FOX's New Suspension - Sea Otter 2015

Apr 16, 2015 at 23:17
by Mike Levy  

FOX Float X2



Those who follow World Cup racing may recognize the X2 from last weekend's coverage of the Lourdes, France, downhill event where Aaron Gwin rode his to a nearly four-second victory. Sure, Gwin looked confident enough in Lourdes to race a wheelbarrow to the win, but anyone who watches how the top racers' bikes react to the terrain will surely have noticed just how planted his Demo appeared to be. No bouncing, no skittering, just staying glued to the ground like a slot car, which is said to be down to a very stiff and relatively slow rebounding setup. He also uses the air-sprung Float X2 because of the inherent ramp-up that its air spring provides, especially in concert with the custom made rocker link that adds even more progression to his suspension.

We've probably covered the Float X2 and its coil-spring counterpart at least a dozen times by now, but FOX used this week's Sea Otter event to debut the production version of both shocks, meaning that you no longer have to be Aaron Gwin or Josh Bryceland to get your sport-class-racer paws on them.

The big news with the both the Float and coil-sprung X2 shocks is a completely new damper design that's nothing like what FOX has employed in their mountain bike suspension in the past. The new layout is what's referred to as a recirculating damper, and it's called that because rather than the oil flowing back and forth in opposite directions as the shock compresses and rebounds like in a traditional layout, the X2 forces the oil to move in one direction up through the compression circuit and then out through the rebound circuit. This gives FOX more control over the damping ranges of the shock, as well as four-way independent adjustment of compression and rebound: low- and high-speed compression, and low- and high-speed rebound are all externally tuneable by the blue and red adjusters, as well as the hex slots at the center of each. Those who want to go even deeper are able to completely remove the modular compression and rebound assemblies to make shim changes, or even drop in a completely different tune.

While the X2's adjustability is new for FOX, there's yet more trickery hidden inside that isn't made obvious by any fancy anodized dials. I'm talking about the shock's Rod Valve System that is claimed to really help keep the bike calm and its tires stuck to the ground - is this part of the reason that Gwin's bike looked so composed during his Lourdes race run? The goal of the RVS design is to basically smooth out the transition between orifice and shim controlled damping - picture your bike railing a berm (a low shaft speed, orifice controlled moment) but then hitting a square edged braking bump (a high shaft speed, shim controlled moment) right in the middle of it. FOX says that the RVS system, which is basically a secondary, smaller shim stack that's on top of each valve, is able to ease the transition between the valve opening and closing at such times, which helps to keep the tires stuck on the ground where they should be.
FOX Float X2

FOX Float X2




The New 36




FOX
FOX

FOX has become all about offering the riders all sorts of options when it comes to suspension, and that's continuing in 2016 with their new 36 fork. They're still offering their RC2 damped model, but they're also adding new 36s that have been spec'd with FOX's FIT 4 damper that had me so impressed with the 2016 34 fork that I recently reviewed. The FIT 4 damper uses a three-position adjuster, but it's nothing like the CTD system that you might be picturing. ''The FIT4 damper uses architecture from the RC2 damper found in the 36 and 40, featuring a 10mm shaft design that increases oil flow to the base valve,'' explained Jordan in the review of the 34 a few weeks back. ''We improved the flow path design in the base valve for the three compression damping positions to provide more adjustment, sensitivity and control. We also increased flow through the rebound circuit for faster recovery from deep stroke hits.'' The three-position FIT4 damper is said to have a wider damping range than the old CTD system, and FOX also listened to many riders who were asking for a more traditional low-speed compression adjuster dial that would allow them to have more control over how the fork performs - there's now a dial to adjust LSC when the fork is set to the Open mode, with twenty two clicks that go from nearly overlapping the Medium mode to offering light damping.

FOX will be offering the 36 with the proven RC2 damper and lowers that can accept either 15mm or 20mm axles via removable inserts, but the FIT 4 36 will only be available in a 15mm axle model. There are also 36s to fit 26'', 27.5'' and 29'' wheels, and travel ranges from as low as 130mm on Talas forks to 180mm on fixed travel models.




Super Lightweight Steel Springs



FOX's new steel springs are lighter than a titanium version of the same length and rate, which is something that may come as a surprise to many riders. I know that I was skeptical as well, but the three springs they had on display for comparison's sake - a standard steel spring, a titanium spring, and the new SLS spring - made it clear that the lightest one was the latter of the three. How did they do it? It's all about balancing the amount of coils and the wire gauge, as well as using high-end steel that receives an intensive finishing treatment.

FOX

All of the SLS springs will be bright orange, which I think looks pretty badass, and weight savings over a titanium version will vary depending on the rate and size. The 500lb x 2.75'' SLS spring on display was 40 grams lighter than the titanium spring next to it, but there can be up to a 100 gram weight savings in larger sizes. Better yet, the SLS springs cost a fraction of what titanium does, with an MSRP or $130 USD. Lighter and less expensive, who would have thought?


MENTIONS: @foxracingshox



Be sure to check out all of our Sea Otter Classic images in this gallery.


186 Comments

  • + 123
 Sea otter makes my jibblets tingly
  • + 13
 Pretty happy to see that my new Fox 36 that has +/- 2 months of age is so old in the design and tech solutions.....


wow, Bike Industry is much faster than my compulsive easy mouse click on e-shop
  • + 15
 It's not replaced, there's just another option. TBH I'd still get the RC2 instead of the simplified FIT4 anyway. I might not know shit about about setting up suspension properly but I do like dials.
  • + 6
 I use 36 Forks since their very first edition (150mm effective and weak axel bolts)
the actual model is my 4th piece...and it was time that Fox give us a real FOX 36 performance for its pricing.
My float 160 is absolutly Amazing and easy to tune (specially for the click number counters, that I am not)

travel adjuster that was a must in the past...is going on the way of sunset, or so seem me.
this basicly for the optimize rear shox pedal damping that do a great job and improved travel efficienty of frames.
now we have 160-170mm forks and frames without front travel adjuster, we all use 65/67 ° head angle ....and do not need TALAS anymore..
that is progress!!
  • + 5
 The FIT 4 damper uses a three-position adjuster, but it's nothing like the CTD system that you might be picturing. It's a much more advanced JUUDJD system. Just Up, Up and Down, Just Down. Equipped with much better Up and Down switchability for when you are going Up or Down but if you are going Up and Down it really works in the middle! Isn't that FANTASTIC!
  • + 3
 Oh! and as an additional benefit the FIT 4 damper makes your jibblets tingle!
  • + 63
 Happy to see a quick release on the 36. In Europe we do not have big trucks and have to remove the front wheel very often...
  • - 57
flag daltonb54 (Apr 17, 2015 at 3:52) (Below Threshold)
 Personally I think quick release is one of the worst things to ever happen to off road cycling. And I drive a nissan micra. Just my opinion....
  • + 8
 Any reason why dalton? i have only had good things to say about it?
  • - 2
 I would never buy another fork without it. I might be paranoid, but I think the dropouts will snap before the fork is worn out with all the bolting and unbolting. Plus it's a right fucking waste of time for no tangible benefit over qr
  • - 6
flag gabriel-mission9 (Apr 17, 2015 at 6:38) (Below Threshold)
 Qr: Heavier, weaker, more expensive. Its like keith bontragers light/strong/cheap triangle, just the wrong way up....

Also carrying a basic multi tool effectively makes every single qr lever on your bike redundant AND adjusts every other allen key bolt on the bike too. Qr is the biggest gimmick there is.
  • - 2
 get a RAM Jimbo!
  • + 3
 @gabriel-mission9 @daltonb54 Neither of you must not have owned a 2006 Cannondale prophet 2MX then?

If you had to remove the rear wheel then you were in for a treat of undoing 4 clamps and then the thru axle. Then if you were lucky the axle wasn't seized in. It was never a quick puncture change. QR all the way for me thanks!
  • + 0
 No cannondale, but a mate of mine has a scott voltage with 4 axle clamp bolts and an axle end bolt. Takes all of 10 seconds to undo. Maybe 15 seconds with a hangover. I thought qr wheels were a gimmick BEFORE tubeless, let alone after...
  • + 5
 you remind me of this youtu.be/JMJXvsCLu6s
  • + 0
 I assume the crocodile is allegory for qr's being angry, unpredictable snappy bastards, and logs being stoic, reliable bolt up fittings? In that case I agree 100% :p
  • + 3
 hacks, qr = 15mm, I take the RC2 and 20mm anyday plus theyre is an aftermarket QR option on the correct side of the fork leg, never had an issue though with bolts.
nsmb.com/fox-q36r-quick-release
  • + 1
 I have the 20mm QR with the double clamps on my older f36 and I don't really use it often but when I do, I really like it. On the other hand, the 20mm Maxle lite I have on my P26 is absolute junk as I have to tighten it every 30 minutes or so.
  • + 1
 That's unfortunate. I have the Maxle lite on my Totem and it has been absolutely faultless for going on four years. I can't imagine how it could be improved!
  • + 1
 The new QR looks so much better than my 2012 36.... I cant stand the 2 QR and little lever thingamajig. So overcomplicated.
  • + 50
 No wallet, stop jumping at the screen!
  • + 16
 my wallet is dead. without any money coming in or out it is just a carcass... waiting for me to stop getting upgrades.
  • + 4
 Any mention of availability or price? didn't see any in the article
  • + 49
 I want that new spring around my shaft.
  • - 6
flag BaeckerX1 (Apr 17, 2015 at 8:17) (Below Threshold)
 That's what I said about my wife when we met.
  • + 7
 Sorry, I couldn't resist. Jokes aside, before the pitchforks come out... She's beautiful, super intelligent, incredibly successful, and an awesome person. She mountain bikes, so she'd get the joke. Smile That's why I married her.
  • + 1
 You must be careful though. When you slip one of these tightly wound units around your shaft, additional friction can occur and there is a higher probability of prematurely activating your blow-off circuit.
  • + 28
 I wonder what brand the Ti spring on display is? As weights for Obtianium springs vary alot! The older Obtianium and Manitou springs were really light, but others are really heavy, so claiming they are lighter is easy, if you get the heaviest Ti spring
  • + 34
 Welcome to the magical world of marketing!
  • + 0
 the fact that the pros were riding the steel springs likely means they are lighter than the lightest Ti springs on the market.
  • + 1
 Let me copy and paste, so that you may reread it. I think you read it wrong!

"FOX's new steel springs are lighter than a titanium version of the same length and rate, which is something that may come as a surprise to many riders. I know that I was skeptical as well, but the three springs they had on display for comparison's sake - a standard steel spring, a titanium spring, and the new SLS spring - made it clear that the lightest one was the latter of the three. How did they do it? It's all about balancing the amount of coils and the wire gauge, as well as using high-end steel that receives an intensive finishing treatment."
  • + 7
 No, you need to do some research. The actual weight if springs differs per brand. An old obtainium 300 x 3.0 spring weighs 258 grams, a dsp spring or nukeproof can weigh alot more even 100 grams plus, depends on the titanium used
  • + 2
 I give it 6 months before you see a ti version of this spring released for all those nuts that go out and drop the 130 for this spring and charge more than double for the ti version! Great sales plan if you ask me!
  • + 8
 That has the be the most tightly wound Ti spring I've ever seen, and it's longer than the other springs. No wonder it's heavy.
  • + 1
 Its awesome to make a steel spring thats is as light as titanium, but when you then see thats its $130 that kind of defeats the purpose. Yes its still a fair bit cheaper than Ti, but the appeal of using a steel spring has always been that its cheap. This spring looks nice, but its still 5x what a standard steel spring costs.
  • + 30
 "Who would OF thought"?!?!

Seriously, you guys are journalists?
  • + 38
 These guyz iz internetz jernalists
  • + 15
 The English language is slowly being destroyed.
  • + 6
 @eatridegrow you beat me to it. I came here to write the same thing. They're not journalists, they're enthusiasts writing for a website
  • - 6
flag richierocket (Apr 17, 2015 at 5:22) (Below Threshold)
 There are other sites on cycling if you "twits" don't like this one...
  • - 7
flag eoisaacs (Apr 17, 2015 at 6:43) (Below Threshold)
 I thought being a journalist was about covering important happenings, not being crucified over minor grammatical errors.
  • + 0
 ^ Seriously, it's not like the New York Times hasn't ever made a typo...
  • + 2
 So often, its basic proofreading that doesn't a pair to get done. Spellcheck doesn't always alert you of correclty spelled words, that are incorrectly used.
  • + 5
 As much as language bastardization (bastardisation for you Brits) irks me, you do realize they're writing on-location in the evenings trying to get these articles written up for you, after a long day of trying to take in as much as humanly possible, right? They're doing their best to get these articles out as fast as possible so you have the latest coverage when you want it. If they were taking too long to get these articles out, due to thorough editing or whatever, you'd be even more irritated, or you'd go read coverage elsewhere. I can easily forgive the mistakes, as much as it tweaks my OCD, to get the latest coverage as fast as they can post it.
  • + 3
 @jrocksdh The irony in your last sentence is thick. Did you type that with a smartphone? Smile
  • + 1
 Only his last sentence?
  • + 1
 Nice job, you when and move two the next round!
  • + 21
 So what's new? now we have the double barrel float and a stendec spring copy. but where is the climb switch model? Or the float x2 inline ? Unless it retails for a lot less and improves on reliability of the cane creek equivalent I'm not seeing the innovation.
  • + 6
 i think they're going more for tracking and pure DH for these shocks. we'll have to see in reviews how it does.
  • + 3
 Cant fault them for going with what works(twin tube system). There's always room for refinement between manufacturers, even if they all run the same design. Racing isn't about being different, its about finding what works best.
  • + 1
 stendec spring and ccdb air copy... have to agree... but missing the climb switch so no so good for long travel enduro market...
  • + 16
 guys, these aren't enduro shocks. you're missing the point, they didn't design these with 160mm in mind, these are for straight gnar runs like Lourde where your shock is going to get worked with big hits and chatter, they're meant to track and soak things you won't ride with 160mm. there isn't a climb switch because the bikes these will be mounted to are going to use chairlifts. not everything has to be enduro specific.
  • + 0
 well guess what I know a lot of guys riding just that on 160-180 travel bikes, they then pedal them when they aren't on uplift days... don't think I'm missing point unless they are only making long sizes. Alot of people don't like ctd and swap it for something like this with proper adjustments. not everyone has a chairlift or uplift....
  • + 1
 Ok we know you have no hills down there. This is standard protocol (or at least was for a long time) for companies that are trying out a new design (especially suspension) it will be made and tested for full on DH bikes first. Simply because it's the best test subject. Then they will trickle down what they have designed and proven to be effective for DH. And although I do 'Enduro' racing I don't give a rats ass about new coming out first to that discipline, proper DH is far more exciting in terms of new shit. And guess what, I know alot of guys who ride DH on 8 inch rides snowflake.
  • - 1
 only 8 " but sorry I've proper avalanche suspension for my 9" DH bike and it gets to the Alps every year and just back from few uplifts in Wales Smile
I'll stick to the proven stendec who service it for me and sell them coil springs already....
  • + 4
 Anybody know when these are available to order?
  • + 2
 Sounds like about 2 weeks... on the early side
  • + 2
 sa-springs.com/product/sa-spring
Been on sale for a year or so.. these fit any shock diameter with the right adaptor not just fox...
  • + 11
 Hilarious.when Ohlins came out with there rear shock all everyone did was bitch about the yellow colour ,but fox releases an orange coil and everyone loves it.
  • + 42
 Guess Orange is the new Black...
  • + 3
 Yea but Öhlins was not the first with colours in MTB. RST and DNM had red springs on the high end shocks in early 2000s. You still find some in Wallmart. There's a 10$ bike locked outside of my office with blue coil spring, steel crankarms and cantilevers. Then Öhlins had yellow springs on their MX and in F1 McLaren MP4 of Alain Prost, that is before everyone rode Enduro before it became cool. But those things may be related indeed.
  • + 7
 It's only steel. Just paint it any color
  • + 7
 finally Fox gets on the recirculating damper design

"recirculating" is a re-brand of what is known as 'double barrel' in terms of shock design, as opposed to the more common 'de carbon' design
  • + 3
 WP Suspension called and want their Orange springs back.
  • + 1
 I recall someone mentioning/speculating in another story that the new Fox coils might be wound from a hollow steel alloy? Is this the case?
  • + 12
 Ferrari wanted red springs for their custom Öhlins shocks. Öhlins said their springs only come in yellow and promptly left the room...NO SOUP FOR YOU!!!

(Cars were sold with yellow springs..)
  • + 3
 I recall someone saying it is impossible for it to be true that this new steel coil is lighter than a Ti coil, quoting some scientific data on alloy composition and split of atoms
  • + 1
 I think the orange is terrible. I mean it's cool for certain situations but it's not very versatile. I think that spring as well as the orange decals on the new fox 40 looked terrible on many of the Fox riders bikes at the WC race last weekend.
  • + 3
 It's not impossible for steel to be lighter than ti. Steels all way about the same. (Steel, not steel compared to ti.) What they have done here is used a high end alloy, probably 9260, and used a thinner wire at a wider coil spacing. Rate is determined by coil thickness, and coil spacing. With lower end steel, wider spacing can result in failure, as the steel has to flex more. Look at the wire diameter and coil spacing on the springs.
  • + 0
 some 8mm or 10mm heatshrink tubing will fix the colour to whatever you can find heatshrink tubing is, way easier than painting
  • + 0
 don't think u can get shrink tube over the end of the coil were it has been flattened to sit against the preload adjuster.
  • + 9
 The "sparse" coils to make the steel spring use less material (thus make it much lighter) sounds like a great idea. I guess it needs more presision to make. Wonder if this technique can be used on titanium springs and how light they'll be at the end.
  • + 1
 Probably not. If they could get away with such a low wind on ti springs they prob would have tried it.
  • + 1
 yes ti springs of all different brands are made this way. thats why ld school obtainium springs where super light and the new ones are not. the old ones use less windings and a different grade of ti and the new ones are cheaper and heavier. so when fox compares there new sl steel springs to a ti spring they don't compare to the lightest ti spring they can find.. when buying a ti spring by the shortest one that will fit and the one with the least windings to save weight.
  • + 12
 That's a lot of clicks
  • + 17
 Well. We all know... Clicks bring the chicks
  • + 9
 Eh Fox db air?
  • + 3
 I'd rather wait for the FDBACS
  • + 1
 FRSFX2DBACSXV now that's a mouthful (Fox Racing Shox FLOAT X2 Double Barrel Air Climb Switch Xtra Volume)
  • + 4
 As engineer myself i think that they have gone backwards in terms of the compression and rebound knobs. Why on earth would you want to carry 2 allen keys to turn them? why not leave it as knobs?
People accidentally lose allen keys on the trails or where ever, have a knob where you can turn by hand like they did previously. Fox are just as bad cane creek, fantastic products but its just the little things that get up my nose and they're simple things as well.

Btw, i will be buying shares now in with allen key manufactures.
  • + 86
 Lete introduce you to...... The multitool
  • + 132
 And I'll introduce myself to autocorrect
  • + 76
 Well as you're an engineer and not some regular person just spouting an opinion on a product we better take your ideas VERY seriously...
  • + 10
 Many people, especially in bike parks, dont want to carry a multi tool in their pocket as it is annoying and if you fall and land on the multi tool it hurts like a mofo. As a freerider/non hardcore racer id take the extra 5 grams for knob over a
  • + 20
 as another engineer i way prefer the idea of using tools to adjust these sorts of things for the same reason i prefer a pinch bolt thru axle arrangement on my forks as opposed to a quick release. a simpler system is likely to be lighter, stonger and cleaner looking than something designed to be operated without the use of tools. cane creek does the same thing on their shocks.
  • + 58
 As a certified a-hole myself, I don't see any problem with it, but you may want to take a course in finance and asset management before you invest in allen key manufacturing. As to losing stuff on trails, I advise you to pray to St.Antoin, the patron saint of lost items.
  • + 4
 You mean you don't already have about two and a half thousand miscellaneous sized allen keys in your toolbox? It would be very easy and un-noticeable in terms of a weight penalty to carry an extra 3 and 6mm allen key buried in the bottom of your camelbak to change the settings on the shock if your multitool was lost en route somewhere.

Two knobs for each damping circuit would take up a lot more acreage than the 3mm within the 6mm hex arrangement. Personally I think the shock looks very tidy and if it performs reliably when it properly hits the market I would consider going back to fox after their CTD travesty than came on my Meta.
  • + 5
 WAKI, did you not read what he said? He's an engineer. He knows everything about everything already, obviously!
  • - 2
 multi tools get lost as well @nojzilla.
I dont want to be stopping on a trail, unclip my camelback, take a tool out to adjust one click on the shock, then put it back in my camelback only to find i that i should've put 2 clicks and then having to start the process again. Your just wasting valuable riding time. Hand knob is good, you stop adjust and go, you dont like it? you stop adjust and go... You get me now?
  • + 31
 Nah mate, see those two holes on each one? You can just jab a stick in there and dial your shock in like that, found on any trail, and since you can throw it away after, it weighs nothing #enduro
  • + 5
 ^^^^^^ BINGO!!!!!

Crisis over......... Fox, carry on...
  • + 15
 When you need a tool, or Allen key to adjust a setting, you are more likely to seriously think about the consequences of your adjustment on the behaviour of the bike. Bos use the same thinking. If a company sticks tool-free adjustment on suspension, the risk of people twiddling knobs mindlessly, or unsystematically increases massively. In the end, you could make even a high-end fork or shock feel awful, through adjustment without consideration.
  • + 8
 Knurled knobs cost more. This is lower profile. Its easy to adjust anything with an allen key unlike wet and muddy knobs. The type of person who buys this wont be thinking about stopping all the time to change suspension settings.
  • + 3
 danob - I think what makes you adjust your knobs better is knowing what you are doing and how it should feel. Medium is irrelevant. Bracketing baby!
  • + 3
 They missed something important.... A CLIMB LEVER.... does anyone else not see this as basically a ccdb with foxs attempt at a twin tube flow.. I have the inline its a set and forget so no need to fiddle much with settings apart from flip the climb lever on and off...
  • + 2
 Have you tried using a multi tool to tune your shock? No room at all with my frame and ccdbaircs
  • + 8
 Must just be me then that gets their shock set up after the first few rides and barely touches it again after. I can appreciate that on some frames getting a multitool in to adjust a shock is impossible. However the inconvenience of carrying a separate 3 and 6mm allen key in my pocket for the first few rides really is something I can get over. Although god forbid I forget to pause Strava, my stops to adjust the shock might drop my overall average speed or cost me a KOM! Oh the shame!

I think @danob raises a very valid point, having lots of twiddly knobs on a shock would make it prone to being fiddled with endlessly. By limiting the adjustment to a tool interface means you will naturally think more about what adjustments you are actually performing.
  • + 7
 On the piggy back valve end there is a black cap. This cap screws off and has 2 little pins that fit in the 2 holes on the red and blue anodized dials. This no need to carry an allen key for adjustment in your pocket/pack (who wants that extra 5g to lug around)

I am surprised no reviewers have covered this as the Fox guys that showed me were pretty stoked about it.
  • + 2
 @bat-fastard, the inline isn't a DH shock, hence the CS. (Climbswitch.) There is no need for it on a shock like the DHX2.
  • + 8
 Can we stop going on about climb switches and on the fly adjustments, it's a downhill shock!!! If you wanna fiddle you do it back in the pits/carpark at the start/end of your run!!
Can't believe the amount of people that just see an air shock and go 'ooo that's for cross country!'
Grinds my gears!!
  • + 5
 mmm, but there's a climb switch on CCDBairCS and it can be totaly used on a DH bike, I am actually surprised why most people don't run DH bikes with climb switches because when I hear them talking geometry what they want is a DH bike that climbs, I don't know why would you like 500 reach, 1250 wheel base and 64 head angle on a trail bike... just get DBarrel with climb switch and set back seatpost other way around on a V10 and stop making short travel DH bikes, because this exactly what bikes like Capra and Nomad are heading at.
  • + 2
 As another fellow engineer here...I think by them making the adjustability via allen tools that it could be easier to set up these shocks since there are 24 clicks instead of the 7-8 click turns it used to be from the knobs? Just throwing a guess out here, but maybe if it was a knob on the shock it would be more challenging to adjust because a knob could be annoying if it was set by moving at centimeters at a time to get to the "Xth" click. Looks like fox is trying to go the route of very finely tuned suspension settings like cane creek where once you have your setting, it would be unfortunate to accidently offset it while riding or what not. Either way it now has a podium behind it now.
  • + 6
 Can we stop popping credentials Big Grin I took a shower in Steve Jones house, fk your degree man
  • + 1
 Glad I got a rise out of you waki...now my week is complete.
  • + 1
 Hahaha, no no, I just thought that being an engineer is not mandatory to form such a perfectly reasonable comment like you did
  • + 1
 Its all good man...yea that was my honest take. Not too often I can poke fun at fellow engineers on here though.
  • + 3
 I think it is harder with jokes among accountants... or among people who try to sound knowledgeable when they are turning knobs on their cane creek shock...
  • + 3
 As a person flushes toilets I find I like to have a tool free lever when possible. As a pb reader I find people will defend stupid crap (like not putting nobs on shocks) all day long if they think a product is cool.
As a bike tech and rider I find fox knobs do less and less over time until they do nothing anyway. As a psych grad and student in an education program I find I like eggs for breakfast.
Any questions?
The most comparable thing to needing a tool is when the lyrik rebound knob would fall off. I found it wasn't a big hassel really, but it did suck when actually adjusting the fork.
  • + 2
 I agree with you tale that simplicity is better when it seems to be practical, good point about the knobs possibly wearing out over time. Did you have any experience with knobs wearing out with a fox shock? I have only rode fox DHX4 coils for my dh bikes so I havnt come across the issue, but Im sure others have. The education requirement in these posts cracks me up.
  • + 8
 I don't know about everyone else here but I like turning knobs on other peoples bikes at the trailhead...these allen head adjusters take that away! How am I supposed to keep up now?!
  • + 3
 As a bigger A-hole than WAKI... Once I get my shock/fork settings where I want them, even if it means using an allen key... I rarely EVER adjust them again. With Allen-key only adjustments... there's pretty much no chance of accidently changing them (like when the wanker fondling your pretty bike parked in the store starts twisting the dials to see what they do).
  • + 1
 knob turning science starts to look like that old joke with solitaire. Always take a box of cards with you when you are onto a lonely journey into nowhere. When you get lost and need help simply spread the cards into a solitaire and sooner than you think there will be an a-hole behind your back telling you which card to put on which. Should work with a shock with 10 knobs as well.
  • + 1
 Its surprising how many emergency items fit into the space of a standard size box of cards (or similarly an Altoids mints tin). I actually build my hydro-pack/take along ride gear around small containers now. Makes it easier to find the item you want when its contained with similar items. First aid stuff goes into heavy-duty ziplock bag. Small tools into another type of container, patch/tube change stuff another, firestarting stuff another. Makes it easy to find what I want in the dark by just feeling the container I know its going to be in.
  • + 1
 I have had fox knobs so working but never fall off.
I too tend to set and forget. I don't forget forever though. I change oil, ride a different style trail, or ride without a pack, and need different spring rates and rebound and LSC rates. If I ride a gnarly dh trail and then a flow trail in the same morning (happens a lot) I might need a click or 2 more rebound. If I forget to adjust until we are all rolling I don't want to stop for 3 minutes to dig out my multi tool while my friends disappear down the hill. I can just go for it, but it is a shame to lose performance when I could just reach down and turn a couple clicks.
I seen to recall RS doing an ad campaign with a guy stopping to tweek his knobs while the other guy just shredded. Imagine how much worse it is to fumble with your tools?
  • + 1
 @danob @JJ-The-Scott I see the main market for this as long travel enduro against the ccdb air with cs. My frame only lets me have the inline which is just a db air without the addition oil volume. Yes some DHers will have one but I'd rather have a coil on my DH bike hence the new steel springs....
  • + 4
 Sure I can (adjust) my knob by hand...But it's much nicer when the proper tool is available to use.

Am I seriously the first to jump on this??

I was just leaving anyway...
  • + 1
 Do you like to have your knobs professionally tweaked? Wink
  • + 1
 I'm not prejudiced...Amateurs are welcome to give it a go! My wife will tweak my knob if she reads this...
  • + 1
 keithrad - Can you record it on gopro? After 4 years of watching nothing I gave porn a go, and I realized again that I just can't do it... You see I am this a-hole who always sees plot holes in all sorts of movies, I can't help it. I mean... No1 - who would volountarily withdraw right before ejaculation and no2 only to masturbate right in front of womans face or chest - who the F does that?! Porn sucks, I need some real sht to turn me on...
  • + 1
 And BTW - spit is a terrible lubricant, I tried it when my chamois cream wore off on a 4 hour ride, and I still had 2 hours to go - didn't work! I finaly had to use a banana skin - Porn sucks! You cannot apply anything from those movies into real life, someone tell it to teenagers!
  • + 1
 Damn WAKI,

banana skin...,chamois cream...,plot holes...no wonder you're such an intense A-hole. I've read many of your posts, and realize that being the perfectionist you are, I think you're over-thinking it. Might I suggest a cold beer and some Slick Honey lube to get that knob turning! As for applying the movie magic....Don't knock it till... ( you know...) !
  • + 1
 As another fellow engineer here............I really don't care!!!!! If it has a knob, I will turn it and if it doesn't, I will use a tool. I take function over aesthetics any day of the week.
  • + 1
 I don't think people are arguing over whether knobs look good. It is a question of function.
  • + 5
 Funny how Some fox' technicians were making some critics on the Vorsprung system, and how suddenly, 6 months later, fox is doing the same system of high volume shocks. Funny.
  • + 6
 So glad it's got 96 clicks of adjustment
  • + 1
 Hmmm... will be really interesting to see if this spring works in the long term. Less coils per inch, i.e. less active coils in total with the same spring rate while the wire diameter looks pretty much the same, maybe Fox found a way to do things differently... would be nice, if they could tell us a little more about it soon.
  • + 2
 its the steel its made from, it more springy so you need less of it without quoting a lot of technical stuff..
Its not new, came from sports cars and stendec have been selling them for mtb as while.
stendecworks.com/springs
  • + 1
 For those that still want the stiffest fork possible, the 20mm 36 will still be around and if you need an easy way to remove the front wheel check out Q36R.com Works like a charm and retains the inherent stiffness of clamping both side on the drop outs.
  • + 1
 What happened to set and ride. Why the hell would anyone want to carry a tool specifically to adjust there suspension, in 1/96th increments, during a ride. Anyone that anal about there bike setup and believe it will have any affect on there riding, should maybe focus more on improving there own technique, instead of looking for the next great shortcut, to magically make them better. Marketing people are so damn good at their jobs.
  • + 2
 Any mention of the new 40s, or are the teams just using this years model with new stickers? and any release dates for the new twin chamber spring version of the rear shock?? Anyone at the event that can tell us.
  • + 2
 New air spring like the 36, and a Performance Series 40 with a Fit4 (LSC only) damper. Also a new seal head on the damper for better small bump sensitivity.
  • + 4
 180mm for 27.5 wheels? please!
  • + 2
 www.ridefox.com/product.php?m=bike&t=forks&p=36203&ref=filter Just remove a spacer and this one is has 180mm of travel.
  • + 3
 cmon 2 little allen keys...u can stash them anywhere....tape them to your saddle rail or summat....
  • + 7
 i stash other things on my bike aswell (i like a smoke and stash it in my bars) haha
  • + 2
 I'm sort of shopping for a new bike later this year or next year. 11spd XT and the new Fox stuff looks awesome. Next year could be awesome.
  • + 2
 SO WHAT YOU'RE TELLING ME IS ITS A CB DOUBLE BARREL AIR WITHOUT THE CS..... COOL :/
BUT THOSE NEW COILS
also who the f wants anything besides a rc2
  • + 1
 Looks like the lighter spring uses coils which are spaced further apart making up for the smaller gauge perhaps ?
Who cares about a 100g savings in your fork when you are riding enduro lol !
  • + 3
 Dear FOX, Not feeling that orange spring. Please provide a neutral color option. Thank you.
  • + 3
 Just talked to Fox, they said Mid-End of May for release on the SLS springs.
  • + 0
 @cowphunk19 Call Cane Creek or Ohlins and get you a real shock!
  • - 1
 Is that an air shock with hi and low speed compression, why didn't anybody think of that before? Oh hold on Manitou has been doing since 2006 only the Fox zombies would n't believe there was anything better. Ya better marketing
  • + 1
 Sorry new-b question here - What's the difference between FIT4 cartridge and RC2 on the new 2015 36 and how does this translate into DH performance?
  • + 1
 @nicolai12 FIT4 has 3 preset damping modes.. (similar but "much different" than CTD.) Basically Open, Medium and Firm compression. Simplifies the compression adjustments for most people. The RC2 is fully user tunable High and low speed compression. The new 34's will only come with FIT4
  • + 3
 Orange is the new Ti! I have no idea how come, but if Fox says so...
  • + 1
 When I'm racing in world cup downhill races I always is my fox x2 because it keeps me glued to the ground. I also eat my Wheaties for energy... Reads a bit like an ad...
  • + 1
 24 clicks really? Who needs to slow the rebound down long enough to make a hot pocket before it full rebounds?
  • + 2
 Will the Fox float X2 air be Trek Slash compatible?
  • + 0
 Do you think high-speed compression (HSC) is necessary for air sprung suspension?
I think increasing or decreasing HSC is identical to adjusting air.
  • + 2
 I see they're making a 26" version of the fork! Yesssssss!
  • + 1
 So pretty much the same design as what Cane Creek has been doing so well with....
  • + 2
 Where I can order the spring ? Take my money !!!
  • + 3
 Take you they will Skautik
  • + 2
 DH X2 the most desirable bike part at the moment
  • + 3
 So...., what's it weigh!
  • + 2
 the shock looks a bit plastiky... :/
  • + 0
 I have no issue with hex keys for adjustments on suspension, I rarely touch anything on the trail. But what on earth compelled Fox to use TWO DIFFERENT SIZES?
  • + 17
 As if they were the same size one wouldn't fit inside the other...
  • + 2
 Have you seen the CCDB adjustment tool?
  • + 2
 I understand that, and yes I have. Just not the best solution is all.
  • + 2
 Why not it opens a BEER
  • + 2
 the two different sized hex keys are because one is inside the other. ie, big on the outside, small on the inside.(keeps it slim)... its a little hard to see from the photos though.
  • + 2
 The new FIT4 catridge will be compatible with older fox float and talas?
  • + 1
 Maybe not as the FIT4 forks only come in 15mm? That indicates a new lower casting to fit the new damper and prevent backwards compatibility for whatever reason...
  • + 2
 have fox done it? Have they beat the ccdb? I guess time will tell.
  • - 8
flag xCri (Apr 17, 2015 at 0:08) (Below Threshold)
 Pretty easy to beat the cane creek double barrel. You just have to make a shock that doesn't break shafts and blow up all the time.
  • + 2
 Damn Fox want to be back on the top spot! look so nice
  • + 2
 No price and release date info?
  • + 1
 I'm really impressed with what Fox has been coming out with. I'm liking that shock a lot Smile
  • + 1
 wheel barrel quote picked up from sorge article response? haha nontheless ... technology!
  • + 1
 when did fox released a new fork? do they have to release a new one eevery year?
  • + 2
 I've been very happy since I ditched my Fox fork and got a Pike.
  • + 2
 Why do we need that shock if we already have ccdb?
  • + 2
 Because Fox can't innovate. They just try and replicate what others have done. i.e. Pike and CCDB.
  • + 1
 Mike, can you find out if they are using Inconel (or similar alloy) for the spring?
  • + 1
 No purple valve(s) yet? Fox REALLY doesnt like complications....
  • + 1
 Well looks like I'm getting a new 8 inches in my rea.
  • + 2
 I WANT EVERYTHING
  • + 1
 Bada bing bada BOOM! Here comes the pain!
  • + 0
 Ive got a Fox 36 for sale in mint condition if anyone is interested.
  • + 0
 weeny squish

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