Meekboyz's Carbon Fiber Kids Bikes - Crankworx Whistler 2017

Aug 12, 2017 at 0:24
by Mike Levy  
Meekboyz


Do you remember your first serious mountain bike? If you were lucky, you might have had something half decent, but the majority of us likely started off on something a bit more, ahem, rustic. And if you were a fortunate youngin who had parents to help out, there's a good chance that said bike was at least one size too large for you... you know, so it'd be the last bike they ever had to buy. Now that it's 2017, there's an entire segment of second or third generation little rippers, many of whom with parents that ride and know the performance difference between a junker and a bike designed to let someone excel.

There are only a few options to choose from if you're looking for a high-end kids bike, and these three from Meekboyz are probably the only option if you'd like to see your little guy or girl on a carbon fiber machine that's exotic enough to make adults wish they were three or four feet tall. All three feature carbon fiber front and rear triangles, a dual-link suspension layout designed to work well with low shock pressures that kids require, and dream-worthy builds that include carbon fiber rims, titanium spokes, Hope and SRAM running gear, and suspension from Fox.

The price? Well, it's a lot, as you'd expect. The 20'' wheeled MiniBeast (100mm/120mm) retails for $6,800 USD; the 24'' wheeled Beast (180mm/180mm) sells for $7,500 USD; and the 26'' wheeled MegaBeast (185mm/200mm) costs $8,400 USD. You're going to really have to like your kid to pick up one of these things, and while there's no denying that most of us are going to scoff at those numbers, don't forget that a high-end adult bike with a carbon fiber frame, carbon wheels, and the best of the best component spec will easily eclipse the price of the Meekboyz machines. Then again, while adults are going to go through a bike every two or three years, at least you won't be growing out of them.
Meekboyz
The Meek clan with two of their creations.

Meekboyz says that they sell about one hundred complete bikes per year, which is, admittedly, more than I would have guessed. They're expecting sales numbers to increase, too, with 2017 being just their second year in production. I've never wanted to be four feet tall more than I do right now.


Meekboyz


The Meekboyz Beast, pictured above, is a 24'' wheeled bike with 180mm of rear wheel travel and a 180mm stroke Fox 36 up front. Like the other two machines, the Beast is built up around a carbon fiber frame manufactured in Asia, and it employs the same dual-link suspension layout that's designed for light riders and off the shelf shocks. And while the frame certainly looks wild, you'll find "standard" 12 x 142mm rear hub spacing, a normal seat post size, and an 83mm wide threaded bottom bracket shell. Sure, the Hope crankset is short to better suit little legs, but the rest of the build is relatively normal, even if it makes most full-sized bikes look like budget builds.

The Beast's claimed weight is right around 26.5lbs, and it has a $7,500 USD price tag. That's a hell of a lot of chores.


Meekboyz


A lot of grom bikes on the market feature some variation of a single pivot suspension layout, likely to help keep costs as low as possible but, as you can probably tell, that's not really the Meekboyz M.O., is it? The bikes' carbon fiber swingarms are molded in two separate pieces before being joined together about halfway up the chain and seat stays, and the aluminum links are machined in New Zealand and then shipped to Meekboyz's Honk Kong HQ to be assembled.

Want your little person's name machined into the link? No problem, dad. All of the pivots rotate on sealed cartridge bearings, and all three models come with needle bearings installed in both shock eyelets.


Meekboyz
Meekboyz


The wildest looking of the three has to be the MiniBeast, a 20'' wheeled bike with 100mm of rear wheel travel that's paired with a 120mm stroke fork. The littlest bike's build is just as Gucci as its bigger brothers, with 20'' carbon rims, titanium spokes, and fancy running gear from SRAM and Hope, all of which adds up to a $6,800 USD MSRP. Could 26'' wheels make a comeback on in-betweener sized bikes? The MegaBeast rolls on 26'' wheels, carbon fiber, of course, has 185mm of rear wheel travel, a 200mm fork, and a $8,400 USD price tag.


184 Comments

  • + 174
 Kids should be learning on a hardtail (or a fully ridgid!)
  • + 4
 Absolutely man
  • + 57
 In the beginning perhaps, but when you're at the level of Jackson Goldstone or groms like him you need something a little more substantial. Plus if my son has more fun on something that isn't shaking him up as much I'm down.
  • + 7
 Right? Learn to suffer ona a proper hardtail.

Everybody is over here complaining about the price and I'm just suffering from an eye-twitch because of this....

"The littlest bike's build is just as Gucci as its bigger brothers"
  • + 10
 Because that's what we did, what, do they think that they're better than us?
  • + 14
 Here in the world of lift access, full squish is necessary.
  • - 2
 No they don't. You can learn all the things on a full sus as you can on a hardtail.
  • - 1
 Probably it's more suitable for 26" die hard fans
  • + 19
 I'd rather have a kid saving/spending for a sick bike like this than an automobile.
  • + 0
 Yes
  • + 17
 @Bunabe: Kids who grew up racing BMX tend to be exceptionally skilled when they get on mountain bikes later in life. This has been proven by them populating the top 20 pro/elite class since the beginning of downhill racing.

Now, a kid that grows up on full suspension could still become a great rider, but they will not develop the body instinct that riding rigid teaches. They will always rely on the bike more. They won't reach their full potential.

Of course any kid would love to have one of these bikes, and have an incredible amount of fun on them. But what if one of those kids turned out to be really fast, got into racing, became a junior WC racer in his/her teens, but then could never seem to get to the next level of speed required to be near the podium?

I say give the kids a chance, give them rigid.
  • + 21
 Maybe they already have done all the learning they need on a hard tail and you happen to be a dentist.
  • + 15
 @mecabeat: This argument is old and let's be honest, it just isn't true anymore, if it ever was.. I grew up in the early 90s riding rigid. The stuff I rode blows my mind to think back. Then front forks with 63mm travel then full sus in the last 90s... And you know what, maybe in the beginning of my full sus years it made a difference, but now? I can barely cope with a hardtail let alone rigid.. Throw anyone who grew up on rigid back on one and I think they'll find pretty fast the skills are gone. And let's be honest you don't need them. You don't need to ride the smoothest line on an FS, because your on an FS. And that's the fun thing, nail some massive rock garden and some sketchy line. Letting the bike work. What does it matter? You think Finn grew up in rigid?! Maybe, but I'm sure he has ridden extremely good bikes for long enough that it didn't matter anyway if he did. And look at him. Look at what the pros could do on rigid in the 90s with experience and look at what is capable now with decent suspension.
Night and day didfference, so holding someone back to 'learn' on rigid is helpful? I disagree...
  • + 6
 @clarky78: I'm not suggesting anyone put their kids on 90's rigid MTBs. That would be incredibly stifling to development. I'm talking about the fact that BMX has produced exceptional mountain bikers. That's not an "argument" or opinion. Modern dirt jump/trail hardtails exist now that better facilitate riding from the BMX/body perspective. These are the probably best type of bike for mountain biking skill/instinct development, and they also work well on BMX tracks, so kids can at least try racing out before committing to a 2nd bike.
  • + 1
 @clarky78: I disagree with regards to being able to step back on a rigid and be inept. I did and actually love it more. If anything it's a complement to being able to ride a squish and even teaches you some skills you just couldn't learn otherwise.
  • + 4
 @mecabeat: then he'll become a doctor and save lives or a skilled carpenter and will make you a nice table. WTF, if it's more fun and kids want it, because it's their passion, you say people shoudn't buy FS because of some sick ambitions?

Both my ankles are f*cked, because i flatlanded waay to much on a hardtail.
  • - 3
 @tornateo:
Yea kind of see where your coming from.
But the 'oldies' who grew up on ridgid/hardtail/bmx are still crushing those who grew up on full sus... If there were 20-25 year olds winning dh then I would see the benifit...
  • + 1
 These bikes are even more dentist than the RedAlp. I mean seriously... how long does a kid fit on that little bike before it has grown out of it? A year? Guess then it's time for another 7k build, lol.
  • + 3
 They can learn on full sus but they don't need one for 7500$. f*cking rediculous. My child isn't getting a car for that much.
  • + 1
 Yeah, hard to say, I think it's mostly down to the rider how skilled they become. Personally my friend was in the process of building a mountain bike, so he had a spare BMX given to him or something for a bit, and I felt like a clown car trying to ride it from a size perspective. My friend was pretty good at biking, but in my opinion it's never the equipment that gets you there.
  • + 5
 I met these guys over in Whistler last year. I had to have a chat when I saw their mini carbon rigs with dream builds. They might be kids, but they rip. Saw a clip of one hitting Crabapple, try that on a hardtail.
  • + 8
 Just because theyre kids doesnt mean they dont know how to ride. A lot of kids that live near ski resorts and parks are riding blacks and doing drops taller than them already, they would make better use of bikes like this than most of us.
  • - 1
 @sngltrkmnd: If a kid is smart enough to save $8g's, then I hope he has more sense than to blow it on a bike he's gonna grow out of.
  • + 2
 Yeah my Mum made me learn to type on a real typewriter and learn Guitar on an acoustic before I could type on a computer or learn electric guitar. Oh wait thats why I never enjoyed either of those and hate my Mum. Being rich sux just as much as being poor. Having rich parents now thats where its at.
  • + 1
 The kids that need these high-performance bikes are usually world ranked bmx racers and DJ stars in their own right. The don't need another hardtail to play on. They want to do real downhill. Check out the Meekboyz YouTube channel and see why.
  • + 3
 I believe these kids know how to ride rigid and no suspension.
They are represent NZ National team racing World Cup BMX ser.

www.facebook.com/CyclingNZL/photos/a.1456598397761943.1073741853.112149808873482/1456603761094740/?type=3&theater
  • + 1
 And yet another reason to not procreate.^^
  • + 1
 @richierocket: I was thinking, if like 1000 people had kids in the world, the kids would have an ace life. They wouldn't have to do shit their whole lives.
  • + 2
 @mecabeat: You're making it seem like a kid can't ride both bikes, or if he/she has a mini-DH bike then that's all they will ride. But this isn't an "either or" scenario. Why can't a kid grow up riding both BMX and DH, why does it have to be one or the other? If a kid has a super fancy carbon wow dh bike in the garage, it doesn't mean that they can't also have a $500 bmx bike. They are two different (yet entirely complimentary) sports. Besides, the vast vast majority of kids can't be at the bike park all day, every day. They'll need a different bike for riding urban, skate parks, and dirt jumps. Both bikes will utilized at different times out of necessity.

And ultimately, if parents can afford a full suspension mountain bike, they can definitely afford a bmx bike. Give the kid both and he'll be a rockstar on a bike.
  • + 1
 @Richt2000: Troy Brosnan? Tahnee Seagrave?
  • + 1
 @Aaronpope1:
Ha ha, not saying there aren't any younger players out there ;-) but look at Minnar and Gwin...
  • + 7
 These bikes are for kids who are past the needing a hardtail stage.

Why should kids like this have to wait untill they're big enough to handle a adult bike?

The Meek boys are perfect examples of this.

I rode Gorge Road dirt jumps with Toby Meek in April, And he got through the biggest set there before I did - And he did it all clipped into his race bmx.

These kids can ride - don't be bitter that amazing bikes like this weren't available for kids when we were learning to ride.

Keep it up Meeks!
  • + 2
 @clarky78: totally agree with you, and in any case with modern FS kids bikes you can lock the suspension out anyway i do on my kids bikes which are FS when it comes to it and they are not throwing themselves down DH runs or knarly stuff, so its the best of both worlds i say..
  • + 1
 @Kramz: in Germany the logic is the opposite. Migrants be like "Let's go to Germany and have 1000kids so we have an ace life"
  • + 1
 The kids getting these bikes that actually are gonna do amazing, probably already have a BMX race bike, a tiny custom dirt jumper hardtail and a little grom sized moto...so in most cases the "learn on a HT" argument is probably irrelevant.

They are already on the n+1 program and will ride the dirt jumps and XC stuff on a hardtail and ride shuttle stuff on this.

The kid who's a spoiled brat and doesn't have "it" and get this, might never progress...and then his trailer queen will hopefully be sold used to someone who can actually put it to good use.

In a world filled with ridiculous overpriced toys, this really doesn't make me cringe (that much).
  • + 24
 $7500 for a 24" kids bike. Safe to say what this comment section will be having a moan about lol
  • + 11
 ....or racing bmx. Learn some proper bike skills
  • + 1
 ...my comment was meant for the "kids should ride a hardtail"......totaly agree...
  • + 8
 @slowrider73: Rory is 2 x World #3 and New Zealand National BMX champ.
  • + 4
 No one ever complains here, ever...Wink
  • + 1
 Norco Fluid 24. That is all.
  • + 1
 @McNubbin: stinky 24 too
  • + 18
 Why do kids need a DH bike? I can understand the lower travel options for those with monstrous expendable incomes but really?
  • + 28
 Because lift accessed riding is easier for little legs. Kids like to enjoy the ride, most are not into the joy of suffering to crush a climb.
  • + 11
 True. what a way to start your kids as spoiled-little-brats at an early age. so what happens when they've "outgrown" these?? " Mommy !, can i have that 7-10 yr old bracket $15k bicycle please ?! "
  • + 38
 @viatch: you know man there is nothing wrong with people who have the income to enjoy it however they see fit. So what's the real harm here, is that a lot to spend? Yeah sure, but is it impacting your life in some adverse way? Nope. Does it's adoption help an upstart company with an idea and bring more young rippers into riding? Yes. More people riding = more advocacy = more trails = more industry investment = better bikes and parts = economies of scale = lower prices for all of us in the long run. These are all good things
  • + 2
 @c25porter: Then get them a lower travel bike that they can throw around and man handle, a kid doesn't need the stiffness, weight and height of a triple clamp fork!
  • + 9
 So they can ride the same tracks with mum and dad. Next time you go biking, go past tescos or what ever big box store is on the way and buy a 100 pd bike and see how much fun you have compared to your normal long travel bike. thats why.
  • + 5
 My first ride was a 20" Spiderman Walmart bike. I don't think I would have appreciated the cost/quality difference of one of these even if my parents had that kind of money to spend on me...
  • + 5
 @viatch: I'm not against anyone buying these bikes. I don't see how you could get a child to understand their value and not take them for granted though.

I also think such nice components are a waste on a kid's bike: kids kill things. Imagine trying to get a ten year old to understand to never touch the rotors or pads, or to never scratch a stanchion laying their bike down on a pile of rocks.

For a kid that races, that's into it even it seems crazy. If it's that competitive and serious then no child is going to have fun doing it, we'll just end up with kids that hate mountain biking the way some kids hate violin, or team sports.

I really don't see the point except for a parents ego.

That and my kid on a commencal kids bike will put your kid on a carbon fiber wumderbike right into the wall. Right. In. The. Wall.
  • + 2
 I could whine about the prices all day long, but what more concerns me is the trend of throwing kids on giant long travel machines so they can just point them downhill and let go of the brakes without learning proper skills such as line choice and bike handling.

I would say that after my son does a good solid few years on a fully rigid bike (which forces you to find smooth lines) then he can graduate to something that will allow him to go faster and handle bigger terrain. Bravo to this company for offering high end stuff that will fit all sizes of kids. I just hope parents use a little sense when thinking about what their child needs vs what they would like them to have.
  • + 13
 @LoganKM1982: you start by saying you're not against anyone buying these bikes then proceed to say how wasteful it is or how evil the parent must be to drive their kid into it THEN talk about how your kid would trash their kid! Haha cmon man, stay linear
  • + 1
 @Deanosuar: That's some logic man....$7000 kids bike will ultimately mean our bikes will cost less!!! This is not a trophic cascade within an ecosystem.
  • + 1
 @gcrider: Do the same thing with an 8 year old and I bet they will have just as much fun
  • + 1
 @LaXcarp: my point is dude that it in theory expands the market and just Bc this is the high tier of the price doesn't mean the price mean goes up. And consider this for a moment: do you recall being a kid and seeing some awesome shit a friend had or something you thought one day that will be mine? Bc i sure as hell do. I remember looking at an intense tracer 15 years ago and thinking someday. Bikes like these will have the same effect of creating drive and desire. So I guess there's two ways you can go about seeing something like this: 1. A person can be jealous and angry that others can and they can't OR 2. It creatives drive to get something like that for yourself someday. Those are two clearly distinct types of people and based on the thread comments it's quite evident who falls into what camp
  • - 6
flag Vudu74 (Aug 12, 2017 at 9:18) (Below Threshold)
 @LoganKM1982: So, your going to teach your kid the value of your jealousy and let him have a go at another kid just because he has a nicer bike? You are pretty awesome at this fatherhood thing, aren't you!
  • + 4
 @Deanosuar: Well, theory is often not reflected in reality, which is where I live. 15 years ago, you were 17, hardly who this is marketed towards. When I was 9, I wanted my neighbors bike because it was green and was called "dirt dog" not because it was carbon fiber. If the intention of creating a light yet capable bike for this age group is the goal, it can be done for probably an 1/8th of the cost of this and would be much more functional (fox 36 for someone who weighs 75lbs?!). The drive should be for functionality, just because you can, doesn't mean you should...im not trying to create the drive and desire to purchase unnecessarily expensive shit that doesn't perform any better, no jealousy or anger involved.
  • + 2
 @LaXcarp: you make fair points and all I was saying is that desire starts somewhere be it a dirt dog or a $7k kids bike or some expensive frame sitting on a shop wall. Also this bike doesn't imply that all kids bikes be in this price range, it's just a part of the range. I totally agree that mass of the distribution of kids bikes should occupy the lower cost tier, as it's done wonders in the ski industry with kids skis looking like pro models minus the more expensive tech inputs.


This is merely a niche a company is trying to service and that's okay too.

In retrospect I think my initial response probably came in a little hot but we can't edit so here we are (shrug emoji) lol
  • + 6
 Why do kids need anything? Why do kids need sticks for hockey... Because you need f*cking equipment for your hobby.
  • + 12
 @Bromaphobe: go check out their instagram meekboyz. The 12 year old throws whips and no handers over crabapple hits. He needs a fork more than you.
  • + 2
 Because they want to sell more bikes.
  • + 9
 I saw several of these at Whistler last weekend. When terrain like this is nearby, why not open it up to the wee ones?
  • + 7
 @viatch: Compared to people in the developing world every one of us on this site ( hell event if you have your own laptop or seat phone) is a spoiled brat that consumes too much and has too much money. It's a sliding scale. Get off your high horse buddy.
  • + 1
 @Deanosuar: linear has never been my thing. I'm also working on not being so damn cynical, so I definitely end up all over the place. I'm more stream of consciousness these days.

Ultimately I know my opinion on whether or not these bikes exist is irrelevant. If someone makes them and someone buys them and they're not nukes, it's all good.
  • - 2
 @Vudu74: hahaha, reading comprehension buddy. Try it sometime
  • + 3
 @Deanosuar: It doesn't impact lives? I call BS. Like no one will ever have to deal with or interact with that kid. Whatever dude. Not everyone who mountain bikes is a worthy advocate. You do realize that just because you are on a bike in the woods doesn't mean you are not an a*shole or self entitled brat.
  • - 2
 @Deanosuar: it does impact our lives when we have to interact with these self centered spoiled brats later in life. Don't get me wrong in not saying that everyone with a fortunate life is a spoiled brat but that lifestyle has a habit of fostering those characteristics of their parents aren't careful. I say if you can go for it but be conscious of the implications.
  • + 1
 @c25porter: Exactly....my son can build skills at the park without the suffering. Kids don't have the same endurance as adults
  • + 1
 @lifeofloon: Dude. If you meet this family you would change your entire thought process.

I have known them for 9 years and they are a middle income hard working down do earth people.

Dad is a Downhill purist, an amazing rider and an incredible Father. His kids are BMX champions who have been riding from day dot. Both boys are incredibly humble, honest caring children who look after and appreciate their equipment.

The bikes are a result of years of Dad custom making / modifying / cutting / welding adult bikes to fit small children so the kids can have more travel to hit the big stuff and have the same high end components that adults enjoy.

Check out their instagram page @meekboys or simply look for them on the DH World Cup circuit in a few years. They are going all the way without a shadow of a doubt.

Ride On.
  • + 1
 @lordchewington: I had no intention of my comment criticizing the Meek family. I actually think it's pretty cool that these are here for those that can afford them. My comment was more about the social implications of the people buying these for their kids that don't impress upon their children the actual value of such an expensive toy as well as impressing upon their children that they are more fortunate than many others and that doesn't make them any better than someone that can only afford the Huffy. So apologies if it seemed directed at the family.
  • + 14
 I am a dad, and like a lot of dads, I would love to give my kid something that I never had-- an awesome bike being one of those things... And, if I had the skills to build it because it didn't exist, I would do it, obsessing over it until I pulled it off. I love this, and am jealous I can't create and build something this awesome. As for the price? What does it matter, really? I would test the market and see if I could recoup the cost of the R&D with a price that I deemed fit. If the market doesn't sustain it, then I would have to decide from there where the price ( and the bikes) should go... It's not about getting rich, but more about pulling off something amazing. But if a profit could be had, why not?! Keep it up Dad, we are all jealous.
  • + 10
 I suppose if you have the means... but my kid will continue to ride her used Kona we picked up for $125.

I do believe in getting kids on bikes that are well built and specd well so they can spend more time enjoying biking without the worry of breakdowns, shoddy shifting, hard to handle braking and all, but $6-9000 is a bit extreme.
  • + 12
 7k and they outgrow it in 6 months. If that's what it takes to buy your kid's love...
  • + 4
 I agree man. I'm not upset that these bikes exist, but they are for the 1%'rs in terms of both income and talent.

You know what I'm really digging? Breathing new life into the cool old bikes from yesteryear. Had a coworker build up a small Voodoo frame for his 10 year old... hardest part was finding a decent fork with a non-tapered steer tube. All in, I think he was still under $900 for a light, sweet bike. All the dads dig it because of the history, and the kids dig it because it's bright orange and rides nice.
  • + 8
 Say what you want but having high end, high spec bikes for kids who are racing, and riding lots of park is still a nice option. Sure it's crazy expensive but there will end up being an active used market for these. If your kid is doing 30 days in the bikepark a year you will sure be spending less on parts with a properly specced bike.
  • + 4
 "Used kid's carbon downhill bike for sale. Never been crashed or left out in the rain, I swear. $3000"
  • - 1
 @fullfacemike: only ridden three times, promise
  • + 7
 Why wouldn't someone just buy a Juliana Strega or Juliana Furtado size XS for their kids? It would be cheaper and better quality. Size XS will fit a kid 4'8", and my 10 year old nieces are about that tall.

www.julianabicycles.com/en/us
  • + 5
 My buddy started his Son out on a F/S bike at about 7 and he was under 4 feet tall. his 20 inch bike weighed close to 30lbs which is half of what he weighs. There are kids out there that are very capable riders that will ride these bikes so hard that we will all feel like squids
  • + 7
 People are dying on earth, because they have not enough food or healthy water... and then kids with rich parents have this. How not to educate your child... yes, mtb is an expensive sport, I know, I have one bike too but it never cost me $7500... no kid needs such an expensive object. Buy a second hand bike for less than 1000 bucks and it's enough... clearly enough
  • + 1
 I fundamentally agree... then again this line of thinking points the finger at our own bikes, cars (ok i don't have one ;P) smartphones, computers, tablets, TV, restaurants, movie theaters, $100+ shoes, gps, nice speakers, fancy tools, etc. etc....

Don't get me wrong, if I could solve world hunger and water access issues by only riding my klunker cruiser, I'd sign up. I agree buying second hand is a better option (esp. for kids) but buying local food, planting trees, reducing driving and a variety of vounteer/philanthropic efforts will have more impact than not riding lift access on fancy toys.
  • + 7
 With frames this small, what advantage could carbon have relative to the price point? Id think similarly sized alloy frames would be very close in weight and reduce buy-in costs considerably, putting more bikes under more kids. What i really want to see in the grom bike selection is adjustable dropouts so you can 20"-26" wheel sizes as the kid grows, and removable bolt on seat tube sections so as the kid grows so does the reach, although I suppose thats why these design have super slack STAs.
  • - 6
flag Bigernmcracken (Aug 12, 2017 at 9:32) (Below Threshold)
 a good kids alloy bike still weighs close to 30lbs
  • + 6
 To my 9yr old son....Son , if you are reading this, understand that you slay the trails. And you do it on a Walmart bike, which you clean and maintain all by your self. You are a humble kid, and whether or not I could buy you a 7-8k kids bike does not matter. I never would. And you understand this because you have never had a 7-8k bike.
  • + 4
 Thanks dad, appreciate ya!
  • + 7
 It's funny that many people who are complaining about the prices of these bikes will drop $5-$10k per year per kid on a club team sport (travel, etc), an overpriced car, McMansion or some lame ass trip to Disney.
  • + 5
 This is how 26in is being re-introduced, new bike marketing strategy calling it a betweener with a $7500price tag! A fool is soon to be parted with his money! You guys see the kids bike in the PB buy/sell section? Get them while is still affordable!
  • + 5
 Such reactions...geesh. Instead of debates on whether or not a youth rider should learn on a hardtail or whether or not an 8 year old will understand the value of the USD - why not ask interesting questions like: 1) will you post up the frame geometry on your website? 2) What does the leverage curve look like? 3) Do you need a US-based partner?

This subject of youth mountain bike builds is by far the most popular of any of the blogs I've written. Week-in, week-out, the pages related the XS Demo 8 build on my website draw more traffic than anything else. Any parent that has followed their 85 pound child down a DH track/trail at over 20 mph knows why proper suspension and geometry is critical. Traction and stability at speed. (Safety and skills progression))
  • + 5
 Rode down Original Sin with those two rippers pictured and who I would presume to be their dad. Those guys can rip. Little wheels do still get hung up on big roots and holes that a larger bike wouldn't otherwise notice
  • + 4
 Building up a 14 inch mongoose fireball and its gonna cost nowhere near that pricetag, granted its no way as exotic or as sweetly specked as the mentioned kids bike's but he will enjoy riding it, I dont think kids worry about whats on their bikes, all they want to do is ride
  • + 7
 smh... I wonder who will be the first to dare producing an E-downhill carbon bike for kids.
  • + 4
 I shop a store that sells used bikes.
As soon as your kid grows they need a new size bike.
So you sell the bike they out grow and buy the next size up.
Every one wins.
Excuse me sir. Im looking for a used carban dualy for my son.
Yes we have this beauty half price. Only 4000$.
Sigh.
All the same i luv the look of these pint sized uber bikes Smile
  • + 4
 Gotta say the only real issue I have is the fact they are carbon.. if I had the money sure. Looks at celebrity kids wearing stupid designer clothes and jewellery.. they still play in the dirt.. The thing is that carbon doesn't like crashes. It doesn't like impacts. It doesn't like the things kids do to bikes. Like falling off, LOTS. One small fall on a rock, crack. Trust me I know... my new wonder carbon bike fell on a rock 3rd ride and crack.. People don't trust carbon still, even more so second hand carbon with no idea how it's been treated. Sure it can be repaired, well, but these bikes are going to be worth little second hand. Then again, I guess the Kardashians and Beckhams of the world don't care.
  • + 5
 These kids shred so hard its crazy. The older one, Toby whips and suicide no handers Crabapple hits like its nothing. Keep an eye out for him at Crankworx
  • + 3
 Can a carbon frame even stand up to the kind of wattage these kids are putting out? The Hope cranks MIGHT be stiff enough but the frame will fold like paper mache at these insane wattages! Guides will never provide enough stopping power either; do they make a six-piston version? Waste of $6800 for the discerning 8-year-old rider.
  • + 3
 Don't full yourselves. This is not a kids's bike. This is for show-off bastards. Like an expensive painting hanging...into the garage. This bike only serves vanity and this is exactly what it is. Go give your money to help humans.
  • + 3
 The kids mountain bike market is really tricky. I don't have kids but take my nephew (11yo) riding a bit. I bought him a used Kona Stinky Jr 24" and it's nearly 40lbs!! So I've tried making it lighter within reason. But how can someone who weighs less than half of my weight, ride a bike that's 10lbs heavier than mine! So he was walking a lot.
I wound up buying a small 2006ish SWorks Enduro and putting the 24" wheels on it. At least as he grows I have the 26 wheels to put back on.
But I think that's about as much as I was going to spend.
  • + 3
 Valve/ logo alignment fail.
I fail to see how a rider sized for 24" wheels needs 180mm of travel but if he's found a market then good for him.
100 units..wow... That's actually hugely impressive.. but how many are sold to kids that actually ride/shred them?
100 Saudi princes I can see...
  • + 5
 Headtubes longer than my large 29"... They all look a mess geo/sizing wise. Especially the small one.
  • + 2
 Man go buy the kid a KTM mini
And a bmx .

And then watch what they can do on a DH bike
( Arron Gwin )

Seriously ya some folks have the cash flow to buy these for there kids , but I agree the kids will learn zero value from one of these bike. This is a let's drop the kids of at gravity camp and go to the spa kinda parents

My kids are gonna learn on a bmx , then a 50 mini
Then progress from there
  • + 5
 im just surprised people are moaning about the price. This is cycling everything is expensive.
  • + 4
 People are forgetting that there are humans in the world that literally have so much money they don't know how to spend it.
  • + 18
 Because this post combines two things most people hate, expensive bikes and other people's kids
  • + 1
 @rewob: this post wins the internet for today. Too bad most people probably didn't make it this far down the comments lol
  • + 4
 So 26 is not dead, there was never really wrong with them after all, just the bike companies are at it again cause the sales on 27.5 and 29ers is stagnant! It's full circle.
  • + 2
 "Son, the good news is your mother and I are going to buy you that $8000 bike you've been wanting. The bad news is that your mother and I will never be doing any house or yard work ever again, heh heh... You know where the toilet brush and disinfectant is so why are you still here?"
  • + 4
 If you have the money, why not! A good light bike will get your kid to enjoy and progress much faster. I remember the heavy turd of a bike I started on...
  • + 4
 yea the fox 36 really rounds out the light package
  • + 5
 Seems odd. A 50 to 90 lb rider on a 36? I guess it's all about max travel, but wow.
  • + 1
 @LaXcarp: Where can you find a 180 mill fork that is lighter?
  • + 2
 @Bigernmcracken: I can find a 150mm fork that weighs nearly half that would give you the same performance for this size and weight of a rider.
  • + 2
 @LaXcarp: Its a 32, it just looks like a 36 because the bike is 10" tall.
  • + 1
 @warmerdamj: The 24 inch bike has a 180mm fox 36 on it
  • + 2
 f*ck the kids. I want a 24 inch 180 travel bike that weighs 26 lbs. Put bmx cruiser bars on it, longer cranks, a 400mm laid back seat post it. Even makes those ugly orange forks look good by matching them. Im 6'3 (laughably short torso though) and I fit on kids mtb just fine. 24 ain't dead. wish the linkage wasn't so ugly. Anyone who gives this to their kid is guaranteeing that their kid gets beat up and the bike stolen.
  • + 4
 Hey guys before you start writing about how they should start on a hard tail, first look at the videos of them whipping crab apple hits, then you might think differently...
  • + 1
 The Meeks are an amazing bunch!
We met them in Queenstown in April, and holy guacamole - these boys can ride.

To everyone saying "kids should learn on hardtails" - both the Meek boys spend a lot of time on their BMX race bikes and could probably beat most of us down garbanzo while riding 20"race bmx.

Keep an eye on these guys - they're the future.
  • + 1
 As if bikes don't already cost way to much for regular people just curious about the sport. I tell my fiends $1000 hard tail and they shriek in fear, "I used to ride a $100 mongoose for years" they say. The sport is not accessible for people who don't dedicate their lives and entire paycheck to it. I may be close to doing that right now but most people don't understand and just can't justify the prices. Bigger kids bikes maybe okay, but 20in or 24in no. Kids bikes should be tough as nails and simple this is the farthest thing from it.
  • + 1
 Why all the travel? If an adult had the same amount of travel on percentage it would be 270mm of travel. Would you ride it? It think the geometry is a bit off also, at least it looks like it. These look like the Commencals which have otherwise good measurements on their bikes but the reach is too small on 24 And 26 Supremes. Obviously the spec on these is Superior. Even too much.

I would recommend buying used xs sized adult full suspension 26" bike with air sprung suspension for a 7-9 years old kid with height of 130 cm of more. You get a bike for years and decent tire options on that size. And the price will be reasonable. At least that's what I did.
  • + 4
 Bikes at this price point are more about "parent bragging" than "kid riding".
  • + 4
 I don't give a flying f*ck how much money you have. No kids need $7500 bikes. Adults don't even need them.
  • + 1
 i don't know what I think, I think a kid should pay for there own bike because that teaches you to fully appreciate it. I would know, I'm a kid. However I don't think it matters one bit if a kid rides a hardtail or full squish, you can progress on either one in many ways.
  • + 1
 The high-performance groms that ride most of these carbon bikes have world-ranked backgrounds in bmx and other bike disciplines hence their genuine need to have a real DH bike that works right and one that they won't outperform. Top-tier groms can do tricks most adults duck for cover. See Meekboyz YouTube channel. www.youtube.com/watch?v=grsTFRP23DI
  • + 1
 when i was 7 i had a rusty 70,s racer with crap mud guards my sister and her mate took the piss and i smashed it up lol,when i was 11 i had a raleigh lisard it had 18 index gears and it got nicked...kids are doing well nowerdays forshure...
  • + 0
 Your kid ain't Jackson Goldstein and buying him a 7500 carbon bike will not get him any closer. Hardtail, if their skills or terrain warrant it, step up to full suspension. The Transition Ripcord is probably just as capable and you can find ways to shave weight for a lot less money. I spent good money on a hardtail and could afford any bike I wanted for my kids. If and when their progression warrants it I'll take that next step. Unless they spend the summer at the bike park I'd say that is the way most kids should progress. A 20" wheel full Carbon Bike is for parents that feel guilty about not beIng good parents or trying to compensate for the fact that your kid lacks natural ability.
  • + 0
 I went interval training up and down a tiny skislope in Sweden today. On my fully rigid Ritchey 29er with a 110mm stem. The downhills has some berms and minor jumps and rock sections, but I was well out of my league on my Ritchey. On my Evil Insurgent I would have destroyed those trails, but I was fully Bambi on Ice on my fully rigid...

However, despite how much I love my daughters, I think a cheaper option will do. Spawn cycles is one. There are also several others who make decent FS for kids for a fraction of this price.

BUT, I love the fact that these guys are building super high end bikes for kids. I hope they find their niche and succeed. I would consider droppin 3k $ on a bike for my daughter when she turns 8 or 9 and show talent and interest. But I would be hard pressed to more than double that...

But there are a lot of millionaires out there, and if they got keen kids...GO FOR IT!
  • + 2
 Sadly they just copy my frame, scale down and change tube shape : ( (dead rabbit bike), but I guess thats how the industrie works
  • + 4
 Kid = happy, Dad = broke, Mom = Divorced
  • + 1
 Oh man, I'm all for putting kids on decent bikes. But this is a bit....much. I sincerely wish this company success but it seems that there will be a pretty small market for this.
  • + 0
 Umm "don't forget that a high-end adult bike with a carbon fiber frame, carbon wheels, and the best of the best component spec will easily eclipse the price", the Canyon Sender CF 9.0 is $4,500, and if you exchange the stock wheelset for an Enve pair (~$2700), the total price is $7,200... so don't know what you mean by easily eclipsing the price.
  • + 0
 Had a hardtail and hard fork huffy when I was a kid that was too big for me that my parents bought be for my birthday one year. My best friend also had a "Walmart" brand bike. We rode to school everyday, and crushed trails every weekend. Those bikes were heavy as hell and made from steal but we loved them because they were ours, our freedom. And they were bombproof. We didn't need suspension back then, 'course kids were tougher in those days.
  • + 6
 I don't know about you but there wasn't bike parks with 10 foot drops when I was a kid.
  • + 1
 The component choice doesn't help, put some cheaper parts on it! Hope brakes are not required, XT will do just fine... they're probably lighter as well
  • + 4
 hahahahahaha!
  • + 1
 things are looking up thow iv just finished building an large on one codiene 29er ,its a starship lol cannock in the woopwooop
  • + 2
 outrageous. Rich dad finds ways to love children which does not require time, effort, or love. hha
  • + 1
 I rode a medium DH frame when I was 13, you just have to learn with what you have. You gotta be a real douche to pay 7500 for a carbon kids bike....
  • - 1
 Are you kidding me, I thought those Lil Shredder bikes were.expensive! So in theory if someone makes one out of plywood, it will be cheaper??? I grew up on a BMX, my son on a Earlyrider Balance bike, now he is on a 16" BMX. He wont have any more perceived fun on a kids spec DH bike as.he would his BMX! Thats just redicolous, and for those that, no offense, are dumb enough to buy one, and the kid doesnt like it, or outgrows it??? Better off taking that money and saving it.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I'll never spend 15k for bicycles my kids will outgrow in 2 years. This is more than any of my bikes, heck almost my bikes combined. Good luck.
  • + 2
 so you're going to spend 7500$ on a bike that your kid can only ride for 1 season?
  • + 2
 Inb4 people complaining about how people spend their money
  • + 1
 And people wonder why kids are turning into entightled little pukes who dont want to do a damn thing for anything.
  • + 2
 As the saying goes "it's not about how you ride, but what you ride."
  • + 1
 What kind of jerseys are those? I have seen them before and should probably know this.
  • + 1
 And here I thought the Commencal kiddo bikes were expensive topping out at $1999USD.
  • + 1
 Almost $7000 and no dropper post???

How can you ask someone to ride without a dropper?
It's child abuse!!!
  • + 2
 Spend it if you have it....especially on cool stuff for your kids!
  • + 1
 Yeah because kids dont need to earn shit in this day in age. Just give them what they want.
  • + 3
 @DaveATthreat: yeah thats it....you nailed it!
  • + 1
 That Beast looks the dogs bananas...make a 27.5 wheel version and I'm sold...otherwise what a load of madness.
  • + 0
 If you like the original.., it`s the dead rabbit splendid DH 27.5, check out www.deadrabbitbike.com. Saddly they just copy my frame : (
  • + 1
 Congrats on the range Steve. Must have been a ton of work, but the results look terrific.
  • + 2
 wish my dad was an engineer with lots of free time
  • + 2
 Lucky lil boyz Boyz inda forest
  • + 1
 No geometry specs here or on their website.
  • + 1
 Looks like the Chumba Zulu DH
  • + 1
 Looks like the dead rabbit splendid, www.deadrabbitbike.com
  • + 1
 Saw these kids hit crab couple days ago super sideways. Bikes look dope
  • + 1
 Oh how I wish I was a kid again Frown
  • + 1
 Does dental school accept 12 year olds?
  • + 1
 I want one to hang from the rear view mirror of my monster truck.
  • + 0
 Kids on 26" bikes are faster than some you and me. So the 27.5 and 29er argument is totally BS!
  • + 1
 i am 42, I want to ride THIS bike
  • + 1
 I didn't need another reason to never have kids but here we are.
  • + 1
 Looks like Josh Benders bikes got kids now...
  • + 1
 The meekboyz shall inherit the earth.
  • + 1
 Damn, thats some steep price tag
  • + 1
 Makes those commie kids bikes look even better
  • + 1
 A Session This Does Not Look Like
  • + 1
 That is a super low main pivot.
  • + 1
 Too much bike?
  • + 1
 doe ff normaal
  • + 1
 Is it april fools?
  • + 0
 Geometry seem off? Seat to bar height?
  • + 1
 Team ginger!
  • + 1
 Spoiled kids alert
  • + 1
 Titanium rims
  • + 1
 Lol
  • + 0
 this thing is just getting pornographic
  • + 0
 This is madness!
  • - 3
 Titanium spokes?!?!???
  • - 2
 Ridonkulous prices.
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