Here's Kona's All-New Satori Trail Bike - First Look

Feb 17, 2018 at 16:28
by Mike Levy  




The last time we saw the Satori name, it was back in 2014 and the bike was a 130mm-travel, 29'' wheeled trail bike. For 2019, the all-around machine that takes its name after the Japanese word for an awakening returns to Kona's lineup, again with 130mm out back (paired to a 140mm-travel fork) and 29'' wheels.

But while those numbers are the same, the expectations of how a trail bike should perform have shifted, and Kona has completely re-worked the 2018 Satori chassis with that in mind.


Kona Satori 2019

Satori DL Details

• Intended use: trail riding
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Fork travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 29''
• Aluminum frame
• RockShox Deluxe RL DebonAir Trunnion
• RockShox Revelation RC Solo Air
• Crankset: SRAM Descendant
• Drivetrain: SRAM GX Eagle 12-spd
• Brakes: SRAM Guide R, 180/160 rotors
• Seat Post: RockShox Reverb
• MSRP: $3,499 USD



Kona Satori 2019
Satori Details

• Intended use: trail riding
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Fork travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 29''
• Aluminum frame
• RockShox Deluxe RL DebonAir Trunnion
• RockShox Recon Gold RL Solo Air
• Crankset: RaceFace Aeffect
• Drivetrain: Shimano Deore 10-spd
• Brakes: Shimano Hydraulic, 180/160 rotors
• Seat Post: Trans-X Dropper Internal
• MSRP: $2,699 USD


So, What's New?

While the name, rear wheel travel, and all-around intentions remain the same as they did in 2014, similarities between that old bike and the new Satori pretty much end right there. The aluminum frame is all-new, the geometry is contemporary, and the suspension layout has been completely re-worked. The idea is still the same, however, with it looking like the kind of bike that's equally ready for a monster death march into the unknown as it is sessioning a tricky bit of singletrack that might trouble an under-gunned trail rig.

The new Satori isn't an all-mountain bike, clearly, but Kona does go so far as to say that there's some Process DNA in its genes, as well as the more obvious connection to their Hei Hei and Hei Hei Trail platforms.

Back in 2014, the old Satori (pictured at right) employed Kona's 'Swinger Independent Suspension' design that was a just a single pivot, linkage driven setup that Kona said ''retains the same advantages and performance features as our other designs, but at a more affordable price. In other words, more function than flash, which also kinda sums up Kona as a whole.
Kona Satori 2015
2014 Satori


Kona Satori 2019
Kona Satori 2019

The same could be said of the new Satori's 'Fuse Independent Suspension' layout, with its single pivot, flex-stay rear-end and vertical shock mounting (pictured above) that delivers 130mm of travel.

The Fuse design is even more simple than the old Swinger system, with Kona skipping the axle pivot in favor of a lighter (and probably more laterally rigid) flex-pivot. They've also gone to a trunnion-mount shock that's driven by a stout looking little rocker link, and it's no coincidence that the design language used for the Process and Hei Hei models can be easily seen in the Satori.


Kona Satori 2019


Geometry

I bet you know where Kona went with their new Satori's numbers compared to the old bike's digits... Yes, longer and lower but, interestingly, not any slacker up front. If we compare the old large-sized Satori to the new large-sized Satori, we see that the reach went from a now tiny 439mm to a much roomier 475mm. Of course, 2014 saw Kona spec what looks to be a 300mm long road bike stem (not actually), whereas the new geo is paired with a stubby stem straight from Kona. The middle of the road 68-degree head angle stays.

You've heard it all before: your center of gravity is moved more rearward relative to the front axle, but the cockpit shouldn't feel cramped due to that long reach. Kona wasn't the first to do this, but their original Process series made the PNW brand one of the earlier major brands to adopt this now standard-ish approach.

Kona Satori 2019
Kona Satori 2019


Sometimes overlooked but just as important, they've also steepened the bike's seat tube angle to just over 78-degrees. That's 4-degrees closer to vertical than the old Satori, by the way, which should help to mask the bike's extra length when pedaling in the saddle. Bottom bracket drop goes from 25mm to 29mm, and the wheelbase grows from 1,176mm to 1,201mm despite the chainstays being shortened by 10mm to 430mm. Shorter out back but much longer up front.


Two Satoris

If you're considering a Satori for your stable, you probably won't have to deal with choice paralysis as there are only two models to choose from, at least for the time being. Both the standard Satori and the higher-end Satori DL are assembled around the same aluminum frame and therefore share the same geometry but, with a wider gear range, four-piston brakes, and better suspension, the DL version looks like a more capable machine.


Kona Satori 2019


The DL comes with a SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed drivetrain, a Reverb, RockShox's 140mm-travel Revelation fork, and a custom tuned RockShox Deluxe RL Solo Air that looks after the 130mm out back. That package goes for $3,499 USD, but you can save $800 USD by going with the entry-level Satori and its Rockshox Recon Gold fork and custom tuned Solo Air rear shock, a Deore drivetrain, two-piston TR30 brakes, and a party post from Tranz-X.

I've got myself one of the new $3,499 USD Satori DL models in for testing, so stay tuned for a long-winded review of Kona's new mid-range trail bike down the road.

Must Read This Week

167 Comments

  • + 114
 Petition for Kona to bring back the Supreme, Primo, and (especially) Dee-Lux naming scheme!
  • - 9
flag Mattin (Feb 20, 2018 at 3:49) (Below Threshold)
 +1. I love Kona but this name reminds me of cheap suspension seatposts.
  • + 66
 Bring back Dawg and Stinky
  • + 0
 @jonsyp: It does look a lot like the Dawg
  • + 10
 I think they still use Dee-Lux, at least I thought DL=Dee-Lux.
  • + 5
 +1 on Stinky...I want one
  • + 1
 @joose: They have said several times since its release that the new process 165 is basically Stinky platform. Same purpose
  • + 6
 Bring back the Scratch and Sniff tires!
  • + 1
 @HurricaneCycles: I've played around on the 165 a couple times, I like the bike. But I am tall and lanky and I need a little longer reach. I just grew up playing on a stinky and I'd like to see a
Rebirth
  • + 2
 @joose:
So you want a short, steep bike?...
Not sure what to tell you...
  • + 2
 I came here to make a Stinky Dee-Lux comment and now I'm just flustered.
  • + 1
 @sam264: old school brah.
  • + 4
 @sam264: Hmmm... in 2004 a large Stinky had a 66.5 headtube angle, 585mm top tube and 72.5 seatube angle... that's not far off modern geometry and that's 14 years ago.
  • + 1
 No doubt another Kona with the same design from 1988. Imagine the chaos and sales if they actually decided to design a bike.
  • + 54
 I was excited to see what their Process 111 replacement would be, but this is disappointing.
  • + 29
 Couldn't read anywhere that this bike is supposed to replace the Process.
  • + 2
 @nozes: ride the new Hei Hei. They shifted the intentions of their bikes this year to make the whole line more versatile and design more contiguous. The the Hei Hei is almost identical in ride quality to the 111.
  • + 10
 68° head angle? Flat land bike.
  • + 8
 @HurricaneCycles: Did you ride both? i found them to be vastly difference. The HeiHei itself is good, but not nearly as naughty as the Process 111.. I found it much more tame and "ordinary", compared to the geometrical magic which is the Process111 (well, except for the added travel anyways...)

I second imperial - i'll be surprised if the Satori is a worthy successor to the 111, which was a pretty unique bike by all counts.
  • + 4
 @HurricaneCycles: the Hei Hei and 111 are totally different bikes. Satori is just another Hei Hei model. Read the reviewer:
"The new Satori isn't an all-mountain bike, clearly"
  • + 6
 @Flowcheckers: the Process 111 had a 68 degree hta for a good while and was rowdy as shat.
  • + 4
 @HurricaneCycles: I don't think so - I've got the 111 and have been riding the ever-loving shit out of it for over two years now. The thing is a brick - and being big and not exactly cat like/light on my feet, I appreciate that. The Hei Hei felt great to ride, but didn't give me nearly the same sense of wanting to go for it as the 111. The new 29er Process is not a successor to the 111 (too much suspension, too wallowy on non-scary trails); the lighter (both in weight and in intention) bikes like the Hei Hei and this new Satori are not a successor to the 111 either. Which leads me to believe that either there's still a new shorter travel Process-like bike on the way, or that the niche is too small to bother making one.

The 111 with a 140mm Pike is a beast, but one that's still very much a one-bike quiver that won't leave you regretting your choice. For a big rider who wants to get rowdy once in a while but doesn't need all that extra suspension (i.e., people who roll more than they huck), that's a pretty neat combo of performance traits. But, I admit, probably a pretty small slice of the market (I don't see too many people my size out there).
  • + 9
 this is a Precept replacement, not a Process replacement.
  • + 6
 This is NOT a replacement for the Process 111. I would guess that there will be an all new Process 134 in both 27.5 and 29 tire sizes in the not so distant future.
  • + 5
 @ssmtbrd: I'd like to see 100-120mm replacement, tbh. Not 130mm. More travel defeats the purpose. I think the Transition Smuggler will be my next bike of Kona doesn't give us a new short travel 111 like Process
  • + 1
 I've owned a Process 111 and the original Satori. The Satori was definitely more of a bruiser than the 111. The 111 is sweet, but had a bit too much pedal bob for my tastes especially for such a short travel bike. This bike is not a replacement for the 111. These new flex stay bikes climb more alacrity, even than the original Satori. Excited to rip one up and down soon.
  • + 1
 @ShredlyMcShredface: Why not just a hei hei. These look like lower end hei hei models to me?
  • + 1
 @FLATLlNE: I think there is some confusion here about how the Hei Hei factors in here. Yes it’s definitely more conservative than the 111 was, but only slightly. There are several different iterations of the Hei Hei so the one I am meaning here is the 120 up front and 100 back. The new satori is in fact a budget combo of process and Hei Hei concepts. As mentioned above it’s sorta in line with the idea behind the precept models. Just a better version.
  • + 1
 @HurricaneCycles: I would tend to agree with your budget model, precept replacement. I would say it leans more towards hei hei however, but you're probably right, little bit of hei hei little bit of process.

I like the hei hei trail bikes, personally. And own a Process 111 which I am quite happy with.
  • + 24
 Well its about f*cking time the mid travel 29er showed up from Kona Jesus Murphy....

Its too bad the price for these bikes is rediculous... You want 3500.00USD for your DL which comes with a low model rear shock, and an okay fork and base model drivetrain?

You can get Trek's Fuel ex8, their top level alloy fuel model for 300 less than Satori DL which comes with a better component list and ill go out on a limb and say... Probably rides better...

And yeah I know there are other bikes that contend in this category as well I just used the fuel as an example, feel free to add a list below this of other bikes costing around the same but are just... Better...

Kona where did all your Cool go?
  • + 12
 It went to the bottom line.
  • + 3
 If it pedals well I can see it carving out it's own little niche of trail riders who value great pedaling manners.

Their decision to spec a 34t front ring makes me think they're targeting more xc-focused riders that are feeling a little betrayed by Treks decision to keep moving the Fuel more and more towards "enduro"
  • + 2
 @JaredHarzan: I think you should go ride a Fuel. I own a 2018 Fuel 9.8 and I wouldn't call it an Enduro bike, its one of the most capable All mountain do everything machines I have ridden though. And lets be real, how many mid travel 29ers have you ridden that don't pedal well? Bad pedaling bikes are a thing of the past.

The 34 tooth up front makes total sense to me the 10/50 cassette allows for flat out speed or saddle seated leg burning climbs.

The Trek FX commuter series and the Trek Fuel lineup were the two best selling bikes from Trek in 2017. If there are riders out there feeling betrayed by what the fuel has become it's clear that it made a lot of people very happy as well. And there is always the Top fuel or Procaliber to facilitate the hardcore XC guys wants. I mean look at the new stumpjumper, its 130/150 travel and people are buying those things up like hot cakes.

Kona has a cult following just like a lot of brands, so the worry this bike wont sell is not really there. I just wonder if this bike is "too little, too late"

Maybe it's time that PB does a big shootout between all the mid level 29ers... it's a fast growing market with some big players and sick bikes. Time for a battle to crown the best! That's something we can all agree on yeah?
  • + 8
 Agree konas lost the plot this generation. Boring, ugly, expensive, crap spec and in the case of the new process way over weight aswell. Was a big kona fan had quite a few was looking at getting the new process but only bike from there entire lineup that still has some kona soul is the honzo IMHO.
  • + 3
 @2bigwheels: I own a 2018 Fuel, the exact ex 8 model that you mentioned in your post. And I'd say it could use a steeper seat tube angle and that there's a good bit of pedal bob when standing up and pedaling hard with the shock open. It's also not particularly light. I admit, these are very minor quibbles.

It's a beast going downhill, and I love the bike, but long days spent going up makes me dream of steeper seat tube angles and a lighter bike. If this Kona accomplishes that, it could appeal to people that value more of xc-oriented trail bike that gives a little up to the fuel when the trail points down.
  • + 1
 @JaredHarzan: interesting to hear you have a suspension bob issue. When I get on the gas and out of the saddle I feel it sits in its squat and not much movement after that, I don't even have a Re:Activ shock on there I got rid of that thing and just run a new RS Deluxe. My 9.8 with 2.5 tires, 150mm front fork and what not is 30.8 pounds.
Seat angle, yeah could be a slight bit steeper but I got long Femurs so it works out, I have a contact who is a bike fitter and we found out any steeper of a seat angle and it would be hard for me to achieve the proper knee location to pedal location type thing so I can't complain.

What size Fuel are you on? and what bike did you have before the Fuel?
  • + 1
 @markg1150: I can get behind what you are saying. I still think the Process 153 is fantastic bike and yeah the Honzo is just perfection (had a 2015 Honzo)

To say they are ugly, that's a little far, for me I feel some of their bikes just kind look "lazy" I mean for instance, look at the rocker link on this bike... like come'on, just put a little bit of "give a f*ck" into the design.....
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: I didn't have a bike fitter help me out, I'm just going off how often I'm on the very tip of my saddle (which is slammed forwards) when I'm climbing. Seat angle feels fine when peddling on more level terrain. Size is 18.5 and I'm coming from a 26" Gary Fischer HiFi (very big change for me). I can't decide if the comparatively lazy acceleration is the fault of the change in wheel size/bike weight/or suspension design. I may need to mention at this point, I really like my Fuel. I'm perfectly happy giving up a little bit in the climbing department in order to feel this confident descending. I've found a good balance for me. But I could see someone else feeling differently/having different priorities.

BikeMag first ride review has a little more meat to it than this press release, and I think it aligns with how I picture them marketing it. Super efficient/comfortable climber. Mix of a XC/trail bike. I live in an area with lots of mellow trails that you can link together for long rides. I'd say this Kona has a good chance to do well here.

I'm a little surprised/disappointed by the weight, but oh well.
  • + 24
 Is it just me or does it seem like a bad idea having a pivotless aluminium rear. Steel or Ti I get because they are more flexible. I can see it cracking.
  • + 18
 Material flex : Al is more flexible.
Structural flex : Al is stiffer only when used for thin walled high diameter tubing, and here the rear has obviously been engineered for flex (seatstays look vertically flexible for example).

Cracks depend also on fatigue life though, and yes here Al is the loser.
  • + 9
 Nowadays most A-quality alu frames are designed around flex. At least when looking at hard tails and road bikes.
  • - 1
 The most interesting aspect of this ride is the aluminum flex pivot and there’s no closeup if it?!?
  • + 5
 A kona cracking!? No way
  • + 1
 For aggressive riders: Stay far far away from flex stays. They will crack, just depends on how long. My Felt Decree lasted 4 months.
  • + 5
 A suspension squish video would be great here, take the shock out so we csn see the flex
  • + 1
 @BryceBorlick: The Hei Hei only had 2 degrees, or 8mm of flex in the seatstays. I haven't done the math on this one yet, but I would guess it is closer to 3 degrees/12mm - which is still not much especially since the tube shaping encourages the flex in middle of the tube, not nearer the dropout like on some previous flex-stay designs from other companies.
  • + 1
 Can someone explain this pivot-less flex stay to me? I don't understand, is it on the seat stay?
  • + 4
 @northwestair: You can imagine how it works in the side view by drawing a line between the rear rocker link pivot and the main pivot by the BB. If it were a clock, with the main pivot being the center, the rear rocker link pivot is at like 11:30 o'clock. It wants to move toward the front of the bike and only slightly up as it cycles around the imaginary clock.

Now if you draw a line from the same rear rocker link pivot and the stationary main rocker link pivot, it's more at like 10:00 o'clock. This means as it cycles, it wants to go mostly up, and only slightly forward.

Combine those 2 motions, and you can imagine how the rear triangle has to "spread open"(heh) in order to cycle through its travel. If the shock was removed, the resistance to cycle the suspension would be the rear triangle opening up by a few mm via frame flex.
  • + 2
 Given the fatigue life of alu though I just can't see it being a great idea. Steel, yes. Alu, no way.
  • + 6
 @sam264: sit in the window seat of a plane at the wing and watch...you’ll either get it, be scared sh!tless, or both. But last I checked, planes were not crashing from their wings catastrophicly failing.
  • + 0
 @ReformedRoadie:
Yes but there is a reason that they retire them after a certain age. It's a known fact that alu fatigues MUCH faster than steel, and I'm sure that the flex in an aeroplane wing is a lot less than 8 degrees. When buying a bike I'd like to have the confidence than it's designed to last a long way past the manufacturer warranty, which I don't think I could ever have with an alu flex-stay frame (same as Giant Stance etc.)
  • + 2
 @sam264: There are a lot of 25+ year old planes still flying around...some a lot older.
  • + 19
 Hmm, I respect the durability of konas but a rear triangle that depends on the flexibility of aluminum while resisting fatigue over the lifespan of the bike would make me a little apprehensive.
  • + 19
 That 747 you flew in? Also depends on aluminum flexing. It's all about distributing the flex.
  • + 2
 @rollingdip:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ET9Da2vOqKM
The break is at about 42 seconds.
That'l do.
  • + 5
 @Poulsbojohnny: You do know that the "154" is equivalent to 154% over the maximum expected flex on any airplane wing right? You just verified @rollingdip 's point.
  • + 3
 @RideTahoe707: That was my intention. Smile
I tried to find the actual PSI applied to the wingtips or main spar, but came up empty.
  • + 2
 @Poulsbojohnny: That is awesome. I love the cheers when it pops...breaking shit just never gets old...
  • + 2
 @rollingdip: Everyone was a bit disappointed when they tested the 87. The wing never broke. Stupid carbon fiber.
  • + 1
 @rollingdip: what's the budget and tolerances on air plane manufacturing? It's not really a apples to apples comparison. But yeah I get it, I just don't want a rear triangle with this type of suspension design. To each their own as the saying goes
  • + 20
 I think it looks frumpy.
  • + 9
 It looks like it's from 2009
  • + 17
 SO. MUCH. WATER. BOTTLE. ROOM!
  • + 16
 So high standover Frown
  • + 7
 you need water bottle for juice from your balls when you hit that top tube.
  • + 2
 Oh yeah, loving this. Every time someone complains about a certain bike not having room for a bottle, get one of these and get another bottle in there. Soon enough there will be companies who develop bottle cages that mount to bottle cages so that you completely stuff that front triangle. Oh yeah, one more bottle in there. Cram it in there. Oh yeah, so good... Just quit complaining about frames that don't happen to have room for that.
  • + 1
 @vinay: and buy proper water system of whatever sort you like.
  • + 15
 If the seat angle on my office chair was that steep I'd be typing this with my t1ts.
  • + 1
 the honzo is 75 degrees, but since it's a hardtail, once you account for fork sag, it's probably about 78 degrees as well
  • + 12
 Just give us back the Process 111!
  • + 4
 The Hei Hei, hands down is the best bikes I’ve ridden. (DH background, 25+years of riding and racing).. that’s a LOT of bikes I’ve had over all those years.

The Hei Hei, And it’s flex pivot, we’re just awesome. For xc riding, but pretty hard!

I’d LOVE to try one of these !
  • + 4
 I think it is interesting that the big critique other than price is the concern over the flex pivot design, and not that it won't function well but durability. My guess is that it will probably last quite well as Kona tends to stand behind their products, and will end up replacing a bunch of them if they don't.
  • + 3
 ^ This.
I'm no metallurgist so I can't speak to the elasticity of AL. But I know that in general, metals have good elasticity and can take 10s of thousands of cycles before fatiguing. I'd be more concerned with the welds letting go before the seat stays.
  • + 3
 Well, Giant would know...just ask them how many Stance rear ends were cracking and breaking and what their warranty costs were, 'cause it wouldn't have been cheap for them.
  • + 3
 @handynzl: yep, giant made the stand rear triangle too weak for a flex stay.

but doesn't the Kona Hei Hei also have a flex stay? i haven't heard of anyone breaking those yet
  • + 1
 @xeren: I did crack a 2017 chain stay, but it was right at the drilling where the rear derauilleur cable exits the frame. Because of that I'm assuming it had something to do with the manufacturing and it was warrantied.
  • + 7
 It is no beauty, but in terms of geometry and spec it ticks almost all boxes for me. Just why no BSA BB?
  • + 2
 As far as pressfit goes, at least they're sticking with PF92, which tends to be the least problematic of PF bottom brackets. As a set-it-and-forget-it sort of option, that's not a bad one. On my 111, I'm on my second BB only because I switched cranks after bending one in a crash and not wanting to go with another SRAM crank; the current setup (Shimano crank and RF BB) has been completely trouble free in well over two years of lots of hard riding (and I'm big/heavy, so there's a bit of force on it). But while it's trouble free in the technical sense (no adjustments needed, still spins just as nicely as it did when new, so the bearings are still in good shape) in a way that a traditional threaded BB just can't match, damn, I'd gladly accept the odd BB adjustment to get ride of the stupid creaking. It's not horrendous (like the lesser PF variants tend to be), but damn, it's always there. I'm sort of tempted to get one of those Wheels Manufacturing setups to see if that's making a difference. Anyone used those?
  • + 1
 @g-42: I have, in my aluminum Honzo frame. No creaks now in almost 2 seasons of riding--it is primarily my winter bike, so it sees plenty of slop here in the PNW. So far the Wheel's Mfg BB has been worth the money to me.
*Disclaimer: I'm not a large rider, just pretty average at 180 lbs. Also, I went straight for the Wheels Mfg BB on initial build, so I can't compare it to any other BB's on this frame.
  • + 2
 @mikealive: thanks, I think I'll give that a try!
  • + 5
 Do. Not. Want.

I thought this was a 'new' bike? Looks like more recycled design/s paired with lacking spec and a higher price tag.
  • + 3
 I like it a lot. Good color, proven suspension design, sensible cable routing, water bottle clearance, steep seat angle. Checks all my boxes except aluminum only, but knowing Kona, a CR/DL model could come out if this one is successful.
  • + 4
 Its damn shame kona going downhill in looks. The canyon strive is a more better looking bike for similar price as is the yt capra
  • + 2
 I rode the older model back in 2013 and it was one of the most fun bikes I've ever ridden (prior to buying my 111). This one looks like a decent evolution of it, up to date geo, reliable parts spec, decent price. Nothing to complain here!
  • + 5
 I love Kona bikes but damn, this bike is fugly. It's nice to see such a steep STA angle though.
  • + 2
 yea wheres the poo names, chute , roast , stuff , scrap, stinky , dudu , kikapoo, lavadome,
& everyone knew the grips were little buttholes
and that one year at interbike where they gave out toilet plungers
bring that shit back!
  • + 2
 Yes, very close to what the new Smuggler is. It's a 'Trail Bike'. A mid-range travel 29er. I have the 2014 model and converted it to 27.5 plus size wheels/tires and it's a lot of fun to ride, especially on real long adventure type rides where comfort comes into play more than sheer enduro type performance. The Satori was a great seller for Kona. I predict this one will be, as well.
  • + 1
 I would love to see a comparison between this and a Norco Sight 29er.
  • + 3
 Welcome to the past with the new Kona! I'd never know how kona survive despite they always make bikes with, looks, research and development one step behind the others.
  • + 4
 I have an original Satori, can't see me ditching it for this. Not enough changes to make it worthwhile.
  • + 5
 Too much money for not enough bike.
  • + 4
 Wow...just wow this thing looks like a WALLY BIKE!!! 3600 hundo for a Rock shox Revolution ??? huh
  • + 3
 That looks like a solid trailbike. Under $4k for Eagle, even GX level, with a solid component list is pretty good.
  • + 4
 No it is not!
Who pays that kind of money for such a built?
My 167 was 4k MSRP (I paied 3k one year after for a new remaining stock) with vidid air & x01 built at that time.
With all the internet brands and all I feel Kona should rethink their pricing ASAP...
  • + 5
 @gapos999: no they shouldn't, for a shop bike brand, that's rather good pricing. The reason why they are more expensive is because the shop and bike company as well both need to make profit, so they can't have the price too low like direct brands. That's why direct brands are cheaper than others like specialized, trek, Knolly etc.
  • + 6
 i really dont think these bikes are cheap at all. how far have we come that we accept an ordinary aluminium frame, with left out pivots and a very basic build (Guide R, descendant cranks, mid-level revelation etc.) as cheap?! the build is functional-yes-but not that expensive at all. c'mon its an almost 4k bike ?
  • + 3
 At the same time Kona's are more bombproof than most other brands. The initial cost might not be the lowest, but those brands aiming 100% at lower costs usually also last shorter. Which is not strange because they try to save as much money as possible in every single place they can. If they don't the other brands competing on the lowest price will be cheaper and your brand will be forgotten (you can only succeed on the lowest price strategy if you are #1 and not #6).

Ride your bike for 5+ years and big chance in the end the Kona will be the cheapest.
Look at it like a Toyota, you can buy cheaper cars with better specs, but in the end it's more reliable and over the years it will save you money.
  • + 4
 this is santa cruz level pricing tho. Barely entry-level components for 2700$? Not even comparing to direct to consumer brands its not really cheap.
  • + 5
 @all

Their pricing sucks. For $2,150 you can get a Stance 1. Same flex stays, Fox suspension, tubeless ready. Some of the other components are slightly down spec (brakes come to mind), but you could easily rectify that with a few hundred and be done with it or just wait until they wear out and then replace. And it comes with a lifetime warranty.
This is a bike store bike, so no excuses.

Or you could do direct sales and get even better build from YT, Comencal, Whyte, etc.

And this:
"more function than flash, which also kinda sums up Kona as a whole."
The price tag for their kit doesn't follow this mantra very well.
  • + 4
 2019? Glad I didn't buy a 2018 bike!!
  • + 3
 Bit early for 2019 bikes isn't it
  • + 1
 Yet another Pinkbike article lacking a geometry chart. I would argue that a geometry chart is the only piece of information necessary in a bike review.
  • + 1
 I liked the old process platform more to be honest. It looked more fun, stiffer and the disegn was unique. The older153 was a great looking bike
  • + 2
 It looks like somebody washed my 2015 Process 153 in hot water and it shrunk, or the aspect ratio of my monitor is wrong.
  • + 2
 Had me until Revalation fork..... Can't decide if an upgrade on the fork would be worth it or just stick with my 111.
  • + 6
 Scratch this.... New Revelation is 35mm.... Take my money.
  • + 2
 @barnz0rz: Yep, new Revelation is the "cheap" Pike. Shares the same chassis. It is to the Pike what the Yari is to the Lyrik now.
  • + 1
 $450 for an Avalanche damper or about half that for a Charger.
  • + 2
 Tough crowd. I think it looks well thought out, I bet it rides great. Looks like it needs to be slightly cheaper though. Wink
  • + 1
 Half seems about right
  • + 3
 Butt ulgy
  • + 1
 2019 Kona Satori: Release date, Feb 2018. I think we're getting a bit ahead of ourselves.
  • + 3
 FUGLY!
  • + 2
 Lots of angry 13 year olds up early today.
  • + 4
 I am not 13 but I awoke early this morning for my compulsory parade laps. You should have seen me in all my resplendent glory. ZOOM.
  • + 1
 @IamTheDogEzra: Did you get the ball?
  • + 1
 Fire the designer, immediately...
  • + 1
 Cool, the lower model is spec'ed with a 28t front ring.
  • + 1
 That looks like a mongoose walmart full sus
  • + 1
 I'm waiting for the Kona Ginsu.
  • + 0
 Another review without mentioning if it has a threaded or PF BB..... C'Mon Man
  • + 2
 If it doesn’t exclusively say it’s threaded, it’s gotta be PF
  • + 2
 Needs Horst link
  • + 0
 Yes. Because there aren't enough bikes designed around the Horst link.
  • + 3
 @BeerGuzlinFool: If it works well, which it does, who cares?
  • + 4
 @BeerGuzlinFool: No, not enough, and no reason not make this one. It works better than single pivot.
  • + 1
 @Axxe: You do realize there are better options than the Horst link and single pivot.
  • + 1
 @Adodero: It works.. but not as well as other designs.
  • + 2
 @BeerGuzlinFool: Horst link is better than single pivot. All other designs with tiny links are too complex and of questionable advantage.
  • + 1
 @Axxe: I agree with it working better than single pivot designs. As far as other designs being to complex. Too complex for who.. The manufacturer?..
  • + 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: And whoever does maintenance. Tiny links good to collect mud. And no, they do not ride "better", trading pedal kickback for antisquat is not for everybody.
  • + 1
 @Axxe: To each there own I guess. I would just like to see more options from manufacturers instead of 20 varieties of the Horst link.
  • + 1
 Non drive-side photos? Ewww gross.
  • + 1
 Drive sides usually get dirtier than non drive sides. Never picture the drive side with the hideous long derailleur cages that are popular now. Instead show off your big brake rotors and four piston brake calipers.
  • + 4
 Non drive side is the bike of equivalent of a taint... and no one wants to see your taint.
  • + 2
 Yeah, nobody is interested in the pivot location or too see how the rear brake is mounted.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Do you even get WHY the long derailleur cages are popular now? It's not about popularity, it's necessity. If you keep adding ratio spread to the cassette cogs you need more capability to take up (or to allow more) chain slack, and particularly with the now untrendy 2X drivetrains. The longer cages can take up or give more chain slack (given a specific range of movement in degrees for the tensioner part of a derailleur).
  • - 1
 @bart882: Yeah, I do get why they got so long. It just doesn't add up. You could ride with a really short cage if you have a chain long enough and accept that it will go slack when you shift small-small. Which isn't a big sacrifice as there is no point shifting small-small anyway. Short cages fly around less on rough terrain, have less chance of getting caught on obstacles. The biggest problem with the front mech was when trying to operate them with a trigger shifter. It is never going to work properly. Just operate the front mech with a grip shift and the rear mech with a trigger. With nine positions to play with, you can always force the chain to the correct ring and once it is there, it acts like a top guide which people pay good money for these days. But the media ignored this option. Most don't like grip shift for operating the rear mech (I don't like that either) so they'll ignore the option that running grip shift with the front mech will take away the issues they have with operating the front mech.

So no, long cages aren't a necessity. If you need the wide range and can't or don't want to make a front mech work for you, then you need a long cage. But again, that is a popular choice. I'm pretty sure that the majority of people who run 1x... now with a long cage simply won't run into trouble when using a 2x setup with a gripshift for the front mech. It may be a necessity for those riders out of that group who keep losing their chains which they didn't do with a single front ring or who really prefer an oval ring (which was my reason to switch). But that is a minority.

Still, the long cage isn't prettier than the suspension linkage or the brakes. So with these modern bikes I don't mind looking at the non driveside instead of the driveside.
  • + 3
 @vinay: I like a good non-drive side too, but Gripshift? Come on man...
  • + 0
 @BenPea: Why not? Triggers didn't work for me with front mechs. With grip shift you put it in the right position and if you hear some rattle, adjust it a single click. Easy. Sure I'm not using it anymore but I'm not using a big range cassette either. If I'd have to choose between a huge expensive and heavy cassette and a long vulnerable cage or just a bit more in the bottom bracket area and a grip shift then I'd take the latter. Both have their downsides. My choice just maybe to be different from what the SRAM marketing department would have chosen.
  • + 1
 @vinay: I'm with you on everything but the Gripshift, on which I once spent a lot of time. It's the same problem as dual control: terrain interference in the transmission.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: I don't quite agree. Dual control is a single lever to operate both brake and shifter. So you can operate the shifter when you intend to operate the brake and you can operate the brake when you intend to operate the shifter. I wouldn't use that either.

Grip shift for the front mech is different in that you don't frequently operate the front mech on a 2x drivetrain and, considering the kind of gearing you're going in or coming from, it won't be a high speed situation either. So when you shift your fingers slightly to yank on that shifter, it won't have a much effect on the way you control the bike. Same goes when controlling the bike, you usually stay clear from the shifter. Yes this is very different from the front shifter which you'd operate at all speeds and conditions so I wouldn't use a grip shift for the rear mech either. I tried once but it didn't work for me. In fact I destroyed two rear mechs this way because it allows you to shift with so much force that you can bend your rear mech. But I was not recommending grip shift for the rear mech. I said I'd rather ride with 2x and a gripshift for the front mech (and trigger for the rear) han a 1x drivetrain with a huge cog and a huge derailleur cage.
  • + 1
 @vinay: it's simply the issue of the shifter being part of the grip. If your hand is constantly gripping the shifter, there's a chance you'll shift onto the granny ring accidentally on bumpy terrain or landings. If your hand is far enough outboard to not be gripping the shifter then surely it's too far out to keep a finger in the brake. Or am I wrong?
  • + 0
 @BenPea: Yeah, maybe some modern brakes got really short levers so that would indeed not fit. My older brakes (Magura Louise, Magura Gustav etc) have levers long enough to reach them even with a grip shifter in between.
  • + 1
 @vinay: sweet, we've got to the bottom (fanny? mmm...) of it then.
  • + 1
 @cmcrawfo: Maybe not MY taint, but there may be some that are OK.
  • + 1
 too much down tubbing going on
  • + 1
 I cringe so hard when I see Aluminium flex pivots
  • + 1
 looks like a session
  • + 1
 Yeah but no.
  • + 1
 a Ninja Satori bike.
  • + 0
 So Kona made an old Norco sight, coolish...
  • + 1
 It hurts my eyes
  • - 2
 Looks like a Trek Fuel.
  • - 2
 Looks like a Salsa
  • - 2
 Looks like a Smuggler.
  • + 7
 It wishes it looked like a smuggler
  • - 2
 I don't like word "flex" next to "aluminium" in one sentence.
  • + 1
 do not get on an airplane
  • + 3
 @FarmerJohn: Kona airplane or any airplane?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.110434
Mobile Version of Website