1Question - What's The Biggest Game Changer In The Next 10 Years?

Mar 3, 2015 at 10:05
by Mike Levy  


The term ''game changer'' really has been overused to the point where I'm sure most of us roll our eyes and think the exact opposite when we either hear it or read it somewhere. To many, especially me, it screams of a marketing foot soldier who's misplaced his thesaurus and only has an hour to hand in his latest campaign strategy. Then again, take off your jade coloured glasses and you'll see that there have been some proper game changers in the last decade. The most obvious, at least on the tech side of things, has to be dropper seat posts, and you could argue that the proliferation of ski resorts welcoming mountain bikes in the summer has also literally changed how and why many of us ride a bike. There are a few other examples, of course, but let's focus on the future rather than the past.

What could have us looking at mountain biking in an entirely new light by 2025? Is there something on the horizon that will see the machines we ride make a technological leap forward, or will the paradigm shift come from a different angle? Could a fundamental change in land access or mainstream media coverage morph our sport into a different animal within a decade? We sought out a handful of industry heavyweights, many of whom have been around long enough to have already seen one or two so-called game changers in their time, to get their opinions on what is going to have the biggest impact on our sport over the course of the next ten years.

Pinkbike


Fabien Barel - Enduro Racer, Canyon Bicycles

A junior World Champion win in 1998, a senior World Champion in both 2004 and 2005, and a number of World Cup wins between 2000 and 2009 have cemented the Frenchman's status among the greats of downhill racing, but Barel wasn't ready to hang up his helmet when he ''retired'' in 2011. Instead, he put all of his focus towards enduro competitions, a discipline that he's also been very successful at. The constant tinkerer, he's also been known to push bike development to places others wouldn't, although it's his numerous and often victorious comebacks from serious injuries that many riders see as an inspiration.


bigquotesI believe that E-bikes will force a huge evolution in the general cycling market in the future. They will open the discipline to new customers, open access to new trails, generate new problems like erosion and speed on the trails, and create new needs in bike design. All that will force the bike industry to adapt. The impact in North America has not arrived yet, but in Europe we have felt it strongly this year. They do give a new vision for the future of the market and the sport itself, but I personally believe that the excitement around these fresh perspectives should not hide problems that could affect the sport - let's stay focused on the roots of what mountain biking really is.





Joe Lawwill - Mountain Bike Marketing, Shimano

If the Lawwill family name sounds familiar, it's because Joe's father, Mert, is both a legendary motorbike racer and a designer that was immortalized in the iconic film, On Any Sunday. Joe has made his own name for himself, though, by racing downhill at the highest level for well over a decade, and even collecting a World Championship win as a Master in 2002. You're most likely to see him toeing the start line of an enduro race these days, with his bike often built up with any number of prototype Shimano parts, and his results are still putting to shame racers who were on training wheels when he was contesting World Cups.


bigquotesAt the rate things are changing, calling out something for the next ten years is almost a shot in the dark, especially considering that ten years makes up about twenty five percent of the entire time mountain bikes have even existed! But with that being said, the game changer right now is electronics, as well as further integration.

The doors that are opened by electronics make things possible that simply can't be achieved with a mechanical system. The new Di2 XTR with the syncro shift is a game changer in of itself. Being able to have the range of a 2 x 11 system with just one shifter is amazing. The integration possibilities are endless. FOX's iRD system already integrates with the Di2 battery which runs both the shifting and the suspension remote adjustments. Battery technology is already quite amazing, but you know for sure that battery technology will only continue to develop. The new Magellan cycle computer already connects to Di2 and can give you detailed reports of your rides as well as display the gear you are in.

As more items are made to use electronics you will see more and more integration, with the ultimate goal of packaging all these cool features into easy to use and clean systems, an with all the tech tucked away out of sight inside the frames. Pivot and Rocky Mountain already offer amazing frames designed around using Di2 and have done a fantastic job of hiding all of the wires and the battery, and over the next ten years there will be many frames designed around Di2 and other tech that all integrates together. I know that ''keep it simple stupid'' is a popular saying when it comes to adding things to bikes, but if you can integrate all of these awesome features into refined packages that are simple, intuitive, don't clutter up your cockpit and will ultimately let you better focus on the ride itself and the enjoyment that can be had, I see it as a win - win. I say bring on future technology. I for one would not trade any of my current bikes for anything I rode ten years ago!





Darren Kinnaird - Crankworx World Tour General Manager

Kinnaird, a Whistler local himself, is the main man behind Crankworx, arguably the most important event each year for many competitors and fans alike. He's been instrumental in what has become the highest payout in all of downhill racing, with equal purses for both male and female racers, and is now heading up the three-stop Crankworx World Tour. He is also one of four board members of the Enduro Mountain Bike Association who's aim is to ''establish, develop and spearhead enduro mountain bike racing worldwide,'' and holds a place on the FMBA Advisory Board.



bigquotesI was going to say mainstream media coverage, but I honestly think that is already starting and will only continue. And yes, it will be a massive game changer for the sport. Instead, I'm going to go in a totally different direction: the biggest game changer for the sport of mountain biking will be the change in the ''modus operandi'' of the UCI. I think this is being lead in particular by Brian Cookson. I had the opportunity to meet with Brian a year ago, along with Chris Ball (Enduro World Series Managing Director), to discuss the Enduro World Series and how it could work on its own but with the support and blessing of the UCI. Brian said something in that meeting, and I am paraphrasing here, but essentially it was that ''Our role [the UCI] isn't to put up road blocks to having people ride their bikes, it's to find ways to make it easier for them.''

I think the UCI has already started to realize that mountain biking isn't the same as other cycling disciplines, and as such needs its own ''method of operation'' and, in some instances, its own rules. I think they are going to make it easier for organizers to host events and do what is best for the various disciplines of mountain bike racing. Is there a long way to go? Certainly, but, now more than ever, I believe they are open to discussions, and I only see this willingness to discuss things growing in the next ten years.





Joe Graney - COO, Santa Cruz Bicycles

Graney's new title at Santa Cruz Bicycles is that of the Chief Operating Officer, but he's also the brains behind some of their most heralded designs, including the new Nomad and 5010c. Having been with Santa Cruz since 2001, he built and ran their test lab that we visited back in 2012, and has never been shy with his opinions on so-called industry standards.


bigquotesI think that the changing demographics of mountain biking is the game changer. Older, more affluent, politically connected riders who aren't golfing, but choosing a healthier exercise for an option... and they want to share this with their kids. This will lead to increased access and a generation of young rippers and more bike parks, especially with the impact of global warming on ski resorts.





Lindsey Voreis - Director of Skills, Liv Ladies AllRide Tour

Lindsey Voreis surely has one of the most diverse backgrounds of anyone in the cycling biz, with a stint on the reality TV show 'Survivor: Africa' in 2001 that led to appearances on Hollywood Squares, David Letterman, Regis and Kelly, and The Howard Stern Show, as well as a cameo in an Eminem music video. It's her work in cycling that takes center stage, though, as she uses her certification in Professional Mountain Bike Instruction and IMBA's Instructor Certification Program to spread knowledge and smiles on her Liv Ladies AllRide Tour.


bigquotesIt has to be mountain bike skills clinics and more women on bikes. With mountain bike skills clinic offerings on the rise, the word is out: if you want to pin it, take a clinic! The community of female riders is growing because they are taking clinics. By taking a clinic they are not only learning to love the sport, they are also learning to face fears, choose their attitudes, and start believing in themselves. When these women experience the power of riding and learning with other women, they naturally encourage more women to get into the sport by taking a clinic. Clinics are also game-changers by giving women a comfortable place to learn about bikes, suspension, clothing and other products from other women.

Clinics also mean better riders, and less injuries means a longer life on two wheels. When you take a clinic you learn the nitty gritty details about mountain biking that you never thought about. I have witnessed people with twenty five years of riding experience get their minds blown. Many people understand how to pedal and get through stuff, but when you truly understand the relationship between bike and rider and the art of balancing the bike beneath you, it will take your riding to a whole new level. With more clinics available, more people are trying mountain biking. This leads to more people on bikes, which leads to more trails, which leads to happy trail builders who continue to have work. New trails can also lead to happy resorts who are losing snow, and then it all comes around to more people finding a passion, a community and happiness on two-wheels and some dirt.





Doug Vinson - Trail Solutions Project Manager, IMBA

An avid mountain biker since the late 1980s, Virginia native Doug Vinson is a Project Manager with IMBA's Trail Solutions. His background includes land management roles with the Bureau of Land Management and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.



bigquotesWithout a doubt, the biggest game changer over the next ten years is going to be the proliferation of professionally designed and built public bike parks. Over the last fifteen years there's been a growing demand for purpose-built bike facilities. During this time, advocates, professional trail designers and land managers were working together to identify trends and develop methods to craft landscapes intended specifically for mountain biking. Along the way, trail builders were seen as professionals - working in concert with landscape architects and urban planners to design and build progressive facilities. Advocates showed up at town hall meetings - in large numbers - to engage the community and share their vision. Land managers ''got it''. Bike parks became a valued asset, funded at the same level as other types of recreational facilities.

In the ten years to come, the popularity of the bike park is likely to surge. Neighborhood pump tracks to multi-million dollar bike parks will sprout and flourish. At the same time, riders' skills will progress with abilities gained from riding at purpose built facilities. Mountain biking will continue to progress and evolve. The next generation of rippers will hone their skills at these facilities while developing a sense of stewardship for the land, and their community.





Steve Jones - Deputy Editor, Dirt Magazine

Jones has been the voice of Dirt for as long as anyone can remember, and during that time he's ridden, tested and written about everything from entry-level rigs to one-off downhill race bikes that have been raced to victory by the fastest competitors in the world. Never one to be shy with his opinion, he's one of the few journalists out there who calls it like it is, which is pretty clear to see from his answer below.


bigquotesCould it be that the mountain bike industry is largely unable to deal with game changers very well? 29'' wheels were a game changer, but only when a handful of clever engineers worked out how best to get frames to match. Many are still guessing, and the rest are probably copying what the good guys did. There's also overuse of that term, for every year bikes and components are said to be better, faster, and stronger, so I'm sure there will be f*cking thousands of so-called game changers. The reality is often otherwise. Things will improve inch by inch to maximize profits, but I'd be happy to see a low maintenance bike come to production, one with a hermetically sealed drivetrain and single sided swing arm.

In terms of racers, I'm looking forward to see who will sit alongside the names Nico Vouilloz, Anne Caroline Chausson, and Sam Hill, who were / are quite different and played a different game. Maybe a super-athlete / risk taker will join forces with an engineer of the same mindset, such as Olivier Bossard or Cesar Rojo. There needs to be more calculated racers, more 'win at all costs'. I hope some daft bastards will make a track that's so technical that only a handful of riders can ride it cleanly, and another track that's so fast and wide open that it makes for truly terrifying viewing. There's so much mediocrity on downhill track design while the bikes have increased their capability. But the answer is pretty simple when a European direct-sales downhill bike will be available this year at 3999 EUR [apprx $4,479 USD], offering performance arguably better than a pro race bike. How much game changing do you want?





Sterling Lorence - Photographer and Mountain Biker

Sterling's name is the one that will first come to mind when the topic of mountain bike photographers comes up, and for good reason. His photos have been featured on the cover of countless magazines, filled the pages of many more feature stories, and captivated every Pinkbike reader who's had them on their computer screen. From shooting Zink's iconic backflip and 360 at the Rampage, to gritty black and white photos of the birth of North Vancouver's 'Shore riding, he's seen and photographed it all.


bigquotesSure, it's easy to default to looking at the bike itself and think that the game change will come from innovation. Yes, our bikes are technically incredible and do make the ride more enjoyable and thrilling, but you need somewhere to apply that to, and I do feel that many populated areas in the world lack truly good trails. I think that mountain biking is still in its primary infancy when it comes to accessing land and trails that are fit for proper enjoyment of the sport. The impact that private and public bike parks and properly sanctioned riding areas have is huge on building our sport's reach, legitimacy and growth potential. Too many cool places are over-suppressed in access due to a lack of proper association and collaboration with local land managers, and / or the short sightedness of the government as to what mountain biking currently is and can grow to be.

I have been witness to the evolution of mountain biking on Vancouver's North Shore and have seen the sport explode, suppress, and explode again within a decade due to the entanglements of accessing land and trails properly with local governments. On the contrary, places like Whistler, Squamish and Kamloops have embraced the sport and both promoted and provided everything that we want. This has managed to make huge game-changing impacts to how we all ride, who rides, and locking in the stability of the future of the sport. What the Whistler Bike Park has become inside of a designated 'ski area' is amazing. Apply that recipe to more struggling ski areas across the globe and we as a sport are going to explode. So, as we enter into this next decade of evolution, I think the biggest game changer needs to be the accessing of more land through bike parks, sanctioning and maintaining current trail riding areas so we can properly maintain, use them, and create more trails, and the opening up of state / provincial / national park areas to the sport of mountain bikes.




Charlie Sponsel - Pro Racer, Top Robot

Some might say that Sponsel is an eccentric that sits on the fringe of the cycling industry, while others would tell you that he's leading the charge when it comes to spitting truth. Either way you look at it, Charlie isn't one to hold back when he writes his often rambling yet completely sensical diatribes on whatever topic he feels needs to be addressed. All this usually goes down on the Team Robot blog (put aside a few hours if you end up there), but it seemed fit to include his thoughts here, in the inaugural One Question. Oh, Charlie also races in enduro and gravity events for Felt Bikes and Gravity Components.



bigquotesThe biggest game changer in our sport will be whether or not we can change the prevailing attitudes of trail advocacy and build legal trails that aren't boring and monotonous. If current trail building trends don't change, mountain biking will be horrible in ten years.

Apparently five years ago there was a meeting that I wasn't invited to where all the MTB advocacy groups on the planet agreed that every new trail that gets built from now until the end of time needs to be have a ten percent average grade or less, be built by machines, paved from one side to the other with crushed gravel, pavers, or embedded rock, bench cut into sidehills, and the only acceptable form of turn is a 180 degree switchback or a massive berm. It also must built to withstand one thousand years of bike tires, rain, snow, sleet, flooding, explosions, stray plane crashes, plagues, and the zombie apocalypse, all without needing any from of maintenance whatsoever.

There was also a second meeting where they decided that anyone who didn't agree with the trail concepts from the first meeting should be labeled as ''just a hater,'' ''anti-growth,'' or ''close-minded,'' and to be ostracized and kept a safe distance away from any legal trail building. Any trails that didn't fit the general precepts from the first meeting would be labeled as ''unsustainable'' or ''dangerous'' and must be closed down or rerouted. I've seen this pattern occur over and over again across the U.S., but also in Canada, the UK, and even in the Alps, and it's resulted in two separate worlds of mountain biking: the world of legal, boring, legitimate trail building, and the world of fun, steep, fast illegal trail building. Thanks to the seemingly irreconcilable differences between both groups, these two worlds grow farther and farther apart every year.

Of course there are examples of legal trails that don't suck. Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance in Seattle, Washington, is building a pretty incredible (and totally legal) downhill trail on their flagship riding area, Tiger Mountain, just fifteen minutes from downtown Seattle. The guys at Momentum Trail Concepts in Colorado are doing a great job. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is probably the most enlightened federal land management agency in the U.S., and they've done an increasingly good job of offering mountain bike opportunities that aren't horrible. It's possible to balance land managers concerns while building a challenging trail for someone with a skill level exceeding ''Fisher Price: My First Bike Ride.'' So why do these positive examples have to be the exception, not the rule?

The challenge facing mountain biking is twofold: will advanced riders speak up and define what we want our trails to look like, and will legitimate trail advocacy groups choose to listen? The answer to those two questions will do more to shape the mountain bike industry ten years from now than any product, rider, or event ever could.




Did one of them nail it? Is anyone out to lunch? Let's hear your thoughts on what is going to change mountain biking the most over the next decade.





477 Comments

  • 349 3
 28" wheel 149mm spacing
  • 330 3
 Corners better than 29, rolls faster than 27.5. Stiffer than 148mm, lighter than 150mm. Sounds good to me.
  • 78 0
 You've forgotten the 17.5m front hub.
  • 81 1
 and 10mm to 100mm reverb front stem with 700mm to 900mm telescopic carbon bars
  • 50 0
 You can't forget about the self regulating tire pressure system. Automatically adds/removes air in accordance with the wet/dry, rocky/smooth trail conditions.
  • 74 0
 I was thinking 28.25ers would be a better progression. Maybe something between 26 and 27.5? Also, we need more bottom bracket standards.
  • 23 3
 the only one a read was charlies because he's such a legend www.pinkbike.com/video/381909
  • 8 1
 WINNING
  • 21 0
 Wait don't speak so loudly. companies might actually catch on.
  • 5 9
flag foghorn1 (Mar 12, 2015 at 8:20) (Below Threshold)
 We need a new axle "standard" that samples the specific alloy of our frames and forks and can tell the difference between new and old. That way the axle can change it's size when it senses new gear forcing us to buy new wheel sets. Then the bike industry can force us to buy new gear without having to impose a specific wheel size on us, therefore saving us endless time bickering over wheel size, which frees time for riding. Also they could just program "glitches" into the system, randomly changing the axle size any time you have a wheel off, forcing us to buy new forks and frames... Can Ya tell I'm bitter about axle and wheel sizes?
  • 26 4
 WHERE WAKI!!!! He's got the answer!!
  • 5 1
 its march and ill say it... comment of the year.
  • 21 0
 WAKIS gone back to the future
  • 10 0
 Right after this article is posted, we get another article talking about 27.5+( chubby bikes?) and a new axle standard from Fox.
  • 7 1
 what about an actual 27.5" wheel rather than an elegid 27.5" wheel that is in fact 26.9" 2 cents
  • 6 1
 If there is going to be more electronics in mtbing how abouts ABS and TC...
  • 2 1
 test
  • 22 0
 It will be the new 26+ Standard. Wide Carbon rims (25-35 mm inner) with "Wide Rim Tires" on wide 26" forks to accommodate.

They'll realize that 27.5" wheels with wide rims and big volume tires will actually be pretty much 29" wheels and will loose the "best of both worlds" advantage, will be too sluggish. 26" wheels will make a comeback in wide, beadless, tubeless versions. Then they'll make a 26"+ fork to accommodate the new 26" big volume for wide rim tires tubeless with Procore. Then can claim the "best of both worlds" all over again.
  • 3 0
 I bet the big players had this planned all along but wanted to draw it out longer by selling a bunch of 27.5" wheels... before bringing out the 26+ right away.
  • 11 0
 Inflatable helmets. Am I the only one who has the great stugggle of carrying a huge helmet around at work before the ride, or at the bar after the ride? If I could deflate it and fit it in my bag, the world would be a better place.
  • 5 1
 29er e-bikes will take over the EWS!!!!!!! It has been foretold!
  • 24 0
 Can we get something worse than pressfit? if so? why not that?
  • 22 0
 I guess in 10 years we will all be riding on fully carbon, endurospecific 25'' downhill fat bikes with electronic suspension, two shocks, a 1x25 drivetrain, chrome spinners and a signal-horn shaped like a turtle.
  • 4 1
 Inflatable helmets already exist - www.hovding.com - they are just from a smaller company.. therefore not extremely essential until specialized makes one too.. (video at the bottom of the page)
  • 1 0
 Watch "'Invisible' Bike Helmet Protects Your Brain And Your Hairdo - GlobeTrendy" on YouTube
'Invisible' Bike Helmet Protects Your Brain And Your Hairdo - GlobeTrendy: youtu.be/Y7jv0pS8G4s
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the links guys, that was very interesting tup No idea something like this actually excists, I was just joking to be honest. Very interesting concept though and looking forward seeing if this will be improved till a point where you can buy it for $50 at any bike shop and it has been proven to always work perfectly.

Altough personally I don't think I would ever buy that: I would be too afraid of it not opening when it's needed. I also doubt if it helps anything if you hit your forehead.
  • 10 0
 TWENTY SIX INCHES WILL BE THE 2025 GAME CHANGER. BELIEVE.
  • 4 0
 Headshot, you read my mind... I just want 26" back as only real wheel size and ride it.
  • 2 0
 I started reading this, and then I thought half these tossers could have had the power/company funds to save the Post Office, and then I didn't care about what they said anymore.
  • 4 0
 Half of these twits just applied the question to whatever their own personal &/or professional perspective is. Like Lindsey Voreis. Skills clinics & women on bikes? C'mon. I'll leave that one there since her hub's a legendary. Lawwill trying to sell $hitmano's electronic gimmicks. GTFO.

I was a mere cvnt hair or two away from shitting on the Dirt rag guy's senselessness about wagon wheels & then about halfway through that paragraph he nailed it on the head. Bit by bit changes are made to maximize profits & the best thing the industry could do is put the drivetrain where it belongs. Gearboxes are about the best thing that should happen in the industry, but we'll probably get another wheel size, chain guide mounting standard, or handlebar diameter. Even what he said about racing is pretty tasty food for thought & I think when it comes to riding, the FMB scene will keep changing & improving the sport the way it always has.

Technologically, 3D printing may be utilized to keep metals competitive with carbon, but otherwise outside of gearboxes, there's nothing major left to be done. It's the only area where we continue to lag behind any other vehicular industry for profit's sake. The commuter bikes have internal gearing but the off road ones that get thrashed have clunkity shit hangin' off 'em instead. :s It's as corrupt as the automotive industry fighting off EVs.

Why the concern about "changing" the game? We should not strive for "change", we should strive for improvement. :/
  • 1 0
 TWO THUMBS UP! Get the F with it someone please and give us the internal drive systems we should have had almost 30 years ago. Shimano prototyped a dual hub/crank internal drive that the pros, including Greg Herbold who tested raved about. then when Hammerschmidt came out Herbold raved it was the future again and so did SRAM... Then they proceeded to inflict their 1x shit parade of flawed engineering at us. A lot easier and cheaper to make a 1 speed crank and then crank up the profit margin by serving it up as a weight savings performance gain... and the sheep buy it.

Well, before index shifting came along Suntour XC Pro was on top. Suntour has a gear box that won't be the future as it is but maybe they will step up and regain their former glory on top assuming anyone at that company remembers those days.

I had hoped maybe new player Box would take up the challenge but instead they are putting all their effort and resources into getting around Sram Shimano and Campy patents so they can serve up another round of the same old shit. FAIL.

I mean really, how hard would it be to develop Alfine into an offroad version? People already use them off road.
  • 1 0
 Mark3 BTW, 29r wheels are 28/700c same as a road bike. 29 is a reference to the tire.
  • 1 0
 Anyone tried a Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 on a full suspension? I'm guessing that a gearbox at cranks will be the way though since the weight will be better positioned on the bike.
  • 1 0
 @b650wagon we build a wheel to fit one of those hubs to go on a trek superfly. Crazy wealthy customer saw that hub, thought it was a cool idea and was like, why not? Everything worked great, never heard from the guy again about how it works.
  • 228 22
 Do not mix e-bikes to mountain bikes please. The e-bikes should be treated as motor vehicles. I think that electronics will only bring damage to our bikes, nobody needs Di2 and electronic suspensions for fun or go fast. Bicycles are simple machines, and should remain so. We all know that capitalists need to renew their commodities to continue "making" money.
  • 93 7
 Amen. I bike to get away from technology. I don't want my fork to run out of power mid ride...
  • 39 8
 On the flip side though, to generate electricity all it takes is to move a magnet through coils, it's not too far fetched to put a magnet in a damper and some coils in a fork leg and you could probably charge all of the things like di2 on your bike by riding it.
  • 14 3
 RIght on minus8!
Not many others out there riding fixed rigid bikes w/cantis anymore.
  • 89 2
 I hope barel is wrong and I hope E-bike will stay in germany.
But saddly they started to cross the border, and now they are invading the whole europe (I'm talking about e-bikes, not germans)
  • 17 3
 Agreed. E bikes isn't even mountain biking. Like talking about the progression of dirt biking and bringing up mo-peds
  • 1 0
 @shikokukichiguy I've had a real hankering for a fixie recently and couldn't work out why, maybe that's it!
  • 7 5
 I agree with road bikes but that Di2 is really really amazing. I wouldn't knock it till you try it. No annoying derailler cables that stretch and need to be tuned. It's pretty great
  • 16 6
 I agree with E-bikes being a class of its own, but electronincs components ? think about the suspension systems on bikes nowadays... you're average Boxxer is a piece of high end tech that not many people truly understand ( i am not talking about changing seals here ) or suspension linkages like FSR and VPP those are all high tech pieces of equipement that we are used and to and sometimes forget about because they make our rides soooo much better. Electronics suspension and shifting is the next step. Di2 is amazing and super reliable on road bikes so its a no brainer for cross country racing. As for electronic suspension anything short of a full on DH bike will benefit from it, its that simple. still I personally think carbon nano tubes and 3D laser sintering is the biggest game changer for bikes as they will give us cheaper, lighter and more durable frames, wheel, suspension chassis.... etc

Just don't brush stuff off without trying it or because you are scared of change... Its inevitable
  • 10 12
 @Brakesnotincluded
if mtb world changes in this direction, I will go back to skateboarding. easy.
  • 6 31
flag owl-X (Mar 12, 2015 at 10:10) (Below Threshold)
 E-Bikes rule.
  • 23 3
 The bicycle is a mechanical contraption that is powered by a human being for the purpose of fitness, adventure and fun. There should never be, and lord help us, never will be a crossover of any form of power assisted bicycles on trails or off that will ever appeal to the greater audienence of PB readers or MTB riders in general!!! NO E-BIKES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 2 5
 @torero el uso de la palabra "capitalista" es alarmante porque estás metiendo teoría económica en el mountain bike... seguro votas por Podemos, y si lo haces verás a tu país hundirse en la mierda como todos los comunistas... yo perdí mi país por culpa de gente como la de Podemos, espero que los españoles no hagan lo mismo puesto que tienen un país de calidad que sólo está pasando por un tiempo difícil. Si Podemos llega al poder van a saber verdaderamente lo que es dificultad y tendrán que repetirse la frase "cuando eramos felices y no lo sabíamos"...no se dejen engañar por el populismo de unos resentidos sociales @torero
  • 3 26
flag owl-X (Mar 12, 2015 at 12:07) (Below Threshold)
 Ebikes deliver fitness, adventure, and fun to humans. You're going to have to keep drilling down, gossman.
  • 21 3
 E-Bikes are Motorbikes there is no real difference between someone riding a Pitbike or an E-bike on MTB tracks and they should be band off all mtb tracks especially sanctioned Legal Tracks!
  • 6 13
flag knarf1 (Mar 12, 2015 at 12:15) (Below Threshold)
 Wow have you got ur head stuck in the sand. Bicycles are simple machines have you looked at ur bike!!!!! Electronic's on bikes is a natural progression. That is what our sport lives and thrives on.
  • 12 3
 I get the dislike of ebikes. But the di2 doesn't make it easier for you like an ebike. It's just more reliable. A derailler with not much of getting out of tune which means less time in a shop and more time on the trail is a plus for me.
  • 12 7
 Pinkbikers may not like it... but electronic drivetrain, suspension and seatpost integration is the future. There really are some advantages to be had here, especially with all wireless components.
  • 6 3
 +1 for treymotleyDH. Current shifting systems need too much maintenance in my opinion. The answer to this can either be bringing everything inside the hub like Rohloff, going electric like Shimano, or getting rid of your gears and ride single speed like me Razz
  • 2 21
flag mackanator (Mar 12, 2015 at 13:05) (Below Threshold)
 @gossman Yes, biking is for adventure and fun, but exercise can take away from those aspects. Using an electronic assist to bypass long climbs climbs is a great way to keep the sport engaging. Think of it as having a free lift to the top of any trail, virtually turning area into a "lift assisted" bike park. Yesterday, I was doing my daily climb up a long 15% grade, I would have loved to twist a throttle and be effortlessly pushed up the hill. I will gladly welcome the integration of electronics into our sport.
  • 4 14
flag owl-X (Mar 12, 2015 at 15:16) (Below Threshold)
 no ebike is "effortless" though. I've put somewhere near 750 miles on various ebikes over the past year, and I find myself just as tired when I'm done as if it were a normal bike. While you can spend a third the energy to go the same speed, if you're a person who enjoys fun you'll put the same effort in and go three times as fast. Trust me. Or don't. E-bikes are fun as hell.
  • 14 0
 They may be fun as hell but trust me so is a mx bike and once again you come home just as tired but only having gone 5 times further and 4 times faster. That doesn't mean it should be allowed on mtb tracks and accepted as the same thing as a mtb just because it has two wheels, brakes, a seat, handlebars, and suspension. Electronics on bikes is definitely coming and if done write will be amazing as long as its simple and user friendly with no ride interfering gimmicks.
  • 2 4
 hey these mx bikes sound neato where can I find one?
  • 7 4
 We need E-Bikes as a game-changer for transportation.

The current method of driving around in a 80% empty steel shell that which is powered by a gasoline or diesel engine is an outdated activity for the majority of people.

Fast, personal, clean transportation can come from smaller electric vehicles.

What Electric-Assisted-Vehicles need is to become sexy. Downhill bikes == sexy. My mouth waters when I see a nice looking one. The same needs to happen with E-Bikes.
  • 4 2
 "Fab Barel (57) wins EWS on twin brushelss motor Canyon ebike" -Pinkbike Nov 2035 . technology - changing the game for the almost aged.
  • 4 0
 Electric derailleurs still need adjustment...they are just mechanical deraileurs actuated by electric motor instead of a cable. Stop saying that you will never again have to adjust a derailleur. They are exactly the same otherwise.

Also, how is adjusting a derailleur so difficult? You set it up once and unless you smash a rock it remains adjusted exactly the way you left it. Sooo how are shifting systems too much maintenance? Lube chain, maybe spray derailleurs down with wax lube and wipe....done. not hard.
  • 1 1
 Can't remember where actually, but I do remember reading somewhere that you can get it to set itsself up perfectly, you just have to pedal, it will automaticcally shift through all the gears, measure up everything, an set itsself perfectly.

It's not hard to do, but it does save quite some time and frustrations if you didn't have the time to do it but you still want to go out for a quick run, having your gears shift like shit and not enjoying your ride as much due to that.

I just think that having to maintain your bike after every couple of sessions is messed up with todays technology.

That's why I love riding my fixed gear bike, I just have to set it up once, and after that I can ride it for many months without even having to look after it.
I ride my mtb probably around 10 times a year, and my fixed gear bike up to 2 or 3 times a week averagly (+-100km per week), and I still feel like I need to maintain my mtb more than my fixed gear bike in total over one year.
  • 4 0
 At the core of my being I do not want a computerized bicycle that needs any alternate power source aside from me. That seems to fly in the face of the very essence of a bicycle. It is theoretically infinite transportation that is not encumbered with the needs of a power source beyond a human. (I am referring to shifting duties, Ebikes are an entirely different beast for entirely different people and purposes.)

I honestly am befuddled as to how your gears function like shit every couple of rides unless you routinely bash the rear derailleur off every hard surface you can find. There are no phantom variables that change by themselves at any point. Derailleurs are the simplest little machines possible. Two endpoint set screws that you set once and never again, and then a baseline cable tension with barrel adjusters to make adjustment super easy. I am lost at how technology could improve such a beautifully simplistic mechanism.

I fully understand the simplicity of a single speed, don't get me wrong. For me though, I haven't had any trouble with derailleurs over the years that wasn't my own fault aside from sticks and rocks attempting to remove the rear ones. The joy of being able to clean a steep technical climb in granny and also stampede through a rock garden at 30 mph with reckless abandon is partially why I ride. A singlespeed--for me--would just be painful and frustrating since the additional mechanics of my bikes allow me to conquer rowdier terrain that would be far less fun and more painful on a simpler bike. I recently got a rigid fatbike for winter riding and the few non-snow rides I did were a fun novelty but certainly not my daily driver choice. To each his own on that one.

My biggest frustration is flats. Tubes or tubeless, 25psi or 45psi I tear sidewalls and poke holes in tire carcasses. Procore...pave the way...
  • 3 0
 Cable stretch: happens only ONCE after a new set of cables are used.

Remedy: turn barrel adjuster counter-clockwise 1.5-2.5 rotations until upper derailleur pulley is vertically aligned with the selected gear.

If that is too difficult: please do not procreate.
  • 1 0
 Guessing I just have bad luck with my derailleur and cables then. I do only buy 2nd hand drivetrains for my mtb. And my main problems where the cables not sliding smoothly anymore. I do know how to set up my derailleur correctly. As long as I use gears just on flat roads they work smoothly and keep on doing that for ages. But as soon as I go abroad to hit some real mountains I tend to have more issues.
  • 1 0
 Mattin, Di2 does not adjust itself as you suggest. You set the stops, shift to the 5th cog, put it in service mode and use the shifters to micro adjust and align the derailleur on that cog.

silvbullit, there is more to what degrades shifting than what you suggest Cables will stretch and housings compress more than once. Grit, corrosion, cable and housing damage are all factors as are poor routing, full housing and increasing the number of cogs. every added cog makes the system a bit more sensitive to the factors I listed above.

One of the biggest benefits is Di2 does not use cables sliding inside housings. Once it goes wireless and it will, it will clean things up even more. As with the RC flying/surface hobbies your bike's receivrs and transmitters will be bound to each other and not affected by other bikes near yours.

So actually wireless tech could be a game changer however don't expect to see braking systems go wireless. They might benefit by going wired electric though.
  • 1 0
 I live in Maine so I am accustomed to grit and nastiness. It is the way trails are most of the time. I was a bike mechanic for years here and out west and I have seen and adjusted nearly every possible drivetrain combination. Sure, all those factors exist but even with constant riding in nastiness, it is a once a season deal to flush out the cables and trim the ends. It is not some incessant problem unless you constantly ride in complete quagmires every single ride. For just about everyone, it is set and forget for a long time.

Wireless will be out there for the nerds that have cash to burn and feel compelled have tech gadgets to tinker with and blab about. Delicate electronics will have their own issues with the elements and forces in mtb. The idea of having to repair or replace batteries and/or electronics trailside is, frankly; dumber than sh!t.

This is definitely breaching the point of humor it is so ridiculous. All this complexity because pushing a shift lever is too difficult? It is laughably absurd.

Also, the obsession with a "clean" cockpit since the introduction of 1X is comical. I am not going to eliminate functional things just for cosmetics. If a lever/button/switch has a purpose it stays.

If I really needed something clean and tidy like a little fashion queen than I could start riding a unicycle.

Btw, in the Rotorua EWS race one of the guys running the Di2 had an issue with it and was stuck in one gear..
  • 2 0
 The Di2 still has shifter levers. Compared to a regular derailler it is much more on point and working at a bike shop I see plenty of people who come in with fucked up cables and housing because they don't know how to work on it. To have something that works solidly and helps people keep their derailleurs on point doesn't sound bad. Now I get your pov because I had the same but after testing the di2 it just feels amazing. Maybe not for everyone but I think it's pretty damn sweet
  • 1 0
 silvbullit, I guess you must ride full housings and/or maybe you don't ride much. I'm a full time mech and there is not a bike that comes in this place that doesn't need a cable lube or replacement.

As shimano says dirt and grit is the enemy of smooth shifting and we do ride in quagmires most of the time. Funny thing is though the grit on the road is far more abrasive and problematic that the mud off road.

I agree with you on the clean cockpit BS. Everytime I see that in a reveiw I think the author had to think of something to complain about. Fail. These same morons would complain about the lack of features if all the cables weren't there too.

Many manual shift systems have failed and stuck in races or on rides too so you really can't hold that against Di2.

I get Di2 isn't for everyone but the cost is going to come down a lot as they add more groups and increase volume. As for fragile electronics watch some Traxxas RC truck bashing videos and some crawling videos where people beat trhe hell out of the trucks and completely submerge them. Electronics aren't so delicate anymore and it is Shimano we are talking about. It would cost them an awful lot if they didn't ensure all the Di2 groups are extremely durable and robust.

I can't even imagine how badly the masses will f*ck up their Di2 systems out of ignorance as they try to save a few dollars DIYing it. Most can't even handle lubing a chain properly.
  • 189 3
 So the Shimano guy pointed at shimanos electronic shifters, the Crankworx guy pointed to media coverage, the woman's clinic teacher pointed to clinics... and woman, the trail building guy pointed to public trails. Any other shocking opinions you want to quote? I think the most honest and valid opinion was Steve Jones'.
  • 16 1
 It would have been nice to see a second one of these done where opinions of the "everyperson" were used. Riders, mechanics, etc.
  • 58 1
 Agreed. The article is a good concept but I think it could have been executed better by quoting people who don't stand to gain from their bias. BTW, I have come parts for sale in the buy / sell. I think it could be a real game changer for whoever buys them.
  • 7 2
 Came here to say the same, way too much "wutever my bossman is doing is teh bestest, buy our stuff!" Take the salesmanship hat off for a minute folks, not everything should be treated as a advertising opportunity. Kinda dissapointed nobody thought about big rims & tires coming to mainstream bikes as a game changer, I'm certainly thinking it will.
  • 46 2
 Sponsel's opinion is totally valid
  • 8 4
 I felt like his opinion was more of a personal rant than a thought on the next "game changer." Not saying I don't agree with him, just that his statement only very loosely sticks to the topic.
  • 2 0
 that pun...
  • 18 1
 admittedly everything that Steve Jones says about YT does lead me to consider he may have some vested interest...
  • 2 1
 Ninjatarian - If you cut all your sales prices in half that would certainly be a game changer for me! On another note, I wouldn't be too hard on these folks. I don't think they are trying to advertise. They are just biased opinions, plain and simple. Those are the things their lives revolve around so it makes sense that their answers would relate back to what they do.
  • 9 0
 Maybe this should be renamed as "Take a minute to plug your discipline"
  • 14 0
 Team Robot. Always the wildcard.
  • 19 3
 Actually, Shimano guy aside (that really is a bit of a marketing spiel) - have you considered that what these people who are "plugging" their own thing as the next big thing might have chosen that thing to be their thing because they were passionately convinced that it is the next big thing (or needs to be)? Examply - Lindsey Voreis (yes, "woman clinic teacher", as you put it) - I'm pretty sure she's doing what she's doing because she's passionate about it and thinks it's what's going to drive the sport forward, rather than telling us it's important because it pays her mortgage (as it probably took a lot of passion on her part to make that gig happen in the first place). Similarly, Doug Vinson ("trail building guy") has been at this for a very long time. Given his apparent background, he could have a cushy job somewhere in public lands management, do a little trail work on the side, and ride his bike a lot; instead, he's the trail guy for IMBA (which I would guess would not be a job you'd take on unless you were driven by passion). Yes, there's a lot of shilling in the MTB industry. No, I don't know these two folks personally. But I would caution that discounting what they have to say because it aligns with where they've invested their life energy risks missing the point.
  • 9 1
 Sponsel speaks for me. Most purpose built trails bore the shot out of me. Give me my stick strewn, overgrown, never touched by anything but a machete and a McCloud trails that are different every time I ride them every day of the year.
  • 2 0
 When you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
  • 1 0
 And that is as it should be. Passion leads to excellence.
  • 103 5
 Just gimme more gearbox bikes at an affordable price and I won't complain. Handle bar mounted laser guns would also be a bonus.
  • 45 1
 Finally! Someone addressing the lack of proper laser gun mounting on mtbs!!! An obvious innovation the sport has been missing.
  • 37 0
 with a detection/tracking system to destroy e-bikes
  • 10 0
 That and the voice-activated silly string dispenser. These engineers really need to step up their game.
  • 10 0
 I have $20 that says someone is going to come up with a lightweight, functional, reliable gearbox in the next ten years. No more rattling or chain slap. No derailleur getting broken in crashes or caught on rocks. No more cleaning the drivetrain every other ride. Seems like this should be simple, its amazing that a good gearbox does not yet exist.
  • 2 0
 @ambatt xc racing would become way more interesting then
  • 14 0
 No way man, 4x with lasers. Pew pew pew.
  • 2 0
 Russian Roulette Fourcross, where riders can shoot at eachother with their laser guns.
  • 2 0
 crap, i was gonna post IBprotoursaysgearbox and yes comrades, i support russian roulette 4X
  • 2 0
 Talking about Russion Roulette Fourcross. I personally think 'fun' should always stay the main factor in the sport. For example I enjoy fourcross races over downhill races, purely because you're battling against the other ones at the same time. That's more exciting in my opinion than battling against a clock.

The less serious a race becomes, the more fun it can get. One thing I would like to see is more events like Fernhill Frenzy. That was a downhill race in New Zealand, where +- 20 riders started at the same time, ran to their bikes, picked it up and started battling eachother down that track that was designed for only one rider at a time. That looks like the best time ever. Even if it's not a main race, I would love to see an extra fun-race like this at the end of every downhill race. Where there's no money to be made, but the winner gets as many free drinks as he wants during the afterparty all night long.

Here's the video of the Fernhill Frenzy - watch it if you haven't seen it yet, it's hilarious and pure awesomeness:
www.pinkbike.com/video/391237
  • 2 0
 Yeah @ ad Peter. $20 plus a grand will buy that gearbox
  • 2 0
 I'm with you on the gearbox, but it's hard to argue when a 1x10 setup is lightweight, has 0 chain slap and is super low friction compared to a gearbox. If they can figure out how to squeeze a gearbox into a minimal looking 3.5" diameter bottom bracket tube I'm sold.
  • 79 6
 Charlie is bang on with regards to legal trails becoming no brainer , no danger disabled access ramps , this trend is dragging every new riders skill levels.down and stopping.progression of the sport , sure more people might be riding but they are being constantly ' fluffed ' and tricked into thinking they are riding gods when the reality is the trails are made to flatter and givea false sense of accomplishment
  • 11 0
 This is so true! All the trails in my surrounding are become more polished, with arguments like; "It needs to be saver, so everyone(the people that never even toucht a bike) can ride it". I like mountainbiken because it isnt the savest sport out there, otherwhise I would be playing chess or something.. Real concern to me!
  • 4 2
 Next time you're volunteering your time to lay out a new trail on public land with the manager from the USFS and he says, "I won't say it again, we're NOT going over 10%, Joe", tell me,
What would you do?

And to say build illegally is a cop-out.
  • 9 21
flag Stinky-Dee (Mar 12, 2015 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 Charlie sounds like the elite rider that thinks all trails are built with his ride in mind. No room for new comers no room for building trails that will last. Sure if his point is they all are white bread then that is no fun. (he comes off as more like i am too good for easier trail) If mountain biking is to grow then it needs entry level trails.

How many ski areas have double black diamond only trails?
  • 16 1
 @Stinky-Dee - We may have interpreted his quote differently but I took it from a different perspective. While you equate it to 'a ski area with only black diamonds' what I think he was driving at was 'Don't build a ski resort with only Blue runs'. He wants some black diamond runs in the mix. Mountain bike trails have evolved and improved but I can certainly get on board with what he is saying.

I have been riding all my life but I now live in an area that only recently (the last 5-7 years) did mountain biking really become a viable activity. The growth has been great and I am excited to see it but I am witnessing exactly what he is talking about. Last year 10 km of new trail were built. The year before that, another 10 km. And two years prior - about 8 km. We have a total of roughly 30km of bike specific trails for a city of 300,000 people. And all of them are intermediate flow trails. I am happy to go out and ride these day in and day out because it is what I have access to but, if I am entirely honest, my skill as a rider has deteriorated over the last five years because there is no access to advanced, technical trails. I am all for intermediate flow trails but there needs to be a balance.
  • 20 4
 @Stinky-Dee

This new style of building gets all the cash and all the approvals from land managers. If this trend continues, there will be more and more trails either converted to this new style, or worse: shut down entirely. This is the current trend. And while it sounds like it suits you, it doesn't suit most of the people who enabled MTB to become a sport in the first place by building trails and buying bikes over the last 20 years.

Funding for trails should not be for the exclusive benefit of less experienced riders. How about giving it a 50/50 split, and give approvals and funding to the types of trails that are the foundation of what build MTB in the first place. All the best trails for experienced riders should not have to be rouge built.

Imagine if a bunch of newcomers to skiing decided it was better to groom all the runs on a powder day, because they don't have the skills to ride pow. And they get away with it because they argue even experienced riders like to rip down a groomed run (yes they do - once in a while). And they want 90% of the total funding available to the sport to pay for it. And they want to clear trees out of the existing gladed runs to expand the area for the beginners. And they want to close some of the steep lines permanently because they are unsustainable and a liability. And then they want to stop people from going into the backcountry to ski what is now disappearing. How about f*ck those guys.

This has nothing to do with being an elitist or "too good for easier trail". It has to do with one type of trail (natural) satisfies the reasons why some of us ride and the other (machine built 10%) does not. Not even close. No need to disrespect anyone for that.
  • 13 0
 But the opposite is true. There are endless beginner trails and only a handful of truly challenging expert trails in Charlie's (and my) area. Most of which are pseudo legal or illegal all together. No one is saying we can't build trails the way they are already being built. Charlie is saying we need to add double black options that most average riders won't try. You have to give people room to grow. Whistler would lose a ton of its business if all the black and double black runs weren't there. Its the expert riders that buy season passes, travel on a regular basis, stay in hotels, eat at restaurants. They are the ones committed to the lifestyle, so they should have trails built for them too.
  • 13 0
 There are plenty of easy trails... 99% of new trails are built for the beginner. What's wrong with making SOME trails black or double diamond? How else are you going to progress yourself as a rider.
A lot of people with agendas in this question.
  • 17 1
 Charlie is spot on! ! ! Some of the trails he rides I can't and I would NOT want it any other way!
  • 5 2
 You can also adjust your bike to the trails. I mean if you ride an enduro bike on a easy smooth trail it's not very interesting. But if you'd specialize your bike on getting the most out of the trail, you could for example get a hardtail with rigid forks, maybe even single speed to keep it challenging (so you're forced to keep more flow on the trails, and actually have to ride smoothly and absorbs everything yourself). This would actually even improve your skills a lot.

If the trail is not technical, you should be able to get a kick out of it from going super fast to make it exciting again.



EDIT: don't get me wrong guys, I agree with you, trails should be challenging and fun. But if you have no other option than only to ride very easy trails you can try what I said to pump than fun-level a bit up again Smile
  • 4 5
 I am all for difficult trails. As builders we have a line about 18% grade with all rock - knarly and the users keeps making a ride a around it. What the users are saying is it is too hard. If the trails are too easy in your town then get involved and help make that change.

The fact is if the trail is too steep it will erode and only two things can stop that move it to less than 10% grade or rock armor it. If the graded trails are not technical enough then put it in a bigger gear and go faster, that will change them.
  • 7 0
 I think intermediate trails is a bigger issue. It seem trails either have big drops, extremely steep, rocky sections, or are flat beginner trails. What about the majority of riders in between? Something fast and flowy with rocks and roots, but i don't have to stop every 50 feet to walk around a huge drop. It's either that or flat trails with zero jumps or built features. If you want people to progress, you need a stepping stone between beginner and advanced trails.
  • 1 0
 The trails in my surroundings are not difficult, im talking XC trails. Some one with literally no experience in mountainbiking could ride them. And the ones that are a bit more challenging are becoming more easy. I already changed my bike to make it more challenging for me but if this progresses, I would become bored with it, and I think I would stop XC mountainbiking.
  • 1 0
 Come to San Diego. our dilapidated trails will be a great place for you to learn how to handle technical and unsightly trails
  • 2 0
 Charlie has a massive point. Just a few years ago I was riding only the easy stuff. Access to harder trails has really pushed me beyond a point I thought I could ever go. My 10 year old daughter is even starting to ride some of the "black" trails.... on a hard tail with 24" wheels. If I didn't have to be at work today I would rather be helping with the build up at Tiger.
  • 3 0
 No one is saying ALL trails should be rough as fuck , double blacks but the ratio is way out from what I see. I don't know of the situation outside of the UK but for every 10 blue or red trails made there is at best 1 black grade made , and from what I see on the trails and hear from a lot of riders is a want for more black trails ! This modern trail center craze swept like crazy with lots of easy , flowy tracks, to not scare of new guys from the sport , which is great and all but there is very little follow up building going on to progress to , just more and more cookie cutter trails with nothing unique to them , lacking anything special , not even using local dirt. Very little progression , more stagnation.
  • 1 1
 I get so tired of people referring to e bikes as motorcycles. We sold a Lapierre Overvolt dually and we have a demo. They are nothing like motorcycles. no where near the power. Even these higher end ones are heavy so they won't be used much on technical trails. What they will do is give folks access to our sport who might not discover it otherwise. They will let aging, injured, ill or otherwise less able people to get out and enjoy our sport and they will also be gate way bikes for people to start on and then graduate to full pedal power. These new people won't be a burden on the trail they will help improve access and funding for new public and private bike parks as mentioned above. If you banish e bikes you are no better than any other interest group that would banish mountain bikes from the trails.
  • 3 0
 e-bikes have a motor... hence motorbikes. I'm so tired of people trying to "sell" these things. People having easier access to the trails isn't necessarily a good thing. Especially for the trail builders. Bike shops care more about making a buck than the greater good.
Gateway bikes? Drugs are bad.
  • 1 1
 Di2 has motors so I guess they are motor bikes too. Actually most motorcycles have engines not motors so they should be in their own class. I've worked on a lot of different types of e bikes and systems. None of them are anything like an actual motorcycle. I doubt you speak wirth any actual knowledge or experience with e bikes. Trail builders have much more to fear from riders who have no clue what it takes to build and maintain a trail than from a few e bike riders. Bikes like those powered by the Bosch system are a long way from over running the trails. They are fun in their own way but they are pigs.
  • 1 0
 Just read a review on the XTR Di2. Apparently you can set it on automatic, that it will automatically shift for you. To me that sounds terrible. What does sound good though is the fact that you can ride about 1000km on one battery.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I don;t know about auto shift but a single shifter for both derailleurs in syncro mode sounds cool. I want to try that.
  • 46 4
 Pretty much the only person whose answer wasn't influenced by a desire to toot their own horn was Steve Jones. Props, Steve Salute
  • 7 0
 I like what he said about the track thing too. Deff UCI needs to listen to the track thing so that my WC viewing is even greater a spectacle.
  • 4 1
 Joe Graney's response was amusing in that he (probably correctly) sees the average future mountain bike purchaser as an older, more affluent buyer walking into a bike store and saying "Hey there. I'm new to bikes, but my co-workers (or kids) are into it and I want one. What's the best bike you have?" At which point the sales guy walks him over to full carbon Santa Cruz. That is to say, Joe has just described the folks already buying Santa Cruz and they intend to keep marketing to this cohort.
  • 30 1
 There is no game changer in the literal sense. Cycling plods along with new innovations every year since the 80's MTB explosion. Electronic stuff is going to be cool. Ebikes are coming but the expense of them will be offset by the impossibility of actually riding one out of the wilderness once the battery dies. I see them as an option for those that don't leave the sight of the parking lot. CF is forcing the price point to the impossible to sustain level. Reality is that this sport is far too difficult and mechanically oriented to get all that popular on a mass scale. Barriers to entry are enormous to the uninitiated, unfit,and marginally funded. Enjoy our fringe sport and be careful what you wish for, as more people will not make it better.
  • 5 1
 you sir are bang on every cent of the money
  • 12 0
 for the core particpant, the one who was practically born into it,...........it's always the best during those last few 'underground' years isn't it?

maybe those barriers ain't so bad after all.?

more riders, means more trail conflict, more kooks, and a whole bunch of johnny and jilly come latelys who are gonna tell the est..........":how it should be".............


maybe some of those barriers help keep the sport a lil closer tho the core?
  • 4 0
 Stacykohut-Bingo!!
  • 1 3
 Idea:

Electric Adventure Bike
(Give this a sexier name)

Design like BMW tour bike.
Give it supple suspension and semi-slick tires.
Collapsable solar panels under cargo racks.

Day trips, week trips, month trips: All possible.

Make is sexy and there will be a market for it.
  • 2 0
 The 80's might probably be the most mainstream MTB gets, especially from an advertising standpoint. Despite our passionate delusions, it is still a fringe sport.
  • 1 1
 @Xyphota

Cool!

But it still looks dinky to me...

The bike is nice....but how do I carry things around?

In my mind I see a trail bike with a cargo rack integrated to the frame and slick tires.
  • 2 0
 @david-kooi My post was supposed to be sarcastic....
  • 32 0
 Direct to consumer sales model.
  • 10 0
 This was going to be my comment and I'm not surprised someone said it first. This sport is getting way too expensive. For mountain biking to grow it needs to be attainable for 1st timers.
  • 8 1
 Agreed, and not just for first timers, but also for those of us (most of us), that are on a budget. I don't know what the profit margin is for new bikes, but while technology gets incrementally better, the price grows exponentially. There is no way a bike should ever cost more than a decent used car when you look at what goes into a car vs. a bike.
  • 6 2
 I can buy a new KTM/Husqvarna moto for less than a new Enduro CF/XTR/XX1 build. That is unsustainable.
  • 5 0
 Agree too. I think this model is even more advantageous to the experienced rider (Pinkbike reader?) that keeps up on the technology, reviews, etc. and knows exactly what he wants. That person doesn't really need the local bike shop "expert" to help him select an appropriate bike, fit, and whatnot and is willing to deal with the cons of the direct to consumer model for the cost savings. I would. Don't get me wrong, I love my local bike shop and patronize it regularly, but like the idea of YT coming to North America and I hope more companies do the same.
  • 1 0
 This needs more upvotes.
  • 28 0
 Oval wheelsets to match with the oval chainrings.
  • 14 0
 I am *so* ahead of my time with that one.
  • 2 0
 oval wheels?..............back to the future.


the rad kids all had homemade versions of this beast back in the late 70's in san fransisco.............

bicycle-diaries.blogspot.ca/2007/06/chicago-to-miami-in-30-days.html#links

offset hub radness!!!!

i can see the short shorts, half shirts, cookies dusters and long socks rippin lombard now.

gotta get back in time!
  • 23 1
 Steve Jones is spot on. "Inch by inch to maximize profits" I would love to see a low maintenance bike that held up and wasn't designed to be obsolete in 3 years by the greedy industry.
  • 9 2
 Functioning bikes only get obsolete if you buy into the industry hype, I have a Santa Cruz Chameleon HT and a full sus Transition Blindside that are about 10 and 6 years old respectively and are still going strong and I will hopefully keep riding them until they snap in two under me.
  • 5 0
 Agreed Pedro404. Just ride your old stuff till it dies, and do it faster than your friends. Look closely, many of the best riders are on the oldest, most clapped out bikes.
  • 25 5
 I would say electronic gearboxes combined with on the go tyre pressure adjusters with double chamber systems. Also dropper posts are gonna adjust the saddle angle as well as saddle height. After all these stuff and years passed, we can start to build fully organic frames changing from xc bike to dh bike by reading our minds. Than we can all die in peace.
  • 4 2
 fully integrated electronic systems would be amazing i guess(one system would rule all). Since we are having lots of cables and buttons on the frame. And also ı guess canyon made that kind of "game changer" thing with strive. I believe other companies will also follow this kind of frame design.


From this article, I totally agree with Sterling Lorence. Trails, trails, trails. I surprised about fabien barel's opinion, for me e-bikes future = mini motorcross. Which is definetely not a bicycle.
  • 3 1
 Seat angle on droppers needs to happen. It's a shame none of them really work as it is... so we're probably quite a way off. I've put together a manual method with a qr for both the post and saddle angle which I think works great but it would be awesome to switch it mid-trail with a remote lever.
  • 1 0
 Tire pressure adjusters on the fly would be sick, but sounds like a nightmare to design.
  • 1 0
 We actually built an on the fly pressure adjuster system for my senior engineering project. Still have the hub, just not the controller.
  • 1 0
 Maybe this is a noob question, but why would you guys like to change the angle of your seat?
  • 1 0
 Look at the seat angle of a DH bike, vs a XC bike. Ideally, a dropper would give you the DH seat angle (nose up) when dropped, & the XC seat angle(level) when raised.
  • 2 0
 There's a couple of reasons for wanting the seat to tilt back as it drops. Slamming the saddle out of the way is great and it's far better than trying to do a descent with the saddle at full 'climb' height but if it's right down you lose a lot of support the saddle can provide. Dropping the saddle to a midway (ish..) point can allow some support for technical terrain but if your saddle is still flat then it can be difficult to get off the back of the bike and it'll feel like it's in the way. Tilting the saddle back so that it's more inline with your pelvis can allow you to run the saddle that little bit higher while still being able to manoeuvre around the bike. Should you need to sit or be forced to sit the saddle will be in a more natural position, aligned with your pelvis and tilting more the further it drops. Sometimes you do want to sit through a bit of terrain to rest or to pedal where having the saddle at full height would be difficult, having a medium height, tilted saddle is good in that situation.
  • 2 0
 I personally feel like a nose up saddle is more comfortable to push my inner legs against, as well.
  • 2 1
 Can someone explain why (besides fashion) it's important to have the nose of the saddle pointed towards the sky on a dh bike? Who sits down going downhill, after all?
  • 3 0
 I did dude ^
  • 2 0
 @groghunter Yeah, you're dead right. The angle of your thighs lines up with the angle of the saddle better with a bit of tilt as well. Your thighs can rest against the concave of the saddle better and can provide more support.
I still think being able to properly slam the saddle on droppers is great. If I'm unsure of the terrain or wanting to get a bit more airborne I prefer to drop it right out the way (where angle is less important as the saddle isn't really doing anything) but if I'm trying to go as fast as possible usually keep the saddle up a little with some backwards tilt (I don't use a dropper at the mo).
  • 4 0
 Cheers for explaining guys! Beer
  • 24 3
 Good to see Lawwill actually gave it some thought and didn't just pitch a Shimano add. . . Ah, well I guess that's to be expected when XX1 caught you with your pants down for the 3rd year in a row Wink
  • 4 2
 Oh wait, I think he just did? I want a Shimano electronic chain tension adjuster for single speed! Electronics by drive train? Really? Give me ABS for front brake and then we'll talk ebout electronics changing a game called MTB, not the one more and more manufacturers play, and it is called "How far can we complicate it so that people still buy it".
  • 1 0
 xx1 f*cks every "many frames designed around Di2 and other tech that all integrates together"
theyd better have just copied it
  • 1 0
 I had the abs idea in my head a long time, can't be too hard particularly with the size of electronics now a days and the fact that we got hydraulic brakes.
  • 2 0
 Doesn't ABS require a reference for what the correct wheel speed should be. I confess I don't actually know how it's done, but I imagined that the electronics just look at all 4 wheels and say that if one is moving slower than the rest it must be sliding, so it eases up the braking on that wheel. How can you do that on a MTB where you are locking the rear brake intentionally? I guess it might still work if the logic was- if front wheel is slower than rear wheel, then reduce front brake pressure? Then you could lock the rear all you wanted without affecting the front. Would it prevent you from doing nose wheelies?
  • 3 2
 There's ABS for motorcycles. Some speed camera in form of laser blablameter could read speed at which the bike goes. The challenge would be tuning the system to braking on loose surface like gravel, how to set it so it creates enough ground bulge to stay effective, but I think on wet roots, the thing would be fantastic!
  • 1 0
 The ABS is useless on slippery ground.
  • 3 0
 To be honest I don't like the idea of ABS on mountainbikes. Just practice on a parking lot for 15 minutes with endos to find out how hard you can actually pull your front brake without going OTB, and to get the automatic response of letting your brake lever go as soon as you seem to be going towards the point where you go OTB.

It's really not that hard. Maybe an amateur will have this problem on his first ride, but after a couple of rides you should be fine. With that same attitude we should add those kiddy-training-wheels back to the sides of our bikes, because there is a very minimal chance that we could fall sideways.

If ABS will be the new standard on brakes everyone will just grab their levers as hard as possible like a bunch of retards, and all the "feel" would be lost. And if you give ABS to the amateurs they will never learn how to use a "real" brake.
  • 2 0
 I don't think you will see ABS on mountain bikes. They've tried it on off-road motorcycles and it simply does not work. Stopping distance drastically increases.
  • 6 2
 I would never use ABS even if it would work, but you must admit that if they play with electronics, they should play with something more ambitious than freaking gear changing...
  • 2 0
 www.motorcycle.com/images/content/Review/4cbr0126.jpg ... shimano will integrate the stuff nicely into your frame to a refined package that is simple, intuitive, doesn't clutter up your cockpit and will ultimately let you better focus on the ride itself and the enjoyment that can be had. sounds good to me... innovation, man
  • 1 0
 Abs takes control from you and gives it to a computer. One more step between you and the trail.
I would expect to see mechanical steering dampers in dh. The use them on dirt bikes right? Pretty sure I've seen them.
  • 3 0
 abs is only good for maintaining control when front wheels are locked up.in a car, if you are locked up, you cant steer. on a bike, if your front wheel is locked up, you have bigger problems. it does not shorten stopping distance and if anything , would probably increase your odds of going otb. threshhold braking is something all mtb riders are good at anyway. abs has no place on a bicycle.
  • 2 0
 @taletotell Same thought here. Steering dampers was one of my ideas. That would allow the use of quicker handling bikes on the climb (steeper steering angles) without compromising stability.
  • 3 3
 Wakibabble: "I would never use ABS even if it would work"

Then why have you been publicly advocating it on Pinkbike for years? Quit wasting ours and your own time and stick to your science fiction mtb drawings.
  • 25 5
 hopefully with the industry changing so much the industry will start expanding to keep all types of mountain bikes i dont care if there is a 36in 300mm fat dh bike as long as they still make a fun 26in freeride bike
  • 11 1
 ^^^AMEN!^^^
  • 8 2
 A 300mm travel 36" downhill fat bike sounds AMAZING!
Sign me up.
  • 10 1
 Double Amen! If there is anyone who actually has a substantial influence in MTB industry reading these comments, please never stop making good 26" freeride bikes.
  • 25 3
 Stop creating and selling solutions to problems that don't exist i.e pf30, bb30 and all the b.s hub standards.
  • 8 0
 Agreed, especially when there are real issues that aren't being addressed-- for example, it's awesome how we're still jamming dropper posts into under-sized seat tubes. If we make the jump to 40mm+ ID seat tubes, someone might be able to build a dropper post that actually lasts more than four months...
  • 3 0
 Right on dirty crab. I'd like the st diameter thing explored further.
  • 2 0
 Plus I now have 3 things to overhaul (or pay to get overhauled) annually: fork, shock, dropper. Not that I wouldn't expect to have to overhaul another hydraulic unit with seals, oil, etc, but sh*t - I've paid more to overhaul a f*cking dropper than my suspension, WTF? Rather than drop another $100 into my Reverb this season, I've been dropping my fixie post the old school way for the last couple months...... Reverb is collecting dust in the garage (for now). Not sure what my longer term solution will be Frown
  • 3 0
 Who would imagine that a game changer would be technological mtb de-evolution?

Those who value simplicity and reliability, and who don't necessarily believe all the marketing hype.
  • 3 0
 Emmm, Reverb is more complicated and time consuming to service than any fork out there hence the price tag. Air shocks as "simple" as monarch or Float are also costier to overhaul than most forks due to hydrogen charge and seal wear. Dropper are worth using when you have frequent altitude changes, like hilly areas or mountain ridges, but if someone climbs for 30mins + only to descend and repeat (or go home) then it is arguable to have one due to decrease in reliability in comparison to regular post. That is an issue with all droppers regardless of make.
As long as we have 30.9 and 31.6 mm droppers that are 400mm or longer, the diameter is not an issue. Droppers fail for the same reason all travel adjustable air forks do - extreme complication of construction. Crank Bros tried to make a simple one and it got even worse.

If you need to change your saddle height less often than once every 30 minutes, then just don't buy one. but if you use dropper every minute then it will change your game more than going from a hard tail to FS Smile
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Not sure what posts you're running, but I've actually never had a failure of the mechanism. However, I've had three Reverbs blow seals in the air spring, all with less than 30 rides on them. It's too bad, because when they're new, they're fantastic. If the air spring were higher volume, and ran lower (sub 100psi) pressure, durability of the seals would improve significantly. Then there's the issue of the posts developing wobble from insufficient bushing overlap. Both of the aforementioned issues could easily be addressed by going to a larger seat tube ID.

However, you're spot on with regards to the Reverb service. Those things are absolutely more complicated to work on than your average sealed fork damper, and that means that service comes at a premium price. However, the price wouldn't be so hard to justify if the damn things held up.
  • 2 0
 I had first generation of Reverb, now bought the second gen which is said to be much better, particularly in floating piston area. I also have KS Supernatural. I have no clue why RS is so keen on IFP just to make it so that when you lift your bike by the saddle the post does not move up (at least this is how they motivate it. My KS does so and I could not be less bothered with it.
  • 18 0
 REAL GAME CHANGER...a bike that does NOT cost 5-10K. Get more people riding. I rode a Crappy Tire bike most of my life. and what you get there for 1000$ is TOTAL garbage...But the next best option, for a new bike should NOT have you considering a Moto-X (no offence guys) because its STILL better $ Value.
  • 4 0
 The og's like norco and kona are still putting out good bikes with smart builds for reasonable amounts. In canada their still competive with yt.
  • 4 0
 The future is now! Here is a selection of used bikes 2013 or newer for sub $1500. IMO if you are getting into the sport talk to people who have spent enough time around bikes to know what they are talking about, do the research, don't assume only the latest and greatest function, don't stress about matching your socks to your frame colour and you should be able to get into the sport without selling a kidney...though that kidney may bump you up to carbon and new fanny pack...sweeeeet.

www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1665096 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1677909 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1624990 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1659423 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1733716 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1735479
www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1736322 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1631683 www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1732506
  • 1 0
 @snl1200 . I am well aware of Used bikes...I have a nice one that cost me 2K but that has nothing to do with NEW bikes.
  • 2 0
 @calebscott - word, good to see both those companies offer decent bikes below the $3k range.
  • 3 1
 @calebscott Absolutely! Love my Norco. And you are correct. That is likely why those companies have not gone the way of the Dodo. Still the vast majority of companies are still wanting the price of a GOOD used Moto-x. So it becomes more likely an end purchase, result. And as i said, moto-x is Still the better $ value. As bicycles comparatively, are aluminum pipe cleaners. That are human powered.

I live in a gold mining town, surrounded with hills. No excuse for $$$ or terrain availability. And yet there may be no more than 10 people with NON Canadian Tire Special cycles, in the whole place. And the reason i have heard Echoed, over and over. Who the F@#K would pay 5 to 10 thousand dollars for a bicycle, when you can buy a Dirt-bike or Quad. and have Way more fun.

And for every bicycle company out there, trying to become the next Norco, rather than the next Schwinn. Has got to realize, 1 to 2 or more FULL pay cheques, for a bicycle. Full sus, carb or not....Will have people lookin elsewhere. Even computer companies realized that. Now you can build a Monster of a PC for the same ballpark range as the over-sized/overpriced Desk-calculators they sold till the late 90's early 00's.

Prices NEED to fall or the sport will Fail. Time has told that tail for about a century now.
  • 20 0
 The end of social media and more riding.... That'll change the game!
  • 5 2
 ...Except Pinkbike! Razz
  • 2 0
 is the end of social media really coming? I tell that to most of my buddies and all I get is hate.
  • 4 2
 No social media? You mean less advertsing, less products sold due to people not seeing upcoming products, less money for R&D, less companies, less options, only 275 bikes. Social media IS the reason MTBs are the way they are today. Embrace it or go interstellar Big Grin
  • 2 0
 yep. I didnt ask the question correctly. I'll refrase. In regards of social media ending. Will the facebook ever end?
  • 18 2
 It seems like Charlie was the only one not pimping the product he was trying to sell so you might want to listen to him. Amazing that the Shimano guy thinks Di2 will be the next game changer and the skills clinic person thinks it will be skills clinics! I never would have guessed. But seriously, the majority of new IMBA trails are built by dentists for dentists. Let's get steep!
  • 5 2
 Check out Shoreplay or Trunk Monkey on Cypress on The Shore. Dentist built knarl. The high income professionals I know ride far more and steeper than most of the dirt bag riders out there. They were just smart enough to choose a high paying career that gives them a lot of time off to play and money for the toys.
  • 7 0
 While I feel like IMBA's heart is certainly in the right place (getting more people into the sport), it seems as though they lack longterm vision for MTB and keeping people in the sport, including potential donors and supporters of IMBA.

It's like cookin' frogs, folks -- put 'em in room temperature water (easy trails) and then turn up the heat with true skills-based intermediate and advanced trails until they're belly up and head over heels in love.

We can't create a bubble by only building and approving newly paved and machined trails, or people will leave. We have to have middle ground and high ground for new folks, and we also have to take into consideration that not all new growth will be at a 'beginner' level -- a lot of people getting into DH started on a moto (Aaron Gwin, anyone?) and they progress towards 'expert' level at nearly light speed. Those people have disposable income, skills and demand high-level trails... Why would IMBA want to alienate those people by only approved wide, machined trails? Hand building trails is a beautiful part of our sport, and hand work and sweat equity is something we should be doing and preaching and educating about far more than gravel pathways. Erosion channels, proper rock and root maintenance, and respecting a trail's ecological area are all WAY more important than some bullshit entry-level fisher price trail.
  • 6 1
 Charlie is spot on and thanks BTW to outing our little project on Tiger to the PinkBike community, but it really is that big of a deal. More of this kind of trail design and community involvement in trail design and build is needed to meet the demand and keep the sport evolving.
  • 4 1
 @kathwill: You sound like a dentist...
  • 3 0
 My boy and I grew up racing Motocross and as it has died moved into mt Bikes, it did not take them long to get bored with builded trails. . . . . . Charlie is Correct and our hero!
  • 1 0
 @kathwill The problem is that shore play nor trunk monkey are exactly legal. Cypress is being closely watched so that the only trail work done is not building anything harder than what's in place. If the district and bp manage to agree on making the area legal for bikes, you bet there'll be changes, and with the current state of advocacy, it's a matter of time until shoreplay will go the expresso way.

I understand it's easier to convince the city that mountain biking is what the city needs with beginner trails than when it's all double blacks, but the day shoreplay goes, I'm outta town!
  • 18 4
 plastic pedals, downduro, solid tires, freeride movies, the return of Freeride Entertainment, Redbull Rampage Kids Edition, Pinkbike Yoga Club (global brand), Whistler Mongolia Expansion, sponsored likes on PB run by Google, Google Goggles live feed from DH races, LuluLemon MTB gear for real men, bike companies that actually make DH bikes with cables that don't go down the bottom of the DT to the BB, men only MTB brand, women running all aspects of the sport which has now become politically correct, equality driven and non-competitive, every race ends in a draw for all entrants and a share of the pot, a ban on fatbikes, Retallack expansion to 500 rooms and $750 for an organic 2oz steak with local fennel gratin au jus and $300 bottle of wine. seriously who cares....ride your bike have fun as Mike Levy (used to) imply. be happy don't worry about MTB, MTB will look after itself
  • 2 0
 Hahahahahahahha! Thanks gnarbar - we take our sport a little too seriously sometimes. "Mountain bikes are serious business......"
  • 5 0
 How about this for a f*cking game changer: overhaul your f*cking life and eliminate half the bullsh*t you think is important so you have more time to ride......... (sadly for me that = less Pinkbike = get to bed earlier = easier to get up early and ride to start my day.

"The things you own end up owning you." -TD
  • 12 2
 If anybody thinks the UCI is going change or be a "game changer" they are sadly mistaken. The old boy's road club has always and will always be doing the big back pedal when it comes to understanding mtb. They dropped the ball trying to develop enduro and have continue to force rules/sanctions/fees down the throats of grown up fat tire hippies that just want to have fun.
  • 6 1
 Agreed. Id like to see a new DH series usurp control from the UCI just like the EWS. And offer more than 7 rounds!
  • 2 2
 UCI should do this and that bla bal bla - you don't pay them to do something isn't it? If you hire someone employed at UCI, pay him good money, you'll get what you want. If you finance building a track, then we will get 8th World Cup! Humans like you and me build trails and advocate for their use as Downhill World Cup venue. Shovels are put into the ground, teleophones are picked up, mails are sent, meetings are arranged and conducted, budget is pledged - all by somoene, somewhere, not by some "organisation". So if you think they can do it better then tell it to them, call one of those people, move the sky and earth yourself. In the current way you may as well print out a UCI logo and shout at it to give you what YOU want for everybody else.
  • 2 0
 You mean like DH1? (god bless thier souls for trying)
  • 12 1
 Sponsel hit the nail on the head "McBiking" is ruining the sport. Bikes are more capable than ever, yet IMBA's autocratic, uninspired trail dogma is turning what should be an adventurous, hard sport into golf.
  • 13 3
 "What could have us looking at mountain biking in an entirely new light by 2025? Is there something on the horizon that will see the machines we ride make a technological leap forward, or will the paradigm shift come from a different angle?"

Could something outside the sport actually drastically change the sport? Yes, and that "different angle" is runaway global warming. Ski resorts all out of business, increasingly violent & destructive storms, increasingly extreme weather, wrecked economies, fires, downed trees, and closed off access to trails.

Hope I'm wrong and we get lightweight gearboxes, steeper trails, and mainstream mtb coverage instead. But the writing is on the wall.
  • 6 3
 Protour, I absolutely agree with you -- climate change is the game changer here. Innovation will center around that as needs arise to keep us playing bikes amidst the chaos.

Good trail changes (ie, steeper, more advanced) will only happen if folks actively advocate for them like Charlie and Steve Jones. I have yet to ride an IMBA-approved DH trail worth riding, and that's unfortunate.
  • 8 2
 Protour and Ambatt should et together and go for a ride. Protour will bring the Kool Aid.
  • 7 3
 @chasejj Oh, my stomach. You're funny! Ever thought about a career as a comedian?
  • 11 7
 Global warming is actually very good for MTB so what the heck are you talking about?! Not only will GW increase time without snow = more lift days it will also mean dryer climate, less drainage on trails, less trees, more freedom to make hardcore lines. I don't know about you but I prefer sandy, loose corners than mud pools. Today I contributed to development of MTB - I ate lunch at Burger King.

I have a suggestion for you Protour to do a great thing for the planet: Kill yourself. Tons of energy will be saved, your decomposing body will be used for eco-fuel generation. At least, if you are truly an ethical person, please don't have kids - ever. If we stopped having kids for 2 generations, if only 0,1% of humanity was allowed to have them, through a lottery - think how good world would that be in less than 100 years? What if one of your kids will grow up and work for BP, Monsanto, become a banker or... a priest? Oh how ironic it is for environmentalists to tell us about thinking about our grand children when solution to all worlds' problems is to not have them at all. If green leftists would be aware of their Instinct of preservation of species, they would shout at least half as loud (or rather do less likes and shares) - nothing more baby... now tell me, did the text above give you enough hints that I deny Global Warming or that I don't care for the planet? Can it be that I can be so immoral? Are you already on your high moral horse? Has it grown wings maybe? Can you sink Japanese Whaling vessels from it? Just please... do not copy all of my text... again... have I insulted you... again?
  • 9 4
 As usual Waki talks a lot but says nothing of substance.
  • 7 4
 mmm I think the first paragraph has all the substance there can be when some idiot mentions something like threats of global warming in relation to MTB, especially that he suggests that if we stop it, we will get gearboxes... MTB is an excellent manifestation of climate-warming lifestyle that all environmentalists enjoy, yet they are writing all sorts of high fly crap on smart phones while taking a sht. The answer to global warming is pretty simple: suicide.There you go baby! Do you have any more ideals? tell me about your ideals... how can we heal the world? How can we live a meaningful life?
  • 6 6
 WAKI-You are a genius! Protour....not so much.
  • 8 1
 nothing like a good Protour burn.
  • 6 1
 @WAKIdesigns dry trails are more "sensitive" to erosion than loamy trails
  • 5 1
 protour vs waki is like watching a scripted episode of real houswives of atlanta. behind they scenes theyre high fiving while we're wondering that the next guy will say in rebuttal.
  • 7 0
 It's so cute when you two fight... Just precious. Would you just get it on and get it over with already?! The sexual tension between both of you is killing me.
  • 4 2
 There's no sexual tension, I have all sorts of sexual tensions lately but he ain't one of them, he's not a sporty girl, with a spiritual mind that can connect me with world of spirits - I need a fool, a scape goat to feel better about myself - he fits, he plays a role in my mind, he's a fantastic screen for projections.
  • 1 0
 WAKI - I'm not sure if you were being 100% serious or not but I'm not sure some of your assumptions about global warming and mountain biking are correct.

Your first point about "more time without snow = more lift days". Theoretically you are correct that resorts could run the lifts for more days out of the year, but also remember that most resorts where you can take a (ski) lift up the mountain are not in business because of their bike parks. They make the vast majority of their profits from the winter season with mountain biking just being a secondary business for the summer months. Without strong winters many of these places will go out of business and thus there will be no lifts at all, no matter how nice the weather.

Second, global warming does not necessarily mean a drier climate and better trail conditions. The prevailing thoughts are that global warming will make areas with wetter climates even wetter, and drier climates more dry. That could actually be bad news for both types of areas in terms of mountain biking.
  • 4 1
 No I wasn't entirely serious and if I were to connect even more issues to it, like increased weather hazards causing economical problems making people care about a bit more fundamental things in life than having stictionin Fox fork on an expensive bike then it would be a bit different as well... I was rather drinking to the issue that luxuries like MTB are manifestations of a lifestyles that contribute to global warming. At this moment of my life I find it hard to care about global warming. I know that humanity will be nothing more but a motion picture film thin layer in ice sheet. Some things are just too big for me and as an ex couch activist I know well enough how we preach that we don't practice
  • 2 1
 americans dont understand cheeky. except ambatt of course - the only mtn biker here with common sense apparently.
  • 2 1
 global warming, if it is indeed really happening, will have no effect on our riding style in any of our lifetimes. it will not be hot in greenland by 2025.
  • 2 0
 ambatt: "Innovation will center around that as needs arise to keep us playing bikes amidst the chaos."

If you want to make a bike runaway-global warming-proof, it would have to be able to withstand hurricanes, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

m.motherjones.com/environment/2012/02/climate-change-linked-to-volcano-eruptions-earthquakes

Good luck keeping trail bikes under 30 lbs, is they want to survive.

Waki: "

Global warming is actually very good for MTB....it will also mean dryer climate, less drainage on trails, less trees.."

By the time we get to drastically less trees on the planet, you won't be thinking about MTB, you will simply be happy to be alive but probably not really enjoying it. But classic Waki-Babble nonetheless; never back up anything you say with anything, just compulsively babble.

www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/feb/03/tree-deaths-amazon-climate
  • 2 0
 More WakiBsbble: "mmm I think the first paragraph has all the substance there can be when some idiot mentions something like threats of global warming in relation to MTB, especially that he suggests that if we stop it, we will get gearboxes"

I never suggested that, you misread it. I simply meant that if it doesn't significantly happen in the next 10 years.

More WakiBabble "The answer to global warming is pretty simple: suicide.There you go baby!"

You seem to have an obsession with suicide, I hope this isn't related to your psychological disorder that you have previously publicly revealed on Pinkbike. Whenever you call anybody Baby!, you make me want to vomit. For the sake of everyone, please don't be so obviously polish-euro/wannabe 80's American.

Waki: "I need a fool"

That would be your poor unfortunate wife, whom you somehow convinced to marry you despite your psychological illness, and then tragically managed to breed with.
  • 4 0
 Oh really, and what are you doing about it, other than making it happen? Feeling guilty?
  • 1 2
 Simply being honest.
  • 5 1
 No you are not honest, you are like a typical lowlife kind of Catholics, who wanks in the morning, goes to confession in the evening says how sorry he is, promises he will never do it again, then three days later wanks again and to release guilt generated anxiety goes around telling others how bad it is to wank. In the same way you live a regular Western lifestyle, yet you tell others that we must stop Global Warming as if you freaking could. In the same way you preach about gearboxes, USD forks yet you don't ride them, despite the fact that they are perfectly available on the market. Please go on reading Guardian, do you have a picture of Bill O'Reilly or Pierce Morgan in your bedroom? You must admit that your self esteem went higher after we started talking lately? How about you get out of your closet and show us your face, your bike? Your riding stance on the bike? Am I talking to a 30 year old know all prick, a 25year old student a-hole with Occupy Wallstreet T-shirt, 50 year old fck-all, or 18yr old hormone slave?
  • 3 2
 I haven't been telling anybody here we should stop global warming, you are once again being desperate. It's too late to do anything about it, the sixth and final extinction of planet earth is upon us and it will likely happen in our lifetime.

m.motherjones.com/environment/2013/12/climate-scientist-environment-apocalypse-human-extinction

Your fixation to continually talk about me in sexual terms only exposes that you are a complete weirdo who is desperate. And you obviously have anger issues. I just feel fortunate I'm not exposed to your strange eccentric personality outside of the internet. There is no reason for you to care about what bike I ride or anything else about me.
  • 5 1
 This is going in a direction I did not see coming.
  • 2 0
 chasejj - It can go into even worse direction as he eats every idea my wicked brain produces then he processes it and craps it out in even weirder form. I am sure he has some pieces of WakiBlab in his lever by now.

Protour - every person that writes so much on internet as you shows up, I may be wrong but you may have ignored a chance to show up lately? I recommended you to someone... Only worst trolls keep themselves hidden because they feel vulnerable, but it's fine, I don't blame yoy, you obviously have your reasons Big Grin You are a wonderful exception indeed. Ok let's go to this apocalypse, first thing of those you mentioned that tickled some of hobbies of mine (ways the world can burn is one of them) - now that you learned about it what is it that you are going to do with it, what are the actions coming from that knowledge, so that it can remain as something more meaningful than a questionable form of entertainment?
  • 4 0
 just typing in here so the dashboard keeps me updated and see how this ends...
  • 2 0
 @Protour Motherjones.com? Seriously? There are a fair number of reputable sources you could cite in defense of your position on climate change. Motherjones.com is a fringe publication that no rational person takes seriously. I'm pretty certain you know that, you're just counting on the ignorance of the audience reading your posts. Shameful really.

PS...Barack Obama wants to put Americans in FEMA death camps.

mrconservative.com/2014/01/30924-secret-fema-death-camps-already-at-a-location-near-you

I posted a link. It has to be true.
  • 1 2
 @Session603. Most people who think motherjones is fringe probably think FOX News is legit. The methane hydrate clathrate gun isn't likely something you will hear on the mainstream news report....not quite yet anyways.

truth-out.org/news/item/28490-the-methane-monster-roars

suffolkresolves.com/2013/12/20/the-coming-instant-planetary-emergency-the-nation

www.nature.com/nature/journal/v490/n7421/full/nature11528.html?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20121025

This article explains why all the current climate prediction models by ipcc, etc should be ignored.:

www.wunderground.com/resources/climate/melting_permafrost.asp
  • 1 1
 "Currently, climate models do not incorporate the effects of methane released from melting permafrost, which means even the most extreme warming scenarios we've come up with might not be extreme enough. A spike in atmospheric methane concentration could set off catastrophic global warming.David Shindell and Gavin Schmidt (climate scientists ofRealClimate) suggest that a real-world disaster scenario would be an instantaneous release of about 10 gigatons carbon-equivalent (gton C) of methane into the atmosphere. Right now, it contains approximately 3.5 gton C of methane.They don't see any way to get more than 1 gton C as methane into the air emitted at one time, fortunately, but the world has seen a massive release of methane in the past: the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Studies focusing on this time period estimate that several thousand gton C of methane were released into the atmosphere. But, although it's hard to accurately conclude how long it took for this to happen, current estimates are around a thousand years. In other words, it wasn't immediate. But the warming that is occurring due to anthropogenic climate change is unprecedented in its rate—the world is warming ten times faster today that in did in the PETM. For this reason, it's hard to rule out any disaster global warming scenario."

It might not be a game changer in the next 10 years, but given the extreme weather we are seeing we have definitely passed the tipping point and there is no going back. But eventually it will be the game-ender. In order to avoid runaway global warming we should have kept emissions below 350 ppm and now they are over 400ppm. What is sad is that it would have been easy to avoid, had we simply invested in renewable energy.
  • 3 0
 Protour, You still haven't explained how you use all that knowledge for the prosperity of your life. Let's assume that it is true that Russian, Canadian and British petroleum companies spread ice melting chemtrails over Antarctis and Greenland to gain access to new oil fields, inaccessible before. What would you do? sign a one click petition?
  • 2 0
 It's simply an interest, I find it interesting but I don't dwell upon it.
  • 1 1
 Nice, that's a much better response than your typical Waki-babble. It sucks when I have to read three paragraphs of your dribbling lame sarcadtic nonsense/weirdmess to get one or two sentences of semi substance, which is often not even sincere.
  • 1 1
 This is a recent response from you I'm the Gwin interview comments:

"care for the wellbeing of your friends and family and fk the world"

fk the world huh? You essentially mean fk the planet that sustains your friends and family's existence. That's exactly the attitude that is responsible for us being doomed by global warming, along with pretty much all the other species on the planet.
  • 1 1
 meant to type *in the Gwin interview comments*
  • 4 2
 @Protour. Priceless. Your defense of your source is an attack on another publication's viewer base. Really convincing. You're even more cliche than I imagined.
  • 3 0
 Haha, no, I made sad face because I thought that's the end of discussion, fortunately you were not able to live up to the statement that caused. But wow, here's some troll food to munch, thank you, you are a great caterer. You do dwell on Global Warming hahaha, and you assume that I say fk the planet... So, in which way are you caring about the Planet? I will tell you what my strategy is for Climate change: buy a big plot of land, a house, learn to farm, learn personal combat with bare hands and with knife, learn to shoot animals and people. Be self sufficient Big Grin I hope as few people as possible will act in a similar way so that their pacifism and optimism will play against them when sht goes down Big Grin So I salute you in your caring for the planet by feeling guilty for actions of yours and others, then feeling sorry for environment and calling others careless. The more you stay in your belief system without acting, the better for me Big Grin

Cheers!
  • 2 1
 Carbon Enduro bike $5k, Apple MacBook $2k, Internet connection $60/mo, experiencing a protour vs waki diatribe/discussion/argument PRICELESS! Yeah that's right, I just took yall back to the 90s visa commercials bitches
  • 1 2
 Session603. I didn't feel obligated to defend the source since you provided no substantial criticism of it. You are even weaker than Wakibabble.
  • 3 1
 Protour. Saying a publication is fringe and not to be taken seriously is in fact substantial criticism. Actually, it's quite possibly the most substantial criticism anyone could level at a "news" outlet. The problem that you're clearly facing is that you have no substantial defense of motherjones.com. So instead you revert to the classic leftist knee jerk defense of insulting fox news or leveling baseless personal attacks. I've never actually found someone so stereotypical, even on the internet. Keep it up. It's hilarious.
  • 1 0
 Ok, explain to me what exactly fringe means? Seems to me that motherjones backs up their articles with facts. Do you mean they are not mainstream? Doesnt matter if it's factual. Besides, I provided 3 other links to similar articles that provide the same message; runaway global warming is at our doorstep.

Since you called me a leftist, I'm curious if you actually think FOX is a legitimate news source? If so, you might want to google 'fox admits not news' and step into the world of reality.

WakiBabble, where is this guilt you speak of, I'm not feeling it. Provide a quote from me that says I feel guilty or go babble at someone else with your weird nonsense.
  • 1 0
 Well you must feel guilt and fear if you are into Global Warming, Religion, Specialized and unresolved hero complex manifesting itself in attack on your unconsious hero that is Aaron Gwin, for whom you have foreseen a more decent future than Specialized in a same way mother knows best which woman would be the best wife to his son. Raising yourself above the feeling of guilt is small minded indeed, unless you are a psychopath, which I doubt, as those guys tend to be extremely clever, not bothering with bullcrap like Global Warming, Economy or superiority/inferiority of Bike brands.

I love how you demistify yourself with dumb accusations based on nothing. Session didn't say that he watches Fox News, you have a set of stickers that you put on people who give tiniest notion of disagreeing with your belief. Use your right brain hemisphere a bit more. And even if he did, what does it say about him? I watch Fox News from time to time for shaden freude, other than that I don't watch nor read any News because things that happen 100km from my place influence me on extremely indirect level and I cannot predict their outcome therefore I cannot do absolutely ANYTHING to avoid/utilize whatever they say will happen to me. Talking on events going on 1000km or 10000km away is nonsense that only a mind deluded with having unlimited executive free will can find attractive. So it doesn't matter what News you propel, Fox, BBC, The Guardian, Young Turks - it is only complex tickling entertainment - in REALITY things they say there are totaly irrelevant for your life, as ong as you sit by TV or computer, there is not a single reaction you could make to change what will be on News in 10 years.

I advise you to be a bit more creative, all you can say about me is Waki babble and nonsense, I deserve more than that. This is no longer entertaining, I thought you are a salvageable idiot, well I was wrong and I don't care Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @Protour

m.motherjones.com/environment/2012/02/climate-change-linked-to-volcano-eruptions-earthquakes This mother jones article is factual? There was not one reference to a scientific journal article in the entire piece. Even your fellow readers of mother jones pointed that out in the third or fourth comment under the article. Do you read anything besides the sensationalist headlines? How do you know it's factual? Because it fits the narrative that you're randomly plastering all over a mountain bike website? Now to answer the irrelevant question that you can't get out of your hyper partisan head...No, I do not think that Fox, or any other American news program for that matter is a legitimate source of news. I watch Fox almost as much as I watch MSNBC, which is occasionally. As hilarious as Fox is, nothing is funnier than watching Al Sharpton try to form coherent sentences. This may be hard for your brain to grasp, but not everybody is a walking political stereotype such as yourself. Now carry on with an arbitrary rant about G.W Bush or irrelevant personal attacks while the rational adults continue laughing, and comparing you to infowars.com readers.

@WAKIdesigns

If left wing forum warriors can't save us from total extinction who can? Protour is mankind's last great internet hope.
  • 1 0
 Whoa, whoa, whoa -- I don't really give a flying f*ck if you all want to make personal attacks on each other, but @Session603, are you attempting to make a point about the trustworthiness of the mainstream media or about the factual, scientific proof surrounding progressive climate change?

Everyone with half a brain knows three things: 1 - Don't trust the media. 2 - Taxes are one of only two absolutes in this world. 3 - The second absolute is death (which will happen much sooner if nuclear war breaks out or climate change manifests itself in increasingly severe ways and Mother Nature decides to wipe our entire useless species off the planet).

But clogging up a feed with bullshit media bitchings of the semantic sort instead of getting right down to the meat of a topic should be criminal. Either come right out and say that climate change doesn't exist so that we can get into a verbal slugging match or PLEASE, for the love of all things holy, stop crowding my notifications feed with the non-stop pussy-footing.

It is happening (regardless of the supposed causes) and it has changed our industry in a major way -- we have ski athletes crossing over, ski resorts closing early to open up bike parks, and some major land availability and use studies going on due to increased erosion, etc. Either way... Go play somewhere else, or get a room or something.
  • 2 0
 @ambatt
What I said, which is readily available right above, was that using fringe publications with zero reference to scientific journal articles makes an argument appear pretty weak. Which some how triggered an autonomic attack on Fox News by our good friend Protour. If you actually read my initial comment I even said, "There are a fair number of reputable sources you could cite in defense of your position on climate change". I never denied that the climate is changing, I never even questioned man's effect on it. I couldn't care less about your climate crusade. As a matter of fact, I'm quite entertained by you climate forum warriors. The very act of using your computer is destroying the environment, so instead of getting in a "verbal slugging match" on the internet and increasing your carbon footprint, why don't you turn off your computer to save mother earth? Then you wouldn't have to see me crowding up your notification feed. Also, maybe you were too busy saving polar bears with your laptop to notice, but there is a little "x" in the right hand corner next to my comments that appear on your notification feed. One little carbon footprint increasing click of your mouse will make my comments disappear faster than arctic ice. Either way... I don't care about your notification feed, or it's state of clutter.
  • 1 1
 @Session603 As you're clearly just looking for an internet war and somehow seemed to have misplaced your sense of humor, I'll kindly retract my sweeping, all-encompassing statements to you, @Protour and @WAKIdesigns from above. I'm sorry to have offended your extremely delicate sensibilities and will refrain from engaging with you ever again. Razz
  • 1 0
 Wakibabble: "Talking on events going on 1000km or 10000km away is nonsense that only a mind deluded with having unlimited executive free will can find attractive."

I don't find global warming attractive, "tragic" would be the label I use to describe it. If you lived in Vanuata during the last couple days, you might have a different perspective on global warming.

www.independent.co.uk/news/world/cyclone-pam-monster-storm-that-devastated-south-pacific-island-of-vanuatu-caused-by-climate-change-10110001.html

Wakibabble "all you can say about me is Waki babble"

No, all you can say is Wakibabble, it is the perfect definition for your endless paragraphs on here lacking substance. You don't deny global warming, you just don't want people to talk about it in the same way you don't want people to ever be critical of any form of Christianity. In other words, you are uncomfortable with facts that are uncomfortable facts.
  • 1 0
 @ambatt - I apologize for cluttering your dashboard with pseudo intellectual, meaningless crap, it won't happen again, if I had a heart I could love you, if I had a voice I would sing.

@Protour - stop fkng yourself, I'm comfortable with any subject, I'm uncomfortable to attach myself to any mainstream fab. In the end we all die
  • 3 0
 Waki: " I apologize for cluttering your dashboard with pseudo intellectual, meaningless crap..."

That is the essence of your existence here on Pinkbike. But thanks for a rare post with surprisingly less babble.
  • 2 0
 the argument fell on it's face with the statement "climate forum warriors"
  • 2 0
 Until now, I tought waki and protour comments were written by the same schizophrenic guy
  • 11 3
 I'm definitely with the IMBA guy on local purpose built bike parks being the game changer... getting the kids involved at a young age and having a purpose built place for them to ride is key. It's not like when I was a kid where I could go out and roam the neighborhood all day on my bike without a care in the world. No way would I let my kids out of my sight all day.. Having a place that families can pass on the passion for cycling to their kids without the worries of "creepers" is key. If you build it, they will come!
  • 17 0
 While I agree with mister IMBA, I'm also with Charlie/Team Robot and Steve Jones -- the level of trails and race courses needs to step up. If we pave every trail for the sake of 'getting more people into the sport', we'll kill the sport.

The soul of mountain biking is built around accomplishment and a sense of progress, love for the outdoors and adventure, and riding a perfectly machined trail that's a mile wide cut into a side hill isn't an accomplishment or an adventure, but a basic human function.

We need to build beginner-friendly trails to get them into it, and seriously challenging intermediate and expert trails to KEEP them into it. Purpose-built bike parks are all well and good, but we don't get amazing riders by giving them perfect trails. The best riders can ride nearly anything, not just groomed bike park runs where the occasional braking hole is seen as 'treacherous'.

Looking at this from a one-issue standpoint is silly. It's going to take big-picture mentality to lead us in a direction we want to go.
  • 4 3
 Can someone remind me why I should want tons more people riding bikes?
  • 2 1
 The kids need to be challenged at a young age, the sooner the better if you want them to actually progress while they are at their highest learning rate.
  • 3 1
 @codypup, probably first? Because it's not about you. It's not 'about' any of us -- we certainly weren't the first dummies on bikes, and we won't be even close to the last. Pretending that this is an exclusive club is just that: pretending, and the elititist bro culture bullshit is also just bullshit.

More people on bikes = more stoke. More stoke = more sustainable growth. More sustainable growth = increased funding for rad contests, race series, festivals, technology, research, development, and best of all, increased global happiness.

Dude. Could you remind me of why we DON'T want more people on bikes?! Smile Playing bikes is rad. People on bikes is rad.
  • 3 2
 @ambatt-just because I don't feel like I need to be an advocate doesn't mean I am opposed to more people on bikes, we just have a different perspective. I don't care about "rad contests", I just like to ride my bike. 95% of the time, I ride by myself, so I don't think I contribute much to 'bro culture.

I'm not elitist-I also believe that we don't need to dumb down mountain biking so there is no hurdle at all to entry-think of it in terms of whether you want your favorite downhill trail accessible to yahoos on e-bikes. Quads are the dumbed-down version of dirt biking and they have ruined thousands of miles of single track and seriously damaged off road motorcycling. Don't get me started on side-by-sides. I taught my son to ride and you will never meet a more passionate cyclist-that didn't happen because we made it easy for him. Balance in all things. People don't value what comes too easy.

I'm all for more people on bikes, but it's not my responsibility to make that happen. If anyone asks, I tell them I love riding my bike and I tell them why I love it. If they buy a bike, I'll take them riding, but I'm not going to feel responsible for sanitizing my trails to the detriment of their learning curve and ultimate enjoyment of the sport.
  • 2 0
 You asked if someone could remind you why you should want more people on bikes. Just being a friendly PB user and obliging your request. Wink
  • 11 1
 The price of bikes going down and more trails, not sure what else would really "change the game" more.
  • 8 1
 What about the enduro/all mountain trend continuing further. I'm not interested in gadgets, but it's amazing you can now get a 160mm bike that rides good up the hills as well. What if in ten years you could buy a 200mm bike that climbs well and descends as well as today's downhill bikes? This has happened once already, why not again... Smile
  • 8 0
 Many of you may not see it yet but High School mtb is growing here throughout the U.S. Within a few years, it will hopefully be a full High School sport. This is where the new pros will be coming from.
  • 1 1
 My son would rule in Norcal HS MTB racing. But the problem is when they run the league. They are competing with major sports like basketball. They need to move it to a different part of the school year to gain more participation. There is no way he would give up the glory sport of basketball for the lonely sport of MTB racing. MTB racing in HS goes nowhere until they figure out a way to have the events near the schools and get student body involved in spectating.
  • 7 1
 While nobody cares what I think, my 2 cents is that the next big thing is app-based suspension tuning. We all carry phones that are very powerful, it's only a matter of time until all suspension players tap this power to make adaptable suspension, no more external switches to flip.
  • 1 0
 Hell yes, I would pay for this in a heartbeat. A database from suspension and frame companies with compatibility configurations. Ability to input style of riding, weight, suspensions type to get the best tune.
  • 1 0
 Never. And I would likely not use high $ electronic suspension. But that's my guess regardless
  • 6 0
 Why do we need a game changer? I love where we are at but I also loved the hell out of where it was at 15 years ago. Time to connect with the outdoors, to be in our bodies and out of our heads, to move...fast, and to add some managable risk are hard things to come by in the modern world and I found them on a bike when I was 5 and still find them now almost 30 years later. I'll continue to appreciate the advances in the sport but lets not forget the game started out pretty rad and still is...so lets just relax a little bit.
  • 7 0
 seriously, e-bikes? wtf
for the last time, e-bikes are motorized: they're motorcycles...leave them out of the mtn biking conversation...leave them out of the cycling conversation altogether.
  • 10 3
 I hope we just finally all settle down on all these new and improved standards across the board. WOULD BE NICE YA KNOW. And ugh at even the mention of E-Bikes.
  • 6 1
 Joe and Lindsey have it pegged - skills training (her emphasis is women, but it applies universally, especially with youth and families and old farts like me), trails access and advocacy, local trail centers (check out Hood River's Post Canyon or all of Bend, OR for a glimpse of what's possible), changing demographics, youth, and a boatload of ski resorts trying to leverage investment in their existing infrastructure in the face of less reliable winter seasons. Put all that together, and that could truly change things up. All the gear stuff is great, all the competition stuff is awesome - but all of it pales in comparison to those factors driving the sport at a macro level.

E-bikes on trails? Sideshow conversation at best, distraction putting access at risk at worst, at least in North America. E-bikes for commuting in town - whole different topic.
  • 1 1
 Agreed.
  • 6 1
 I think e-mtn-bikes have the potential to greatly harm trail access for pure-human powered biking. The only thing I can do is vote with my dollars: any company that produces an e-mtn-bike and any shop that sells an e-mtn-bike is on my blacklist. No, e-mtn-bikes are not just another new tech such as disc-brakes or suspension forks once where. I absolutely love trying out the latest technologies on my bikes just so long as they are 100% human powered!
  • 8 0
 26" wheels... in 10 years they will be 'rediscovered'... the latest and greatest... oh wait....
  • 11 3
 Team Robot getting it spot on as usual.
  • 10 2
 E-Bikes can fuck right off, on and off road versions.
  • 4 0
 Can we bring 4X back?

The tracks can be built in a relatively small area, stages for crowds to see the action like outdoor moto, crossover fans/athletes from bmx and moto. It can be televised, commentated and draw in local crowds like a race tour. It can bring mtb into area's that dont have the vertical landscape to create a local scene. It could tie in DS and speed & style. Ultimately we could have these remaining parks in between the race stops for everyone to enjoy.
  • 1 0
 ^^^^This. 4x and dual slalom C'mon UCI. Get it together.
  • 3 0
 Eliminator was pretty bad.
  • 3 0
 Eliminator *is* pretty bad.
  • 2 0
 I thought the uci was doing away with it for world cups...?!?
  • 2 0
 Really? I hope this is true!
  • 4 0
 The first thougt when I read the title: More bikeparks and more trails. Electric bikes are not going to grow the sport. It's all about accessibility: The easier it is to get yourself and the bike on a trail, the more likely you are to ride.
  • 6 2
 I'd say "Pinkbike members maturing and not complaining automatically about every new product, size, standard, price, etc that makes what they have already obsolete" but that'll never actually happen in 10 years let alone 10 decades.
  • 1 0
 So here's a myth that I keep seeing pop up: Any new standard introduced makes things made to existing standards obsolete. This simply isn't true in most cases. 26" will likely never be obsolete because there is nothing wrong with it and there are so many millions of products out there to support it past the average enthusiast current consumer life time.

There are others. The "standards" that will go obsolete are the proprietary ones especially those that involve some miniscule dimensional change, just enough to force you to buy the maker's replacements that are paired with an equally miniscule alleged improvement that shows a difference on paper but not perceivable on the road or trail.

The fastest way to end this stupid trend towards miniscule differences created by companies like Trek and the different for the sake of being different like Cannondale is to not buy ant of their stuff. I've never seen a Jekel or Claymor on a trail any where in our region from the Fraser Valley to Pemberton. We do see lefties though and lefties really were superior every other fork manufacturer would make righties... and create a new right brake standard... Kermit the frog says Yaaaaaaaayyy!
  • 5 0
 Charlie Sponsel was hitting a very important topic. That's why I am now heavily involved in my local trail building non-profit. If shredders run the clubs then we will build what shredders want and need.
  • 4 0
 there is A LOT of support for charlie's take in this thread. i vote the "top robot's" response to be the most important one in the article - it is all about the trails, not the bikes or innovations that will stoke our sport for the next 10 years.

land managers need to take a 101 class on what it is that brings stoke for us during our rides(and might be better if they weren't spandex weekend warriors with an opinion, who happen to work at dnr), but ones who research the stats and get enlightened on how rad legal building has become on sanctioned trails recently.

also, the term "black diamond trail" can be misleading. a black diamond trail doesn't necessarily dictate being riddled with big gaps or drops, but is instead a matter of how steep, technical and challenged you are during your run of it; that brings up your stoke factor. "jump-lines" are for people who like to jump. steep, technical, gnarly lines on natural terrain through the forest on the other hand, are for all of us... & more on point for what i take charlie's opinion to mean. let's throw out the 10% rule as a first step.

most importantly for our futures sake, let’s open up the bridge to bring together the dividing line of builders who either decide they need to sculpt “un-sanctioned trails” (because the land managers on their close-by government hill only allow IMBA style “mineral soil highways” with no natural “test your skill” technical sections), VS the army of peeps’ willing to help on the sanctioned digs’. This is the golden gem of hope for our future.
  • 9 1
 ROBOTS TAKE OVER IMBA
  • 1 1
 That would mean he died. We don't want that.
  • 4 1
 I have a strong hunch the "game changer" of the next ten years may not yet have been conceived, I guess we'll have to wait & see.

As far as E-bikes, I think they have a tremendous potential to ruin any of the good will that riders/trail advocacy groups have been working HARD to gain since the 90's.
There are people that will be attracted to them because they don't have to "earn their ride", but them being out on PUBLIC trails shared with walkers, hikers, etc is going to become a bone of contention. I maintain that if it has an engine or a motor, it is NOT (in the strictest sense) a bicycle, and does not belong on PUBLIC MTB trails (particularly when they're shared use trails).
  • 8 1
 Steve Jones....legend! Just say it like it is!
  • 3 0
 I can't help but think that all mountain/enduro bikes are one of the biggest game changers to date. They enable people like myself to ride whatever they want fairly competently without the need to pick a disciple and live with it because I for one can't afford - and don't have space for multiple bikes. Now a modern enduro/all mountain bike does it all (at my non pro level of course) without any drama or worry. I remember when I started mountain biking, you were either a dh'er, xc'er (or trials, FR'er, street or dj'er, e.t.c) rider and you had an appropriate bike that was generally pretty heavily biased towards that disciple only. Whilst you could have a hack at taking your fairly dedicated machine to occasionally try your hand at another mtb discipline, it was generally more effort than it was worth and even some what risky if for example you were taking your beloved superlight xc machine down black grade dh trails.... But now, all mountain/enduro bikes seem to enable you to ride whatever you want. It's great to have more areas of my favourite sport opened up to me in this way Smile . There will always be contingents of the mtb community who dedicate their time to one core discipline, e.g. dh and that's still great for the sport but for what I suspect is a notable proportion of the mountain bike community, capable enduro/AM bikes are a very welcome development in the industry and I look forward to seeing the future of am/enduro!
  • 5 0
 If pinkbike is still around in 10 years they should repost this article to compare what has happened to predictions of what happens
  • 2 0
 That would be amazing! Beer


They should also ship a package of cookies to the person in the comments who was most right Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @space97 -> time capsule, bitches! I love it!
  • 5 1
 Adjustable geometry in combination with cheaper/more common carbon builds. A 160mm+ that literally climbs and weighs the same at a 100mm bike? Come on...
  • 6 2
 Great words of Steve Jones undoubtedly the industría should focus on improving affordable bikes and not so much on that cost $ 10,000 ...
  • 5 3
 @fabien barel, hate to burst your bubble but e-bikes will never be a "thing" over here in 'Merica. their are already options for motor assisted riding, they are called Dirt Bikes and they are a bajillion times more fun and reliable than your rechargeable bicycle. its one or the other, for the sake of the sport. how would you like to be rippin down a trail on your dirtbike, come around a corner and have to avoid a group of e-bikers doing less than half your speed. Or to be on your local trails and get blown away by some jamoke on a silent motor assisted bicycle. KILL IT NOW!
  • 2 2
 I read on US forums all the time about MX tracks closing down over there due to noise and environmental BS, not as much as a problem as over here in Europe as you have so much more space but it's definitely an issue. an almost silent E-bike could help save the sport from the tree-huggers & NIMBY's.
  • 2 5
 im not talking about mx tracks, im talking about trail riding. you can neg me all you want but its just not going to happen. "im going to trade in my 450 for the new e-bike!" SAID NO AMERICAN EVER.
  • 3 1
 I would seriously challenge your idea that e-bikes will never be a "thing". For God sakes electronic longboards are gaining a massive following.
Especially as battery and electric motor technology increases and they start to get lighter with longer run times you are going to see them explode in popularity (and that's not to say they aren't pretty amazing right now, cause they are!).

For people looking at bikes as purely a form of transportation, an electric bike makes an incredible amount of sense. Sure motorcycles exist, but you can now effectively ride an electric motorcycle which requires no license, no insurance, no road testing, no emission testings, etc.
With an e-bike, out-of-shape people can now ride triple the distance and you can ride an hour to work and not be sweaty!
Weekend warriors will love them as you won't even need to be in shape to spend all day on the trails. Are too tired? Slap a charged battery on your bike and you can spend another hour doing some climbs.

Do I think it will bring the people into mountain biking people like you and me would probably want to hang out with? God no.
Will it make mountain biking more Rad!? Hell no!
Will it be the demise of mountain biking? Will it be the straw that breaks the spine of mountain biking, ushering in all sorts of skinny armed, wrist protector wearing weirdos? Yes. It may be the cryptonite of Mountain biking. But think its inevitable that the popularity of e-biking will only increase.
  • 2 4
 if your argument is for cheap power assisted transportation than look at 49cc scooter prices opposed to e-bikes. im glad you feel the need to "challenge" my statement, lol. lets continue this conversation in ten years time.
  • 2 0
 A part of my argument was for power assisted transportation. But having the ability to ride your downhill bike to work, and then after work ride it up the mountain, and then be able to go un-power assisted down the mountain could be a "game changer". I am not saying it is going to be the most beneficial thing for mountain biking but to dismiss e-bikes as a passing fad I think is short sighted.
  • 2 1
 ebikes are here to stay. either we like it or not, there's a 1 to 3 ratio on most big cities when it comes ebike stores vs regular bike stores, it is a growing market, I was part of an ebike engineering development team back in 2010 and 2011, I had mixed feelings every time the boss showed the long term sales forecast
  • 1 0
 whitebullit, e-bikes will continue to evolve into much better bikes than they are now. Were you around when the first production mountain bikes came out? What we have today has 30 years of development behind it. I get to ride nice old school bikes frequently and while they are still nice the feel of the new components is a world better.

We sell Lapierre Overvolts at our shop. They are a fun diversion but pigs on the trail. There is nothing to fear from these bikes over running the trails. Shimano will introduce their own e assist at the end of this year. In 30 years when you want an e bike to keep riding that bike will be a world better than what we have today.

As for 49cc scooters and gas engines on bikes I pass one of those pieces of shit commuting on my 600.00 29r hard tail every day with flats and full knobbies. What a waste of gas those things are. The guy has to push his piece of shit gas bike upp the switch back I ride up easily.

I'll finish with how ridiculous it is to suggest the experience on a current motocross bike is anything like what it is on a mountain bike or pedal assist e bike. They are worlds apart.
  • 7 2
 joe lawwil is an idiot-nobody gives a damn about difucking2. shimano's stupidest idea to date...
  • 3 1
 oh, i forgot, you wanna integrate di2 into an ebike platform and then lease out parcels at trailheads to mickeydees so they can sell burgers and fries and cokes to fat asses who wouldn't otherwise ride. awesome...
  • 2 2
 @upchuckyeager -> Not sure why but the dithuckstick2 also pisses me off. Guess it's because I'm attempting to trend towards a simpler bike, and not a more complicated one. Possibly also because I've seen prices spike sharply in recent years and another expensive electronic gizmo is the last thing that's gonna add value to my rides and life. In recent years I've ditched a cyclocomputer and the whole front derailleur shtick (now 1x10), though I have added a dropper.

So not interested in electronic gizmos with batteries integrated into my bike, but the "roadie" mtn bikers will love it. I'm happy to not care about whether my top or average speed was more or less than last ride. How often I ride and how well I ride (smooth / in the zone) are most important. Strava is polishing the brass on the Titanic.
  • 4 1
 seriously mr lawwil, 1st rule of marketing-know your audience. this is pinkbike...go sell your douchebag DI2 to the idiots who read velonews. that's it, i'm done with this little tirade.
  • 2 2
 Agreed. I usually prefer Shimano stuff for shifting duties but I do NOT want batteries on my bike. All-day epic exploration? Sounds great! Wait, I need to order more battery packs. The idea that my bike need electricity to function is asinine.
  • 2 2
 Wow. Hellfire and brimstone, anyone?! Y'all are sure worked up about this... You'd think Shimano was holding guns to heads over this.

Joe isn't an idiot, he's simply looking into the future a bit with some wishful optimism. Fortunately for you, Shimano isn't even talking about phasing out mechanical groups and in fact, are releasing the XTR Di2 right alongside the XTR mechanical.

But does anyone want to be realistic? GOD FORBID, NO!!! I mean, it's not like they kept the DuraAce mechanical group on the market when they released the DuraAce Di2 or anything... Oh, wait. They did. As long as there's a market for the mech, I'm pretty sure Shimano will keep making it. No one is trying to cyborg hack your bikes, guys... There's still plenty of mechanical stuff on the market, they're just increasing a consumer's options.

Is that such a bad thing? Did ENVE close down the mid-priced wheel market? Are only carbon wheels available these days? No. It's just another option in the line up of many. Maybe move the hysteria over to trail building or something? I dunno.
  • 2 1
 ambatt-the point is shimano could've spent 1 week developing an 11-44T cassette, and a minor mod to existing derailleurs. instead they came up with DIfucking2. maybe joe lawwil is an idiot, maybe he isn't. more than likely he's just a paid marketing hack. a hack who doesn't know the audience here at PB. the lycra clad idiots who read velonews will probably eat DI2 with silver spoons. me, not so much.
  • 3 1
 ambatt: Your point is implied to the extent that you did not need to type it out. It is a universal and tired capitalist argument justifying everything that is bad about profit-first, logic-and-ethics-second business practices. Everyone knows they have a choice. Vote with your money yada yada...

The annoyance for those that agree with me is the over-arching theme of "innovation" that adds expense, and complexity for an end result that is the same or possibly even worse than the existing system. I would say a glaring example would be the advent of press-fit BBs and the resulting mass of standardization fookery as a result. In the case with the Shimano Dic2short system it seems there would be a host of negatives to solve a problem that is non-existent. "Two steps back"--to quote Paula Abdul.

Get two beers in any industry rep and he will tell you that many of the newest "innovations" are to drive sales.

It was already addressed by Mr. Chuck Yeager himself that the only guys and gals that will buy this crap is the techno-weenie rich guy who spends more time checking the accuracy of his gram scale than actually riding his bike. As a result he is slow and extremely annoying yet still runs Strava every ride making excuses as to why he can't ride. He talks your ear off at the trailhead about how rad and super light his bike is while you bite your tongue because you don't care and just want to ride. His bike rack is worth more than my car.

Joe Lawwill is an employee of a relatively large corporation and he has to hawk their newest shit or he loses his job. He is a prostitute for Shimano or has a great job. I say a little of both but what he said falls right in line.
  • 2 0
 Not sure about this wireless stuff I go out with my Bluetooth headphones on a walk, when I go past certain power lines and telegraph poles they cut out Don't want the dropper post suddenly collapsing or the gears going berserk and splattering me across the windscreen of the oncoming local bus!
  • 2 0
 With electronically controlled suspension already a reality, my guess is going to be course specific, section specific live-tuning based on seeding run data acquisition. For example, in pedal sections the suspension will change its parameters to be more pedal efficient. This may actually happen sooner than later.
  • 4 2
 last 10 years the price of bikes has doubled. You can not find a decent bike below $3300 these days. If the price keeps going up it will be the end of new comers to the sport because no one wants to throw thousands into something to start out.
  • 2 0
 Second hand.
  • 2 0
 If you search well you can find 2nd hand bikes and parts in a decent state for about 25-30% of the retail value.
  • 2 0
 @chrisg1111 re: prices -> I'd like to see the trend toward more "affordable" carbon frames (eg. Santa Cruz) continue, but I'd also like to see aluminum options still offered liberally (eg. Yeti -> where the hell is my SB5-A?!?! Love your bikes, but can't support a company that doesn't see the working man as part of their market).
  • 2 0
 a dh tire/rim interface. No, not procore, but a better bead area of the tire that helps prevent burping or flats. I would also like to see the development of a super lightweight tire mousse for dh purposes, eliminating flats altogether.
  • 4 2
 Yea e-bikes destroy trails! Their owners go at nights to bikeparks and create brake bumps with special tools. Then they rebuild dirt jumps so that they are smaller because they are affraid of jumping the big ones. Those cunning E-bikers also make cutties on switchbacks, cut trees and bushes to make stright Strava lines through S-turns. No real MTBer on a non assisted bike would ever modify a trail to KOM. The worst kind of e-bikers skid with foot out flat out!

BUUUURN THE WITCHES!!!

I say make it 100% allowable for anyone to compete in EWS on electric bike, and let's see how many pros will chose to race a predominantly downhill track with 20 pounds more attached to the bike. The devil is not out there, it is in the mirror. No, MTB is not the same thing for you as it is for Fabien, and No, you don't know what he means - get better at things you accuse e-bikers of,
  • 2 1
 "No real MTBer on a non assisted bike would ever modify a trail to KOM" - tell that to the strava*sholes in Agoura
  • 1 2
 Is that really the best you could come up with waki? That's not even Waki babble, that's just boring and lame. You are out of touch with your cliche sarcastic comments, ugh.
  • 2 0
 Joe Graney...hit the nail on the head, the next tiger woods will be a mountain bikerish person, probably affluent white rider from West Coast with a family in the Ebiz industry. this will open up more trail opportunities , better value in bikes/parts and an overall moral acceptance into mainstream culture. Its already happening with road bikes, needs a decade to make sense I guess. Wink
  • 2 0
 I agree with the next generation comment, there is an amazing dirt jump park in our community run my the manicupality and it is very busy with kids and adults. I am now starting to ride with my kids 9 and 6 years old. We decided not to play soccer this winter and ride instead. We get time together, exercise, nature and excitement, .......also my enduro 29 is a game change too!!!!!
  • 3 0
 the whole industry needs to be standardised just so you know what parts will fit together and it'll drive the cost down as all the OEMS won't need specific molds and equipment to supply orders to certain companies.
  • 2 0
 I think the next big game changer would be if manufacturers found out what riders want and then made it, rather than making a whole load of stuff that only Steve Peat could get the max out of and convincing everyone they need it.
  • 7 0
 Charlie nailed it !!
  • 2 0
 I hope we will see a sealed, mostly maintenance-free belt/gearbox system for full suspension bikes. There are still fundamental problems with the current chain and derailleur drive systems that effect safety, reliability, durability, performance, and even suspension performance. As one member so elequently put it, "They are like polished turds." So I would love to see an all around superior gearbox/belt drive system become the new standard. Everything else will probably just be incremental improvements as we have recently made a lot of semi-major leaps in component sizing and geometry and with things like dropper posts.
  • 2 0
 Has there ever never been any "1" game changing factor in MTB? Will there ever be? I think the fact that this articles author chose 9 people from such diverse backgrounds in MTB was fairly obvious, and answers both of those questions with a resounding... NO. Regardless of their position in the MTB world .. each interviewees perspective spoke to some essential element(s) that are imperative to mountain biking's continual growth and success. Mountain biking ubiquitously, is a subject with so many various components that could be " game changers " - & they are ultimately connected to each other.
  • 2 0
 I agree with Lindsey and Joe L. Electric assist and throttled bikes should stay off single track and out of the parks but electronic shifting and adjustments etc, BRING IT ON! As for women in the sport, we're constantly seeing growth - there's been women motivating their guy friends or significant other into the sport lately, on the road and trails! The kids too, how about that Norco Fluid 24" bringing an affordable dual air suspension bike on the market for the future pro riders?!
  • 2 0
 Homegrown grassroots events and ride groups will continue to change the game and make it accessible. Fostering the interests of new riders through "unsanctioned" events, group rides, education opportunities and youth empowerment will get families involved. Quality affordable opportunities to participate in our sport will bring new members to the tribe for years to come.
  • 2 0
 Sponsel has the right of it. If our advanced riders can influence trail advocacy then public parks can become a real thing. Barrel makes a good point about the dangers of ebikes. What he misses is that ebikes are a small technological leap away from being a motorcycle innovation, not a bike one. A bit of battery improvement and they can replace big heavy motocross bikes with dh bikes with battery packs. 10 years and gas based motto cross will only be half the market.
  • 2 0
 Wasn't sure what happened the last 10years, so I took a look into the April 2005 issue of MBA.

Bike parks like Whistler were the rage back then.
Specialized brought out their new Enduro and Demo, equipped with Fox36/40.
Hollowtech2 was THE new standard, but Shimano tried to establish inverse shifting and dual-control levers too.
RC ranted about the disadvantages of 29er bikes.

Man, what a difference to today!!
  • 2 1
 All of them make valid points! Don't know if any single part of it is suggests "game changer". That is a marketing term at best, not a narrative of the future. There is obvious momentum in the evolution of Mountain Biking considering all their comments. OH!, if the UCI removes their head from their a$$, that could be seen as a game changer, but unlikely.....
  • 5 0
 No one has mentioned the warp drive yet? Or the flux capacitor?
  • 9 3
 YT!!!
  • 3 0
 I agree, especially with the carbon Tues that is cheaper than other aluminium DH.
  • 3 0
 I think change is going to come in the form of rider organized events like the Fest Series. A more relaxed atmosphere with the athletes going huge.
  • 5 1
 Really liked Charlie and Steve's responses. How about a Team Robot feature in Dirt?
  • 3 2
 Take Fabian barel and joe lawwill OUT!!! And ADD Cam Zink !!!! It would have been a "spot on" article !!!! Why not take all that cash for r& d for electronic widgets and pay riders more money make tracks balls out and give out more prize money ? We need more females !!! And trail advocacy !!! Better trails better athletes who ride !more women ! sponsored riders getting taken care of !!! Sounds good for the future of biking to me ????
  • 1 0
 I think we're going to see an increase in direct to customer bike sales. I'm not sure that's a good thing as I have my favorite shop as everyone else probably does. But with Corporate needing to keep making their money, how could they keep a low(er) pricepoint and exploit it? A bleak look at the next 10 years, I know, but I know I scraped to buy my bike. And it was used.

Let's face it; 6k for a bike ain't cheap. You start putting the latest widget on and you're paying corporate's R & D for said widget.
  • 5 0
 I love how the Shimano marketing guy says Di2.
  • 1 0
 Something about Barel's comments smack of Canyon introducing an E-Bike sometime soon.

Personally, I think this particular "game change" is going to be extremely negative for the sport.

You think hikers and equestrians hate us now? Just wait till a bunch of f*ckbrains on E-Bikes start swarming the hills and because there's no longer any pedaling involved, a.k.a. The "Joeypocalypse". But now, instead of only making DH parks their hapless domain, it will spread to trails everywhere.

Smart land managers and municipalities will ban E-Bikes from trails before this can happen, but many, many more won't even see it coming.

I do, however, fully support those with medical issues which keep them from accessing trails being able to utilize these bikes. I think if an amputee wants to get out on the trails, but pedaling really creates an impediment for them, then they should be allowed some kind of permit that grants them access.

But other than that, this whole thing is bad news.
  • 1 0
 Believe it or not, the move forward in popularity of pedal-assisted e-bikes (as full power ones will probably end up getting banned from most every trail) will probably come from the DH crowd, looking for a better and much shorter way to get to the top and take more runs. XC bikers are out riding for the cardio and the light bikes of today make most every track they are likely to ride climbable, so their use would be counter intuitive.
  • 1 0
 The "game changer" will be when FS bikes are affordable, durable and reliable; that in turn will bring more competition to the field from people that would otherwise not be able to afford a high dollar rig to race and maintain.
  • 1 0
 In 10 years we will all be riding bikes with electronic adaptive suspension and we will all feel like Sam Hill until being smoked by someone who has always been faster and is now even more faster-er. Maybe in 20 years we are buying bikes with uniform branding. Fox, Sram, Shimano and all the others have been purchased by the bike brands and when you buy your bike all warranty issues handled by the one entity
  • 1 0
 Correct me if I'm wrong, but the reason we don't have an affordable gearbox yet is because nobody mass-produces it. Once the production numbers of gearboxes worldwide approach those of conventional gear systems, the prices will go down. Sadly, it will only happen if the big players in the industry start designing and building gearboxed bikes.
  • 3 0
 Laughed at joe from Santa Cruz, more retiring doctors to buy our 10 grand bikes and then buy a 5 grand bike for there kids.... I'm liking YT even more now haha..!!
  • 1 0
 Forget about game changing tech it's all about how the big players like Specialized/Trek are going to compete against direct sales ?
YT & Canyon have both top bikes at good pricing and better spec then others.

Would love to see Trek go direct sales?! Just think what a new slash carbon or session carbon would cost?
That would be game changing.
  • 1 0
 I've been into bikes and downhill since the early 90's. Things have changed so much since then. Back then we all wanted more full sus bikes that worked and that the masses could afford. I remember bikes like the GT RTS and the trek/gary fisher Y bikes, these were real game changing machines. I feel that we have almost reached a limit to far we can go with non electric bikes and parts. There are so many different bikes now with almost endless offerings of suspension travel/wheel size and component packages it makes things hard to choose. The one thing I would like to see happen now, is for this sport to become far more affordable, and I'm not talking about crappy, mass produced budget bikes that weigh a ton and get palmed off on ignorant first timers. Most manufactures need to present a better line of cheaper/low end models and the technology from the high end must trickle down faster. So many people I speak to, who are interested in starting the sport are put off at the first hurdle, as they feel good bikes are too expensive. I really hope the rise of brands like YT and Canyon with their direct sales approach will continue to lower prices of quality bikes.
  • 1 0
 Why are E-Bikes continually mentioned in MTB media? There is zero threat to our sport. The only commonality is that our bicycle manufacturers are already tooled up to manufacture them so they will be entering another market in order to increase profits.

Our sport will remain pedal-powered and Fabien mentioning them as a "game changer" is ridiculous.

The amount of e-bikers that will try to ride mtb trails will quickly realize that they fall under the "motorized vehicle" category and they will enjoy the same trail access limitations as dirt bikes. Which is, around here, very scarce.

They are efficient transportation; think: moped. And they will be used as such. Ford just announced their entrance into the E-bike market.

Bike parks won't allow them since people will get hurt far too easily. If you are too out of shape to pedal a bike you probably shouldn't be ripping through a park on one with a motor.

The only problem they will create is the usual trail access dilemma. It will be up to individual land owners and trail stewards as to whether or not to allow E-bikes and they likely won't have a very passionate following nor find any MTBers going up to bat for their cause. I find it hard to believe that Kingdom Trails would allow huffing and puffing ebikers to meddle with the efforts of fit and dedicated cyclists on the same trails. Seeing some fat-ass pass you because he is on a bike with assist will not win over many MTBers.

I practically get kicked in the shins if I ride my mini-DH bike on a trail ride and hugs and french kisses if I ride my steel hardtail. Imagine if someone shows up on an ebike. They will be shunned on anything that isn't paved or completely private. So we are giving them lip-service for no reason.
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike themselves have said it repeatedly yet the industry refuses to retool for wider rims (aside from Velocity Rims.). Rims need to have an internal width of 30mm or greater. PERIOD. The handling difference and advantages are greater than the difference between wheel sizes in my experience.
  • 1 0
 The new things will be, like today, just recycled ideas from the past with a shiny name in italics colored in bright neon colors. And everyone will love it, especially Germans, because they are succers for neon Smile
P.S. I'm not German, just borrowing the country for a while.
  • 1 0
 3D printed bikes and crowdsourced parts to bring down the duopoly of Shimano and SRAM. Lower priced bikes has to be in the future or else our industry is screwed!

a href="http://assembly.com/minimal">assembly.com/minimal//a>
  • 1 0
 Yes, each person seemed to be focused on what they are interested in, that's typical of a predicting article. However, I think Fabian is right. I hate to see it but, the e-bike is a game changer. It will change trail access, trail design, demographics and industry fabricators. I wish it would go away but they are here to stay.
As a biking community we can help shape the way these bikes are in introduced to the trails.
1. Shame any bike shop that sells e-mt. bikes
2. Laugh and point fingers at e-mt. bike owners
3. Flag their strava rides
4. boycott e-mt. bikes
5. drop a electromagnetic bomb that wipes out all electronics leaving the rider(s) pushing a 60lbs bike up the trail. (yes, it will wipe out your iPhone too)
Or, we work with land managers now to address the issue and create a distinction between pedal powered trail access and e-bike access.
  • 1 0
 I agree with Steve Jones, we need a sealed drive train and since both Shimano and SRAM have the tech to do it why not do it? No one would accept owning a car or truck that needed to have its drive train replaced 1 or more times per year so why do we accept it on our bikes? Why do we need to get our full range of gears on our cassettes? Thank god Shimano has included 2x11 and 3x11 and is explaining why they made the effort to do so in their 2015 tech seminars.

Hopefully folks will do some critical thinking, watch the XTR Di2 Demo video and learn how a multi speed bicycle drive train works and is supposed to be used.

Now lets get back on that 35 speed all internal prototype system FM-5 was it? From back in the 80's that the pro racers who got use it raved about... And hey Sram you reintroduced Grip shift so how about updating Hammerschmidt too? Maybe take a look at Dual Drive as well.

DH riders are going back to 7 speed so I hope Shimano's rider tuned concept that lets us pick how many chain rings we want gets extended to letting us choose how many cogs we want too.

The really interesting points above are on land access. I teach at a ski resort where winter was a no show this year and 3 0f the 5 last Januaries were crappy too. Thy used to do mountain biking and stopped citing the lamest excuses you can imagine. makes no sense to have all that equipment and land sit there most of the year adding doing nothing. Thankfully weather patterns are going to force their hand to reconsider opening for mountain biking again.
  • 1 0
 Game changers of the past brought actual change to how things are done. SIS index shifting was a game changer that wiped out two of the top three component manufacturers in the mountain bike category. Prior to SIS Suntour XC Pro was the top off road group but they never got indexing to work well and who knows why Campagnola couldn't figure it out. After that, suspension, disc brakes and most recently dropper posts and 29r wheels both to a lesser extent than indexing and suspension contributed noticeable changes to how we ride and use our bikes. Game changing technology is new technology that will actually change things making it risky and expensive so we see very little of it. Something really new always meets with plenty of resistance especially if it takes some thought to understand so it requires a lot of marketing and education to get it accepted. Most companies will opt for the easier margins and faster profit of the status quo re-warmed year after year. The next game changing drive train won't be an idotic 12 speed cassette it will a better designed internal system that uses gearing front and back to give us better range of useable gears with less clicks on the right shifter. DH is already moving back to cassettes with fewer cogs and fewer clicks to get the next gear they want faster. Its absolutely naive to think a better internal system can't happen. SRAM and Shimano both have the technologies to do it. Better game changing technology in drive trains isn't due to a lack of ability its due to a lack of will make it happen.
  • 1 0
 One real game changer may be the further development of off road trikes and wheel chairs that let people with mobility issues get out on the trails. NSMB just did a piece on Elladee Brown's wife who is a freerider who is now paralized below the waist and rides a cool full susp trike with hand cranks. There is also a video of the guy in whistler who shreds on his DH chair. Its so cool able bodied people drive hem too. There isn't as a large a market but both are suitable for cross training on and damn cool.
  • 5 1
 Kirt Voreis is the luckiest man on the planet.
  • 3 0
 Mtbers join the anonymous collective, and 'workng with' strava, successfully delete/prevent illegal trail data!
  • 4 0
 Entry level Spesh Enduro for 8k$ and the pimpest Demo for 25k$. Wanna bet?
  • 2 0
 I think 8 million dollars and 25 million dollars. I expect USA to get into such big financial troubles that all their money would lose all its value. Lets hope it wont happen though, as it would effect us in europe too. Dont want europe to get into financial troubles again due to stupidity that happens in the USA.
  • 2 2
 My guess:


- Electrical shifting and braking. So much easier, no maintanance needed, automatically resets itsself so it works perfectly all the time. I think this is a big step forward.

- I think as soon as the patent from ISM Seats is over, most saddle companies will start copying their double-nosed design. It seems like a perfect solution against saddle pain and saddles locking up nerves and preventing blood flow in the area where you sit. The only thing it needs is some more companies producing it so there will be competition in it and the product quality will go up (the main problem right now is A- they are fat and ugly B- they are expensive because no competition due to the patent). I really think as soon as the patent from ISM drops, most saddle companies will start producing their own version of these. This means great media attention due to marketing etc of all of these companies, and probably a big change in saddles, making our rides more comfortable and more healthy.
  • 1 1
 Can someone remind me why I should want biking to be easier?
  • 1 0
 I see the misunderstanding. I ment easier to maintain because there's no maintenance needed on electrical shifting. Didn't mean that the riding itsself would be easier (except for better shifting performance maybe).
  • 2 0
 Everything that has moving parts requires maintenance of some sort. The electrical current required to powerfully actuate a brake would require strong motors and large batteries. Which means you need to carry batteries and extra ones for long rides...sounds like a great idea.
  • 1 0
 Im sure they can build it so it will last at least 12 or maybe even 24 hours. Even if it's by putting a bigger accu in it. As long as no one said how long it will last it is false to see your expectations as a fact. Truth is that we dont know yet how long it will work. I am a bit more optimistic about it because i know a bigger accu could make it last a lot longer. If it would really only work for a couple of hours, the design would be a huge failure. And even if it would ge a failure in the beginning, they would fix these problems over time.
  • 1 0
 The ammount of time they put into a new product for thinking, designing, testing, improving, and repeating this circle all the time till it's good enough to hit the market, takes much longer than you think. As far as i know they have been testing prototype electrical shifting for example for years now (behind the scenes). For companies like Shimano and Sram, having such big research teams and professionals developing new products, i doubt that they would make such silly mistakes.
  • 3 1
 Next big game changer will be suspension. I don't know when it's coming out but say goodbye to the fully rigid mountain bikes!
  • 2 0
 I dont think that would ever happen. Can you imagine how insanely heavy a bike would become. Please leave now, we dont want your witchcraft here
  • 1 0
 The next big game changer is when a company comes out with a bike that uses all the latest technology and only costs around $1,500.00..
Making this sport more affordable to the masses needs to be the next big game changer.
  • 1 0
 Thats only cheap to someone who knows what bikes cost currently, Its still an offputting price tag for most people.
  • 1 0
 Yes it still is pricey but far less than what is available now..
  • 5 1
 9 thumbs up to charlie sponsel
  • 2 0
 and sterling lorence
  • 3 0
 steve jones-things will improve inch by inch to maximize profits-like shimanos 11 spd 11-40 cassette. seriously, why did they even bother?
  • 2 0
 doug vinson-dude, i love your optimism about purpose built trails, but i don't always share your enthusiasm for the results. i dunno. i guess i kinda like riding more primitive stuff. purpose built trails seem a little generic sometimes.
  • 1 0
 the other thread that seems interesting in an awful kind of way, is the loss of snow at ski resorts, and how mountain biking can fill the revenue void. personally, i could give a shit about the owners of vail or park city. but the people employed in that biz are probably hurting a bit.
  • 2 0
 Hey upchuckyeager - Thanks - I am indeed super optimistic and super stoked about bike parks - what I was referring to - not just bike optimized trails, which some people refer to as "flow", but full on bike parks - with jumps lines for beginners and other bad ass stuff - to full on bad ass huge gap, pro/expert only stuff - all in your neighborhood, or a very short commute away., everywhere in the nation. And not just jumps, but everything else, too. Bike parks that test all kinds of skills and skill levels. Think of the skatepark explosion of the 80's, without the subsequent implosion. Bike parks with everything you want. That's what I was talking about.
  • 4 0
 Sorry- forgot to reveal my true identity - Doug Vinson, IMBA TS guy, doug.vinson@imba.com - and to say that if there's a trail related need that's not met in your community - whether it's getting to know the government players that approve trails, getting hooked up with the nearest local advocacy group, assistance in raising funds, partnering with unlikely allies, or designing and building your trail vision, let us know!
  • 2 0
 I go for on the fly geometry adjust. maybe gearboxes. maybe a rear cassette with some gear box in it. or a shimano chain that lasts longer than a week.
  • 1 0
 Carbonite.....
  • 2 0
 Ever more ridiculous Acronyms !! And at least 30 brand name logos on every frame, 'Cos I need to know its a Giant or a T rek from every possible angle.
  • 2 0
 Gearboxes! I give us a gearbox that lets us change gear regardless whether we are pedalling or not, which lets us lose the rear mech and centralise weight.
  • 3 0
 Oval wheels?

A fork with only one stanchion but on the right side?

Apple bike?
  • 1 0
 With the way people follow trends now-a-days - THIS IS THE FUTURE!!!
oi60.tinypic.com/2v8lou8.jpg

^^ The 'it' from South Park.

69" wheel. two 1" diameter by 12" long skewers. Hint hint, they don't go in the wheel.
  • 1 0
 Top end bike with the best part available for $5000 tops would be the best thing to happen to the sport. It would allow the sport to continue to grow rather than becoming more and more exclusive.
  • 1 0
 I can't see any point in a bike over 5k even though it would cost me a lot less since I work in the industry. While working in a mobile bike shop I worked on several road bikes over 10k. They are so light I'd be scared shitless doing any more than my post repair test rides on them but I guess its all what you are used to riding. My bikes are basicly demo bikes. I ride them up top a year and then sell. My max retail value is 4k because after that at the end of the day it doesn't make any real difference in the performance and above 4k retail they get harder to sell. One game changer could be to have the choice of how many chain rings and cogs I want in my system at all performance levels. No one needs 10 or 11 cogs on a cassette and the trend in DH has been to reduce the cogs for a while now. With that trend continuing in DH and Di2 having the ability to run 10 or 11 speed by changing the cassette and reprograming the shifter its possible. Such a thing could reduce SKUs, related expenses and therefore prices at the consumer level... LOL! as if the industry would pass on the savings rather than pocket the additional margin!
  • 4 5
 In my opinion the next game changer is going to be wireless technology.

The electronic gear shifting has made a "forced" entry into mountain biking and seems to be doing well so far.
As soon as the price level drops a bit it should be adpted by a wider audience and the next big thing would be to enhance the electronic mechanisms with some type of wireless sensors and mechanisms that will allow wireless shifting.

Imagine a bike that wirelessly shifts gears, drops post, or locks its fork and shock...
That should convince the last remaining riders of the future who swear by mechanical shifting to "shift" to electronic.



And to take it a bit furhter: Imagine all these features integrated into your cell phone via a "strava-like" app.

You run the route or trail once and next time the app identifies that you just entered segment "X" shfits your gear to the one you had when you did it last time, drops your post exactly at the height you want for that specific trail, and sets your suspension to decend mode and all you have to do is look for the exit of the next corner...
  • 3 0
 I'm sorry, but I can't think of anything worse personally. Electricity should be kept as far away from mountain bike as possible, keep it pure and simple, bike and rider connected. This is exactly what I was saying about the induction of technology into a mass market of people who (on the whole) will be no better off for having it. Just my two pence though...
  • 1 0
 I agree with bikes needing to be as simple as possible.

But for shifting I think electronical is as simple as possible (except for single speed of course).
Why? Because electronical shifting doesn't need any maintenance. It automatically resets itsself so it will shift perfectly all the time. Also no friction in the cables, also not after riding a lot in bad weather / muddy conditions. It would really safe you a lot of maintenance, and that's why I can see this becoming popular.

For me personally, I don't like gears due to all the hassle they bring. Can't seem to be able to ride for a couple of weeks without having to maintain it. That's why I prefer single speed. But as soon as there will be some more affordable options for electronical gearing I would love to give that a try.


I do agree with you that I would not want to have automatic gear shifting etc.Then again, things might change so much in the future that we'll change our minds. Just like shifting in cars is dying and everyone is switching to automatic cars. Who knows? Even if it seems very unlikely, never say never.
  • 1 0
 Yup to simplicity. Nope to more wireless shit. Wtf is the point? Once it breaks you REALLY cant fix it and you end up wishing you had a lever and a cable. Make sure you tape one of those battery pack chargers to your downtube on your geek-o-tron-2000-wonder-turd. Make sure to figure in that weight when you post up the details of that technological marvel.

I swear humans are getting dumber and logic is nearly extinct...lazy asses here in 'murica dont even shift cars anymore. I guess you cant update facebook and drive if you have a stick and an extra pedal.
  • 2 0
 Same goes for hydraulic brakes. Have fun fixing a leaking brake while being on the trails. People are always skeptic when new stuff comes out, but usually within a couple of years they all have it on their own bikes aswell. I disagree on the battery. Im sure they can find something that will last for hundreds of hours of usage. Cant be that hard nowadays. Same goes for automatic cars. Its simply the way forward. Its so much more comfy to ride one. No one who switches to automatic will ever switch back. Shifting cars is outdated and makes me feel like im riding a flinstones-car.
  • 1 0
 Silvbullit; absolutely agree. Mattin, struggling to disagree more. Batteries are a dreadful technology. They have been around for a very long time and those that power anything remotely high powered or with a brain have a very short life. Batteries are not the way forward. Automatic cars may be they way forward for the masses; the vast majority who do not take pleasure in driving, but for someone who is properly enthusiastic, the feeling of changing gear by stirring cogs is unmatched by automatics. I've driven automatics and absolutely loathed them, would never own one. Same goes for drivetrains on mountain bikes, it's difficult to explain, but I want to feel like I'm directly involved in the shift, through physical input. It's a very difficult concept to explain. and as for it making bikes more comfortable; I don't wish to be unkind, but if that's one of your main concerns, I believe you're in a different demographic to the majority of PB users and mountain bikers.

Again, this is just my opinion and everyone else is entitled to their own. If people want bikes that do everything for them, they can go right ahead. For me though, I'll do the changing gear and altering suspension settings myself please, I don't want to be a passenger while my bike does the riding.
  • 1 0
 N.B. people aren't skeptical of new ideas these days; if anything they are far more receptive than ever before. Just because I'm opposed to electronic shifting does not mean I'm against all new conventions: my XC bike has 29" wheels, I love narrow/wide chainrings, if I could afford it, I'd have a dropper post. People in the modern world with increased wallet sizes will give anything a fair bashing if they've dropped a large sum on it. I'm not saying that I represent the majority, I speak solely for myself, simply suggesting that there will be those who advocate and those who shun with more or less any new development: carbon frames/wheels, 650b, fat bikes. There's absolutely no "one size fits all" mindset in mountain biking.
  • 1 0
 Hydraulics are simple and reliable. I was an early adopter of Hayes discs back in 1997. In all these years riding Hayes, Formula, Avid, and Tektro hydraulics I have NEVER had a failure. I have had spongy brakes that just needed to be bled, which is easy with minimal tools and brain cells.
  • 1 0
 For real? I cant seem to ride more than a year until my hydraulic disc brakes start leaking and i have to replace something.

(Losing all the pressure in my brake, so when i pull my lever i continue going at the same speed as before)
  • 2 0
 nothing will be a game changer, just small evolutions of what we already have
  • 1 2
 I feel like fatbikes are the biggest game changer...

Just kidding i think there are two developing game changers right now, direct to consumer bike sales as well as dual chamber tire systems(procore).

The direct to consumer bike sales is huge, bike prices are getting stupid, wage growth in the US is almost stagnate still. Its just too hard for the average joe to afford a new bike. Being able to buy a well speced bike for 3k(less than the cost of a nomad frame) like what YT offers makes total sense.

The dual chamber tire system is massive as well. Think how many dh and enduro races have had top pros not finish due to a flat. In the world of moto/enduro the bib mousse has made flats very rare. I am hoping the procore system will show the bike industry how hard a tire can be pushed. I know I will be buying procore once its out. Even at $200, last year i destroyed three tires due to torn side walls, a dual chamber system would have stopped atleast two of those. With tires at $50-80 each it will pay for its self as long as it works as advertised.
  • 2 0
 Maybe more people should go for a ride on a ten+ year old bike once in awhile to remember why biking is so much fun???
  • 1 0
 You are so right. My 600.00 3x8 29r hardtail commuter is a 2013 but the tech in those alivio components is older and simpler. That bike works great and has more gear range in its useable 16 combos than any 11 speed system. I also ride other older bikes lie an original pre index Klein road bike. So sweet! I hope the trend towards fewer cogs in DH catches on and spreads wider. I may actually get a steel Brodie unibomber this year, put an alfine hub on it and use it for my commuter.
  • 2 0
 So this article is partly an add for Di2? And e-bikes? Come on biking needs to be simple.
  • 2 0
 The last three nailed it, as they're the only ones who don't have other agendas.
  • 2 0
 A rider,a bike and a place to ride.Hope we can do the same stuff like that on the Planet Earth in 2025.
  • 2 0
 zero chance of getting to Tiger Mountain in fifteen minutes from downtown Seattle!
  • 3 0
 I would guess electrical brakes should'nt be that far away by now?
  • 1 0
 Shimano guy thinks Di2 will be the next game changer : how could he think something else => he works at the marketing departement !! Smile
  • 1 0
 Biggest game changer? PB posts that open in new tabs automatically, so I'm not on the home page again after accidentally clicking a post 10 pages in......
  • 2 0
 Dough, Darren & Charlie
The rest, meh
  • 1 0
 Interesting consensus on trail building issues...death to pavers (except berms... I love berms now and then)
  • 3 0
 Suspension cranks.
  • 5 3
 Amen, Charlie Sponsel - Spot on
  • 4 2
 I think Charlie Sponsel just became my hero...
  • 1 0
 The real game-changer will be when downhill mountain biking becomes an Olympic sport. Watch how it explodes then!
  • 2 0
 lesser travel & more dialed geometry.
  • 2 0
 dedmann FTW! It's all about the geo, baby!
  • 1 0
 Fat bikes, that will be the big game changer, like Thomas Edison, 100 ways not to do something
  • 2 0
 the future? 26 and steel.
  • 1 0
 For a bike purely built for fun: yes.
For a racer who must shave off seconds off his run, they will choose carbon instead (so all the pros). Based on this, and thw fact that everyone copies what the pros ride, steel will never become bigger as other materials again.
  • 1 0
 False, steel can be used in competition (I used) steel has great advantages (strength, vitality, comfort, reliability, and sustainability). But carbon and used primarily for marketing reasons, AC goes out of style quickly, margins are larger and the weight is the top priority 1 therefore easier to sell. A production that also costs less to produce.
  • 1 0
 I never said it cant be used in competitions. I said that you should be a couple of seconds faster in the end due to rhe weight saving.
In the end frame design is the most important part of how a bike feels. Way more important than just the material (only material says nothing about the frame).
  • 1 0
 Riders who grew up on run bikes. That's what will change the world of mountain biking, the groms of today.
  • 1 0
 On the athlete side, the biggest game changer is probably going to be Jackson Goldstone!
  • 1 0
 three themes here: people (politics), bikes (technology), trails (environment)
  • 1 0
 US Forest Service and US Bureau of Land Management > National Park Service
  • 2 0
 Not a single mention of gearbox bikes. Lame.
  • 1 0
 The E-bikes rise up against humanity and take over the world!............ ..............maybe not
  • 1 0
 inexpensive inverted forks, like on motorcycles, paralever front suspension, like on motorcycles, or single-sided swingarms
  • 1 0
 or maybe bikes that aren't ridiculously overpriced? I could buy a KTM RC390 for less than most Cannondales or Specializeds.
  • 1 0
 this is all too easy, bike lanes with road access as 4 wheeled vehicles in the next ten years...
  • 1 0
 they gotta build easy to ride trails otherwise where are all the dentists gonna ride their $10k evils?
  • 1 0
 Very cool and insightful piece!
  • 1 0
 So the future is bright then!
  • 1 0
 As always: Fab nailed it!
  • 1 0
 Norco's video analysis program is a game changer !!!!
  • 1 0
 +1 to bike parks. Let there be more of them, even if small.
  • 1 0
 all i ask is more affordability and more bike parks
  • 1 0
 the return of the penny farthing.....
  • 1 0
 3"+ tires for everything.
  • 1 0
 Can't we just go back to when people just rode there bikes.
  • 1 0
 All hail the robot! Sponsel has nailed it.
  • 1 0
 Definitely 6mm wider rear axles and 10mm wider front!
  • 1 0
 Can't wait for some company to release 110x15mm
  • 1 0
 Gearbox bikes will be one of the biggest change in the next ten years
  • 1 0
 Back to hell with derailleurs and all their unholy brethren,there MUST be a better way,please bike god.....
  • 1 0
 Hydraulic everything. All cables being hydraulic. Please Discuss
  • 2 1
 Urine icepops to boost energy.
  • 1 0
 No Mid drive pedalec MTB mentions? These are gonna rule the earth.
  • 2 1
 Sterling was bang on
  • 1 0
 Rumbleship
  • 2 2
 Team Robot spits the truth!
  • 1 0
 Bikes with no wheels!
  • 3 2
 Charlie Sponsel, spot on
  • 1 1
 Chaz! You are da man, man! See on Monday. FREEDOM RIDERS UNITE!
  • 1 1
 fatbike downhill uci races
  • 2 1
 flying bikes
  • 1 0
 Wi Fi shift!!! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Climate change
  • 1 0
 RESPAWN
  • 3 3
 Charlie wins. Spot on.
  • 1 2
 the only opinion on here that actually matters is the robot's
  • 1 4
 Wide carbon wheels. They are the future and the future is bright.
  • 3 0
 Wide aluminum rims: they are cheap, barely heavier, somewhat repairable and entirely recyclable. Moto tried carbon and ditched them for a reason...
  • 1 3
 Joe Lawwill nailed it..
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