First Look: 5DEV's Titanium Chainring Promises 3x the Durability

Jan 24, 2023 at 9:41
by Mike Levy  


5DEV, the manufacturer of those wild-looking aluminum see-through cranks, has just released a titanium chainring designed to be used on both mountain bikes and e-bikes. The rings are available in 34 and 36-tooth sizes and use a 104mm, 4-bolt BCD mounting pattern – there's no direct-mount version at this point but it's in the works. They're claimed to weigh 48 grams.

You can get your 5DEV chainring in bronze, purple, teal, or raw, the latter being the only correct choice for anything made of titanium. All options cost $149.99 USD, and they're said to last three times as long as an aluminum chainring.
5DEV titanium chainring
• Intended use: mountain bikes, e-bikes
• Sizes: 34t, 36t
• Mounting: 104mm BCD
• Material: Titanium
• Narrow-wide tooth profile
• Colors: Bronze, purple, teal, raw
• Compatibility: 7, 11, 12spd SRAM or Shimano, OChain
• Weight: 48 grams
• Made in San Diego, California
• MSRP: $149.99 USD
• More info: www.5dev.com




Why might someone want a titanium chainring? 5DEV says that their ring will last three times as long as a much softer, faster-wearing aluminum version. Chainrings typically wear out slower than a single cassette cog (or entire cassette) and need to be replaced less frequently, which is why most bikes come with aluminum chainrings that weigh less than a steel version that would, of course, last longer. But a titanium ring aims to combine the low weight of aluminum with the durability of steel... for a price.

Just like their stem and cranks, the chainrings are manufactured in San Diego, California, and are not inexpensive, with all four color options costing $149.99 USD. That's in the same ballpark as an XTR direct-mount ring and a bit more than one from SRAM but, given that 5DEV says that they, "provide at least three times the durability and longevity of your aluminum ring," would you consider one?

Is a titanium chainring a smart upgrade or a beautiful extravagance?


263 Comments

  • 208 11
 Steel does the same thing for a quarter the cost
  • 88 0
 A quarter? My RaceFace steel ring was $15 on sale. $20 at full price. They are 100g heavier though, if that matters.
  • 57 2
 Quarter? Sram steel chainrings are $15. Try 1/10th.
  • 100 12
 @mtblol: ok and a $2500 bike can do the same thing as a $10000 bike, certainly doesn’t stop people from buying the latter.
  • 28 1
 My M8000 series XT ring is around $60usd. It has an aluminum body with steel teeth. Not sure of the weight, but I remember it being substantially heavier than the Wolftooth it replaced. The Wolftooth lasted almost two seasons before the narrow teeth were like little daggers. I finished my third season on the Shimano and it's teeth are still in very good condition. For the Ti ring to be a better value than the Shimano it'll have to last nearly a decade...

(grammar edit)
  • 12 0
 I got tired of my chain rings wearing out pretty quickly and looking like shark tooth daggers, so I too went and got a Race Face steel ring.

It still looks new and perhaps its related, but the chain I've run with it seems to have also lasted much longer.

Only downside is that the ring is significantly heavier, when you compare holding one in each hand. But that extra weight sure beats blowing through a $60-80 chain ring once a year.
  • 14 13
 Only if it's cheap steel. The Wolftooth steel chainring is $120 but it's a way better investment than a titanium one if you aren't a weight weenie.

"104 BCD stainless steel chainrings can last 5x longer than aluminum chainrings. Wolf Tooth has chosen to use 416 stainless steel despite the added expense and machining difficulty. The 300 series steel, often used by other manufacturers, is tough but still softer than the 416."
  • 7 35
flag thenotoriousmic (Jan 24, 2023 at 11:06) (Below Threshold)
 Steel always bends well before it wears out. I’ve never had much success with them. Aluminium rings don’t bend and don’t seem to wear out anyway these chainrings are for people who’ve bought like E wings or something like that and they want to carry them over from bike to bike. They cost more than an entire XT crankset and bottom bracket.
  • 6 1
 and double the weight, so it comes down to your priorities when selecting a product I guess.
  • 11 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Which aluminum rings have you had that haven't worn out/how much are you riding?
  • 33 3
 Comments need a filter for whining about price.
  • 11 0
 Agreed. I paid $12 for my last steel chainring.

And, while it weighs more, the longevity is... impressive. And while I do care some about weight, I also care about the cost of consumables.

That said, I can see the market for a Ti ring. If it is truly 3x the durability of AL, then the pricing here seems to make sense. They don't look too great compared to steel in terms of dollars per lifetime, but I don't think they were ever supposed to.

Although I'd have thought the market for TI chainrings was more in the 30-34t range, not 34-36t. But maybe their chasing XC pros, and Ebikers?
  • 7 2
 and you can harden steel so it lasts forever hahahahaha evil scientist laugh.....theres probbly some marketing mileage to be had saying your ring is hard
  • 3 0
 @Quinn-39: I had a North Shore Billet ring that lasted forever.
  • 3 4
 @dirtnapped: science says that 100 grams is negligible. The price difference is, but there's always people willing to pay for extravagance.
  • 5 4
 @dirtnapped: steel rings are the galaxy brain choice because they last forever AND lower your center of gravity by placing mass in the best location.
  • 26 2
 Actually no, steel doesn't do the same thing, it does better.

Aluminum is the lightest of the 3, also the weakest. But if your constrained by size can be used for a favorable strength to weight ratio. It's also VERY easy to machine, cut, sand, shape, and weld. Tubes can be butted, shaped, bent, etc, thus it's popular with early dual suspensions with a zillion different designs for the rear suspension.

Titanium is stronger, but much harder to machine, harder on tools, hard to weld (can't expose to o2), and hard to shape. It's memory makes even something simple like bending a tube hard, since it will return to it's original shape ... until you go too far, and might not return to where you want it.

Steel is stronger still, easy to weld and machine, but not as easy as aluminimum. Doesn't foul tools, and doesn't require a nitrogen bath to weld. It's by far the strongest of the 3 if you are size constrained.

So for things that can be any size/shape, aluminum is often the best, so it's cheap/easy. It's particularly friendly to CNC machines or tig welding. Ti is stronger, but MUCH harder to machine or weld. Best for relatively simple things, which is why Ti frames are much close to simple triangles than aluminum frames. However for maximum strength and maximum life for any fixed size, like a chain ring, steel will be more durable, stronger, stiffer, and cheaper.
  • 7 0
 I was gonna come here to point out the same thing but then I started googling and damn, those steel chainrings ARE heavy! 150g vs 50g that ain’t nothing
  • 4 0
 Goes for frames too. Get a Pipedream or a Cotic and never worry about your frame snapping.
  • 5 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: This "50g" is for a BCD chainring only. The sram steel chainrings are around 100 grams and include the "spider" since they are direct mount.
  • 12 0
 This chainring would make an awesome upgrade for me to post about on the Pivot Owners facebook group I'm in
  • 8 0
 @Starsky686: turns on filter, scrolls to the comment section: 0 Comments
  • 15 0
 @Mac1987: it's true 100 grams doesn't matter but this is only 1 piece of the puzzle. what if you save 100+ grams in 10 different ways through component selection: pedals, fork, cranks, chain ring, wheels, brakes, tires, bars, dropper, chain, cassette, grips. It goes on and on. then it can add up. One can easily shave 1500 grams on components alone which is over 3.3 lbs. is that worth the insane amount of money? No, but it's nice if you can afford it
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: the only issue with the wolftooth chainrings is they are kinda loud. However, they also make the only hyperglide plus chainring that fits directly on sram cranks, so I have them on two bikes.
  • 3 0
 Doesn´t go so good with electric yeti
  • 2 0
 @knarrr: Agreed, the bb area is the best location to have your weight so adding a little there shouldn't be that much of an issue. Before I started using oval front rings, I was just using a double crankset (so 22t, 32t and a bashring). Never replaced the granny so I don't know what these cost, but the steel Deore 32t ring was 9 euros to replace. That said, I've got the feeling I've had to replace this steel 32t ring more often than I have to replace my aluminium Superstarcomponents ring (34t oval). From what I understand, the top guide I'm using does reduce wear on the chainring as the chain approaches from more moderate angles. Maybe without a top guide, aluminium chainrings do indeed wear quite fast. As it is now, I'm wearing out (or mainly, developing burrs on the teeth causing the chain to skip) the smaller XT or XTR sprockets of my 10sp cassette than that I'm wearing out the chainring. Steel oval 34t chainrings for 104BCD are rare (can only think of Wolftooth) and it will take forever to see it be worth my investment.
  • 1 0
 @Quinn-39: Never mind. I was absolutely positive I’d ether bent or folded every steel chainring I’ve ever used well before they showed signs of wear and all the aluminium rings I’m currently using haven’t lasted years without bending or wearing out. My mistake.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: To weight weenie out for a moment...

SRAM DM X-sync 2 34t steel, 141g, $25 MSRP
SRAM BCD104 X-sync 2 34t steel, 136g, $25 MSRP
Wolf Tooth BCD104 steel, 72g for a 30t, oddly 88g for 32t so I'm guessing 95g for a 34t, $120 MSRP

So if you're already planning to buy the Wolf Tooth, maybe an extra $30 isn't so insane for a different weight/durability optimization.

I'm not that customer, but I'm happy with whatever 7075 rings are on sale, and a guide with bash plate.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-thetown: don’t wanna burst ur bubble but chainring profile doesn’t matter for hg+. All the ring needs is good chain retention, has absolutely no effect on shifting performance. Don’t believe everything the big manufacturers tell you *puts on titanium foil hat”
  • 2 0
 @TannerValhouli: well the Sram chainrings were even louder than the wolftooth ones, so that's at least one reason to use them. I didn't expect different shifting performance at the rear from a new chainring...
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: honest question bud- I've burned through the Chromag, SRAM, and RF aluminum rings I'd been using for years (averaging about a season per ring before they wore to the point that chain retention was noticeably worse), then got a few RF steel rings a couple years back and haven't had an issue.
  • 1 5
flag solf (Jan 25, 2023 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 @TannerValhouli: that's wrong. I'd destroy a $2500 bike. Probably destroy myself along with it. I've ended up with top of the line bikes because everything else breaks or gets dangerous when you're pushing it, due to shit breaks and suspension.
Ill rephrase your comment so it's accurate. A $2500 bike is good for average riders who are not pushing too hard.

The guys who know, know.
  • 5 0
 @solf: agreed. Shit breaks and shit brakes are both relevant when discussing entry level bikes
  • 3 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Also the SS WolfTooth seems to weigh less(at least in the hand tham budget steel) used them on cross, and gravel bikes; excellent durability.
  • 4 2
 @solf: I’ll agree that having a dialed bike helps when pushing it 100% but for the majority of riders, high end parts are often a bandaid for poor technique/inability to read trail. I used to break stuff all the time too while I was learning proper techniqueSmile
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: forever is a long time, especially the last bit.
  • 1 0
 @NZRalphy: ok...it's relatively speaking...at least 3 or 4 times as long as the race face that came before it. Better?
  • 2 1
 I tried the steel chainring and it was noisier. Went back to aluminum. Also tried aluminum derailleur pully wheels and they were noisy as well and did not shift as well because they were not narrow wide. Went back to the SRAM composite pulley wheels which are much quieter and shift more precise.
  • 1 0
 @Quinn-39: Haha the exact same chainrings. GX from 2017 and 2018 and a Raceface which is even older donated to my son from a friend. Seen out plenty of chains and a cassette honestly don’t even look chewed. Still not dropping chains. I’ve not been riding as much this last year but 30-30 miles on average a week and about 8000-10000 ft.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic:

I've only owned raceface steel chainrings since I started biking 4 years ago.

Until this comment section, I literally didn't even know narrow wide AL chainrings wore out in terms of chain retention Big Grin .
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Wild- I've found that they start dropping chains in both XC and Enduro applications between 2000-2500km. I'd venture a guess that your average riding conditions would probably be at least as wet (and likely muddier) than mine as well.
  • 1 0
 @DCF: hahaha. Yep
  • 2 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: curious why you believe the Wolftooth at $120 is a “way better investment” than this Ti version which is $150?
  • 2 0
 @TannerValhouli: I agree. It's easy to go fast, just Don't use the brakes. But eventually after some pain you've got to slow down and learn to actually ride. Been there.
  • 2 2
 @onawalk: The Wolftooth 416 will last about twice as long as a titanium chainring and is less expensive.

Wolftooth lasts 5x longer than aluminum. 5DEV claims 3x as long but I'm a little skeptical of that on a mountain bike where the chain gets dirt in it. Titanium is very strong but blunt.
Not as abrasion resistant and scratches easier than steel.
  • 2 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I guess the idea of investment is subjective. Clearly this ring wasn’t developed to replace a steel ring for those that choose to go that route, it was developed to replace alu rings, which are light, stiff, but wear quickly.
This at $150, while expensive as far as I’m concerned is pretty good value if you’re looking to replace a (wear quickly) alu ring, with something that’s just as light.
Just because something doesn’t appeal to you, doesn’t mean it doesn’t appeal to others, and isn’t good value for them…
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Those who say aluminum chainrings wear quickly, are you using a top guide and what size chainring do you use? Before I went for an oval chainring (hence went with a single front ring), I was using a dual ring (and bashguard) setup with a steel Deore 32t shift ring. They were cheap (9 euros a piece) but I felt they wore much quicker than the (currently 34t oval) aluminum chainrings I'm using now (from Superstarcomponents). Sure if I'd frequently have to replace them I'd be willing to invest in the steel alternative and the slight weight increase doesn't bother me one bit. But these aluminum rings already last pretty much forever so there doesn't seem to be much reason to get a steel one. But that's just me. So yeah, if you are wearing aluminum rings quickly, are you using a top guide?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I’ll go through a ring a year, I use a top guide with lower bash guard.
  • 1 2
 @onawalk: No chainring made of any material is designed specifically to replace a chainring of another material. If you used the word marketed instead of designed your sentence would make sense.

$150 for a ti chainring is never a good value unless you simply love ti, which some people do. A steel chainring is only about 15 grams lighter, vast majority of riders are gonna take that if it's twice as durable. There isn't much appeal here for the price unless you simply love ti.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: oh jeez,
Semantics I guess.
Yes being marketed as a replacement to alu rings, for those that want, light, blingy, durable.

Does that somehow make you feel better?
  • 64 2
 Pinkbike should do a 'Bling, Buy, or Skip' seasonal feature for these kinds of items they regularly introduce on the front page. I firmly place these in the 'Bling' category. I'm sure the ring is many grams lighter than a steel counterpart, but it lasts the same amount of time, and costs 5x more. Its saving grace is that it's Ti, and Ti is always cool so I can't say 'Skip'.
  • 12 2
 Titanium is also a lot heavier than aluminium though, so unless you can make the ring almost half the volume of an aluminium one, it will still be heavier and therefore skip.

Love the feature idea though, @brianpark.
  • 12 1
 @L0rdTom: The real solution is aluminum or carbon spider with only the ring and teeth being titanium. This is the only way to break the $200 barrier. Win-win.
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: Shimano XTR M970 middle chainring was composite with titanium teeth.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I think I have seen those in the road world. But, don't feel like digging to confirm.
  • 36 0
 The last photo says it all...precision-made for the discerning ebiker with a bike budget of $16K+
  • 8 0
 Right. Are we just bolting money to our bikes now?
  • 6 0
 @tbubier: Nah. Copper, nickel, silver, gold, they all have a very poor stiffness-to-weight ratio.
  • 6 1
 @tbubier: That's essentially all kashima is..
  • 33 6
 My buddy snapped his fancy 5dev cranks at the bike park when I was there. So, I don't believe the hype.
  • 24 3
 When I asked about their lab testing I was essentially laughed at.
  • 4 0
 @justanotherusername: I have been wondering about their durability. This does not bode well lol.
  • 5 1
 Uh oh, I have a pair on order for a new build and i'm not a light dude.
  • 8 0
 @nyhc00: No issues for me after ~2,500 miles (Stumpy Evo, various enduro and trail riding)
  • 5 3
 This is the main reason I've never considering their cranks. I seem to break all cranks including a set of eeWings. Much cheaper to just buy a set of GX or similar aluminum cranks each year. No more fancy expensive cranks for me. I've thought about trying Hope cranks some time since they are suppose to be very strong.
  • 3 0
 A buddy of mine snapped his eeWings too. They were quick to give him a new set, but dang. Hopefully my White Industries stay with me for a while.
  • 13 0
 @thustlewhumber: EEWings snapping ?
So this is what it feels like when your dreams die.
  • 3 0
 @WalrusRider: Al GX cranks are just fine, not that heavy, don't break often, under $150... I can afford expensive cranks but I can't find any good reason to buy them.
  • 3 0
 @davec113: same I'm not a heavy guy, but I have used the Descendant Alu cranks that came with my last 2 bikes and I've never had a problem. Don't see the reason to get something special when they just work. And I do ride in the bikepark, jump, and huck stuff
  • 4 0
 Yup i snapped a pair. They were great sending me new ones but still have not requested the broken ones back. Super disappointing/concerning. That would be a pretty awful injury off of a drop or lg jump. I feel they are sold on the same premise (increased durability ) clearly they have some issues. I would not buy again
  • 10 0
 @WalrusRider:

Username checks out
  • 1 0
 @mtbthe603: thanks dude, good to hear
  • 4 0
 @Dogl0rd @Nicksand5: Out of curiosity, where did they break (at one of the cut outs, pedal insert, spindle)?
  • 5 0
 @ervandew: mid arm straight across so i guess youd say the cutout.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: Just like the 90's all over again.
  • 2 0
 @ervandew: I believe it was at one of the cutouts
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider: Been using Hope cranks for years now. Never any problems. Most of Hope’s stuff is pretty bomb proof.
  • 7 11
flag damagemydirt (Jan 24, 2023 at 18:59) (Below Threshold)
 @Nicksand5: Your crank broke. You got a free replacement i'm guessing. You didn't break a frame... I think you should be praising the company vs bashing them. They honored a warranty and could have easily said it's not covered. You know how many warranties I've had denied? All of them.
  • 12 0
 @damagemydirt: Praising a company for honoring a warranty is for the benefit of the company and not yourself.
  • 3 1
 @WalrusRider: Breaking a set of cranks every season...JFC dude...you're either 300 pounds or might want to re-evaluate your riding style...
  • 2 2
 @damagemydirt:
Sure thing. Ill follow your orders sir.
  • 2 2
 They copied the styling of AC cranks from the 1990's. Can't say I'm surprised that the durability seems to be copied as well.
  • 3 1
 Aka 5joke
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: you mean the one that doesn’t exist?
  • 3 1
 Buddy broke his riding local trails.
  • 4 6
 Just stating the obvious here. CNC'd parts can be modified at any time. They aren't forged. If 5DEV had an issue with their cranks, they could change their design and update the crank at any time. Unlike a brand who sources thousands or even millions of units from overseas. You guys all seem butt hurt about this brand for personal reasons.
  • 5 2
 @damagemydirt: You mean, it's the client doing the testing,at their own risk.
As I said before,just like the 90s again: Design something cool looking,fire up the CNC machine,sell it for big money and then we'll see how it performs.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: name a brand that doesn’t use real world results in any industry to improve a product. Also send me your address I have a few broken frames laying around that passed “testing”. you can have them for free.
  • 4 1
 @nozes: I’ve got an X2 that has cavitated 3 times in the past 6 months. Fox won’t even warranty it. They say it’s my fault. Won’t list the amount of rims ive broken. Cranks? Frames? Bars? Stems? Pedals? I’ve broken every part on a bike frame. Even snapped a Ti bolt once. These comments are laughable to anyone who rides a mtb. If you don’t want your bike to break. Don’t ride it. It’s that simple. Granite always wins.
  • 1 2
 @SoftSoilSampler: what a copout, you're saying no part is better than any other. Some parts last multiple crashes and multiple bikes and some, like my NX derailleur don't last a few weeks
  • 3 0
 @wolftwenty1: I'm about 200lbs and not the most graceful rider lol!
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider: lol. Username checks out! Smile
  • 18 1
 You don't typically buy Ti parts because they're the cheapest. They're not even always the lightest. Frequently, Ti parts are bought because the buyer just loves Ti. I love Ti. My wedding ring is Ti. I have Ti spacers under my stem and Ti centerlock rings. I don't have those things because they're the lightest, but because they're Ti. I am absolutely 100% the market for a Ti chainring. When they get them one piece so they direct mount, I'll probably get one to put on my EE Wings...as long as they have the tooth count I want.
  • 4 0
 @tomhoward379: That one sure is pretty, but it's a lot more expensive than the 5dev one. I'll wait and see.
  • 1 0
 @Bitelio: dward-design.co.uk/product/titanium-mtb-chainring

@Explodo: you don't typically buy ti parts because they're the cheapest. And when they wear out or break, you can send them to the French countryside to be made into airplane components: www.eib.org/en/stories/titanium-recycling

@chrod: they talk like they're in a literature class
  • 1 0
 I am have the same train of thought, but I started using Ti bolts cause I can not stand the steel bolts rusting. This started my replacement of fastening hardware, even the Shimano plastic crank spindle bolts have been done.
  • 19 1
 3x the durability for 3x the price. Sign me up.
  • 1 0
 I was just going to same thing. 3x the durability isn’t really a better value if it costs 3x the price.
  • 2 1
 @sino428: Though I probably wouldn't buy one of these, buying one would be the same price but less wasteful.
  • 3 2
 Factor in that 3x the durability means a lot longer spent riding round on a "nearly but not quite yet" worn out chainring. During which time you will be spending a lot of money replacing chains much more often than normal...
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: we all like buying new stuff. This just misses the mark for me. One can purchase brand new x-sync 2 chainrings on eBay for £25-35 depending on if anyone else bids. They've got the best tooth profiles and are very strong and light.
Why on Earth anyone would purchase a heavy titanium ring for $150 beats me!
  • 1 0
 @sino428: considering as well that recycling is challenging to find the right place to throw it, whereas a steel or alloy ring can be thrown in any recycling bin.
  • 18 0
 I just carve mine out of wood..when I need it light for race days bamboo
  • 9 0
 You should give balsa a try. Stellar hardening properties
  • 11 1
 @pargolf8: Hey man, what ever floats your boat.
  • 16 0
 I love PB comments.
  • 11 2
 I love titanium, I have three titanium framed bikes, but man this isn't its best application. Steel narrow wide chainrings are $15 and barely weigh more, and will last indefinitely.
  • 26 17
 im not right good at english but when did “not inexpensive” become the way to write they are expensive ( which obvs depends on your POV)
  • 98 19
 when i write how I talk is why, okay. This ain't a lit class, engineer guy
  • 16 5
 Probably around the same time that "obvs" and "POV" became the way to write obviously and point of view.
  • 6 6
 @mikelevy: -He only speaks Russian ? -He speaks some English, but he cannot speak it good like we do
  • 4 0
 The English like to use double (or more) negatives. Not sure why as it takes more effort to parse what's they are actually trying to say
  • 16 1
 @stuie321: we definitely don't dislike double negatives. I think it stems from our need to frame things in as pessimistic a view as possible, even when we are forced to be positive.
  • 12 6
 "Not inexpensive" is honed journalismspeak to avoid pitfalls of direct declaration:

"This is expensive" is a direct declaration of an opinion as fact. This absolutely equals "this is not cheap" and will illicit flame responses from the comment section.

"This is not inexpensive" is a more limited declaration, avoiding the "expensive" claim, dulling the same opinion and leaving an option open to reader interpretation as "this might be expensive" and implying "... expensive to some but not to others". And Levy doesn't have to clarify to whom and how much.

smooth moves, crafty politics, placated readers, happy sponsors
  • 6 6
 @chrod: lol I hope that I don't need to point out this is expensive
  • 3 4
 @mikelevy: no need to, the people who won't buy it will cope and tell you it's expensive. The rest will never comment and just go buy it lol.
  • 3 2
 @mikelevy: Mike, I’ve heard that you can speak ancient Mayan in 5 different languages. No? Well maybe that’s not as funny as I’d hoped but I for one appreciate “conversational writing”.
  • 3 2
 @chrod: I’m not unhappy to don’t disagree!
  • 10 1
 Does it last longer than a steel chainring?
  • 30 2
 In short... no.... in long? nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
  • 3 0
 @bonkmasterflex: PB hmu and I’ll fix these long words from breaking the mobile experience lol
  • 9 0
 What about some 5 dev titanium cranks..
  • 5 0
 Everybody drools over factory machined parts for pros. Then when a brand makes those parts available to the general population they complain... It's amazing. I'm not buying this product but i'm also not going to bash a brand for making cool high things and selling them. It's my fault i'm cheap and poor not the brands.
  • 5 1
 I went back to steel chainring after going through a few alu ones. Only downside is a bit of rust that build up mostly on the off season for me. Best side of it is half the price of an alu chainring. Would not pay that much for a titanium ring but they look nice and they won't rust while lasting a bit more than the alu ones.
  • 6 0
 Non-XTR Shimano 12spd direct mount rings have steel teeth and a composite/alloy carrier. They’re not much heavier and a fraction of the price…
  • 5 0
 “You can get your 5DEV chainring in bronze, purple, teal, or raw, the latter being the only correct choice for anything made of titanium”. A man with class.
  • 2 2
 100%. If I pay for titanium you can be damn sure Im leaving it raw so everyone can know (or theyll think its aluminum and Ill cry)
  • 4 1
 I ran Boone Tech booneti.com/collections/chainrings Ti Chainring and Cassette cogs on a dream build Ti Boulder Bike back in the mid 1990s and loved the durability and especially the amazing sculpted curves of the "Big Ring". This one looks very plain. Too bad. One of the advantages of Ti, is that it's so much stronger that it can be sculpted beautifully, using less material, than steel or aluminum. A point missed on the wallet drainer from 5DEV. Looks like. they hit a home run with the cranks, and dropped the ball with the chainrings.
  • 1 0
 Uhhh-it’s way easier to mill intricate shapes into aluminum…..or steel.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: For sure it is. That's exactly what makes the Boone product such a special and stunningly beautiful thing in comparison.
  • 6 0
 For something made in the US by mountain bikers, the price is reasonable.
  • 5 1
 So for the price of this chainring I can purchase about 10-12 years worth of cheap aluminum chainrings. Sounds like a no-brainer.
  • 1 0
 With all the talk of steel chainrings, I just ordered a SRAM NX ring to test it out. $22ish bucks. Hope you guys are right.
  • 5 0
 5 dev cranks + o-chain system + ti chainring... That's like the price of a entry level hardtail right there haha
  • 2 0
 Hard sell. If you care about the weight, there are options out there that are 2/3 of this. Alu chainrings aren't exactly 'race day only', but if you are counting grams for a race, you don't care much about longevity. If you care about longevity, five SLX composite/steel combo rings will last many times longer for the same investment and a 53g weight penalty. So the only markets are those for whom this is just the compromise they have been craving, and those who just want bling everywhere.
But hey, that latter category is big enough.
With the relative prices of cassettes and chainrings these days, I'd prefer my chainring to wear at a similar rate to the cassette and not put a new chain/cassette combo on a half-worn ring, accellerating wear.
  • 2 0
 I get about 4500 miles out of my aluminum chain rings. Change the chain when it needs to go (~1500 miles) and the cassette and chain ring will last.
Love Titanium, and it has it's place, but not on my chainring.
(I did have a Ti framed hardtail, great bike, and that is a proper place for Ti)
  • 2 0
 I get plenty enough life out of my aluminum chainrings too.
  • 1 0
 I'd like to try one when there is a 30T SRAM direct mount option. Also, is this the only chainring that is equally compatible with SRAM and Shimano 12spd transmissions? I remember Shimano compatible 12spd chainrings being somewhat unique.
  • 1 2
 A titanium spiderless ring you probably won’t ever see, it will be like $300+
  • 1 0
 Shimano chain won't really work on "normal" NW rings because the inner plates have an extended chamfer that the Shimano-compatible rings account for with a corresponding chamfer on the wide teeth.

You can see a bit of a chamfer on these rings, though it looks about the same size as many existing rings like RaceFace, Wolf Tooth, OneUp, etc, that might not indicate Shimano 12sp compat...
  • 2 1
 @tomhoward379: their stuff is lovely, niche but lovely.
  • 4 2
 @justanotherusername: cheap at 3 times the price ......we were making these for these people www.aero-coach.co.uk/store/AeroCoach-Aten-titanium-carbon-track-chainring-p373704892 i think they sold for 1k a pop
  • 3 3
 @justanotherusername: indeed. Though It’s existence seems to be quite triggering for some, by the looks of it.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername:
$300+ you say? I wouldn’t have it any other way. Money is no object when it comes to my MTB fantasies. After all, it’s justanotherchainring
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: aero dentists only
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: the chamfer helps to distribute load and centre the chain on the ring, they would work with any ring without getting the benefit of this but they also made the chain narrower and the is is the issue with it working with non HG rings.

Most of the ring manufacturers have HG specific profiles now.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: you should say chamfer one more time
  • 1 0
 @thustlewhumber: shamp-feeeer!
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: only the outside is narrower. The inside of the narrow link isn't any narrower, but the inside of the wide link acts narrower because of the chamf..., I mean because of the angular extension of the inner plates.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: i have noticed there starting to be overlap between defence work and making expensive bits for people with bikes,
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: $175 and your dream comes true:https://booneti.com/collections/chainrings/products/boone-titanium-double-step-direct-drive-chainring
  • 1 0
 I've got ~4000 miles on an XTR ring on my Knolly, probably ~5000 miles on my gravel bike with a WT 46T ring... neither is worn enough for me to care. Not dropped chains, not looking too pointy... Most of my riding is pretty dry, so I don't have a PNW type muddy slurry abrading my chainring teeth most days...

But no one is buying this because of it's value prop.
  • 1 0
 This isn't even going to fit a lot of current bikes without the option for at least a 30T ring. The Enduro is one that comes to mind where anything over a 30T will contact the swingarm with the correct chainline.

More silliness from "the industry".
  • 1 0
 My first reaction was "marketing fail" for just this reason. The buying market for this product is old guys with money and bad knees, ie 30t or even a 28t chain ring.
  • 1 0
 An Enduro can only take a 30t??
  • 1 0
 2 words, stainless steel
For chains - check
For chainrings - Surly
For cassettes - N/A (if made light enough with SS teeth and Ti body)
Recipe for bomb proof drivetrain, minus the exposed rear mech?
Too bad wear-parts are profitable. Cheers
  • 3 2
 Yield strength to weight of 6alv4 Vs heat treated 416 is almost identical, and in a non thin wall application, means a properly designed chain ring will weigh the same in either, except the 416 will be cheaper and slightly harder. Another overpriced under-engineered product from the turkey gobblers at 5dev for the over monied fwits who think a warren truss is a great torsion member. Imagine if they used a real tool steel with a nitriding...
  • 1 0
 But wouldn't you use similar tooth profiles in either material? Meaning the Ti will be lighter and wear faster. It would be very interesting to see how long a drivetrain fully out of a hard tool steel would last. I have no clue about production difficulties for those metals, so no idea if it would become much more expensive than current options.
  • 4 0
 Did the engineers also steal your girlfriend and kill your dog? You should make your own parts and sell them if it's so easy. Sounds like you got it all figured out. Where's the emoji button for laughing face.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: you are correct, I should have said similar.
  • 1 1
 @SoftSoilSampler: unfortunately there's too many morons who buy things like this to make doing it properly worth while. Bike industry is full of marketing geniuses unfortunately.
  • 1 0
 alumium chainrings are chasing grams for the published weights of bikes. i would always seek out the "cheaper" steel option when im replacing my chainrings.

So with that said, the question is, is a Ti Chainring worth the cost uplift for the weight saved?

still no.
  • 1 0
 SLX and XT rings are made of steel and bolt to a better engineered set of hollow crankarms-at a fraction of this price. 5Dev is the gapiest gaper brand out there these days. Like-if you were an overweight poser with a Zaskar or LTS with all purple CNC parts in the 1990's and didn't break anything because you didn't ride your bike, you buy 5Dev stuff for your broped......that you still don't ride.
  • 5 2
 It’s just a beautiful extravagaaaaaahold on so is mountain biking! I’ll take one!
  • 2 0
 Yeah all the bling for riding to the local gelateria and bragging about the weight saved.
For everyone else: just use a steel chainring
  • 6 3
 I’m starting to think that 5dev is losing its touch. This doesn’t look even remotely like Swiss cheese!
  • 1 0
 "But I could buy 6 alu alloy ones on Amazon or Aliexpress for that price". I've also never needed a chainring replacement due to wear, but I don't get the mileage round these parts.
  • 2 0
 You can buy about 4 rings from somewhere like works components for the same price, no need for alibaba tat.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Had no idea they made chainrings - love the headsets - nice one!
  • 2 0
 In what parallel universe do alu chainrings last longer than cassettes? I blow through several alu chainrings before having to replace a cassette.
  • 1 0
 GX cassettes don't last long. I imagine several other models don't either.

XO1 cassettes though...maybe someday I'll need a new one?
  • 1 0
 Replace your chain often . Then your cassette and chainring will last much longer. Still titanium . Who doesn't like titanium. I'm a big fan of 6al 4v alloy . China makes cheap titanium . Not into the cheap stuff.
  • 5 0
 No 28t ? No sale
  • 4 2
 No watts?
  • 4 2
 #getsomelegs
  • 3 0
 @Motohed:
#getSomeMountains
  • 3 0
 Titanium, the surgeon's favorite material for work and dentist's favorite material for play.
  • 3 0
 I have a Titanium chainring from Dward Designs, and 3 young kids. So I'll never need to replace my chainring.
  • 3 0
 You know what else lasts 3 times as long as an aluminum chainring?

3 aluminum chainrings.

Or a $15 steel one.
  • 1 0
 Enjoy your rusty ring
  • 2 0
 @Motohed: I have had a $16 sram steel ring on for at least 2 years now (maybe even 3?) and while I'll sometimes spot rust on the chain I've never had any on the chainring. This is with way too much riding it in wet conditions and then just leaving it in the car.

Neither has my steel coil spring.
Or my steel spokes.
  • 1 0
 They do offer the chain rings in direct mount, I just installed one on a customers bike with their cranks...

ride5dev.com/collections/chainrings/products/5dev-7075-classic-chainring
  • 1 0
 If you look at the various materials in question, titanium has a comparatively high coefficient of friction, I wonder if this will contribute to any appreciable driveline losses or not.
  • 3 0
 It does look very very cool
  • 2 0
 I think my XTR ring was titanium. The oneUp aluminum lasts years though so why bother with ti?
  • 4 1
 But does it wear out the chain quicker?
  • 1 0
 Chains don't wear because the gears are a harder material or just doesn't wear. It's not a trade-off where one piece has to wear because the other doesn't. Chains wear [internally, pins and bushings and rollers] because they move, and some of the movement is under tension.
  • 1 2
 Maybe I wouldn’t buy this, but an Absolute black oval ring is close to $90, and this is just a bit under double that price. Though, Titanium is definitely boutique, and not what I’d personally buy unless I was going for a total bling build. I guess I’m getting closer and closer to that though.
  • 2 0
 Absolute black rings are obscenely overpriced though, the company is marketing led, go and buy an oval chainring from any number of other companies for much less.
  • 4 1
 Another reason ebikes suck
  • 4 5
 Harder metal will likely wear chain faster. So you'll be replacing more chains and less rings. Also, they can't use Xsync-2 chainring tooth pattern so if you're on SRAM you will get a louder, lower performing drivetrain with these rings.
  • 1 1
 It doesn't work that way, at least on dirt bikes it doesn't where I could wear out a well maintained, but lightweight drive train completely in about 6 weeks.

The steel sprockets as they don't wear (much), and then begin stretching your chain, result in much longer wear throughout the entire drivetrain.
  • 2 0
 Since the ring won't wear as fast as aluminum one would, it won't affect the chain wear. What affects the chain wear - and causes elongation - is the crap/grit that gets into the rollers and wears the pins. That process is accelerated when the rollers wrapped around the ring are not supported evenly and thus the load is not spread evenly amongst all engaged rollers. But since Ti or steel ring lasts longer, chain wear will depend mostly on its' care/maintenance.
  • 4 1
 If anything the harder chainring will hold it's shape better and engage better with the chain for longer, increasing chain longevity. I don't think I've ever seen a case where hardening the softer part has increased wear on the hard part.
  • 1 0
 OK, thanks for info! Stand corrected on metal on metal issue with the chain/ring. But the tooth pattern thing is still a thing.
  • 1 1
 problem with ti is it has an inherently "rough" surface. Ti is far more abrasive than steel
  • 1 0
 @arek: Rollers being evenly supported would be the case of ring and chain are worn by the same amount, right? Or am I missing something? So if you have a really slow wearing chain ring it would accelerate chain wear once the two get out of sync. And then again when you replace only the chain. In my experience using two chains and frequently changing them makes everything wear at approximately the same rate and I replace the whole set once it starts to seriously show shifting problems.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: I think real life scenarios can vary wildly, depending on different setups, riding conditions, maintenance/cleaning regimens etc. My point was, that the harder wearing ring material (vs. typical alu) is not going to be your main concern when it comes to chain wear.
  • 2 0
 Eye roll. Steel is harder than Ti and will be longer wearing. The most durable cassettes are steel.
  • 2 0
 Or just get 1/3rd of durability for 1/15th of the cost by getting one from AliExpress.
  • 2 0
 Wow $150 geez I rather go on pinkbike market and find a chainring for $15 and buy like 3 of them to last 10 years
  • 8 0
 I don't think you're the intended customer
  • 1 0
 Oh, but they are... Gotta normalise those extravagant prices somehow, before you hike up the rrp of the cheap tat
  • 3 0
 I’d like a titanium ring the same weight as a steel ring
  • 3 0
 Imagine riding chains. love gates
  • 1 0
 I've been using the same steel NX chainring since 2017.... Somewhere around 2019 I bought an aluminum one for $70 that broke within 4 months.... Steel for life.
  • 1 0
 5clowns social media team out in full force with all these neg props haha watch out you haters you might get reposted on the gram!
  • 1 0
 Always de durability sales justification. However there are so many people buying a new bike every year, some don't even service the fork 1 time...
  • 1 0
 My chainring missing teeth like the Flyers Bobby Clarke but it still gets the job done. When it gives up the ghost I'll opt for the $20 steel option.
  • 1 0
 Don't tease us with that O-chain pic! Seriously, who's tried one, how do you like it?
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: What’s up with the adjustment looking dial on the Ochain (in main photo of this article)? Haven’t ever seen that before…
  • 3 0
 Been riding one for almost two years now. Don't regret a cent I spent on it. Bike is quieter, smoother, my feet don't get bounced as much (I ride flats) and long descents are less tiring.

And no, it's not the same as just using a low engagement hub. Wink
  • 1 0
 @CamPaine: thanks my dood
  • 2 0
 I imagine there's no direct mount as it would be a bit wibbly wobbly.
  • 2 3
 Mine (2x Study cycles & 1 Dward designs) aren’t.
  • 2 0
 Who is riding 34-36t rings? I'm not sure my bike even fits a 34t!
  • 1 0
 @Starsky686: I bought my last XC bike off a girl who was running a 34t on it.

I swapped in a 32t for myself though.
  • 1 0
 150dollars for that reason i m out mtbiking has become blonde crazy expensive
  • 1 0
 I got sick of my drivetrain wearing out so now I push my bike up the hills while we talk about "safety".
  • 1 0
 … and no comments about sizing choices?

Only XC boyz ride 34-36t, no climbing just flow Wink
  • 1 0
 But is it noisier? I tried a steel chainring and it was noisier. Went back to aluminum.
  • 1 0
 I’ve never found the weight of bike components an issue. It’s the 16 stone that sits on the bike the problem.
  • 2 0
 With 5Dev a fool and his money are soon parted
  • 1 0
 Dear Pinkbike Tech People, Please do a test of these claims, a chainring shootout!
  • 5 5
 it's been a long time since I wore out a 1x chainring, but I bet Titanium causes the chain to last less long.
  • 12 1
 A) Chains don't wear much where they touch the gears. The wear that causes "stretch" is mostly on the pins and [integrated] bushings.

B) A chain-ring that doesn't wear as fast, that maintains its shape for maximum and proper chain contact, will help a chain last longer by spreading the forces through many links at a time.

C) You're probably on a worn ring and worn chain right. A new chain OR ring would probably be loud for a bit as the worn part accelerates wear on the new part.
  • 2 2
 ah yes, one more way to feel better than your friends without getting any better at riding
  • 1 0
 TI chainrings! sign me up.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, but TITANIUM...
  • 1 0
 Is that an adjustable ochain ?
  • 2 0
 Nice! but ugly:/
  • 2 0
 direct mount or GTFO
  • 1 0
 Sram or RF direct mount in a 28T or 30T would be sweet
  • 1 0
 @Bitelio: Very nice, but I'm not sure who their market is for £360.00 – £420.00 a pop.
  • 1 0
 @abercrave: *raises hand*
  • 1 0
 @abercrave: *raises hand too*
There is a support group in the pipeline for those of us with addiction to Titanium. Feck...I just broke the first and second rules.......
  • 2 1
 Wow, 3x the cost for no science. I'll take an alu oval, or 3
  • 2 1
 Jet fuel melts steel beams so I'm gonna get titanium I guess.
  • 1 0
 Finally a chain ring I can pass down to my kids.
  • 1 0
 Titanium is fancy and bling, but for a chainring steel is the winner
  • 1 0
 Is there going to be an oval option?
  • 1 0
 who knows this cranks brand?????
  • 1 0
 Same one that makes the chainring…
  • 2 3
 Would the TI have a smoother relation with the chain, sustaining it's longevity? (smoother than steel)
  • 1 0
 I found steel chainrings to be noisier than aluminum.
  • 1 0
 I thing longevity is really fucntion of how much work you push through the chain. Chainrings arte ususlaly messed up mostly by stretched chains. In reality chain is way bigger problem I for example am am replacing the chain every 2-3 mounts average, which 5-6 chains per year. This is for XX1 chain. ~$90 after the 10% discount + the Cali tax at sports basement. It last between 500-800 miles depending on how much I climb. So in reality can be a month of biking. I see people are getting 2000 miles out of chain but those are probably on a downhill bike!
  • 2 4
 Certainly a good idea vs Alloy (warm butter) rings. They need a direct mount Hyperglide 12+ configuration.
  • 7 0
 this ring is made from a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and not pure titanium
  • 2 2
 oh look, another muppet who thinks al means alloy.





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