. At least Tranny outfits most bikes with good parts. That Trek has super low priced ShiTmano brakes on it. MT810's or something like that. you can buy the set for less than $150... not quite sure how Trek can justify that $4k price tag with stuff that might look good (from a distance) but isnt very costly to them.. The only reason Trek is what it is today is because for 7 years, Lance Armstrong put them on the map --- they quietly walked away when the shit hit the fan.
  • 2 0
 @BikesNBites: Tranny bikes and Trek bikes have different sales models. Transition has a hybrid model and Trek's a brick & mortar.
  • 5 0
 @BikesNBites: @BikesNBites: What's wrong with Bontrager parts? They're pretty good imo.
  • 3 2
 @BikesNBites: you think treks mountain bike division is where it is today because Lance Armstrong?

Wut? Lol
  • 3 1
 I brought a 7k yeti that was 3 years old for 1500 why would I even consider buying something new with that money?
  • 1 1
 @SupraKZ: Bontrager was pretty good before Trek bought them out --- quality dropped off after a couple years under Trek's wing
  • 1 1
 @TheBearDen: Not the actually the MTB division .. the whole company.. Trek was already big before Lance hit TDF.. sales for Trek went through the roof after Lance started winning --- making a company that was already big, huge!! If I had a nickel for every time someone came into the shop asking "you sell Trek" during those years.
  • 1 0
 @BikesNBites: Trek was cranking out Waterloo-made frames way before the Texas 1-Baller saddled up with the USPS Team. Check your map, pilgrim.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: HA --- 1 baller.... thats not right. YES, they were already big to begin with but really, sales shot sky high after Lance won TDF on a Trek. I forget the numbers but, it was something huge as far as % increase in road bikes sold.... like from $50mil to $500mil
  • 2 2
 It's like asking if buying a used car is worth it
  • 2 2
 I think a better question might be 'is buying a NEW bike worth it?'
  • 1 0
 Bingo.
  • 1 3
 Iv'e got an idea, buy one on your credit card. If it's a shiity lemon, just dispute the transaction with your credit card. Brain busted
  • 2 1
 Yes, well worth it
  • 1 1
 Of course it's fucking worth it
  • 1 2
 Yes it is and someone buy my Giant Trance ????
  • 2 0
 I thought the Trance Advanced 2 was Carbon?
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