New Motors, Derailleurs, & Yetis: EWS Crans-Montana 2022

Sep 15, 2022 at 11:09
by Mike Levy  

Richie Rude is aboard what appears to be a revised version of the current SB150 at Crans-Montana, with changes to the swingarm, bottom bracket area, upper suspension linkage, forward shock mount, and front end that all set it apart from the current production model. Starting at the back, the shift cable now exits in a different spot (pictured below), the swingarm sports slightly different tube shapes, and the top rocker link is now captive in the front triangle whereas it pivots on the outside of the production SB150.

There's also much more frame volume near the bottom bracket and what could be a door on the underside of the downtube guard that points toward a frame storage compartment on the new bike. Maybe. The downtube around the bottom bracket area also doesn't look to extend as low as on the previous model, which should provide some extra ground clearance.




With the EWS this week and the EWS-E event last weekend, there are plenty of interesting things to see, including another look at what seems to be SRAM's eMTB motor that we've been predicting for a least a few years. This time around it's on Elliot Heap's raw Nukeproof Megawatt, with the 170mm-travel frame being modified versus the production version that comes with a Shimano EP8 motor and battery. Other things to note include a different set of chainstays, a display integrated into the toptube (not pictured), and rumours that the eMTB-specific derailleur is wired to the same battery that powers the motor.



More new-ness from SRAM with another look at their unreleased direct-mount derailleur and drivetrain that we first saw back in August at the Les Gets World Cup. This time around it's being used on EWS-E winner Yannick Pontal's bike rather than a cross-country rig, and while the mud is doing a good job of making it hard to tell, it appears to be shaped differently from that earlier version. Looking from the rear (below) shows how much additional support the two-sided direct-mount should provide versus a traditional hanger, as well as how it protrudes less from the frame for more clearance.



Stay tuned for more tech from EWS Crans Montana.


238 Comments

  • 111 3
 The mythical Yeti has finally been photographed!
  • 55 0
 Since they are riding them this weekend, I wouldn't be surprised if Yeti releases the new models next week. SB120, 140 and 160 29ers is what I heard.
  • 42 1
 @husker411: 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 i wanna see it
  • 52 50
 Who cares about derailleurs and e-bike motors. More Yetis
  • 12 0
 @husker411: i saw a Yeti guy riding here in Golden on a bike that said SB160 last week and I thought my eyes were playing tricks on me and maybe it was really a 140.
  • 59 77
flag jaame (Sep 15, 2022 at 12:27) (Below Threshold)
 I don't get Yeti. That silly little linkage and the price tag. I mean really, why do they bother with that gimmicky design?
  • 5 0
 @ace9: Depending on the details of that 120 I'd be in the market. Or do we just give up on all these fancy linkages in 120mm bikes and go with the flex stay?
  • 1 0
 @husker411: What's happening to the current SB140? Converting to a mullet 150?
  • 2 0
 @naturallight87: If they keep it, probably. But I also heard that model might be going away because of low sales.
  • 11 0
 @naturallight87: The current SB130LR 29er is one their best sellers and it is around 137mm I believe. It makes sense to replace with a 140.
  • 3 0
 @ace9: fingers crossed for it being released along side the upcoming trail bike field test.
  • 27 9
 @jaame: uh because it works.
  • 20 1
 @husker411: Where’s 169 and 420?
  • 6 1
 @Roost66: Printed nicely along the downtube of the Kona Honzo.
  • 16 0
 @husker411:

Green and purple SB420 is what I’m waiting for
  • 12 1
 @jaame: yeah, such an over complicated bb area
  • 3 3
 So much new but orange fork is so done.
  • 2 0
 @yupstate: it looked like an SB150. Didn’t have the vertically oriented shock like their e-bikes do.
  • 1 0
 @husker411:

SB120 yes please. With my Stumpjumper’s geometry… I’m all game!
  • 2 1
 @naturallight87: Worst selling bike since the SB75. The 140 is going bye bye
  • 7 23
flag Zuman (Sep 15, 2022 at 17:03) (Below Threshold)
 OK we've found the Dentists PB comment sections. Unsurprisingly no one's complaining about the possible price.
  • 9 7
 @generictrailrider: Please elaborate. It essentially works as a pivot but requires more labor to service and is more expensive to replace. What exactly is the benefit??
  • 2 0
 @yupstate and @DutchmanPhotos: May want to look at an ASR-C. Still so relevant when compared to 'current' numbers and tech...
  • 3 0
 @husker411: come on threaded bb’s and no sliding bits. I’ve stopped paying my dentist so I can finally afford his bike
  • 1 0
 @husker411: and with threaded BB's, not that the Press fits were an issue on any of my many Yeti's....
Just the smaller bearings wore out prematurely.
  • 25 3
 @Zuman: such a worn out reference, can't you be more creative??? So many people purchase Yeti's that could spend the same amount on any of the other higher end carbon bikes. It's not brand specific, some folks just like quality.
Like myself, I own 3 of them, and am not a dentist..... just save my pennies.
  • 1 0
 @hughbm: I would say the Derailleurs seen here will become the standard in the future. Imagine not needing a bottom bracket, manufacturer specific. nothing becoming obsolete after a few seasons.
  • 2 0
 @Zuman: Probably cheaper than Santa
  • 1 0
 @ace9: yes yes yes
  • 5 3
 Richie is a dentist?
  • 3 19
flag Zuman (Sep 16, 2022 at 3:26) (Below Threshold)
 @pedaler: Cliches are cliches for a reason, Normies/Dentists buy Apple products and Yeti bikes for a reason, and it's not because they are quality products, and it has nothing to do with their dope as' pro rider.
  • 4 0
 @husker411: @husker411: 140 is very versatile- especially combined with a 140 or 150mm 29er fork. Go 140 w/ stock linkage, or 150 with CC link. Front roll-over capability like the 130 yet stronger while retaining the more nimble playful (and less flexy) rear end. Snap up the discounted 140 (and 165) and mullet away...
  • 3 3
 @pedaler: so you're an orthodontist?
  • 1 0
 @naturallight87: you can actually already mullet the current SB140, I almost went for it, but decided on the SB130LR instead.
  • 1 0
 @Staktup: I’m sure the new 140 will at least have a 160mm fork. It’s what’s specced on the current 130LR. The kinematics of the Switch Infinity allows them to run much longer forks for a given rear suspension than other mfgs.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: probably because it's a different looking design which makes it marketable. If it didn't sell they wouldn't do it.
  • 1 2
 @thisc*nt: great user name. Love it.
  • 64 2
 I am confused as to why I would want to run a direct mount derailleur? If I wreck a hanger, it is a $15 part. A bendy hanger can be easily fixed with a DAG 2.2, but this thing looks like it will break if I were to smack it with a rock.
  • 40 30
 The current AXS derailleurs have a breakaway clutch mechanism that lets the derailleur move out of the way during an impact. I've had pretty good luck with it - I wouldn't be surprised if this had something similar.
  • 79 1
 @mikekazimer: Why not have both safety features and not risk breaking your frame tho? Is the shifting that much better that I won't mind snapping my dropout off?
  • 24 0
 @mikekazimer: Yeah, of course. But it only helps to protect the electronics and small mechanics inside.
What happens when on harder impact that breaks or bends the hanger now with big direct hanger in the future? Something should be "the weak link" and I'd rather break $15 hanger than $600 derailleur
  • 37 11
 @Tacodip420, I feel like having the direct mount combined with a thru-axle is going to make the chances of a frame breaking from a derailleur strike a lot less likely than people think.
  • 61 4
 @mikekazimer: normal derailleurs have a mechanism that allows the cage to move inboard too. Just push it with your fingers and it will move Wink
  • 5 1
 @mikekazimer: Fair point, forgot about thru-axles. I still stand behind this being an unnecessary "advancement", but I'll still probably buy one
  • 14 26
flag Hayek (Sep 15, 2022 at 11:45) (Below Threshold)
 I bet SRAM hasn’t considered this yet. Nino should count himself lucky that he didn’t end up with a catastrophic frame failure or broken derailleur when he wrecked onto the drive-side of his bike during World Champs.
  • 11 0
 @mikekazimer: anecdotal I know but I hadn’t broken a hanger in years until I switched to AXS this season. Broke one at Trans BC and one at Whistler last week! Maybe just bad luck.
  • 12 7
 it will break. it is designed to. the piece of the mech that mounts is replaceable from the rest of the derailleur. so what you are actually getting is an integrated hanger, which makes everything more exacting.
  • 10 1
 @mikekazimer: ...if spares for that are as eays to get as SRAM chains, brake pads, derailleurs etc. (EU market) it is - and that is just my 2 cent - a very stupid idea that will not do much for your riding time
  • 21 0
 @kovyrshin: The weak link in this system is the rider's financial solvency. tehe.
  • 11 4
 @mikekazimer: fuak that shit ride pinion Wink
  • 6 2
 @conoat: Do you know that for sure? Cause it seems like SRAM isn't exactly great at supplying spare parts to repair things.
  • 4 0
 @93EXCivic: yes. go search for spy shots of the der. youll see a thin line below the mount. it's two pieces.
  • 3 0
 @conoat: SRAM might have something hidden up their sleeve with the dm hanger. It would honestly be cool if it had a break-away function that didn’t require a new hanger. Just spit-balling but maybe some sort of clip? Magnetic break-away? IDK…
  • 13 1
 @wake-n-rake: That's where see who blindly falls for the marketing talk and who actually does a little bit of thinking. SRAM had to implement the protection mechanism to protect the system against a problem they introduced themselves (by using motors) yet sold it as a feature rather than a fix. For instance the 2005 Shimano Hone rear mech (which was low normal, so the cable pulled the mech outwards) also had a mechanism like that. On a regular mechanical rear mech, the cable pulls inwards and you just have a spring pulling outwards but easily gives way in case of a knock. Whichever system you have, nothing gives way when you hit the static part of the mech, which is what sacrificial hangers or breaker bolts are for.

Talking of Hone and Saint, both didn't rely on the hanger anyway as they were fixed to the axle. I still have a 2007 Saint mech (which isn't rapid rise, just the "proper" cable version), they take a beating. Hone was fixed to the hub axle (no thru axle for Hone) but that was pretty easy to replace too if needed. I still think the axle mounted rear mechs were the best solution.
  • 3 1
 @vinay: @vinay: Fantastic bit of info there. Had no idea about Shimano Hone, and yeah this new Sram mech is a similar idea to that. I doubt Sram would bring something to market that they knew didn't work, so I'm all for this direct mount system, I bet cable operated direct mount mechs will shift like a dream without any B movement + pivoting on the hanger.

Im all for it!
  • 6 0
 @Gabe001: Shimano introduced the original Saint groupset in 2004. The rear mech was axle mounted but the rear mech was also rapid rise (so the cable pulling towards the heaviest gear and the spring pulling towards the lightest gear). And pretty much no one liked rapid rise (so this pushed a lot of people towards SRAM at the time). Hone was introduced in 2005 as a more affordable "all mountain" alternative where the derailleur threaded onto a long (non thru axle) axle. I feel not too many people are aware that the 2007 Saint wasn't rapid rise and for 2008 they dropped the axle mounted rear mech. Hone merged with LX into SLX and the current LX group is more for trekking etc now. So yeah, so much for the history of axle mounted rear mechs Smile .
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: same experience. Derailleur is scratched up but hanger is perfectly straight.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: If you’ve thought of it, they’ve thought of it 100 times already. Come on now
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Shimano has one too.
  • 21 1
 @Gabe001: " I doubt Sram would bring something to market that they knew didn't work,"

Ahh, to be young and naive. And not spent my life working in the bike industry.
  • 2 0
 @TommyNunchuck: haha yes mate My thoughts exactly.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Would you also not be surprised if the clutch is adjustable? That's what is at the top of my wishlist.
  • 5 0
 @Gabe001: *cough* REVERB *cough*
Also: *cough* Juicy brakes *cough*
  • 2 1
 @Zak-B: An expensive exposed AXS rear derailleur is still an exposed derailleur and is only one stick or rock away from ending your ride. I've also seen them break also and the breakaway clutch mechanism is more marketing than anything else.

With 12 speed shifting and huge cassette the derailleur manufacturers have pigeon holed themselves into a situation where they have to have a stiff hanger to have accurate shifting, especially with Shimano and their reduced cable pull. It's nice that they don't bend easily but the trade-off is you have to replace the more expensive derailleur rather than a hanger. There's no great solution with exposed rear derailleurs.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Unless one really needs 500% gearing range or more, the more affordable options like Microshift are still there. Unless people are buying complete bikes pre-spec'd with 12sp gearing, but that's a choice too. Always take the cost and possibility of repair and replacement parts into account for whatever you buy.
  • 1 0
 @kovyrshin: where are you getting these $15 hangers? Where I live it's often cheaper to buy a new derailleur than a new hanger, at least for brands with machined hangers
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: I'll let the early adopters to find out
  • 43 17
 direct mount derailleur is dumb. SRAM forgot that hangers are meant to be the component that breaks/bends in the event of a derailleur smash on trail, not your entire derailleur or your frame. bunch of silly gooses over there
  • 10 1
 In theory I agree but in practice this hasnt happened to me in years. Couple years ago I sent the derailleur into the spokes and rather than the hanger breaking or bending, the hanger decided to rotate against the frame and crack my rear triangle. Still use the same hanger!
  • 153 3
 Queue old guy voice: I've been in the bike business long enough to know that replaceable derailleur hangers DO NOT exist to protect derailleurs from damage and they never have. They exist to protect the frame from damage. Back in the day, frames were made out of steel and the hangers weren't replaceable. If you damaged one, you brazed in a new dropout. Then we went to aluminum frames and when those hangers bent and you wanted to weld in a new dropout with hanger you had to re-heat treat the whole frame. Then, full suspension aluminum frames came around and when the hanger bent, you replaced the whole swing arm. Finally, replaceable hangers showed up but a new problem emerged. If the hanger was a cheap cast aluminum part it was so flexy that it hampered shift speed and precision. If it was strong enough to resist flex, you typically ended up with a damaged derailleur and hanger in a crash. So, Shimano came out with Shadow derailleurs to offer more clearance and a weak link in the form of a replaceable link between the hanger and derailleur. But, the extra replaceable link could move around and more imprecision was added to the system. So, the best solution (where SRAM is going now) is to have the improved clearance that the Shimano Shadow derailleurs offers, but without all the floppy imprecision that comes from a single-sided mount and an extra sacrificial link. To further protect the derailleur, they put in breakaway clutches. Is it perfect, well... it's about as perfect as it is ever going to be without being virtually free of charge (which is the expectation of your typical PB commenter). So, I recommend going back to the other PB favorite canard of crapping on derailleurs and demanding gearboxes that are also basically given away at prices that a teenager with an allowance can afford.
  • 15 0
 @ShopMechanic: nailed it
  • 2 3
 @tjbiker38: Had the same things happen on my Specialized Enduro. It was the installation shops fault - inappropriately set limit screws allowed the deraileur to shift right into the spokes while climbing. This twisted the entire thing in the frame and destroyed the carbon fiber in the process.

The shop got REAL lucky - Specialized was somehow convinced to warranty the seat stays.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Solid outcome. Mine was 100% my fault. I was running a clapped out 11 speed xt drivetrain. I had a brand new 12 speed on my workbench but was waiting on the free hub to make the switch which was backordered. So I kept running the shot 11 speed for too long and it didnt go well....$400 later SC sold me a new rear triangle.
  • 4 3
 This industry is full of so many dullards.
  • 14 3
 You’re right,
What on earth was SRAM thinking.
So good that you’re here with your internet knowledge, and ability to peer into a crystal ball to foresee the future, and know that this is a bad idea.
Friggin SRAM, and all their knowledge of cycling drivetrain systems, it’s really too bad they don’t put it to good use, and Gigi back to making super reliable 3x9spd systems
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: So the first time you hit the lowest gear on the new bike was on an actual trail hill climb? Why wouldn;t you have checked the gearing range on the stand or on the road/street first?
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: oh yes you’re right, this is a very deep technical domain that is very complex and doesn’t need to be protected by “IP” rights. Clearly the best minds of the mechanical and electrical engineering world are applying themselves to bicycle drivetrains. I can see them already, fitted flat billed caps and all, straight from the bike shop employee pipeline! Even better if they were field reps! They also only have the best intentions when it comes to the consumer market and sustainability as well.
  • 2 0
 The UDH's and many other hangers (my Norco is similar) are so beefy now I don't see how they could ever break. I've broken three 12 speed derailleurs where the hanger is just fine, not even bent.
  • 1 2
 @cogsci: fair, there’s just no way that SRAM has competent, successful, talented mech and electrical engineers on the payroll. You know, ones that have chosen to work in a field that they’re passionate about, rather than chasing a dollar somewhere soul sucking….

With all this Mech and elec tech know how, along with the development, testing, and manufacturing facilities I’m sure your version of a better mtb drivetrain is just on the horizon.
Let me know when it’s available, and I’ll fork out the money to support you.

Flat billed cap and all…..
  • 3 3
 @onawalk: SRAM probably has a lot of "knowledge of cycling drivetrain systems" but what they know more is about SELLING STUFF. Whether this is innovative of a real improvement isn't relevant. How many engineers work on this doesn't matter and SRAM knows this. They know how to sell stuff. This is new and different and SRAM will use that to say it's better and our monkey brains say "ooh shiny" and eat that shit up.
  • 2 0
 @Spencermon: Alright, I’ll take the bait. How did you become so knowledgeable about the inner workings of SRAM?
  • 1 0
 @ShopMechanic: I'm no expert on the inner working of SRAM and I don't really need to be to understand that a wide range 11 speed drivetrain isn't worlds better than a wide range 12 speed drivetrain but that novelty fuels this industry. Electronic shifting is baller but is it really so much better, or does it justify higher prices? I understand that people will pay for what they perceive is of value to them, and SRAM does a really good job at convincing people that these are all valuable improvements and innovations. But then we're back where we started that SRAM has an incredibly powerful marketing department that is able to convince us all that GX AXS is "entry level"
  • 1 0
 @Staktup: Correct - I took the bike to my local trail, which is a flat concrete path that leads to the foot of a trail. From there, it is a straight climb for the next 2.3 miles. About 500 yards into the climb, I came to the first steep bit and shifted to my largest cog - BOOM! Instantly into the spokes and around she goes!

The buddy I was riding with was a shop mechanic. He took a look and examined the derailleur settings and immediately identified what happened. The shop that did the work took a look and agreed and made it right.

As everyone knows, shifting a bike under no load and in a bike stand is marginally different set of dynamics than when the bike is being ridden and watts + resistance are being applied to the system. You've never had a bike that shifted ok in the stand, but had some issues actually being ridden?
  • 1 0
 @Spencermon: It appears that you're definitely not convinced that GX AXS is entry level and I would venture that is the consensus of PB commenters. What I find interesting is that it seems like the overwhelming majority of commenters see through SRAM's "incredibly powerful marketing department's" messaging, yet, it's still incredibly powerful... Seems like a bit of a contradiction.

But I get it, we're all exhausted by the product development cadence that Apple has sensitized us to with new iPhones every two years. In the bike business, Shimano started a 3-year cadence decades ago. SRAM went to a 3-year cadence about 3-4 years ago (they had no set cadence before that), but because of the pandemic it's actually been 4-years. So, in this specific example, SRAM has held back on its new product launch cadence.
  • 1 0
 @ShopMechanic: yeah. It's easy to forget that Pinkbike commenters are a very small percentage of overall bike riders. Of course we see through SRAMs marketing, but that's because it is shoved down our throats day after day. As much as commenters say "if you don't like it, don't buy it", it really feels like there isn't a way for the riders like us to have our opinions heard. Whether or not I buy a GX AXS bike, we are seeing the slow death of high quality cable operated drivetrains.

I guess my original comment was more aimed at @onawalk since he insinuated that the only reason a company like SRAM would release a product is the engineering behind it. While this is certainly ONE reason, another huge reason is that SRAM releases a product that they think they can sell. They wouldn't release a fantastically engineered product if it wouldn't sell. They would, however, release a product that might not be engineered as well as it should be as long as they know they can sell it.

When a new product comes out most brands are quick to make sure that it's an option. They don't want to get left in the dust or be seen as not "with the times". I haven't seen a single FOX live valve equipped bike in the flesh, but almost every MTB I've come into contact with since its release has been made compatible. I'm sure this new derailleur is going to be an improvement, but it's disingenuous to imply that the only reason it is being released is the engineering behind it and that Marketing didn't see this as an opportunity to release something new and flashy that people will fall over to make sure is on their newest bikes.
  • 2 0
 @Spencermon: That’s a fair assumption, but it’s just factually incorrect. The marketing department doesn’t decide what products get made or even what features those products have. It’s a decision made by product managers and executives. I know that’s splitting hairs a bit in this context, but the idea that the marketing department is “shoving [things] down our throats every day” is a quite a stretch. If you really feel strongly about an aversion to new product, tell the bike companies that buy the product as OE equipment because you’re right, your voice isn’t being heard, but the OE voice is. So, what I am trying to say here is before you criticize the ideology and process behind a metaphorical sausage, it’s really helpful to first understand how that sausage is made.
  • 1 0
 @Spencermon: have you actually used axs or similar for any extended period of time? If you do and say there’s no perceptible improvement, you’re not being honest with yourself. There are so many benefits, many that don’t even apply to actual shifting.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Yes I have experienced that but the indexing never changed like that so I was curious
  • 1 1
 Of course it’s dumb. But from a manufacturer’s perspective, imagine the possibilities… people having to buy new frames, because there are no derailleurs available any more for the “standard” their frame used, every new generation of frames coming with a new generation of derailleurs and mounts, no possibility to use the old stuff, having to buy a new frame, when switching between Shimano and SRAM - some derailleurs and frames broken in crashes, where you used to only right the hanger, are just the icing on the cake.
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: Except UDH makes every frame backwards compatible with traditional derailleurs while solving the issue of finding unique hangers for every frame model. So, the facts in this case are basically the exact opposite of what you’ve described.
  • 2 0
 @Spencermon: jeez man, little bit paranoid there. Not sure I understand your tangent into AXS or SRAMs ulterior motives, but obviously SRAM is in the business of selling things….I’m not entirely sure what you think they’d be doing, making this stuff to give away?
I think we can all agree the adoption of the UDH was, and is a good thing. The fact that SRAM likely had a larger plan shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone. None of us have any idea is it’s bad or worse, but the pontificating and end of world ideas is pretty wild from a niche group of mountain bikers.

Ride your bike, enjoy that it’s so much better than it was 20 or even 10 years ago, and have a good time.
  • 2 0
 @dfogle: I have used AXS quite a bit on many different bikes and applications. XC, Enduro, Road and Gravel. I think it is absolutely fantastic and shifts quite well. I'm just not sure it is necessary and it serves to drive up the price of "entry-level" bikes. (though that isn't really part of this conversation, just a response to your reply)
I have decided not to buy AXS for my personal bikes.
  • 1 0
 @ShopMechanic: You're right there. I guess I just default to "marketing department" for simplicity sake. I work in the bike industry and I do give feedback on OE equipment, but sometimes there isn't part availability for any other options so you are kind of forced to eat the sausage. Wink
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: the tangent into AXS was a response to someone else.

I only was addressing your sarcastic comment. No end of times doomsday-ing here.

I know what SRAM is up to. They are quite clever. It's a masterful strategy to release UDH and then make a derailleur that is compatible with the UDH interface. Brilliant. But it's not going to be a perfect solution and there are always pros and cons to everything. Sometimes we (consumers) are just forced to accepts the cons to a system that SRAM has designed, however beneficial the pros are. I.E. DOT fluid, Reverb dropper posts, etc.
  • 2 0
 @Spencermon: you’ve lost me man,
You make it sound like there isn’t a plethora of other choices out there.
No one is forcing you, or anyone else to do or buy anything. You’re overwhelmed with choice and make it seem as SRAM has some devious mastermind strategy.

Here’s the thing, said company believes in a path, product or strategy. They work to develop, test, produce such thing. We as consumers get to decide if we want such thing, easy peasy.

You, and for the larger part all of us, have no idea what SRAM is working on. You’re simply putting the pieces together now, after they have been seen in the full view of the public. None of us have any idea, we are just speculating like a bunch of kids about cool bike stuff.

What’s the issue with Dot fluid, you’re some how not a fan of one of the most popular braking fluids used across multiple forms of transportation for decades?
Lots of choice out there, just use something different….
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: on some level, I think we are misunderstanding eachother, but it's all good.
  • 16 1
 Yeti Engineers- "Hey we got that new platform...so...new paint scheme right?"
Yeti Style Dept- "NO...BLUE PEPTOBISMOL TIL WE DIE!!!"
  • 32 1
 I’m here for it. It’s such a iconic color and when pretty much any other brand uses a color even close to it people say it just look like a yeti haha
  • 20 0
 Yeti Turquoise is in a stalemate with Fox Orange and Maxxis Yellow for who can make stuff that hard to match to the rest of the paint scheme
  • 4 0
 @IsaacWislon82: Maybe this is Stockholm Syndrome speaking, but I love how my Fox Orange bits look next to my Maxxis Yellow bits.
  • 10 0
 Fox has only been orange for about five years, it's not close to the history of Yeti and turquoise!
  • 3 4
 Time for a new generation. Let’s land something wild and impressive. Let’s utilize spy shots, let’s harness the entirety of the internet to build some hype to really show this off.

The only noticeable detail that the premier media outlet catches…the derailleur cable outlet port is in a different spot.

Groundbreaking work Yeti.
  • 3 0
 I’ll bite. Come on man, it’s THE most iconic mtb color of all time. Every company tries to copy it in some way. Original Turq all the way!!!
  • 2 0
 @MillerReid: agreed, I love it. Very interested to see how this bike compares to the older version!
  • 30 18
 Was really hoping Yeti would do away with that goofy switch infinity and bring the same linkage they have on the 160E. It's expensive, high maintenance, prone to failure, and accomplishes the same thing a cheaper solution can accomplish.
  • 3 0
 I assumed the new 150 would have the E160 layout. Must be a good reason for it.
  • 7 6
 Frame bearings and service are expensive across the board, usually 300 bucks for quality bearing kit and hourly service for punching and pressing, the switch infinity replacement is 300 bucks, the yeti pivot service is also very home mechanic friendly if you have a grease gun and a torque wrench
  • 7 16
flag fullendurbro (Sep 15, 2022 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @Naughtjm: But the switch infinity doesn't replace frame bearings. It's in addition to. And I don't have to hit my bearings with a grease gun every 6 hours of riding. That's literally every three rides for me. And then after all that, you go to service it and find out that your bolts have seized.
  • 7 1
 @fullendurbro: recommended SI lube schedule is every 40 hours of riding.
  • 7 4
 @fullendurbro: but you don't have to grease switch infinity every 6 hours
  • 15 1
 @Naughtjm: I replaced a bunch of bearings (including shock eyelet bearings) on my RM Instinct with an 85$ AltAlt kit and about 50$ in bearings. The Full RM bearing kit was 37$ (there are a bunch of them) and then two extra for like 15$ for the eyelet bearings on the shock hardware. All EnduroMax. I also went and did all my kids bikes as well.

Where is this 300$ coming from?
  • 34 1
 Switch infinity does everything that the 6bar does in a much lighter/ simpler package. The 6bar was a necessity on the ebike in part because there’s no room for it when you add the motor.
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: transition owner here, so 90 bucks full enduro frame bearing kit, 80 bucks an hour for mechanic work for say 2+ Hours of punching and pressing and reassembly, sort of works out
  • 17 0
 As a sb130 owner, I wanted to chime in and say the yeti bearing kit runs me ~$60, which includes all linkage bearings and also the SI bearings. Takes as long to service as any other bike.

Greasing the SI is honestly a 15 minute job, very easy to do by just removing 1 bolt.
  • 1 4
 @Naughtjm: Gotcha. you still have to do all that with the Yeti tho...it's just that you ALSO have to deal with the SWitch Inifinity as well, right? Seems like it could go from 300-500/600$
  • 6 0
 @Svinyard: I've had the same SB150 for 3 season now. SI link slides wonderfully still and is greased whenever I remember to or after it's been hitting some wet BC conditions.
It's an amazing linkage.
No issues with it at all, or on my other 2 Yeti bikes. And I ride them hard and often.
  • 8 0
 High maintenance? You mean removing one bolt plus few shots from grease gun about every time you service fork lowers? And Id say the new system on e160 has more bearings obviously with more linkages. 6 hours is crazy - minimun service interval 10-15 hours *Servicing the Yeti Infinity Link more frequently than this is excessive, messy, and unnecessary.

Most people bitching about infinity switch have never touched it and can barely change a tube, that is my experience.
  • 3 3
 @bok-CZ: I was literally one of the first people in the country to have an SB-150 and I raced it for a full season. While servicing the switch infinity every 6 hours is a bit of an exaggeration, I was advised by my friend and engineer at Yeti to service it more frequently due to the extremely dry and dusty conditions we have on the front range.

For a pro level racer in some of the driest conditions in the country, that was about every 8-10 hours. Was it a huge deal? No, because at the time racing and riding was my life and I loved working on my bike. But fast forward a few years to having a real job and a family, I don't want to have to do that to my bike with any degree of frequency.
  • 8 0
 This thread reads like electric car debates: people without Yetis/EVs have concerns about the potential issues of these new, unknown systems, Yeti/EV owners (who have mostly also owned other bikes or gas cars) say it's not an issue in their experience, then the non-Yeti/EV owners ignore them and continue to suggest everything will go wrong.

Now in fairness, I've seen a few accounts over the years of SI sliders wearing out under very heavy use in wet conditions (usually UK riders). But For most of us, including myself on my 4-season-old bike, the SI sliders work as good as new with a bit of grease added once in a while, which is a 15-minute job tops your first time, and closer to 5 minutes once you know what you're doing. Bearing replacements have been needed no more often than any of my past bikes.

I've been riding for 27 years, and wrenched my own bikes since day one (as well as working for two years in a bike shop). There's nothing that stands out about my SB130 as being any more cumbersome to work on than any other bike I've ever owned (other than a very small initial learning curve, of course).

edit: I should also mention that my Yeti wasn't cheap, but there were plenty of bikes with similar specs from some of the biggest and smallest brands that were priced similarly when I was shopping. I think their $$$ reputation is at least partially spurred on by their lack of lower-end models/builds.
  • 4 0
 @fullendurbro: That's great, but that isn't a normal use case. When you raced, you also probably bled your brakes, put on fresh tires, serviced your suspension, serviced bearings, etc. way more frequently than a typical rider. Just because racers do all those things for an extra hundredth of a second doesn't mean any of those things are flawed. I ride in dusty conditions several times a week and SI works like butter with regular service, which is much longer than 8-10 hours.
  • 6 0
 @big-red: agreed on the SI durability. I've had my bike 3 years, ridden it 1000s of kilometers and have had no issues. I grease it every few months... In regards to yeti price, I don't think their pricing is out of line with other similar top end spec bikes. Are they expensive? Yes. Are all top end bikes expensive? Yes.
  • 2 0
 Have you owned and ridden one for any extended period of time? I’ve never had any trouble with mine. You also don’t need the crazy efficiency the SI brings with an e-bike. Yeti not putting it on an ebike says absolutely nothing about the effectiveness of the platform.
  • 1 0
 @bok-CZ: Amen!
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: okay then, but this is the case all the parts needs to be serviced more often. It also says "race bred" on the top tube
  • 1 0
 @dfogle: In addition to that, you can't fit a SI into an e-bike due to space constraints thanks to the motor
  • 14 0
 SRAM: behold the universal derailleur hanger
Everybody: Yay!
SRAM: behold the direct mount derailleur
Everybody: ...
  • 11 3
 I like the fact SRAM is continuing to push progression in terms of making the derailleur better. The direct mount moves the derailleur a bit forward and tucks it in a bit so it's in a safer location. This might not be the answer that everyone wants to see, but what answer is right for everyone? The Universal Derailleur Hanger was a step in the right direction, and this directly mounts to bikes that have moved to the Universal Derailleur Hanger.
  • 9 0
 Makes you wonder if this was in the pipeline when UDH was being pushed. (Don't get me wrong UDH is great)
  • 6 0
 @dwd416: The timing is too suspect otherwise, 100% this was the idea when presenting UDH, not that it's not a benefit by itself anyway, as it is.
  • 6 0
 @dwd416: UDH was SRAM master stroke. Get all the manufacturers onboard with UDH and now all the frames are compatible with this new derailleur format.
  • 5 1
 @dwd416: of course it is. Carbon frame makers love the UDH because it makes for an easier, cheaper and stronger part of the frame. Nothing suspect about it. Im a Shimano fan boy but what SRAM has done here is bang on and I've adopted the specification for both my mountain and road bikes.
  • 3 1
 @devlincc: I was a Shimano fab as well, until the clutches started needed maintenance way more frequently. Then they got replaced with GX AXS and shifting has never been better. Shimano chain & cassette mated to the AXS is pretty flawless so far. I'm still a fan of Shimano brakes also, even though that seems to be a hot topic around here.
  • 1 0
 @blum585: good to hear, thanks for that. I might be going that way too. New bike has XTR and rear derailleur already got replaced (local shop FTW) cuz it started rattling like a piggy bank with a bunch of play in the bushings. Top of the line mech fails after like 10 rides? Uh, Shimano, what happened to your QC? Love the gear spacing on the XTR cassette.
  • 1 0
 @Speeder01: This is where the idea came from: www.bikemag.com/gear/components/drivetrain/a-mismatch-made-in-heaven-xtr-axs

If Ryan Palmer says it works and lays out the details it can't be bad, right?
  • 1 0
 @blum585: I really don't want to go with sram but I'll maybe have to do it too... My first 12s XT derailleur clutch broke after 3 months (didn't know what was going on while I was riding so went to the little shop in the town I was and they broke something inside so didn't have any clutch after, even if I do clean it, I just can't put it back! Then my SLX was good for a year but was now shifting like shit... I just put some triflow on the pivots and it was good or nearly good but it took me a couple of weeks to find out that. I used to never have any problems with Shimano... I had some DX pedals for 11 years without one single rebuilt, only put some chain lub on the springs from time to time. Also have some rattle problem so was looking for a GX AXS but read soooo many bad comments!!! It nearly don't have any clutch + so much loose pivot problem that you cannot adjust your derailleur anymore, after a couple of months only!

You think I should really do it, your AXS is perfect???
  • 1 0
 @blum585: I'm still having a great time with my XT 12 speed derailleur and like wise most of my gear seems to last pretty well and it's ridden regularly. The set up you've done was my next drive train though, purely to lose the cable. Maybe on the latest version of the Jester I'll build for myself.
  • 2 0
 @blum585: your AXS clutch will soon be gone
  • 1 0
 @blum585: I'm all in on AXTR after that article. Love it. I f*cking hate the stupid 42-52T jump in the newer SRAM cassettes, but I see that SRAM is finally going to somewhat correct that with the new cassette they will be releasing.
  • 1 0
 Well I just took off my rear wheel and find out than my slx derailleur is loose...it didn't move well so with some triflow on the pivot, I could now have all my 12speeds but shifting was never perfect. My pivots are so loose, I can move my derailleur a LOOTT from side to side. My 3months old XT that doesn't have a clutch anymore, is rock solid so I guess that shimano is now the same garbage as Sram. You buy one, you throw it in the dump after a year and have to buy a new one! At least the slx is 130$ and not 5-6-700 like the AXS GX.... but not fun for our money and planet!
  • 1 0
 @Timo82: My AXS has been flawless so far using a Shimano 12 speed chain, XTR Cassette on one bike, and XT Cassette on the other bike, along with Shimano crank / chainring.

I've read a lot of the same comments you've read about GX AXS and it does have me some what worried. But So far so good...

My Girlfriend has new SLX on her bike and it's pretty flawless so far so there is that.

It would be a lot cheaper to just replace your SLX derailleur a with new SLX derailleur along with housing and cable, and maybe shifter? The Sramano solution isn't for everyone, but I'm enjoying the experiment so far. I split time between two bikes, which minimizes wear, and I've only had it on one bike since June and the other for a couple weeks so I've got no long term (year plus) testing... My opinion may be different next Sept?
  • 1 0
 @blum585: Ok good, thanks a lot for the reply!

I have a brand new shifter, housing and cable and it was better but still not good so that's how I discovered that in fact my real problem was the derailleur. I have changed everything so yeah I still gonna buy a new SLX or XT derailleur. I wanted AXS to not have to go once again throught the hassle of Banshee internal routing/foam/rattle more than anything.. lol
  • 14 6
 Sram wants to sell more derailleurs, so much more profitable than replacing hangers.
  • 6 2
 I thought the hanger was originally to protect the frame. Do we not care about that either?
  • 7 7
 @noapathy: It is - Direct mount is plain stupid.
  • 1 0
 Yes, originally they were to protect the frame. My old steel Marin from 1995 has no derailleur hanger- you smash your derailleur hard enough it bends (or breaks) that mount, and now your frame is broken haha. It wasn't until later that the benefit of protecting your derailleur became clear.

That being said, the point of this new "mount" is that its pretty unlikely that force on the derailleur can seriously damage the frame.
  • 2 0
 But Sram is also the group that is pushing the universal der hanger for everyone to use.
www.pinkbike.com/news/sram--universal-derailleur-hanger-udh-eurobike-2019.html
  • 12 0
 @neimbc: At least now we know where the old Reverb design team is working.
  • 8 1
 Could SRAM make that motor any bigger? You can probably see it from the moon!
  • 6 0
 "eMTB-specific derailleur is wired to the same battery that powers the motor" Sounds like a great way to have a truly unpedalable bike when the lights turn off.
  • 2 0
 Plenty of early shimano powered bikes were like that with di2 shifting. When the bike died you had 60ish shifts left.
  • 9 1
 That Yeti looks BEEFY!
  • 2 1
 agreed it looks proper stiff
  • 10 0
 It looks a bit fugly around the bb / seat tube tbh. Shit I’m gonna get flamed for that!
  • 8 1
 @rich-2000: I actually think it looks way better than the old model.
  • 5 0
 @husker411: it’s a pretty bike, just feels like not much of an upgrade outside of a slight bump in travel and maybe bit slacker ht
  • 6 0
 @husker411:
If it rides better than the old one then they are on to an (expensive) winner. Sb150 (and 130 and 140 for that matter) are amazing bikes)
  • 2 10
flag Baller7756 (Sep 15, 2022 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @mknott9: The previous gen Yetis were all great but they did have limited rear travel compared to their front travel. I suspect this impacted sales a bit... so I suspect they will increase the rear at least 10-20mm for sure. It would also be nice if they went with a threaded BB.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756: I read they are bringing out SB 120, 140 and 160, all 29er
  • 4 0
 @Baller7756: In a video they explained that they do that to match the actual vertical travel between front and rear, which in turn is supposed to provide a much more balanced suspension feel compared to say 170/170 front and rear travel. Kinda makes sense to me, but also couldn't say how much of a difference most people would be able to feel
  • 2 9
flag Baller7756 (Sep 15, 2022 at 17:08) (Below Threshold)
 @EnduroG: Yeah, I watched the video. However, having owned 3 of these bikes I can confirm that they do indeed go through the rear travel way before the front. Air pressure and/or compression adjustments are unable to balance the front and rear travel while maintaining proper support and performance.

Regardless of the travel imbalance issue, you still have a 150mm Enduro, a 130mm Trail/All Mountain, as well as a 100mm (recently 115mm) Downcountry bike. All of which are on the light side of travel for thier respective class.
  • 7 0
 Sounds more like improperly setup suspension @Baller7756:
  • 1 2
 @gspottickles918: Probably... I suppose you could set it up properly? Have you ever owned one of these bikes?
  • 1 0
 @rich-2000: Good move.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroG: Got link to that video?
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: few tokens and firmer high speed compression and I'm just fine
  • 1 1
 @bok-CZ: I get it bro… I’m not saying the bikes are trash or the suspension is a bad design. I have owned 3 of these bikes… I’m a Yeti fanboy too.

Just saying IMO they could use more rear travel… geez.
  • 6 0
 Just waiting for Ritchie to win to release it and claimed the new Yeti already has Podiums under his belt
  • 3 0
 Haha. Literally two hours ago I was at the Yeti HQ in Golden and randomly asked what their product cycles are… the guy gave me a history of their switch infinity and left it open with a smile. Also we were told that “normally we would give you a tour of the assembly, but we are doing construction and rearranging our office layout”. The exact same thing I was told when I stopped by there four years ago just a few days after the SB150 was released and the SB130 accidentally leaked, but was not officially released… the show room and whatever else you can see from their customer area looked exactly the same.

We were told they are back to 2 weeks lead time btw. if you’re looking for something that is not in stock at a dealer.
  • 6 2
 Cool. Now if the derailleur gets ripped off there's a chance to kill the frame at the same time rather than just a cheap, replaceable hanger. smh
  • 5 0
 Tell me more about those ergon grips at Richie's bike @ergonbike
  • 1 0
 Seems like a lot of ergon athletes run other brand’s grips.
  • 1 0
 @McKai:
Its the first time i see someone who is sponsered by ergon riding different grips.

But the grips from Richie looks exactly like the ones from burgtec.
  • 1 0
 @Hamburgi: I believe Vali runs odi with ergon end caps
  • 1 0
 Yep Burgtec with ergon end caps and clamps
  • 1 0
 @McKai:
You're 100% right, she rode some ODI grips in Val Di Sole
  • 3 0
 @Hamburgi: you can see it says Burgtec on them if you look closely. Also Jack Moir is running Odis with Ergon bar ends
  • 2 2
 I don’t think sponsored riders should be allowed to run alternatives to their sponsored brands. It’s false advertising
  • 2 0
 Anyone else had their SRAM Universal Derailleur hit so bad, it ended up smashing into the frame? I've seen several now and start to wonder what the heck is up with those things.
  • 2 0
 Interesting that Richie is still combining xtr levers (m9120) with Saint calipers....he did it before with the m9020 levers but since Shimano released the current calipers I have not seen this combo anymore.
  • 4 0
 Greg Minnaar runs the same combo.
  • 1 0
 Some riders of the Syndicate do it, too
  • 1 0
 I run the same setup too, its DREAMS
  • 2 0
 Same piston diameters etc so feel and power should be identical, but a bit more material and weight to help with heat management on long decents
  • 1 0
 How are saint and XT/XTR calipers different? Honest question.
  • 1 0
 Just run full saint brakes. Nice and simple
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: thats what i had then nuked one of the levers and xtr was all i could find
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: no idea. I just remember seeing it in a bike check
  • 3 0
 Couldn't have sprayed a little water on the derailleur before snapping a picture of it? "accidentally" spilled a cup of water on it.
  • 4 0
 they were going for the shabby chic look.
  • 2 0
 Looks like it might be Superboost, the BB and rear triangle look wider, lots more chainring clearance. Also note the new chainstay protector looks like the one from the ARC. Beast of a bike!
  • 2 0
 Any bike designer who designs in frame storage which is accessed from under the down tube should be made to open it having ridden through the muddiest cow infested field with no gloves.
  • 1 0
 Full float chainring from SRAM?? I wonder why they would have a two piece pinned design unless the spider is some crazy expensive super light material and the ring is replaceable.
  • 5 2
 Dentist calls me to book my yearly cleaning on same day Yeti spy shots released... Coincidence? I think not.
  • 4 1
 Hopefully they have stiffened the 150 up. Borrowed a buddies. It is a wet noodle
  • 1 0
 I agree completely!
  • 9 6
 Hopefully Yeti have finally started to thread their BBs
  • 1 0
 Please, oh please...
  • 2 0
 @dans160: Someone posted some more pics on MTBR Forums and it has threaded BB.
  • 1 0
 @husker411: So the planets did aline!
  • 2 0
 What's the 3rd clamp on Richie's left side, inboard of the brake? Some sort of round tab on the front side of the bar.
  • 2 0
 I think they are still testing the wireless fox shock (not currently on the bike) and that was the lever for it. Richie and Jesse M. were using it at the last three races.
  • 2 0
 Will new yeti’s be released before a new tallboy? Stay tuned each Tuesday morning
  • 2 0
 where did he get hold of a 29 DHRII maxxgrip DH casing is what i want to know
  • 3 5
 the direct mount derailleur is perplexing. Hopefully that is a prototype thing. Perhaps an e bike derailleur needs to be stiffer, I'm just not sure how I feel about that design. if I was feeling bitter today, I'd say that the mtb industry is trying to kill the last vestiges of any sort of standard. Maybe make a comment about dentists, But I honestly think this might change when it sees production, like norco's spam can headtube.
  • 3 1
 A. It won’t change B. The UDH is the most standard drivetrain part in the industry. It works with these derailleurs (presumably) and every other derailleur on the market.
  • 3 0
 SB160?
  • 3 0
 Yes, if you look closely they have turquoise tape over the label on the rear triangle.
  • 3 1
 Looks like an electronic Fox Transfer?
  • 1 0
 Well spotted! For sure something wonky is going on with that left lever
  • 1 0
 @skimons: It's for the wireless Fox shock (not currently on the bike).
  • 2 0
 Yeti/Rude, no RAD fox shock anymore?
  • 1 1
 Direct mount derailleur seems super dumb. Unless buying new frame parts is no big deal to your wallet. Even the seems super wasteful.
  • 1 1
 Post anti government message on Facebook and Justin will block your bank and turn your new bike and car off all on one click of a vertual button welcome to 2025...
  • 1 1
 About time. The current yetis are/were too long at the front and too short at the rear. Hopefully these issues have been addressed. 'Modern' geo went too far.

/grump.
  • 1 0
 That head tube Bic lighter makes me want to rig up a camelbak as a bong....
  • 1 0
 Richie running two different grips? ergon right, burgtec left?
  • 1 2
 waiting for a sb120 and a sb140. If they make a sb140 lunch ride edition (145-150mm rear and fox 38 170mm front) that would be the perfect do it all bike.
  • 5 0
 just buy a current SB150??!! Wink
  • 2 0
 @striveCF15: And they are on sale!
  • 1 0
 No new linkage like their ebike? A bid sad. Also, no DH bike...
  • 1 0
 Has no one else noticed the road bike chain on the sram e bike.
  • 1 0
 Direct mount? Have we come full circle?
  • 1 2
 Derailleur wired to the same battery as the motor, so that when you run out of power, you won't be able to shift to a lower gear...
  • 1 0
 Are they new Ergon grips on the yeti too?
  • 1 0
 What no first ride review of the SB160 yet. Standards are slipping :-)
  • 1 0
 Maybe the new SB150 wont be as flexy now.
  • 1 0
 Need to revise color of his fork!
  • 1 1
 The yeti is actually the SB199, 199mm of travel
  • 4 6
 Motor bikes, There you have it Folks!
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