Öhlins RXF 34 - Review

Dec 5, 2016 at 10:51
by Mike Levy  
How do you get a bunch of mountain bikers really excited? One way is to tell them that Öhlins, the legendary Swedish suspension company, is jumping into the mountain bike biz with not just shocks, but also two different forks designed for trail and all-mountain use. It's the $1,150 USD RXF 34, the lighter weight of the two, that's reviewed below. The fork is available in 120, 140, and 160mm-travel options, but it's the 140mm-travel version that we've now spent nearly a full year on so we could compare it to its main competitors, RockShox's Pike and Fox's 34.

The RXF 34, which weighs 2,270 grams (5.0lbs) on our scale, employs Öhlins' twin-tube TTX damper, as well as an interesting three-chamber air spring that is claimed to allow for a massive tuning range without the need to use volume-adjusting spacers. It's certainly different, but is it better than what we're all used to using?

Öhlins RXF 34 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Travel: 120, 140 (tested), 160mm
• Wheel size: 29''
• Three air chamber system: two positive, one negative
• Adjustments: high-speed compression, low-speed compression, low-speed rebound
• Forged, one-piece crown and steerer tube
• Stanchions: 34mm
• Axle: 15 x 100mm, non-QR
• Weight: 2,270g / 5.0lbs
• MSRP: $1,150 USD
www.ohlinsusa.com
Ohlins RXF 34


Inside the RXF 34

Legend has it that simply saying the Öhlins name is enough to make the bumps feel smaller, something that no doubt comes from the company's long history of being the name in such motorsports as WRC and MotoGP racing. And it's MotoGP that Öhlins says is the birthplace of their TTX damper that uses a twin-tube layout and is employed on all of the company's high-end offerings, including their mountain bike suspension.

Ohlins RXF 34
Part of the RXF's TTX twin-tube damper (top) and the fork's three-chamber air spring (bottom). Photo: Ohlins


Let's not get carried away, however, because the TTX twin-tube damper in the RXF is obviously very different from what you'll find inside their motorbike units, but the basic architecture is similar. Twin-tube means exactly that; the damper is a tube-in-a-tube design that sees both filled with oil and the piston working inside of the inner tube. In the most basic of terms, it is constantly recirculating the oil between the two, and it's said that a twin-tube damper creates lower internal pressures than a more commonly used mono-tube system, and lower pressures can mean more control over forces and less stress on seals. It also requires a more complicated design - there are more things stuffed into the same small space - and therefore it can be more difficult to work on. Öhlins most definitely doesn't want you to open up their damper in your garage.

The TTX setup employs a spring-backed IFP rather than a bladder like what's used in a FIT4 or Charger damper. Öhlins says that they went this route because it's not just easier to manufacture, but also more reliable over the long run while being easier for service centers to deal with when the time does come to open the system up.


Ohlins RXF 34
Ohlins RXF 34
Air spring detail on the left, and damper piston detail on the right. Photo: Ohlins


The RXF's air spring is also different from the norm, with three air chambers rather than the usual two (one positive and one negative) that you see on other air-sprung forks. There's the usual positive air chamber, tuned via the Schrader valve at the top of the right fork leg, and it works in conjunction with a negative air spring that self-adjusts by way of a common bleed between the two. That means that if you require a lot of pressure in the positive chamber for your weight or riding style, the negative will self-adjust accordingly, much as you'll see from other air-sprung forks.

It's the third air chamber, adjusted via the Schrader valve at the bottom of the same leg, where things get very different. This is your bottom-out control, with more pressure meaning more resistance to using all of the RXF's travel, and vice versa. This third chamber does the same job as the tokens that you add or remove in RockShox or Fox fork to tune the volume, but while a socket or wrench, and of course some tokens, are required by most other forks, you'll only need a normal shock pump to get the job done with the RXF. This should make not just initial setup easier, but also changes down the road.



RXF 34 Chassis

The RXF chassis is pretty straightforward for the most part. There's no funky quick-release thru-axle system, with Öhlins going with a simple bolt-on 15mm axle instead that ensures the best alignment, and a set of 34mm stanchions slide into understated lowers. There is one big talking point, however: all of Öhlins' forks feature a one-piece crown and steerer tube assembly with a built-in crown race. That's right - you don't slide a traditional crown race down over the steerer because it's already there, machined right into the top of the crown. It requires the use of a 52 x 40 x 7mm bearing, which is very common these days and also available from Cane Creek if you need to grab one.


Ohlins RXF 34
Ohlins RXF 34
There's enough clearance at the arch for big meat, although proper plus-sized rubber would be a tight fit. You'll need a 5mm hex key to loosen the pinch bolt and back the 15mm axle out.


Öhlins aren't the first company to use a one-piece upper - X-Fusion has been doing it for quite awhile now - but what's the reasoning behind the design? It's done to remove the joint between the steerer tube and crown where the two are pressed together at the factory, a joint that can sometimes be prone to creaks and groans. Word is that it also increases rigidity, which is noteworthy for a fork with 34mm diameter stanchions that's designed for a spot of rowdiness. The one-piece construction also lends itself nicely to the built-in crown race by eliminating the 90-degree corner that could be considered a stress riser.


Ohlins RXF 34
Ohlins RXF 34
The one-piece crown and steerer tube, complete with a built-in crown race, eliminates a joint that can be prone to creaking.




Riding the Ohlins RXF 34

Many of us are familiar with setting up a RockShox or Fox fork these days, so much so that it often takes only a few rides, turning the dials once or twice, and breaking out the shock pump a few times before you'll have a setup that feels pretty much like home. Adjusting the RXF isn't any more difficult than what's required of other forks - it's actually easier in some ways - but it's certainly different.

Öhlins recommends 100 - 110 PSI for a rider who weighs 154 - 176lbs, and since we're near the top end of that range, we started at the second figure. The ramp-up air chamber called for 150 - 165 PSI, and since it had been extremely wet, and hence the speeds were slower than they might be on a fast-rolling summer day, we went with the lower number to start things off with. This created a relatively linear setup - more so than a 34 or Pike filled with four or five tokens - but damn, it felt ideal in the slower, softer, damper conditions.


Ohlins RXF 34
The 140mm-travel RXF 34 lived on the front of a Stumpjumper, replacing a Pike of the same travel for the last eight months.


But not so much when the rain disappeared and the trails went from being wetter than the inside of a submarine with a screen door to being dusty and fast. Queue up many bottoming moments, although never once were they the kind that rattles your teeth and makes you question your grip strength. Out came the shock pump and up went the pressures: 115 PSI in the main air-spring chamber and up to 165 PSI in the anti-teeth rattling chamber. And that fettling took all of three minutes. No wrenches. No plastic spacers. It's so easy, in fact, that we ended up having different spring rates for different trails and conditions, something that caused much eye rolling from our riding buddies and many OCD jokes.


Ohlins RXF 34
Ohlins RXF 34
The RXF's bottom-out resistance is adjusted via an air valve at the bottom of the right leg, eliminating the need to install or remove tokens. It is very effective.


With the RXF's rebound setting, when we first pushed on the fork we thought ''Oh, it must be wide open right now.'' Then we backed out the anodized gold dial and thought, ''Holy shit; it goes even quicker.'' We ended up with the fork's rebound dial set close to the middle, and while it felt lively, it didn't feel anywhere near as uncontrolled as you'd expect after giving it the ol' parking lot push at the trailhead. Low-speed compression was set with five to seven clicks, and just one to two clicks on the high-speed adjuster did the trick.

Those settings created a fork that was impressively supple at the top of its stroke and into its sag point, and while we would use all of the travel, it never felted wasted. The process took longer than with a 34 or Pike, but only because we were starting from scratch.

Sensitivity and Air Spring - The RXF 34 matches a well-looked after Pike and 34 when talking about slipperiness, and it stayed just as supple throughout the last eight months of use. Actually, because the fork's bottom-out can be adjusted so quickly to compensate, it's very easy to tune the spring rate for a given ride, say a bit softer for wet or extremely loose and dusty ground. This means that the RXF can feel more active and supple simply because the air pressure is closer to ideal for the conditions. Sure, you can certainly lower or raise the PSI on a Fox or RockShox fork, but that might also mean that, for the best performance, you might also need to add or remove tokens accordingly. With the RXF, this can be done with a shock pump in only a few minutes.

Chassis Performance - This one is easy: the RXF 34 is as stiff as it needs to be. It feels at least as torsionally rigid as a Pike or 34, and maybe just a smidge less than a 36. It never once felt like it wasn't as precise as it needs to be when pinballing through a rocky minefield or at the bottom of a steep shoot that would load the fork up with torsional forces.

Granted, at around 170lbs we're not exactly beefcakes who make everything feel a bit too bendy, but it felt more than adequate nonetheless.

Where it might have an advantage is lateral rigidity, however, as the RXF 34 displayed less of that 'tucking' feeling of the front wheel flexing backward slightly under heavy front brake loads. We don't have this complaint of a Pike or 34, though, as that's never an issue with those two forks, but the RXF seems as though it's a hair less flexible in this regard.

Ohlins RXF 34

The lack of a quick-release axle is of absolutely zero concern to us, and we don't suspect that anyone who owns an RXF will be fussed by it, either. If you suffer a flat and don't have a muti-tool to remove the wheel to fix it, you probably deserve to have to walk out of the bush, and you probably don't have a tube on you anyway.



Damper Performance - While it's not the only thing that matters, how a fork's damper performs is probably the most important. And do you honestly think that Öhlins would f*ck this up? Not a chance. The TTX twin-tube system offers impeccable control, and it's on par with a FIT4 or Charger damper, which is saying a lot. It's probably not better in that it does everything to a high degree, but that's not exactly a diss against Öhlins when you consider how well things perform these days.

Low-speed compression control is on-point when a handful of clicks are dialed on, but the RXF could feel a bit divey through its travel if you backed the LSC adjuster out too far. On the flip side, one might call this a very useable range of damping as enough LSC could be applied to supply enough control for any type of rider, but it could also be backed off if it wasn't required. It's the same story with the high-speed compression, with a wide enough range to be called usable. The HSC lever's tab also made it simple to tweak on the fly, say if one knew that a nasty huck to flat was coming up and didn't feel like putting their wrists through a year's worth of abuse for a single impact.

Simply put, the TTX damper never feels out of its depth or at a loss for what to do during descending.

Öhlins uses the RXF's high-speed compression lever as a sort of lock-out, and while it does firm the fork up considerably, it doesn't match the firmest setting of the three positions of a Charger damper. This probably won't matter to a rider who would be considering the RXF 34, but it's worth noting if you're the kind of person who likes to lock their suspension to smash out a climb.


Ohlins RXF 34
The black dial tunes high-speed compression, while the blue dial at the center handles low-speed duties. There aren't a lot of clicks, but the effective range is quite wide.


Reliability - We saw some ''long-term'' RXF 34 reviews pop up only a few short months after the first batch of test forks were sent out, which sounds like anything but long-term to me. We've had our RXF in use for over eight months now, which is probably just long enough to comment on how it should hold up. And hold up it did; the RXF has seen literally zero love, aside from the occasional wipe down, and it feels as smooth and active as when it first saw action. There is zero discernible bushing play or binding, and aside from some cosmetic wear, you'd be able to convince us that the fork is brand new.


Issues - The lack of an external travel adjust feature doesn't bother us - we're generally not a fan of on-the-fly stroke adjustment as a crutch for a bike that's excessively slack - but changing the RXF's travel does require shipping it off to a service center to have the air spring cylinder tube or complete air spring assembly swapped out. The 140mm-travel fork can be set to 120mm and vice versa, but neither can be bumped up to 160mm due to the piston rod length on the damper side. However, the 160mm fork can be set to either 140mm or 120mm of travel with an air spring parts change. Yes, it's true that some other forks on the market require similar changes to alter their travel, but it'd be nice if it was a simple matter of moving some internal spacers around inside the RXF to get the job done.

The RXF's three-chamber air spring system also requires you to "reset the fork to its original length" if you've decided to lower the main air spring pressure. To do this, you simply hold the wheel down on the ground while pulling up on the handlebar ten times, or until you've fully exposed the correct amount of stanchion tube; 140mm for the 140mm-travel fork and so on. This isn't a big issue at all, but forget to do it and the fork won't fully extend, meaning that you won't have all of your travel available, which seems a bit hokey for a $1,150 USD product.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesNo, the RXF 34 isn't exactly the mind-blowing paradigm shift of suspension performance that the Ohlins name might have some riders thinking it should be, and we wouldn't even say that it's better than a Pike or 34 in terms of outright performance, but it is certainly just as good. It's also heavier (about a full pound compared to a Factory Series Float 34 of the same travel and wheel size) and more expensive, which may or may not matter depending on what you value.

What Ohlins has created is a fork that seems to be bombproof, with an extremely easy to tune damper and air spring that will work well for any type of rider. All that makes the RXF 34 a worthy alternative to a Pike or 34.
- Mike Levy



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227 Comments

  • 139 12
 You've got to be rÖhlins in the dough to buy this fork
  • 39 36
 it's shocking that they're asking so much
  • 61 10
 @shredderIII: I don't know how shocking it is, but it sure isn't forking cheap!
  • 9 13
flag slowrider73 (Dec 13, 2016 at 21:18) (Below Threshold)
 Henrys fork of choice.............
  • 33 11
 That weight put a damper on my excitement for this fork
  • 10 3
 We've gotta put a fork in these comments. They're starting to dampen my spirits.
  • 9 4
 MSRP on a Pike is $1030. A 34 is in the same neighborhood.
$1150 is in the ballpark, however, being just AS GOOD with higher weight?
Why bother?
  • 4 1
 Ya mon...Ohlins the rich will buy...Ohlins ya poor an' wan' dis...like me Rasta man.
  • 21 5
 @roxtar: why bother? Because if someone judges bike component by price to weight ratio he has nothing to say that would be worth listening to. About anything.
  • 6 2
 @WAKIdesigns: it's a good starting point for an innovative design but if it was only slightly heavier I could see the advantage. A whole pound and nothing groundbreaking though for more money is where anyone with a limited budget would question using that money elsewhere on a build or somewhere else in life. Your logic taking weight and price out of the conversation is just as bad as making it the only part of the conversation. Also, we've got to forkget about these puns.
  • 11 8
 @bmoore34: weight to price ratio coming up in conversation about a high end long travel fork is silly. Because price is obviously almost out of the equation for a person considering a high end fork. Also both weight and price are easily quantifiable properties understandable for any idiot. The issue is though that smarter people may recognize what Öhlins means. That is hard to measure quality. Like manufacture tolerances or reliability. A high end suspension company with F1 and rally background, supporting world fastest drivers, refused developing a cartridge for RS Boxxer because chassis tolerances were not satisfactory enough. Do you find it a coincidence that Öhlins made a cartridge for the Fox 40? Their rival in motorsport?

So yes, Pike and Lyrik get the job done more than well. How come Yari or Sektor doesn't? Only a little brother complex filled sport full of clueless bottom feeders and dentists can take Öhlins product and go "meh".
  • 7 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes and no, when the ratio becomes price/performance/weight, because we've always been told by the industry that it's easy to create components with a great performance for my but the difficult part is doing them also lightweight. Weight is what the industry uses to justify bikes that cost as much if not more than a motorbike.
  • 10 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I do agree that the quality of what you're buying is superior, but if I was going to to a top end build(I'm poor and can't) the quality would not be enough to sway me over fox. The fact is I could build a lighter bike with the same performance. F1 teams wouldn't accept a shock on their cars that are a few pounds heavier and do it just for the ohlins stickers or quality. There are other suspension producers out there every Sunday sitting on the same podium. I do see that weight is an easily over hyped figure but we're not talking grams here. It's a whole pound.
  • 9 3
 @WAKIdesigns: So basically your into the hype of ohlins? lol you can talk F1 and tolerances all day but at the end it still doesn't perform any better than RS and fox and weighs and extra pound, costs more and as far as we can tell Isn't anymore reliable. so tell me again why ohlins are actually better? lol
  • 6 3
 @WAKIdesigns: You missed the main point. The entire review basically said it was as good as a Pike or 34.
Not better.
So it's as good but heavier and (slightly) more expensive.
Like I said, "why bother"
  • 8 9
 @bmoore34: a pound of weight is nothing. And you base it on Mikes review as if it was written in stone by God himself that Ohlins is just as good as Pike or 34. I had a 11.3kg bike for 1 ride. My current bike is 14.5, and will be 15, as soon as I put on tyres with Double Down casings. Every fork under 2.5kg is a light fork. I leave simple indicators to the simple minded... stuff that is easy to grasp to those who can't grasp much more. Hence my original comment. F1 teams use steel coil springs and their dampers are nowhere as impressive nor subjected to such torment as ones in Rally cars or on Motocross bikes.

@nismo325 - there is no Öhlins hype, never was, never will be. Especially in MTB, where S-Works demo owners sell the TTX because they don't like the color of it. Just buy RS Yari or Suntour Auron if you want to live up to your ideology.

@roxtar - this is a bike review on internet, even if written by Mike Levy himself, take it with a pinch of salt. He probably wouldn't expect you to do any less... Now you are just making a point for a sake of stupid argument using a skewed point of reference.

I'm off. Typical "too expensive" stuff. Wouldn't expect anything else. I love this game.
  • 7 5
 Mike is an awesome reviewer but he is a human being. If there is anything I am disappointed with this fork is that it doesn't come in coil version. For people who actually want best possible suspension performance and feel, not giving a damn about stupid sht like weight in places where it doesn't matter.
I'm a heretic anyways, a hardtail with 38t fron 36t rear, Mavics 729 and spen 50% of riding time practicing on parking lot.

Sorry now I'm off. You are all fantastic Öhlins is crap. You can go back to daily life with no peaks of excitement. Ordinary Mary
  • 7 1
 @WAKIdesigns "Only a little brother complex filled sport full of clueless bottom feeders and dentists can take Öhlins product and go "meh"." Ok. I guess that is one way to look at it. Of course, no one who has criticized the weight has disparaged the company as a whole. I would guess that if anything, people are commenting on the weight as being high because so many of us do have high expectations for the overall product Ohlins produces. As a response to the quote from you that I have included above I will close with this. Only a self-serving douche who is too busy dick-riding the Ohlins brand would look at what the reviewer stated above and still claim that everyone else was the problem...
  • 5 0
 @roxtar: if you look closely, Mike off set the weight by removing the pedals.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: what would be interesting as far as weight concern goes is real world parts out on the scale. Ie, set of carbon rims, with too much tape, one pound of stand liquid and a light tire vs alum rim with a tube and dd case tires. Maybe take parts off of pro bikes and throw on the scale to show people how much of a difference variables can make. The end result after all tuning, bearing choices, tokens, ect. People would probably be surprised
  • 2 2
 Guys don't take Waki too rough in the end he is Swedish like Öhlins is. I would get their products for a car built but on my bike RS is more than enough...
  • 4 0
 @b-wicked: Actually, he's Polish. I once replaced my Showa suspension with Ohlins on my Gixxer back in the day, and the ride was transformative. Based on this review, it sounds like the ride will not be transformative, but as good as the competition, which isn't enough motivation for me to go and spend a premium on this fork. And the quality of top tier Fox and RS suspension isn't exactly shit either. Also, a pound on the front of the bike will be noticeable, especially if you enjoy air time. Now if they had put a coil in this and reset the paradigm for how a fork should ride, the extra pound would be forgivable. I'm mostly disappointed that Ohlins didn't knock it out of the park, since that is what they are known for.
  • 5 1
 Does the damper come with ohl in it?
  • 1 0
 I can't afford them though... ...but i'll rebound out of it!
  • 2 0
 Can't imagine they'd sell many of these in New Öhlins, too damp.
  • 1 0
 @JesseE: As a native New Ohlinian, this one hit close to home.
  • 2 0
 @supercollider: doesn't shock me.
  • 80 18
 A pound heavier though? No thanks.
  • 16 5
 But you can futz around with it every ride to make sure the pressure is just right! Yeah, you're right, review says performance on par with a pike and 34, so for a pound heavier and $300 more I expect better than on par. She is a purty one. Think I'll stick with my MRP Stage though. Heavier than a Pike or 34, but far more composed in the rough stuff, so I think it's a tradeoff worth making.
  • 20 4
 That's how they make it bombproof I guess? I plan not on riding through a war zone so I think I'll save a pound thank you very much.
  • 18 10
 Not impressed with this from Ohlins.
  • 74 3
 Bomb-Proof is marketing speak for heavy AF.
  • 22 2
 @TucsonDon: At that point get a 36
  • 9 3
 The weight is indeed kind of absurdly out of line, I stopped being excited and reading the review when I saw the 5 pounds figure. (Before restarting reading the usual semi-commercial and sort of nonsensical tirade about how stiff the fork is or is not).

Anyway, both Fox 34 (110-150) and Pike (120-160) are at or below 4 pounds depending on wheel size and boost. It is not a matter of what one values, it is a matter of evaluating some rather obvious criteria: similar performance (at best), way heavier, more expensive ... no thanks!
  • 6 13
flag Boardlife69 (Dec 13, 2016 at 22:59) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like a Pike.
  • 84 3
 But you compensate for the weight by riding with a much lighter wallet
  • 14 7
 @duzzi: I don't know what you read...

+"we wouldn't even say that it's better than a Pike or 34 in terms of outright performance, but it is certainly just as good" --> At least same level of Performance --> I personally like the coil like feel of the öhlins better

Other points
+ Stiff chassis
+ Superior Build Quality:
external: No Fox/Rock Shock crown creaks
and internal: look up the nsmb.com review
+ Longer service Intervalls
+ On the fly Progression setting
+ Useful High Speed Compression settings (on the fly - not 999 clicks like on the Fox RC2)

- Heavier!
- Expensive (In Europe about the same price as the Fox 34/36 Factory)

So in my view I would only go with the 34 if i was a weight weenie. Or Performance/price ratio vise: Pike/Mattoc
  • 17 2
 @VwHarman:

yup.

all my fox forks (32,34,36) and a number of Rockshox forks have developed the dreaded creaking "CSU", requiring replacement under warranty. Not cheap if out of warranty. I've spoken to super helpful techs at both companies and Fox said consumers want light weight parts, and the CSU is slimmed to the bone to keep weight off the fork overall.

My Manitou was heavier than equivalent Fox / RS with a much burlier build, and it never creaked...I'd take the heavier build of the Ohlins any day..
  • 1 0
 @Boardlife69: It actually looks a lot like an old White Bros fork with black stanchions.
  • 4 0
 I'm pretty sure most creaking CSUs are due to the crown interface, not the steerer tube.
  • 4 0
 what does pink bike community think of the £1000+ new MRP Groove 200mm dual crown fork?? no reviews anywhere or even a mention online www.mrpbike.com/groove
  • 11 11
 @duzzi:since when did a pound become "way heavier"?!? Kids these days are little whiners!!! Try coming up when BMX's weighed more than dh bikes of today. You youngsters have it good and you still complain over 1 effing pound lol unreal!!
  • 4 0
 Just put an AWK air spring in yer pikes=ohlins.
  • 6 1
 Would rather run an extra lb than run that FIT4 nonsense. Switching from a 34 to a 350CR saw local lap times drop even though the fork was heavier. Sometimes, the weight isn't whats slowing you down.
  • 5 2
 @atrokz: I agree whole heartedly with your statement man!! Bikes today are push the boundaries of lightness and now every bike I see that's 2010 or newer needs to be serviced all the time for creaking among other things but yet my 04 rmx which is built like a brick shit house and weighs in at just over 45lbs hasn't been serviced once since I've owned it and doesn't make a peep of noise while riding. Just remember the lighter you go the more reliability issues you're going to have!!!
  • 2 0
 I'd like to point out that MRP just announced Ramp Control cartridges for the 34. Good timing, no?

www.bicycleretailer.com/new-products/2016/12/13/mrp-offers-ramp-control-cartridge-fox-34-forks#.WFFwwVmIbqA
  • 1 1
 @poozank: which is also lighter than this fork...
  • 1 0
 @Bluefire: what do you think of mrp groove 200mm fork?? no reviews or mentions anywhere???
  • 2 0
 @hampsteadbandit: No one said you shouldn't. For me, if I can have top end performance, save 1/5 to 1/4 of the weight, and save a few bucks as well and the trade off is annoying creaking, I am going to consider it. Besides, if the industry keeps forcing carbon bikes with press fit BBs then creaks from the CSU of my fork will not be the only creaks I have to deal with on the trail...
  • 2 1
 @sirmi: Forget about the stiff chassis, there is no evidence whatever that this fork is stiffer based on this review. And it is is not only competing with the Fox the 34, there is the Pike 35 (and I just piked a nwe RC Dual 130/160 for an unbeatable $510), and of course the FOX 36, which is still lighter by a chunk and has low and his speed compression. Tokens? You set them up once in your lifetime takes 2' for every change until you get the one you like ...

Some ha commented that one pound is not much more weight .... maybe not but I would not buy a 7.0 pounds carbon frame from a newcomer maker when I can get a 6.0 from half a dozen of established players ...
  • 1 1
 With a QR would be even more.
  • 2 0
 @Bluefire: Glad you pointed that out. It's also crazy if/that this is being considered new. I have a 2006 marzocchi 66sl on my backup bike with a bottom out air chamber on the bottom exactly like this RXF; it works perfectly to this day with an absolutely massive range of adjustment. When it comes to big hits that marzo is still comparable to brand new pike/36. I just rebuilt it and the performance is kind of blowing my mind, although there is no doubt the small bump sensitivity of these newer forks is on a level unimaginable in 2006. Still, not to mention those 2006 marzos had "boost" spacing too (110mm).
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: Since the moment it became 25% heavier than the competition (and in a part of the bike where weight really matters).
  • 2 0
 @mhoshal: Kinda like fat chicks. Much less maintenance than the hot ones. So I hear.
  • 1 0
 @gemma8788: bear in mind ohlins is not a newcomer. To a bike fork maybe but not to suspension forks.
  • 1 0
 @atrokz: Truth. Didn't mean to hack on Ohlins, this vintage marzo just has me giddy.
  • 1 0
 @gemma8788: it's hard to beat an old marz tbh. Had them since the Z1 with bolt on crown, then DJ1, SuperT, 888. To this day very few beat that supple feeling. Much prefer the newer HSC and bottom out, but in terms of traction and feel it's like we went backwards. On a 350CR now, which I love. Great fork, esp for the price. Took seconds off my laps at Kelso over a lighter more expensive 34. Been on a lot of forks, faves are probably the older 36 floats that still had HS/LC compression not this FIT crap for slowpokes. Ok enough reminiscing over old stuff.
  • 2 0
 I have a brand new RXF36, which weighs 2.078gr out of the box, including axle.
  • 32 3
 Ayyyyyy Pinkbike mods! Just wondering, is there any chance you guys could get a ride or review in on the mysterious X-Fusion revel? I seemed like quite the game changer with its USD design compared to all the conventional forks out there.
  • 6 0
 Not happening in North America. A few were released in Asia but after showing it off for 5 years I think it's officially dead.
  • 17 0
 Not to mention xfusion has been using twin tube damping with fully machined metal internals for years with first their veangence, now their metric and RV1. People assume xfusion isn't good because they either hear from people that rode the OEM metric R on specialized status or are going off the review on here of the RL version. Their HLR damper is top notch twin tube damping.
  • 2 0
 @ibishreddin:


By the way, if someone has to offer a X-Fusion Metric R (Not HLR) please PM!
Need a cheap replacement it other fork fails or is on service
  • 1 0
 @Powderface: officially dead - yes...

but there are some out in the wild...THEY LIVE!
  • 26 1
 On-the-fly adjustable bottom out resistance seems like it should be the next move for Fox and Rockshox. But if Fox comes out with a golden fork that is completely Kashima-saturated I'm still game.
  • 10 0
 I would suggest you look into the MRP Ramp Control module - can be installed on a Pike, Lyrik, or Yari, Fox34, or Boxxer and does just that.
  • 7 0
 Hydraulic lever that when you raise the dropper it puts shock and fork in climb mode and also adds psi to tires all with the pres of a lever Wink
  • 3 0
 @tehllama: I suggest looking at the AWK air spring assembly for the Pike. MRP cartridge only gives you control over the end of the travel and not the midstroke, which is were the pike loves to dive.
  • 5 1
 I it would be a nice feature but how much would the average user touch the dial once set?

I cant imagine wanting to adjust bottom out during a ride unless it was initial setup or the place I was riding was completely different to my usual riding - It would make it easier to setup initially though, or easier to ruin the forks performance...

I think for many LSC, HSC, Spring Pressure & Rebound all external with volume internal is too much to deal with - There are so many people with no idea how to setup their $1000 suspension.

A lot of people would probably benefit from a 10 point LSC dial, similar rebound dial and air pressure. Two tunes, one for smaller to average guys and one for average to fatties (me) so you dont run out of adjusment.

Set sag using stanction indicator, compression so it doesnt dive but doesnt feel like crap and rebound so you dont pogo off and ride.

I could see on-the-fly bottom out resistance being used as a band-aid for lower than correct air pressure and low levels of hsc.
  • 2 0
 @Racer951: In my eyes more adjustability the better, especially because we are looking at about the highest-end offering there is.
If someone does not have the time to think about stuff like this, probably they are not buying the fork for the performance gains over the competition costing several hundreds less anyways
  • 5 0
 The third chamber is not just bottom out control, you can control the entire spring curve, you can't do that with tokens

www.mtb-mag.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-19-at-11.22.56-AM.png
  • 2 1
 @CorollaRWD: actually that's exactly what tokens are for. Spring curve so you can ramp your travel quicker, but the third air chamber seems to let you fine tune that, instead exact same token sizes each time.
  • 6 0
 @treekilla: Tokens are just spacers that decrease the entire volume of the air spring making it more progressive within that given volume, The third chamber is a floating piston system which gives to access to where you want any progression to start so you can have a big volume initially then ramp up at the end/middle or anywhere you like, it is a lot different to a spacer/token system.
  • 1 1
 @CorollaRWD: I'm not totally clear on the location of the third air chamber here, but it sounds a lot like the dual-spring systems you see sometimes, only in air spring form. What I mean is you have one large main spring, then a shorter spring inside of that with a higher spring rate that kicks in when the main spring is fully compressed. In this case, when the fork is about to physically top out you have a "third chamber" whose volume gets much smaller than the main air chamber volume.

I imagine it behaves a lot like those spring-in-a-spring systems.

It's a neat idea but TBH I wouldn't pay a premium for it.
  • 1 1
 @Racer951: The only adjustments on a bike that actually need to be used would be LSC and spring curve ala ramp control/tokens.

Here in Fruita for example, we have 3 trail systems that I would change both settings.
18rd- plush since it is so smooth.
Lunch Loops- steeper spring curve to avoid bottoming out on drops and going otb on big chunk.
Kokopelli- in between unless riding Moore Fun trail, then mimic Lunch Loops settings.

I hate adjusting anything on my bike, but the fork is the only thing you just cannot get around. The compromise is too great to leave it stiff or supple depending on the trail. I think the majority of people posting here know how to setup their suspension and do make adjustments if their fork allows it. I'm just glad to finally get ramp control from MRP rather than deal with tokens or compensate with the LSC dial more than I would like.
  • 2 0
 @Racer951: You hit the nail on the head with different tunes for different rider weights. Most products seem designed for lightweight riders if guys who are 175 pounds are having to insert multiple tokens to resist bottoming out like seems to be the case in most of the reviews I read.
  • 18 1
 Pfff, claimed weight of 2050g and then 2270g in real life. That is lying in my book. Not cool. And on par performance with a Pike? You know, no matter what Pinkbike says, the Pike is not an excellent fork out of the box, certainly not. But it has huge potential. Just look at all the different tuning dampers (or just at the stock shimtack and compression pistion for that matter) and air spring mods that are available and make the fork that much better.
And Öhlins is only on par with the lame stock setting? That sounds really disappointing. And you guys say that this can be interpreted positively. No way. I don't know, are you sure the damper is not miles better than Charger?
Also air spring curves would be interesting and Pinkbike should ask manufacturers for air spring curves at least vs. coil. This is such an important parameter in air forks and comes short in this review (again). Not impressed with fork or review, can't you feature Vorsprung Steve next time? In a time when the tech in forks and shocks gets better and better it only seems logical to me to create more scientific reviews. But maybe I am alone with that opinion....
  • 4 1
 Fully agree with you, 2 positive chambers do a lot more than just affecting "end progression". After this review I think it would make more sense to just get the 2 chamber system for pike
  • 3 1
 Pike is pretty bad out of the box according to a lot of fast people who actually run the fork. From what I've heard, some testers are saying this is actually better than the Pike.
  • 7 0
 More facts in reviews woulb be nice for me too but sadly its more easy to sell with subjective reviews like this than trying to educate people... Props to Steve from Vorsprung for giving us education!
  • 19 3
 A pound heavier, more expensive, and equal in performance. So, why would we buy it again?
  • 3 2
 Looks cool, would match an STX or TTX shock... that's about all I've got.

I think with the ability to pick up a Lyrik/Pike, Luftkappe, and MRP Ramp Control module for less money, and have all the key features, that argument is harder to make.
A Yari+AVA Open Bath Damper + Luftkappe + MRP Ramp would be slightly cheaper, but arguably a better fork.
  • 9 1
 Well at least it doesn't need to be serviced as often as a Pike, creak free CSU is pretty tempting too.
  • 7 5
 It says Ohlins on it. Status symbol, man! Slap it on your Nicolai...
  • 10 10
 If you think a pound is some kind of huge difference you need to go to the gym buddy. Is pinkbike full of 60lb wimps now a days or what?
  • 6 3
 @mhoshal: An extra pound on a deadlift, no, not noticeable. But an extra pound of the front of a bike is totally noticeable, if you ride at a moderately high level. Maybe you need to spend more time learning how to ride and less time at the gym.
  • 1 1
 @skelldify: an extra pound on a deadlift is also noticeable tho Smile
  • 12 2
 Honestly the fact that I can change the bottom out resistance without spacers is a huge selling point for me. I hate taking apart my suspension just to fiddle with something, realize I did it wrong and then do it all again. Rather just take off a valve cap, put a few pumps in and ride
  • 4 0
 If you are referring to a pike search up mrp ramp control. Same thing but for designed for pike
  • 5 2
 But you don't have to 'take apart your fork' to R&R spacers. You simply remove the left fork cap(after you've released all the pressure of course) and pull it out. Your spacers/tokens are right there. It literally takes no more, or even less time that it would to change air pressure on the Ohlins(and FWIW, I'm a total Ohlins homer)
The best design(and the best riding fork IMO) is the Dorado. You simply set your anti-bottom with a dial, and it doesn't affect the first 90% of the stroke whatsoever.
  • 3 0
 @ibishreddin: It really isn't the same thing at all.
  • 2 1
 @YoKev: it really takes longer... Letting out all the air takes time... Then I have to remove part of my fork and fiddle with tokens. There are better ways
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: just more things to go wrong. i change spacers on my fork approximately 5 times over the life of the fork - as i'm dialing it in, and then pretty much never again.

i don't get where changing spacers is a constant pain for anyone. changing damping from time to time? yeah. but not changing the spring curve, there's no need to once you have a curve that works for your weight, bike and riding style
  • 2 0
 @xeren: I'm a picky bitch that's why hahaha
  • 17 7
 This is insane. So now with frame with "integrated" headset we have a bearing that interfaces fork and frame directly? Engineering nightmare. My bikes stay with me for at least 10 years. This is a recipe for a failure after 2 or 3 years of heavy usage.
  • 3 0
 Is it though? I guess if it's soft enough it will wear out. I've never worn out a bearing race but they're steel I think where this steerer tube is aluminium.
  • 10 1
 @miff: First of all direct interface of aluminum part and steel bearing is just pure wrong. Because of two issues. Difference in hardness and second bearing is a replaceable element, but fork/frame is not. Another serious issue is that conditions in which those elements operate in a bicycle are far from perfect. This machine works in a optimal conditions for first one or two rides. After that some dirt will eventually go between bearing and fork/frame. That is why there is supposed to be something pressed onto fork and pressed into frame to protect the fork and frame from premature wear. The problem is that bicycle industry decided some years ago that and average life of bike is short enough to cut costs and just place bearing straight into frame. Horrible idea. That is in fact much cheaper. And I really mean much cheaper to produce such a frame. But in the end I think maybe manufacturers are not to blame. Stupid enough people are still voting with their wallets to support this kind of subpar products.
  • 1 0
 @goroncy: I don't see how it's (much) cheaper to produce a frame with an integrated headset compared to a frame with a traditional headset. I mean, with a traditional headset you just need a straight tube, with an integrated headset you need the cups as well. Or do I miss something?

That being said, I'm also not sure I like this fully integrated steerer tube.
  • 7 0
 @cvoc: No. With IS standard there are no cups. The bearing goes straight to the frame. It is cheaper because of tolerances and the step where a worker is pressing the headset to the frame. Traditional non integrated frames have to be prepared with very tight tolerances and have to be reamed and faced before the headset cup is pressed. In integrated frames this whole procedure is missing. The tolerances for putting the bearing directly are not so tight. Next step is also missing. The worker when assembling the whole bike doesn't have to press the cups. He just places the bearings straight to frame instead.

What you might be thinking about is so called semi-integrated (ZS) standard. Which is in fact not integrated at all. This just means that cups are pressed to the frame but not visible. This is currently by far the best standard that you may have in your bicycle.

If you don't want to make mistake of buying shitty frame with IS check what kind of standard the manufacturer is using in this particular model: www.canecreek.com/headset-fit-finder

Trek, Spacialized and most of the big mainstream companies are using IS. Funny thing that Giant who is producing really decent bikes of his own as well as most of the frames for all the other companies is using the ZS standard.
  • 1 0
 The huge issue here is the Ohlins fork actually hits headcups on some headsets - Not all headsets are designed the same and some bearings sit quite deeply into the cup which means the crown contacts the headcup once installed.
  • 4 0
 @goroncy: You have summed up IS headtubes perfectly.

A pure excercise in reducing cost as tolerances are reduced. I really dont like IS headtubes, almost as much as press fit bottom brackets.

You cant use an angle headset, you have greater trouble finding bearings and parts, total BS.
  • 5 0
 correct. Also dissimilar metals will create galvanic corrosion at a quicker rate. The amount of penny pinching via pushing standards that only serve to increase the profit margin and not the quality or performance of product, is sad. What's sadder is people eating it up like it's better, because a designer said it is. Cups pressed in is the better way, period. Don't get me started on press fit BBs.
  • 5 0
 @atrokz: yep. press fit is truly dreadful also. the sad part is that there is no really good standard for BBs. threaded BBs are better but there was nobody to have the guts and make a threaded BB with bigger diameter to let the bearings inside the frame. Or maybe I am wrong and someone did it but as we all see it didn't get the traction. All of this just shows what is what I called economy driven product evolution. The final product is as good as the absolutely bare minimum required. Fortunately there are still some companies that try to brake this pattern.
  • 2 0
 @goroncy: Thanks for the explanation and link.
  • 2 0
 I was wondering, what happens when the crown race goes? I guess you have to pitch the entire upper and replace it. Sounds...expensive.
  • 2 0
 @WaterBear: Yep. And in case of any problems with frame with IS headset you need to replace the front triangle Wink . Even more expensive.
  • 2 0
 @atrokz: another thing worth mentioning is that without crown race you loos one other thing. Cane Creek for instance with their 110 headset gives you a crown race with a special sealing. Together with the lower cup it makes almost a perfect connection that really gives the bearing great protection against elements. With the design shown above if I am not mistaken the bearing is very much exposed to everything. It may seem hidden but after one muddy day in the bike park the dirt and water will go in contact with the bearing.
  • 2 0
 Yea, I really don't understand why companies think integrating stuff like this is a good idea. In general, integration limits flexibility/ choice and that is obviously anti-consumer.

All the companies putting out plans for bikes with in-built, proprietary power meters, computers, lights, dropper posts, gearboxes; do they ever stop to consider that it's actually not a great idea?
  • 14 4
 Please release an inverted dual crown. Boxxers are so 2005
  • 7 1
 I think inverted is more old school than new school because when dual crown forks were emerging BITD there were many inverted ones: Cannondale, Hanebrink, Risse, White Brothers and later on RST, Marzocchi, Manitou.
  • 13 6
 I don't know why this is just hitting me but the fact our pedal bikes can use the same suspension tech that is used in raced out motorcycles is so awesome. What an amazing time we live in
  • 2 1
 Same architecture, design philosophy, and tuning methodology. Different stuff at the individual item, but clearly benefits from the motorsport stuff they do.
  • 7 1
 It's also awesome that bike companies are able to compete with some of the finest suspension manufacturers in the world.
  • 9 10
 Thank you. You are a rare kind in this world of spoiled pussies.
  • 4 1
 @WAKIdesigns: And all along, I thought they were meant to be spoiled.
  • 4 7
 There is time and place to spoil a pussy... and it's a job and a privilege of a limited group of Endurance athletes... it does not apply to whiny babies who expect everything to be put under their nose for free and they still spoil milk
  • 5 1
 Honda went back to coil springs on their 450 MX bike! ! !
  • 8 2
 I had a Pike (and tried all the different settings/spacers) and replaced it with the RXF and the RXF is definitely better at handling bumps. Feels a lot more plush, stable, and tunable. But some people like their forks rock hard so they may not feel as much of a difference. And sure, I agree that were not talking massive differences or perfection but it was definitely worth it to me.
  • 1 0
 Have you heard about Marzocchi dropoff ?
  • 1 0
 @b-wicked: I haven't.
  • 1 0
 @Bristecom: Maybe that's why you can't appreciate how good today's ordinary forks like Pike is very good for what it is, case in the past we payed a lot more for such crap, mtb suspension became very good this days and to much are want to have something more to just stand out...
  • 6 0
 I'm getting this simply for the bling factor. I'm also going to put this on a full-suspension frame made in a solar-powered factory by blind artisans from southeastern Bulgaria. They only wear hemp clothing, and pray to Russian Orthodox gods every 50 minutes (not including their 15-minute breaks every 4 hours).

I'll be the guy at the trailhead not riding, instead spending the morning drinking overly-hoppy IPAs and talking about my esoteric tastes in cycling apparel and gear. Just look for the pimped out Vanagon...
  • 1 0
 Amen
  • 11 3
 26, 1 1/8, 20 would be great
  • 7 1
 Sounds like you need a 36.
  • 2 0
 @PhillipJ: Sounds like he needs an X-Fusion Metric. Love mine, although I have now run out of excuses for chickening out of big stuff.
  • 1 0
 @DokonjoDaikon: Do they still make that with a straight steerer? Impressive range of options from a smaller company.
  • 1 0
 ... Says the entire rest of the world who don't want to buy new frames. Just a 1 1/8 straight steerer is like finding a leprechaun riding a unicorn over a rainbow. Looks like I'll be keeping my old Boxxer chassis with Avalanche internals forever.
  • 1 0
 @skidrumr: i don't want to get a new frame, might half to get a metal lathe
  • 5 2
 I tested one for two months on my trail bike..i usually ride a pike..what i can say about this fork is buttery smooth..i can compare the feeling of plushness to a coil sprung marzocchi.. Plenty of tuning possibilities and the only issue i had in my test is that i had to return it back.. Great job Ohlins..
  • 5 3
 The weight of a coil sprung Marzocchi too...
  • 3 0
 i'd only be interested in a ohlins fork if they the lowers were painted the same gold as their motorcycle forks, yes it's vain, but at least you can show off you've got an ohlins fork not just an RS or fox fork with different stickers.
  • 2 0
 This is what I'm saying. How could Ohlins not go gold? That is their trademark! As soon as they do, half the haters here will be on board.
  • 2 0
 @dickT3030: when they releasing the dual crown prototype inverted fork that looks killer then il pay attention
  • 2 0
 Ohlins: "Should we make it gold? What's the vogue color in the mountain biking industry?"
Fox Shox (grumbling): "...Black."
  • 4 1
 Not that impressed. For less money you can the burly DVO Diamond at the same weight. For even less, the Mantiou Mattoc, which is nearly a pound lighter and plenty stiff enough unless you are a clyde (guilty here). Both of which are easly serviced by a home mechanic rather than having to be sent back to Ohlins for $150+ each time. The Pike is also user servicible, but IMHO, the DVO and Manitou are better forks.
  • 3 0
 Is this Ohlins' first foray into the fork market? And they produce something that, despite a weight and cost penalty, is considered "on par" with the big boys on their first swing? Say what you want, but that's impressive. Any other brands out there without MTB pedigree do that? I do know that Ohlins is the gold standard (pun intended) of suspension components in nearly every other wheeled sport. I have a Ducati, and you know what it came with? Marzocchi and Showa, and they are terrible! Replacing them with friggin' expensive Ohlins by summer, and it will be worth every penny. Think it sucks to have only a handful of options for your MTB? How about if your only choice was crappy stock units, a couple half-assed internals kits, or the holy grail for a fortune. The MTB world has it pretty damn good in the scheme of things.
  • 1 0
 So damn true. And sometimes if your motorcycle is cheap, you have the option of buying the fork off a sportbike made by the same manufacturer, fabricating some adapters, and bolting it onto your own bike. Man people love to bolt gixxer forks onto SV 600's and R6 forks onto Fz6's.
  • 2 0
 Interesting review. I'm running a 160mm RXF 34 on my Enduro but have been struggling with setting it up - particularly getting traction under braking. I've found that I have to run the rebound quite slow at my preferred sag (20%), or else run the fork quite soft (i.e. more sag) to have my preferred quicker rebound, to find the front end grip I'm looking for.

Wondering if the article writer might have any setup tips...? Maybe the ramp up chamber might have an effect on this?
  • 3 1
 @mikelevy
Not convinced on the relative weight comment....you save the weight of a crown race and 3 tokens which is about 200gms.

140mm 29 pike is 1876 or say 2080 included those bits so real difference is about 200gms for a slightly stiffer fork and the convenience of not messing with tokens. It seems same weight as a Lyrik so maybe we could get a comment on elative stiffness?

On price I guess it will be a case of what the real price is not the RRP....just like rockshox...
  • 2 0
 ohlins forks aside. what does pink bike community think of the £1000+ new MRP Groove 200mm dual crown fork?? no reviews anywhere or even a mention online www.mrpbike.com/groove this fork is obviously made by the famous chain guide company it looks wicked is it a worthy alternative to bos idylle rare etc: ????
  • 1 0
 The Groove has actually been around a while!
  • 1 0
 @PatCampbell-Jenner: finally a reply pat!! really whys there no vids on youtube no reviews no mention on any forum??? is this the holy f*cking grail of forks people are searching for. ive been on site and what i read sounds soo promising and it looks killer, not to mention exclusivity factor. would you rate as good as bos idylle rare for same price or massively over priced?
  • 3 1
 I know Fox and Rockshox are the go to forks for comparison purposes, but really PB, you do know there are other forks out there and some of us are riding them. Given the Mattoc has the IRT system and MRP have ramp control of their forks, how about comparing the Online with them as they would seem to be a bit more similar in function, at least with the air springs.
  • 2 0
 I'm sorry, but acting as if bottom out control via a chamber is a new thing is either disgenuine or plain ignorant. There are more than a few that have used a chamber or bladder for bottom out resistance.

Going to designs that need tokens or volume spacers (other than being stupid) only helps the manufacturer.
  • 3 1
 So to sum it up:

-Heavy
-Not cheap
-Hardly tuneable
-Not user serviceable
-Stuck with one bottom bearing size

Mmmm...

On the other hand we've got Rock Shox forks which are basically exceptional platforms for suspension customization with lots of aftermarket suspension goodies to choose from to get top notch performance. They are easily user serviced, spares are readily available, upgrading them is a no brainer and they come at a fair price.
  • 3 0
 The inability of the user to service this fork, and a lot of other high end suspension, really kills it for me. I don't like paying hundreds of dollars and waiting weeks for someone else to do it for me. Rockshox is really winning me over with their ease of maintenance. Where other manufacturers use retaining rings you have to pop out with a pick, RS uses snap rings. Fox won't sell you an air spring main seal, and their air springs are hard to find - RS distributes air springs to retailers. So on and so on.
  • 4 0
 What does Ohlins charge for service and how long does it take? Doubt many bike shops know how to work on them.
  • 1 0
 I would guess it's the same as their ttx22m shock, there are a few authorized repair shops around.
  • 2 1
 I wonder if they'll do a dedicated 650B 160mm fork? As far as I can tell, their RXF 36 is 29er fork that can take plus wheels. I've been really impressed with the TTX. But ditching the Pike RC for a Mattoc Pro means I'm pretty happy on the fork front.
  • 2 0
 They are coming out with a 650b version during winter of 2017
  • 4 1
 Shouldnt it be compared to a Fox 36 since its the same price and is heavier? I dont think anyone would be cross shopping this and a Pike.
  • 4 1
 But it's only a 34 mm stanchion, and only 140 mm travel as tested. So goes up against Fox 34.
  • 3 1
 get pike (600€), install the awk high pressure air chamber (130€ for non boost pike) and be happy. if not get the mst charger tuning and you will have the most advanced fork available and it costs even less than a 34.
  • 2 0
 Have to tried the mst charger tuning?
  • 3 1
 That schrader valve in the bottom chamber which is a bottom out preventer is the same that my old Marzocchi 66....I don't see nothing new there, MRP is a better option just turning the dial on top.
  • 1 0
 It's pretty cool, but it also seems almost like companies have given up trying to undercut one another. If they put this fork out for slightly cheaper than the competition, I could see it being very popular, but I guess they want to enforce their high position in the market.
  • 3 0
 I'm riding a BOS deville and I can't imagine anything working a lot better. I can't imagine worse customer service either though ...
  • 2 1
 Works the same as the competition, costs more, weighs more, less shops can service them in house. Sorry, that's gonna be a no from me. I think xfusion and suntor need to gain more traction, because I do think we need more options in suspension. Especially because more options means more price points to choose from.
  • 2 1
 "While it's not the only thing that matters, how a fork's damper performs is probably the most important. And do you honestly think that Öhlins would f*ck this up?"

Yes, I think will f*ck this up. Personally, I think the damping range on all their STX shocks are garbage. The range does not offer a slow enough damping setting. After 2-3 minutes of heavy descending the STX fades and rear wheel traction is no where to be found. I've scene this on all the Enduro and Stumpy platforms. After months of hating my new purchased expert carbon level bike I had my STX tuned for slower damping and compression. Finally satisfied.
That being said, I do feel that Öhlins got the range of damping speed spot on on the TTX. Some may disagree and say it's too slow.
  • 1 0
 Great technology, beautiful design, sky-high price tag. If I could only get my hands on a (new) old-style, bomb-proof, open bath fork like the marzocchis from years ago. Do we really need all those adjustments? I'm doing just fine with preload and rebound. We need a "volkswagen" fork, something simple that just gets the job done.
  • 1 0
 never had or known anyone with a creaking stearer tube........I guess it can happen but never have I heard of this in any of the other makes forks reviews before. Not saying it can't ever happen but come on this is surely highly unlikely as otherwise what the heck are the other companies up to. If your stearer creaks in the crown of your fork then crickey there's something seriously wrong there as its supposed to be a really tight interference fit. I mean they are pressed in and anyway you could say the same about the bushes in the sliders and the stanchions in the crown.
  • 5 1
 I can't wait til ohlins makes a double crown dh fork!
  • 2 0
 Watch bruni. That's my gut feeling of his new sus partner. HEARD IT HERE FIRST
  • 1 0
 You mean you can't wait until they release one to the public. They already have a prototype inverted one which looks badass.
  • 1 0
 they have its in prototype stage google "dual crown ohlins prototype fork" it looks killer sick inverted design
  • 2 1
 Maybe it's just me, but I have a hard time believing that a built-in crown race functions as well as a separate piece does in practice. However, I can see the benefit in removing a potential source of creaking.
  • 2 0
 Had a pike pressed in steerer move and rock shox would NOT warranty it. Boy did it creek too. Threw the parts away! ! !
  • 1 0
 Interesting, have you heard of Fox forks with the same issue?
  • 1 0
 I had a pair of these, really nice forks, I preferred it to the Pike that preceded it. Then I got made redundant, now back on a rigid 26er, guess what? Still really fun! Just not as fast.
  • 3 0
 I wish @mikelevy that all of your fork and shock reviews indicated the service interval.
  • 2 0
 I have a rfx36 and it was actually lighter than the boost pike it replaced. I don't see how the same fork non boost with smaller stanchions is heavier.
  • 1 0
 Was thinking it's cool to see an integrated crown race; one less thing to hammer on.

Been a welcomed staple for cro-mo bmx for a while. But, with aluminum, I wonder if having everything all-one-piece would create problems.
  • 2 0
 What meats are on that bike? Are they good? I've been Googling around and can't figure it out.
  • 2 0
 No idea how they perform, but my googling turned up a Michelin wild rock'r2 advanced gum-x 29. Happy hunting!
  • 2 0
 Michelin Wild ROCK'R 2's, in 2.35".

I realize he's paid to rep that tire, but seeing Cam Zink's photo shoot run on that tire tells me it will handle some radness and he's a major fan... but it's also an 1100g tire in 29x2.35 form.
  • 2 0
 www.pinkbike.com/news/michelin-wild-rockr2-tire-reviewed.html

I'm running one in front. Grip is phenomenal and it's wearing really well, but there's a weight penalty.
  • 1 2
 @DMal: It's my understanding that they aren't very tough, despite being labeled as reinforced.
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: thats incorrect. extremely tough but heavy
  • 2 0
 Thanks gang! Interesting review. Might give these a shot in the summer.
  • 3 0
 @VwHarman: have 29er RockR2 front, awesome tire. Shwabble Rock razor going on rear tonight ! Bought SG casing 2.35 on Jensen for $19!!!! originally $90+! Both between 950-1050g but not likely to leave you flat
  • 4 4
 It "may or not matter depending on what we value," says the author... If it is merely comparable (not better) to a pike or 34, at a pound heavier and a more expensive price tag, how is it a worthy alternative?
  • 5 0
 Long service intervals?
  • 5 4
 Also those forks don't feel 'brand new' after 8 months of hard riding, or even 4 months for that matter. It sounds like this thing is incredibly well built and sealed better.
  • 15 0
 It says ohlins on it. Pretty sure you'll be rolling in b***hes
  • 4 3
 @friendlyfoe: Fo' real they be like 'damn your fork's so stiff and exotic.... take my panties already you dirty biker.'
  • 4 1
 @DaPeach:
Meh, I'd rather spend 1/2 hour on a lowers service twice a year.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: my Fox 34 absolutely felt new after 8 months of riding. That was the first time I changed my oil and I only did it just to be proactive. I've had it almost two years now and only two oil changes and one seal change. It's still working flawlessly.

I find people that dislike Fox forks only have experience with their old stuff from over three years ago. Current Fox forks are amazing out of the box while Pikes require aftermarket parts to compare. At least we have the Stage and Mattoc that compete now.
  • 1 0
 I was looking forward to their 36 fork, until I read it has a 51mm offsetFrown So it basically only works with 29ers and 27.5+ bikes.
  • 1 0
 No dude. I'm running a 23in wheel (650b/584mm) with 51mm offset and it works just fine. I do have a 63º headangle though Wink
Guys at enduromtb mag also ran the 36 24.5in fork (29er/622mm) with 23in wheels with no problem.
  • 3 0
 Did someone say free beers?!!
  • 2 0
 This three chamber air spring reminds me of what Manitou is offering for their Mattoc and Dorado products.
  • 2 1
 Wow, it's heavier than my 4 year old Lyrik RC2 DH Coil 170mm.... And I would doubt that it outperforms in terms of plushness and rigidity... NO BUY
  • 1 0
 Too pricy for me but it looks sweet. Anyone else wonder why we don't see or use stanchion covers anymore? Mine require as much maintenance as my chain this time of year.
  • 2 0
 I think I will stick with my three air chambered, pound lighter and half the price Manitou Mattoc
  • 1 0
 what is the distribution route in North America? My understanding is it is only through Specialized.
  • 1 0
 Front tire is a Rock'R2, excellent choice. But what is on the rear? Michelin prototype?
  • 1 0
 if its a michelin then my guess is wild gripr.
  • 2 0
 knobby nic
  • 1 0
 It's not a Grip'r but does look like the nobby nic.
  • 4 3
 Great objective review. A lot of time, effort and thought have gone it to this. Thanks Mike and Pink Bike. Keep em coming.
  • 1 0
 $1200 for a fork that is on par with forks you can get for less than half the price..... no thanks.
  • 2 0
 Waiting patiently for the dual crown!
  • 1 0
 When is Cane Creek going to at least let us know about their fork?!When I saw it,it looked sweet!
  • 1 0
 Look over there its an over priced heavy ass fork that doesn't nothing more or less than the rest
  • 1 0
 I wish ohlins doesn't leave out the 26" market, I'd like to buy the 160travel.
  • 1 0
 ohlins rear shock is what they should make , only make.
  • 1 0
 My Mattoc blows the Pike and Fox34 i've owned out of the water.
  • 2 2
 Thank you Mr. Levy for the thoughtful and comprehensive review. We also loved the use of the royal we Smile
  • 1 0
 Needs a Boost 27.5+ option.
  • 2 0
 already exists - rxf 36 (29/27.5+ compatible).
  • 1 0
 @ledude: Drool thanks, didn't see it on their website unless I used the Google
  • 1 0
 @TenBeers: yea, ohlins usa - dont know why theyre not to keen to update their website..even with the information that is published - the data is pretty sparse...if you want more info on the 36, let me know andsee what i can dig up...i have the owners manual for the 34 and 36
  • 2 1
 I'll keep my Fox Factory 34 FIT4 130mm.
  • 1 0
 its ohlins, just take my money!!!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 classic, when a component is to heavy its becomes bomb proof
  • 1 0
 they coulda least come up w an original model number
  • 1 0
 No 36 no buy
  • 1 1
 looks like a durolux, or a DVO or an Xfusion velvet
  • 1 0
 Your gay
  • 1 1
 Too Heavy. Should be under 2kg
  • 1 1
 New fork need time!
  • 2 5
 From the journalist who told us Horst link outclimbs DW Link.
  • 1 1
 It does
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