First Look: SRAM's AXS Web Tool Tracks Your Shifting and Dropper Post Usage

Mar 23, 2020 at 14:23
by Mike Levy  


Attention data dorks everywhere: SRAM's new AXS Web tool gives you the ability to track more ride metrics than ever before, including shifting and dropper post usage, and even your tire pressure. You can record it all via a Garmin (and Wahoo, soon) computer and then check it out post-ride on your phone.

Alright, who's this for?

We're all dorks who love pedaling around the forest on a sunny Saturday afternoon, but while some of us would prefer nothing more than sending the same hip jump all day, others have just as much "fun" crushing a hard tempo session on their way to the descent. If you use your highly calibrated thumbs to check tire pressure, live in the biggest cog from the garage to the top of the mountain, or aren't sure what a watt is, then maybe stick with Angry Birds rather than the AXS Web.

AXS Web Details

• Tracks usual metrics w/ Garmin, Wahoo head unit
• Mapping function
• Records shifting and dropper post usage
• Tracks time spent in each gear
• TyreWiz integration
• Low battery push-to-phone warning
www.axs.sram.com


But if you look at Strava as soon as you get back to the garage to see how those KOM attempts went, routinely swap tires or change suspension settings to better suit conditions, or could talk for hours about something called an FTP, then the AXS Web tool might be your kind of dorkery. Access to the new software is free, just like the app, but you'll obviously need the AXS drivetrain and/or the AXS Reverb to partake.

The idea with all this data, SRAM says, is to offer ''... a web tool designed for riders who want to better understand and improve their experience on the bike. Riders can quickly and easily learn more about how their bike is working for them and consider adjustments.''


A Garmin or Wahoo head unit tracks the usual ride metrics, and you can view them on the AXS Web dashboard.



What Does It Tell You?

Using a Garmin or Wahoo (soon) head unit, you can keep tabs on ride time, elevation change, distance, the heart rate and power numbers that you may or may not live by, and all the other usuals that you'll be able to see on the AXS Web dashboard. But more interesting that that stuff is its ability to track AXS shifting metrics through your phone, which you'll also need to bring with you.

Using the AXS Web dashboard, you'll be able to see how much time you've spent in each gear, how many shifts you've done, and even your shift-per-mile ratio. It also tells you how many times you've used your dropper post and the drop-per-mile ratio, which is directly correlated to the smile-per-mile ratio. Besides (some of us) finding those numbers interesting, how could the data be used?


Shifting, tire pressure, and dropper post metrics are tracked through your phone, which then talks to the AXS Web dashboard where you can view it all.


If I went out for a three-hour lap and spent all but twenty minutes in my 50-tooth cog, then I might use that data to determine that no, my 36-tooth chainring isn't ideal given my current fitness level. Or maybe I've been training my ass off and eating three fewer donuts each weekday, and the numbers tell me that while I spent two-hours and forty-minutes in my biggest cog when I did that ride in January, I only spent an hour in it during the same ride yesterday. Probably why my legs are so damn sore, too.

There is a ride mapping function, of course, and James Meyer, Category Manager for SRAM's Digital Integration, did say that they ''Definitely want to put a lot more data on the map, including gearing and dropper actuations.'' There's no ETA on that, but overlaying shift and dropper post data on the map would let you see what gear you were in at any point during the ride, and the same goes for whether your seat post was up or down. It sounds like that's coming.



Zipp 3Zero Moto carbon wheels
ShockWiz
The TyreWiz system (left) is integrated into AXS Web, but ShockWiz (right) isn't yet incuded. That'll likely happen down the road.


Where's the ShockWiz Integration?

The AXS Web tool will tell you your tire pressure down to a tenth of a PSI by talking to your TyreWiz gadgets that everyone owns and uses all the time, but it doesn't speak with a much more useful gadget: SRAM's ShockWiz device. At least not yet. ShockWiz is a tuning tool that constantly monitors the fork or shock's air pressure as it extends and compresses, and then uses that data to calculate things like sag, number of deep compressions, rebound speed, and even average time spent in the air per jump. It'll also tell you how far out to lunch you are with your current setup, and give you tuning suggestions to make it better.


ShockWiz
The ShockWiz system ain't cheap, but it can be very helpful when it comes to getting the most out of your bike's suspension.


AXS Web tool and ShockWiz integration seems like a no-brainer to me, and while Meyer agrees, that ability isn't included yet: ''We intentionally left ShockWiz out of AXS Web so we didn't blow up our development team and confuse users on our first release,'' he explained before adding that it's in the works but there's no ETA. There are also those persistent AXS suspension rumors, and it'd sure make sense to release that stuff and ShockWiz compatibility at the same time. It's also worth noting that SRAM is usually a one-stop-shop kinda company, so don't be surprised to see them eventually offer their own head unit at that point. Stay tuned.

When and if that happens, you might be able to zoom in on a precise point on your ride map to see exactly what your suspension was doing. How could that be useful? Let's say there's a section of trail that always gives you or your bike trouble; maybe it's one heavy smash at the bottom of a steep rock slab that might cost you some teeth one day, or maybe it's just a rough bit of trail that rattles those teeth loose. Theoretically, AXS Web might be able to focus on those exact moments of your ride to tell you that yes, your suspension setup could be improved and here's how to do it. We'll see.

What's your take: Would you love to dig into this kind of shifting and dropper post data, especially if you could put it over a ride map? Or do smiles-per-mile count for everything during your ride?


125 Comments

  • 85 4
 I'd like to see this data be used to profile a course and automate the shifting, suspension lock-outs, and -potentially- the dropper. Just turn the rider into an automaton, and then eventually replace that with a Bosch motor. #Progress
  • 43 1
 Why stop there? Mount a camera on the bars, steering mechanism and folks can just throw on a VR headset and sit on their couch.
  • 12 2
 @RadBartTaylor: Now that's a quarantine activity I want to take part in
  • 4 0
 @me2menow: Can't leave the house!... But it'd be a shame if the bike doesn't get ridden...
  • 3 0
 I like to sit on my bike and watch videos, too. Gotta be careful not to lean too much though.
  • 2 1
 I know your being sarcastic, but I think that idea would be super cool to see!
  • 2 1
 @butters1996: I agree; sarcasm aside, it would be interesting to see how an automated implementation of shift/lockout/dropper usage across an XC course (perhaps with some tie-in to preferred power and cadence ranges that can override a patterned gear setting along the course) would compare with self-selected shift/lockout/dropper usage.

On the other hand, I look at the gear usage metrics as strong support for riding $1500 faster on my single-speed.
  • 41 6
 Definitely useful metrics for XC racers the most. They can fine tune what metrics would be fastest and most efficient for any given track. SRAM XC racers using AXS for training and racing will have an advantage over other drivetrain companies.
  • 11 2
 @tacklingdummy XC racers should only care about gearing insofar as it affects their cadence. Given that they already have cadence information from power meters and know at what cadence they produce the most power, they don't actually get much useful information from this. Day-to-day and moment-to-moment interactions with the track will impact what gear they choose, meaning it's not something they're likely to optimize before a race. Granted, this assumes that XC racers have power meters, but I can't imagine that anyone is racing XC and upgraded to AXS without having already invested in a power meter.
  • 3 0
 @airdonut41: That's not completely true. Say you're on a variable course where you really use the whole cassette. You could use this data to see exactly how long you spend at either end of the cassette and figure out pretty definitely which end you could trade off to improve your times (through choosing a different chainring). Maybe the course is such that you spend enough time at your top end that you're willing to have a suboptimal cadence in your lowest gear in order to have a higher top speed for an overall net benefit. Marginal gains, my friend.
  • 19 31
flag Andypanda82 (Mar 24, 2020 at 10:38) (Below Threshold)
 WHO CARES CROSS COUNTRY SUUUUCKS
  • 6 0
 @fullfacemike: Was waiting to see if anyone caught it! Good man. Stay safe!
  • 2 0
 @airdonut41: I don't agree that they don't optimize gearing before a race. Granted the course conditions change and there is situational occurrences on the track that you need to adapt your gearing, however, they definitely have a framework of what gearing they feel is most efficient and fastest for that particular track. For instance, look at Schurter and Courtney, they crush high gears while on the other hand Neff is high cadence spinner. Totally different gearing and obviously have optimize their gearing to suit their riding.
  • 44 11
 I thought there weren't any metrics I wouldn't be interested in knowing about my ride. But, lo and behold, SRAM has stepped up and proven me wrong.
  • 5 18
flag auzb (Mar 24, 2020 at 7:15) (Below Threshold)
 Right, useless
  • 17 3
 @auzb: not useless if you know what your looking at
  • 14 0
 Seems like the data creates a better product usage, life, efficacy, etc picture for SRAM to be able to refine and develop new products. They also just happen to make it available to users as a beneficial tool
  • 7 1
 @Mntneer: exactly, if you spend most of your time in the upper portion of your cassette you could down size your chainring and got the most out of your 12 cogs
  • 11 0
 @Tr011: Just as well they have a fancy app to tell me that. There is no way I could work that out for myself Wink
  • 11 1
 @carlitouk: they dont charge for the app so there really is nothing to complain about unless your a di2 owner jealous of all the cool sram stuff
  • 4 1
 @Tr011: Don't get me wrong, I 100% see the benefit to Sram. That's some great free product research they get back. Smart business move for sure.
  • 2 1
 @Tr011: OK, I get the usefulness of the time in each cog metric, but what's the point of the dropper measurement?
  • 2 0
 @Tr011:
Disagree.
I spend most of my time in the last 4 gears because most of the time is climbing. If I downsized my chainring d/t that logic, I'd lose overall range that I want for the WHOLE ride.
  • 2 1
 @IamZOSO: that is the whole point of the app, if you spend 1% of your ride time in your hardest gears why not downsize you chainring to make better use of your whole range?
  • 4 2
 @Tr011:
I give up. You don't get it.
  • 1 1
 @IamZOSO: d0nt f33d t3h tr0llz
  • 2 0
 @Tr011: And you can install a non boost front chain ring and get better chain line and drive train life.
  • 2 0
 @Tr011: Shimano has had this for years. Pair it with any computer or use their E-TUBE app and it does the same thing
  • 4 0
 @IamZOSO: Man, he kind of sounds like he DOES get it. If you spend a lot of time in your low gears and not a lot in your high gears you might benefit from having yet one lower gear and seeing how it goes. Case in point: I used to race just fine on a 10s 11-36. When I went to 11s I got a 10-42 and thought, "I'll never really have to use this lowest gear but it's there so whatever." I use the f*ck out of that 42. I also had the option to use a bigger chainring and have an even higher top end without losing any low end. This data can guide all these decisions without having to just trial-and-error and blow through hundreds of dollars in gear and hours of testing.
  • 2 0
 @fullfacemike: Nope ZOSO is saying time in gear is not a good proxy for whether that gear is needed or not. You might spend a very small amount of time in the hardest gear but that doesn’t mean it’s not as valuable as a more used gear. It might actually be really helpful to not spin out to clear a gap and add a lot to a ride in a few brief moments. Your example adds a gear, here we are talking about shifting the range, which gains on one end and loses on the other. Whether the top or bottom end you lose effects your riding is informed more by the specific circumstances of your riding then time in gear, which hopefully we don’t need an app to tell us.
  • 1 0
 @strangemeadowlark: I could have added fifty gears and it wouldn't change the fact that I was 100% convinced that I wouldn't find any gear with more than 36 teeth useful and I was 100% wrong. That's saying something considering I'm the kind of guy that agonizes over this kind of stuff.
  • 2 0
 @fullfacemike: Fair enough, I’m responding more to the if you only use your hard gear 1% of the time, you should downsize. Assuming 12sp, if you want the lower gear, you have to drop chainring teeth and lose top end. Only disagreeing that the amount of time you spend in a gear shows it’s value, when the particulars of a trail and riding style might mean that 32-or 34-10 really adds a lot even if it’s not used much.
  • 1 0
 @strangemeadowlark:

Thank you. You get it.
  • 35 3
 For only 28.99 a month it can tell you what gear you are in.
  • 1 0
 A good 28.99 joke, I haven't seen those in a while. Congrats.
  • 22 1
 Cool. So important and handy. I'll make some statistical analysis and search for correlation between dropper usage and quality of my excrement.
  • 5 0
 Don't forget sperm count!
  • 6 1
 @goroncy that was very Freudian
  • 17 0
 Does it track how often my post went up and down in my bedroom too?
  • 11 0
 And more importantly, who operated it...
  • 21 0
 That's the soon to be introduced CockWiz.
  • 11 0
 I have a reverb, it goes up very slowly when it's cold out...
  • 5 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Sounds pricey.
  • 7 0
 @kcy4130: good thing you don't have the old reverb. It often doesn't go up at all without some outside help...
  • 6 0
 @kcy4130: my reverb sags down slowly when its sat on and doesn't come back up unless I pull on it.
  • 1 0
 @Ritgut: sounds like a very personal problem Wink
  • 5 0
 It seems so simple to make the jump from ride tracking to consumable-component wear tracking. When paired with a power meter SRAM could basically tell you when you should replace your chain, bleed your brakes, service your suspension and more. And you can report usage statistics like when you replaced your BB so they can keep better track of performance in the field.
  • 2 0
 Yes and no - I think component wear depends on so many factors it's not going to happen. How often the bike is cleaned and lubed, the conditions where you ride, etc. It would be useful for tracking whether the batteries are likely to need charging though...
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: It doesn't have to be exact, I think there's too much variance in chain manufacturing for that, but suggestions are a good thing. Keeping track of the 50 hour interval for suspension service is very easily done. Knowing when to charge batteries is a pretty light lift, if our bikes are integrating technology to make the ride experience better then what's to say they can't use that technology to improve the life of the product. In my experience too many riders don't do enough regular maintenance on their bikes.
  • 8 1
 As if I didn't over-analyze my rides enough already.
  • 8 0
 Same here. I don't think any of this data will really help me, but I do find it hella interesting.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Since I wrote this, I've literally been sitting here envisioning my local trails and estimating what cog I spend most of my time on.
  • 5 2
 This is pretty cool, not because I want to see how often I'm shifting/using my dropper post, but because the overall potential integration abilities are robust. I would love to see integration with power meters, shock wiz, tire pressure, and detailed (+/- one foot) GPS data. The challenge would be the accuracy of the gps data, especially in areas with heavy tree cover.
  • 4 1
 Definitely interesting stuff. This is all the same kind of data that auto engineers use to improve their products. Could definitely see pro XC racers using these metrics to improve different aspects of their riding. Also, I’m sure SRAM will find the data useful to improve their products.
  • 3 0
 I usually read other comments before I jump in. Not this time, too bloody busy balancing work, monsters (kids) and self. Summary - I love this shit. I don't have the time, nor the skills to utilize it to improve my performance, and I would rather work on the data vis and optimization then purchasing it at the moment, but I see this as an amazing way to auto tune your suspension and gear selections in the future. Think about like many other IOT apps out there today where aggregate data (crowd sourced) and your data (E.g. watts, apple/android health apis, other..) drive a better ride experience. I think it is amazing. I'd love to work on this stuff.
  • 3 1
 Only analysis I'm currently doing is that when I wash out, I hike back to check my tracks to see whether I've braking or not. Other stuff that may be interesting to log would be my fore-aft weight balance and bike tilt leading up to the skid. I don't think I care enough about what gear I'm in.
  • 2 1
 I thought about this article on telemetry that was out some weeks ago and quite frankly while it could help and elite downhiller like Bruni or Brosnan chances it would cause anything else but confusion to a mortal are rather low. If you want to get better at braking practice braking on different surfaces, grab that front brake as hard as it is viable. Learn how long are braking distances, Most of us are scared to squeeze that basterd hard. And there go huge gains. I did it long time ago and fee I need to revisit it. Onceyou get more comfortable with dropping that front anchor, teach body to work with this much force to not go over the bars your braking distance will go down significantly. So if you can do with much shorter patch of dirt, everything gets easier. Check those vids with Remy M where does a steep rock slab. He does some really hard braking there. Most of us would drag the brake all the way in a shitty manner risking to get the bike sideways
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Funny enough I'm way more comfortable with the front brake than with the rear brake. When I started out I had V-brakes front and rear. At some point I got a new fork and got a disc brake in the front, but not in the rear. The frame wouldn't accept it anyway. So soon enough I started to neglect that rear brake and relied on the front brake for everything. It could get hairy at times but on the other hand I felt much more in control. Only years later (about five years after I started) I got a disc brake in the rear too but I still rely much more on the front brake. I'm not afraid to go near or past the point where it starts to skid and can recover when it does. It is just that it is the one thing I check when I slide out. I walk back and see what the skid is like. Usually it is indeed kind of like it is raked perpendicular to the riding the direction. I can clearly see that the knobs don't slide in the riding direction at all, only perpendicular to it so that's good. It does imply that I had too little weight over that particular wheel. Got to add I said wash out but I meant to say this goes for both wheels. Ideally you're at the limit when both wheels drift simultaneously but in choppy corners (with roots, rubble and holes) you rarely have that. There is always one wheel that goes first. Usually it is the rear that goes (though it got much better now that I've got a longer bike) but when the rear goes, I may overreact at times and recover the rear but lose the front. I'm fine with learning here. This is not extreme DH kind of stuff I'm talking about and consequences are low/nihil. Instead these are corners that give little support hence make it a challenge to go fast. Which is just that challenge I like to give myself. So obviously going back to reconstruct what I have been doing is part of that. Otherwise I never learn.
  • 2 0
 Interesting throwing out the AXS Suspension comment there. Really was surprised that the SID launch didn't include an AXS lockout option, seems like it would be a pretty easy win as dual lockout cables are obnoxious and would integrate nicely with the Reverb. Maybe they are saving the AXS branding for a full Fox Live Valve competitor.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: It would be easy to envision an algorithm where seat extension and gear selection corresponded to damping/lock-out.
Full height / 50t cog - full lcck-out.
Fully dropped seat, lower half of cassette, wide open mod.

Just don't forget to charge your batteries.
  • 2 0
 It’s cool tech, but even as a data junkie I’m wondering why any of this matters. Maybe change chainrings if you’re spending too much time at one end of the cassette? Otherwise I have no idea why I would care how many times I use my dropper or any of that.
  • 2 0
 I don't see any reason I would need something like this but it might help sram to develop better components based on the real usage of everyone. I would actually be interested in finding out how much i use my brakes and where. i need to use less brake
  • 3 2
 It really sounds like fun to ensure drivetrain is charged, ensure shifter and dropper work, ensure phone battery is good, ensure various apps are turned on and working. Ride a little bit. Go home. Plug everything as needed and spend more time reading how many time I shifted or used the dropper. And if something does not work, just bring the bike to the shop for weeks. This is exactly my idea of having fun riding a bike.
  • 1 0
 Only pro xc racers could find utility for this app. Personally when I want pedal like hell I use my road bike and get all data like cadence and speed etc. When I use my mountain bike I have to luck around all the uphill and want just fun downhill.
  • 1 0
 How long before they integrate the height of the dropper and the compression settings of the shock in the app? When the dropper is up top, the shock is locked out, when down low, the shock is fully open, and a spectrum in between for technical climbing.
  • 1 0
 BMC already has this (dropper-compression automation) and unless you’re riding a specific kind of trail on an XC bike, it’s pretty worthless. Think about it- who wants their rear shock locked out while the saddle is fully extended in a place like Moab, Fruita, Sedona, Hurricane, etc? It’s useful on a very small scale.
  • 1 0
 I'm the nerd/geek/tech guy mentioned in this article. I am borderline obsessed with data and having a day job as a data scientist helps fuel that obsession.This is a really cool addition to the AXS product line and something I wanted from day 1. I loaded up some of last year's races and right off the bat the data shows I can size up my chainring to be more in the middle of the cassette. What I want next is Garmin to be able to read the derailleur feed and plot it on a graph in Connect and Strava. It would be nice to see gear info on Garmin Virb video overlays etc. This added feature is not for everyone but for those who appreciate this sort of thing it will keep us busy through the isolation period.
  • 2 0
 Hello, fellow dork Smile
  • 1 0
 Is there wireless telemetry to measure butt pucker? I think that would be more useful than this. Just wondering because I know surgeons use a device to do exactly that when operating on spinal cord injuries, to ensure they don’t damage nerves...so the technology exists!
  • 4 0
 Now I'm going to have data on how less I ride.
  • 1 0
 Wait, SRAM is gonna tell me I changed, but I want to know what everyone else did who beat me on Strava (apart from wearing a Garmin Strava watch of course).
Wait... they went faster!
  • 3 0
 Nice to see the Five O course on here! ...I mean, the riding in the Black Hills is terrible, don't come here...
  • 2 0
 Not only shifting data, SRAM is now tracking where dentists ride, how often they ride, when they ride, and how many dentists are riding in a group.
  • 1 0
 In the end... New world order..databases will know everything you do and go..if you allow it..bye privacy and true freedom welcome control... If you keep allowing it..it's your choice...
  • 1 0
 I would love to see this become a feature for my Di2, just to see how much time I spend in what gear. They have bluetooth connectivity for the newer junctions so I can make changes via phone, cmon Shimano!
  • 1 0
 I can't believe they still have yet to come out with the functionality to take the data from 2 Shockwiz units and parse them together so a user can attempt to balance their suspension front/rear.
  • 4 1
 I actually find this pretty interesting
  • 1 0
 so when do they start using this data to shift and drop my post for me as they know which sections of which trails i do both of things?
  • 3 0
 Is there a single speed version for my flip phone?
  • 2 3
 Does anyone remember the days when mountain biking was about getting out to mother nature to enjoy an awesome rad adventure on your bike and have fun. As an absolute numbers nerd this could be fun for a second, but its completely useless to the average rider. At first glance I can only see this have any actual value to race team that need this data to give feedback to the racer for possible improvements. It is my humble opinion that any recreational rider who thinks they need this has completely lost touch with the pure beauty and essence of mountain biking. FUN!!!!! Mountain biking should only be serious for a competitor or when you get injured. Please cycling companies.....make cool things we need and actually want rather than having your marketing company pay Pinkbike to market this crap. In fact fire the entire marketing team and listen to your engineers instead. Sorry, rant over. Stressed these days
  • 1 0
 re: AXS suspension - I'd like to see pre-determined set points that could be implemented at certain points of the trail based on GPS
  • 3 0
 so this is what working at home cos of corona looks like.
  • 1 2
 Garmin what ? What a joke ,sometimes he can even say how is the altitude you are ,or ........everything else ,these gadgets are a joke ,how can they take money from people, and make them believe in they’re data ,even the heart rate has a delay of 5 or more seconds ,and I don’t want to discuss the so call watts,cause that is a thing that not even professional riders can understand in their rides :-)))),but hey for a recreational point of view ,why not :-))))))
  • 4 1
 BUT...why???
  • 5 0
 Dick Pound
  • 4 1
 I am thrilled
  • 3 0
 How is this useful?
  • 3 3
 As a former professional athlete and avid mtb'er how does anyone actually care about this. Just ride your bike and smile a bit.
  • 1 0
 This data won't help me go any quicker, but I do find it interesting.
  • 1 0
 Can the app give you the data of what cog you were using in a particular part of the trail???
  • 2 0
 That info is in the article - it can't do that yet, but that's the plan in the future. I suspect we'll have the same access with suspension via the ShockWiz tools.
  • 1 0
 We're getting real close to being able to hack our buddies derailler and dropper to mess with them...
  • 1 0
 Nice!! Hopefully SRAM can use this to see if something is covered under warranty, or if it is over used
  • 4 0
 Exactly! Or when someone sells a camera, they sometimes say how many times the shutter has been used. Maybe we'll see the same with AXS derailleurs?
  • 1 0
 Based on the listings in the Buy/Sell forum, there aren’t many people buying used AXS kits. Smile
  • 1 0
 Probably really rad for high level training. For me....I'll stick to instagram
  • 2 0
 nice to have validation that I will never, ever need an app like this.
  • 1 0
 Don’t forget you are feeding SRAM all of your data online so that they can optimize their products for you...
  • 2 0
 Dumbest shit ever!(for today anyways)
  • 4 5
 you know those tech geeks who have big pockets, beer guts, and post excessive content of there summer fat bike riding, this shits for you....
  • 1 1
 So does the app actually work? Someone in the one shot rode over 50 miles in 108 F temps?
  • 2 1
 I hope you will be able to use it with Strava soon, that will be awesome!
  • 2 0
 NERDS!!! jk lol
  • 1 0
 How have I been riding w/o?!?
  • 1 0
 How skynet realy started taking overvthe World
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy thanks for the black hills shout out--come visit sometime.
  • 1 0
 I wonder how many times my post has gone up and down in your mother...
  • 4 3
 ...really?
  • 2 3
 Privacy concerns? Could this be initial steps towards something more intrusive?
  • 11 1
 So true. I don’t want anyone knowing how much I’m using my granny gear. My life could be ruined if that info were leaked.
  • 4 1
 @Deadclmbr:
Exactly, they use this data and sell it to third parties to feed ads to you promoting lower chainrings because you can't climb. Once you sign up they can later start implementing other tracking features without your consent because you clicked through that fine print.
  • 1 1
 @Jcolis1904: Already got an ad from revealing too much in the PB comments section. Subsequently, I’ve purchased the new 70 tooth SRAM add-on.
  • 2 0
 No, there are no privacy concerns.
  • 4 0
 Yeah one day they know what gears and PSI you use, the next day THEY KILL YOUR WHOLE FAMILY.
  • 3 3
 I go mountain biking to escape technology.
  • 2 3
 Clunker with coaster brake. Cool story bro!
  • 3 2
 @DHhack: yeah, obviously I’m not talking about advancements in mechanical technology such as suspension, geometry, shifting. Are you stravulating?
  • 3 1
 @sriracha: the true retro grouches aren’t on pb, you’re just full of yourself.
  • 2 1
 SRAM jumping the shark
  • 1 0
 NERD ALERT
  • 1 0
 Why
  • 8 11
 Just another way for Sram to make more money from your Data.
  • 9 8
 SRAM is definitely the only one's who'll find this information useful.

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