OneUp Shark 50T Sprocket Kit - Review

Mar 16, 2016 at 23:47
by Mike Levy  
OneUp

Cassettes with cogs as big as the large chainring on an old triple crankset have only been a thing since 2012, and while some riders are still unconvinced that a single chainring and cassette with a massive spread is best for them, OneUp is taking things a few steps further. The Squamish, B.C., company's 50-tooth Shark Cog and Shark Cage kit, which are only sold and designed to be used in combination with each other, give your Shimano eleven-speed drivetrain a 19% jump in range. In fact, OneUp says that the Shark Cog creates an 11 - 50 spread cassette with the widest range available when using a standard, non-XD freehub body.

The $125 USD kit includes the 50-tooth aluminum Shark Cog, an 18-tooth nickel-plated hardened steel cog, and the required high-offset Shark Cage for Shimano Shadow+ eleven-speed rear derailleurs. The large cog and derailleur cage are both available in either gray or OneUp's customary green color. Did you know that adult great white sharks have about fifty functioning teeth at any given time? The more you know... www.oneupcomponents.com


OneUp
Great white sharks have about fifty teeth, which is where the Shark Cog's name comes from.
OneUp
The Shark Cage is sold with the Shark 50T Sprocket kit and is required for the system work.

Shark Cog Details:

• Spread: 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 37, 42, 50
• Material: 7075-T6 aluminum (50t), nickel-plated hardened steel (18t)
• Compatibility: XT M8000 11 - 42 tooth cassette only
• Freehub requirement: standard freehub driver
• Cassette range improvement: 19%
• Colors: grey or green
Shark Cage Details:

• Pulley offset: 50% more than stock
• Compatibility: Shimano Shadow+ 11-speed derailleurs
• Crash replacement cages available separately
• Colors: grey or green
• MSRP: $125 USD for kit


The massive 50-tooth cog is so large that it makes the 42-tooth XT cog right next to it look small in comparison, but the Shark Cog wouldn't be possible if OneUp hadn't designed a new derailleur cage that bolts to Shimano Shadow+ 11-speed derailleurs. This is because the stock Shimano cage puts the upper pulley in a position that's designed to work with a 42-tooth cog, not the much larger 50-tooth Shark Cog, so OneUp's answer was to simply reposition the upper pulley wheel to provide 50% more offset relative to the cage's pivot point. The pulley wheel's new position is much more off-center of the derailleur cage's pivot (much like what SRAM has done on their 1X derailleurs), and it allows the pulley wheel to move further down and out of the way to clear 50-tooth cog when the cage is pulled forward by chain tension. And no, you don't need a different B-tension screw, and you'll likely find that you won't even need to dial your stock screw in all the way.

That isn't all, though. The upper pulley wheel's drastically offset position also means that it comes up closer to the small, 11-tooth cog when you're at the opposite end of the cassette. This provides more chain wrap and more security, but it also should help with shift speed at both the high and low ends of the range.

The gigantic 50-tooth cog weighs 92 grams, and the OneUp 18-tooth cog comes in at 24 grams, making for a weight increase of 73 grams over the 19-tooth (24 gram) and 17-tooth (19 gram) stock cogs that are getting ditched. OneUp's Shark Cage weighs 6 grams more than the stock, medium length XT cage, so you're looking at a total weight jump of 79 grams.
OneUp
The pulley wheel's large amount of eccentric offset relative to the cage's pivot allows it to clear the large cog while still staying close to the other, smaller cogs.


Installation and Setup

Do you have the tools and knowledge to remove and re-install a cassette? If so, you also have the ability to install the Shark Cog and 18-tooth steel cog onto your XT M8000 11 - 42 tooth cassette.

The 50-tooth Shark Cog sits right up against the back of the stock 42-tooth Shimano cog, so you simply slide that down into your freehub and then follow it up with the two Shimano carrier clusters (42, 37, 32, and 28, 24, 21). Now, instead of dropping on the separate 19 and 17-tooth Shimano cogs, you slide the OneUp 18-tooth steel cog and the stock Shimano spacer before the final three Shimano cogs. You've just ditched the stock 19 and 17 in order to run OneUp's 18 and 50-tooth cogs. Easy.


OneUp
  The 50-tooth Shark Cog on the left, the six stock Shimano cogs next to it, OneUp's steel 18-tooth cog, and the final two Shimano cogs.


Your large cog was a 42 and it's now a 50, and that extra size means that you're going to need to either install a new chain or put a few links into the one you're already using. OneUp would prefer you to do the former, but adding a few links of chain is a pretty easy task. If your chain isn't long enough, and it probably won't be if you leave it at its original length, you risk causing some real carnage (a shark attack?) and incurring a hefty repair bill if you bottom-out your bike's suspension with the chain in the 50-tooth cog and it's not long enough to allow for that to happen. For this reason, always check chain length at bottom-out and when it's in the largest cog.

Installing the Shark derailleur cage is a bit more intimidating, but it's something that can be done in only a few minutes. It's best to do the cage before installing a new chain so you don't end up fighting its spring tension, and take note of which pulley goes on which end of the cage.

It also should be said that while Shimano generally remains quiet when it comes to this topic, you can bet your last eleven-speed quick link that they don't want you messing with their stuff. That doesn't mean that you shouldn't do it or that the OneUp conversion doesn't work well, but only that there are likely some polite Japanese engineers groaning when they see this. Oh, and you can forget about any sort of warranty on the derailleur.
OneUp
The backside of the Shark Cage on an XT Shadow+ 11-speed derailleur.

I did run into one setup note that's worth mentioning: I installed a 34-tooth oval chainring with the Shark 50T Sprocket kit, and the drive-side crank does have to be spaced out a bit more than optimal in order for the ring to clear the Ibis Ripley's chainstay. This made for a chainline that was pretty out of alignment, enough so that the chain would drop off of the 42 tooth Shimano cog when I pedaled backward even though it was one in from being the largest cog. Interestingly, the chain wouldn't drop off the Shark Cog when rotating the cranks in reverse, despite it being even more out of alignment with the chainring. This is because the shift gates on the Shimano cog encourage the chain to drop off in order to quicken shift speed when going into a harder gear, whereas OneUp's cog features a different design. This foible is purely down to the chainline of my test bike.






Performance

I wonder what mountain bikers would say if you could travel back in time by a decade or so and tell them that 50-tooth cogs would be a thing in 2016? Would they call you an idiot, or would they say that they couldn't wait for a drivetrain that offers nearly as wide of a range as a two-ring setup but also one that I'd argue is much less complicated and refined? I think that it'd likely be split pretty evenly because, just like today, there are riders who aren't looking for the easiest possible gearing and enjoy pushing themselves on climbs, and there are just as many (or more) riders who just want to get up those same climbs.

I fall into the first category, so the idea of a 50-tooth cog appealed to me about as much as running a triple-ring crankset does, but then I turned down my attitude a bit and actually thought about it.


OneUp
  The massive 50-tooth Shark Cog manages to make the stock 42-tooth XT cog look small in comparison.

OneUp's 50-tooth cog might sound silly large, but you can easily manage your gearing by going with a larger chainring so that your easiest gear comes close to resembling what you had before, but the opposite end of the cassette becomes taller. So that's what I did. I went from a 30-tooth chainring to a 34-tooth oval ring, which meant that I instantly started using different cogs on the XT cassette than I would have otherwise. You can keep using the same chainring you had on pre-Shark Cog, but it makes far more sense to factor in the price of a new ring so as to adjust your drivetrain to the new, wider ratio.

The eight tooth shift from the stock 42-tooth cog to the 50-tooth OneUp cog is a big enough jump that my legs didn't really like that much. It wasn't the shift itself, mind you, but the actual eight tooth difference that just felt a bit odd to me when it came to matching my cadence and effort. Also, the larger chainring means that the gearing is obviously harder when the chain is in the 42-tooth cog, which is something that saw me make that eight tooth jump up on more than a few occasions while making my way up my steep local climbs.

Are you a numbers guy? For reference, the final jump on a SRAM XX1 cassette is six teeth (36 to 42), and the last jump on the pre-OneUp'd XT cassette is only five teeth (37 to 42). This means that the percentage of change between two largest cogs for the XX1 cassette is 16.66%, and the gap for the stock XT cassette is 13.51%. The OneUp'd XT cassette sees a much larger jump of 19.047%. Another number to keep in mind is the percentage spread between the highest and lowest cogs: the Shimano XT 11 - 42 is 281.81%, a SRAM XX1 10 - 42 and 320%, and the OneUp'd XT 11 - 50 cassette offers a wider 354.54% range.

OneUp
Shift speeds up to and off of the 50-tooth cog was impressively quick.

Considering the Shark 50T Sprocket Kit? Decide if you want the 50-tooth as a "Holy shit, I'm dead" bailout gear and keep something close to your original chainring size, or get out that gear calculator and find out what chainring best suits you and your terrain.

Somewhat odd feeling gearing jump aside, the shift up to and off of the Shark Cog is remarkably quick and drama free. I was expecting some lag time - all of these conversions seem to be about 80 or 85% as quick as a stock setup - but the Shark 50T Sprocket kit is better than that. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that a lot of riders might never notice the difference in shift speed if they were to do a blind test, which is pretty remarkable given the eight tooth difference that the chain has to span. This is surely down to the Shark Cage and the offset upper pulley wheel that provides clearance but also locates the pulley in just the right spot height-wise. The setup even plays nice under high pedaling loads.

And speaking of high pedaling loads, the 34-tooh chainring and 50-tooth cog provided me with the gearing to get up anything that looked even remotely climbable. If you like to challenge yourself on steep, technical climbs and take pride in staying clipped-in when your riding buddies end up on their feet, the Shark 50T Sprocket kit could be ideal so long as you pair it with the correct size chainring.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesPut aside for a moment the idea of such a large cog being only for riders who just need to work on their fitness, even if there might be some truth in that. Am I unhappy with a stock Shimano 11 - 42 cassette? Not in the slightest, and I personally don't feel the need for an easier gear, but remember that the Shark Cog and Shark Cage allow a rider to greatly increase their gearing spread, and not only their low range but also their high range if they decide to go with a suitably larger chainring. This could be a real benefit to a rider with greatly varied terrain. - Mike Levy




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373 Comments

  • + 202
 Meh... Waiting for gear boxes to be the norm!
  • + 22
 Exactly! With a gearbox you can remove almost 1 kg of unsprung weight off the rear triangle. That would be the weight of the cassette, the derailleur, the removed chain links and there is probably some grams to shave of a singlespeed specific hub!
  • + 34
 too bad the kilo removed from the back wheel turn into 2 kilos extra on the frame..make em lighter! though I´d really fancy a Pinion!
  • + 25
 Just when you thought One up drive-trains could not get more absurd.
  • + 47
 That derailleurs like 3 inches off the floor......
  • + 25
 When 36 inch wheels become the norm we will have 60T rear cogs
  • + 4
 E13 TRS 9-44 cassette has nearly the same range with 10-50t One up, so this looks like an easy decision to me.
  • + 38
 Shimano should do the f*** gearbox. They have ALL the knowledge and resources needed.
I think that we have became hostages of XC racing. When will those guys realize that AM/Trail/Enduro MTB != XC racing. We do not need 11 or 12 tight gears, we need wide range. We do not need complicated and pricey XTR Di, a gearbox is just fine. And unlike XC racers we do have rear suspension, so the unsprung weight really matters.
  • + 6
 This'll make all those fashionistas even easier to overtake on the climbs.
  • + 3
 Honda developed a gearbox for their RN-01 DH racing bikes back in the early 2000's …. surely SRAM and Shimano can figure it out by now ?? Its been over 10 years ?
  • + 28
 I think SRAM and shimano have worked out that a gearbox wouldn't wear as quickly as a cassette/chain/etc and they would loose $$$'s in consumables.
  • + 6
 The Honda "gearbox" was a mech in a box, but it is true that they have been worked on for a very long time now by a few niche companies.

Why not Shimano? Well, why would you promote long life drivetrains when people are buying your expendable parts frequently Wink
  • + 3
 Exactly what I was thinking @nomadrider10 I see mega cassettes as being like extremely good thumb shifters. Seem to be quite a few pinion builds appearing on the innerwebs so I'm hoping it's a sign of things to come. Plus, once there are no more wheel/tire standards to market, it could be the new thing to push.
  • + 6
 They're definitely the holy grail, but since all current gearboxes are constant mesh they create a feeling of drag and friction. Every time I've ridden one I've felt like I was peddling through sand.
  • + 4
 Looks like there might be a cure for drag and friction www.youtube.com/watch?v=drD416THU7Y - some truly next-gen stuff with magnets right here.
  • + 26
 Never had a problem with my front derailleur.
"If you're having shifting problems I feel bad for you son, I got 99 problems and my 2x ain't one."
  • + 4
 I still say a variation on this should be tried, and see if it could be made to work

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13049543
  • + 1
 @Skinnyman: Thx for the info. Very interesting. Nerding out on it big and pimpy.
  • + 3
 Magnets are heavy since I last checked
  • + 3
 @Frowzy They have high density. It depends on what strength of a magnetic field would be enough for a reliable engagement. I would imagine that the gearbox that employs this kind of technology would be smaller and lighter then Pinion, but just speculating of course at the moment.
  • + 10
 I just keep sayin that I would rather have a light hammerschmidt type of thing than these monstrosity cassetes.
  • + 5
 TANIWHA!!!!!! Problem solved.
  • + 7
 Who cares how heavy the magnet is. . . as long as there's a big chunk of metal at the top of the hill.
  • + 1
 How much does a gearbox system weights compare to standard?
And what are the advantages besides having everything out of the way?
The market will go where most money are to be made. I am sure after they exploid 1x, 2x electronic etc. it may end up with gear box. Maybe gearbox and electric motors will be interchangeable.

Having ridden any standard system from 5 speed rear to 1x11, the 1x11 is the most primitive with huge great jumps. 2x11 Campagnolo is the best have ridden and the most intuitive/efficient shifter set up.
  • + 2
 It'll be probably less than a kilo when that happens cos the cassette and the rest of drivetrain would be mostly harden aluminium by then. And by the time the gear box is perfected, I'll be shredding e-scooters at the old folks home.
  • + 11
 This derailler market is self sustaining through wear and tear and spares and breakages and minor tweaks. What do we really want? The move to single ring indicates we want simplicity, the trend for bigger rear rings is an indicator we still need range, and both these things plus reliability and durability and protection from mud and sand come from a gearbox. In marketing terms the Derailler system (in the mountain bike sector) is mature to the point of near extinction, so actual price against a gearbox is low. But to sell gearboxes, the whole frame has to change, making the change risky. We just need to see a few enduro wins with a gearbox and off we go......
  • + 3
 @mikeep got it.They make much more money selling spare derailleur, new chain and cog than selling a gearbox that would last a lifetime.
  • + 3
 Did anyone remember to bring the popcorn?
  • + 5
 Glad to see so many joining the call for gear boxes! Shimano already has working gear boxes inside the Alphine and Nexas hubs, Roloph too. Shimano also has a crank like the hammerschmidt too. A system called the FM-5 was being tested by top racers like Greg Herbold who loved it. Herbold also loved the Hammerschmidit too.

Seems to me the Alphine could be redeveloped around a hollowtech crank and put in the middle of the bike where it belongs.

It is all about maintenance and repair part sales and has nothing to do with derailleurs being better.

In addition to a single chain line, narrower and stronger rear hub and wheel every one forgets the chain could be dumped for a far lighter kevlar belt... and yes they can sort out any issues with the belt too.

Why go to the effort of a faster stronger longer wearing system when it is so easy to convince the majority of riders that the current lucrative high maintenace systems are better?
  • + 2
 I have a 50er cog. Impressing the girls Wink
  • + 2
 Make a 26" rim-sprocket already, why niggle?
  • + 1
 @hamncheez That's basically what the Honda RN01 was, but with the mech in a box to create an air of mystery and intrigue.
  • + 2
 Extra weight centered and low is a much better option.
  • + 2
 www.nicolai-bicycles.com/shop/index.php/bike/ion-gpi-pro.html 16.4kg
www.nicolai-bicycles.com/shop/index.php/bike/ion16-27-5-komplettbike-tech-line.html 14.3kg

That's approx the weight difference between gearbox and 1x

You can make a detailed list with 1x components weight vs gearbox weight but you will reach the same 2kg value I suppose. Just imagine you replace a 250g cassette + 250g derailleur with a gearbox (with housing and oil) + a rear cog and eventually a chain tensioner. If you consider downhill bikes then the gearbox advantages decrease even more.
Gearbox replacing current drivetrains is just not viable.
  • + 2
 Who sent you here....?
  • + 0
 Common sense of engineering (I don't work in bike industry).
I would love that someone proves me wrong in a few years, I also want to be able to buy better bikes. But I don't think gearbox is an option. Sorry to ruin your dreams.
And I created the account to be able to read the negative comments if you were wondering.
  • + 2
 Not an option because of what ? +2kg ? Really ? As an engineer make an experiment and weight yourself 2 times a day for a month. 2kg is measurement error of human + bike + equipment.
  • + 3
 @uskas That's not common sense of engineering. You're comparing the weight of two drivetrains with different ranges and qualities. 2kg is not the difference for chain and gearbox with an equal range, more like 1,5kg.

Common sense of engineering then would take into account the location of the weight and a couple of other factors.
  • + 2
 Sounds to me you are searching for excuses to accept the gearbox.
You might have different criterias for choosing a bike and I can accept that.
But from what I've seen the norm for 160mm travel bikes is 14kg for aluminium and 12kg for carbon and 11 speed range is considered acceptable. Then 1.5kg is too much added weight.
And I think you won't decrease this difference too much if you decrease the range supported by the gearbox.
Just compare P1.9xr and P1.12 (the table at the end) : pinion.eu/en/p1-9xr-gearbox
  • + 2
 @Ikubika: What would be your suggestion: go to toilet and do not eat for some time before riding a gearbox equipped bike? And do the other way around for rear derailleur equipped bikes?
Not joking: the added weight from a gearbox does not produce additional power nor aids the efficiency.
  • + 1
 @uskas Nah, I don't really need excuses. As you mentioned, people have different criterias and some of them would trade weight for reliability and simplified maintenance any day.

The weight difference will obviously not decrease if you decrease the range, but it will decrease if you increase it.

I tested the Nicolai that you mentioned on a parking lot and it's not the added weight that I noticed first, but rather where it was located. All in all it's not that bad.
  • + 159
 No. This needs to stop. If you cannot push a 44 tooth rear cog with a 30 or 32 tooth chainring the answer is not a 50tooth rear cog it is a 2x system or stop being a pussy and push some gear. this is rediculois
  • + 16
 When is someone going to make a 10-36 eleven speed?
  • + 7
 Closest cassette to that right now is the SRAM cassette debuted on their CX1 group with an 11-36 spread on a normal Shimano freehub.
  • + 54
 @meafroninja Coming from the guy at TWENTY THREE (23) FEET above sea level..
  • + 10
 I think it makes sense if you have a 150-170mm bike that you grind up the mountains but also take to the DH park. My local trails gain 450' a mile so I run a 10-42 with a 30 up front. If i take it to to the park I'm sometimes close to spinning out when trying to throw in a couple of cranks for a big jump. I usually run a DH bike at the park so not a big deal for me personally, but if I was running 1 bike for both I'd consider this for sure.
  • - 7
flag abzillah (Mar 21, 2016 at 0:40) (Below Threshold)
 @catweasel I have a 170mm fork on a nomad and run a 10-42 with a 34T up front, I have never once thought that I need a lower gear. If it gets too steep, I'll jump off and push my bike up. On the other hand, I have thought of getting a larger chain ring up front, need a higher gear for some sections of trail and park.
  • + 12
 Good for you dude, your faster than me if you're spinning out a 34, I try not to push if I can help it for the sake of my fragile ego. Seriously there are a lot of fun tech climbs in places like Moab that I like challenging myself on, but couldn't crank out with my puny legs and a 34 up front
  • + 2
 @dklemm thanks for the intel
  • + 5
 @catweasel I fit Pritty well into the criteria you describe. When I go 1x11 this year though I will more than likely go with a 30T. Then buy a 32/34T for days in the park. It's easy enough just to switch the rings when your prepping the bike the day before.
  • + 1
 Good point well made
  • + 41
 LOL at the "I can climb anything with my 32-36 combo so why would anyone buy this?" comments.

Yup, it's overkill for you so clearly it's overkill for everyone else out there since we all ride the SAME trails.
  • + 37
 I agree. Companies should not release products you specifically do not need, or are too physically tough to use. Personally, I think anyone who uses anything but a rigid fixie with no brakes and a seat carved from solid granite is a pussy.
  • + 3
 As a guy who has been using a 1by drivetrain since the 90's, this is getting outta hand. I don't fault anyone who can use gearing like this - and there is plenty of merit in it - but we are getting to the point where another system should really be considered by now.
  • + 4
 I acknowledge that that people need lower gearing. However i find it ridiculous that someone would choose this as their solution to lower gearing when there is the e13 cassette that gives you an even wider gear range and shimano makes a 2x set up for this very reason.
  • + 1
 I run a 28t front and 11-40 rear and the ratio is basically just barely faster than walking speed. If I went up to 50t, it really would be slower than walking. I don't see the point of this, just get in better shape!
  • + 23
 The point is so you can up to a larger front chain ring. These micro front rings spin out very easily
  • + 3
 They need a side by side comparision with the e*thirteen 9-44 cassette. I realize not entirely apples-to-apples as the latter requires an XD driver.

I just hope these new cassettes along with the SRAM eagle group drive down the prices of existing 11 speed cassettes.
  • - 1
 Well, shimano will have there 46 soon and sram will have there 50 was it 52 soon, allowing larger front rings. Review on that e13 noted some creaky noises. That cassette splits in two halves.
  • + 10
 This will allow to use a bigger chainring, that's what is useful for. Nobody is going to use a 50t sprocket with a 28t chainring obviously.
  • + 6
 no offense, but I keep chuckling at 'ridiculois'
  • + 3
 say it with a french accent, you'll get a few more chuckles, "ridiculois"
  • + 1
 i'm not hating or trying to be manly, I just genuinely don't understand what people need such low gears for
  • + 5
 Well you are welcome to come ride my trails. You'll find very quickly that big cassettes are a great relief after the first half hour of constant climbing...when you realize you are about halfway there.
  • + 9
 Again, its so you can gain more top speed by using a larger front ring. That has huge appeal to me, living in an area with really fast trails.
  • + 6
 The point with using a larger cog is for folks to use bigger chain rings instead of a 30 or 32, say this time use a 34 or 36. That's where you get the benefits of a 50T cog, not with a 30 or 32.
  • + 7
 I love my front shifter.
  • + 2
 Just give me a 10-36 someone! I don't need these super wide range cassettes that feel like crap due to the cadence jumps
  • + 1
 Shimano has made 11-36 since its inception, why would you need a 10-36? There is no need for such a small difference. Nothing stopping you from tearing apart some SRAM cassettes to tighten that range though.
  • + 1
 For me personally, but not everyone obviously, 10-36 would give me a perfect range with a 32. 11t would be better with a 34, then 36 would not be low enough. But that's splitting hairs.
  • + 0
 I cant get a shimano driver for my wheelset, I'm stuck with the xd driver, hence why I want a 10-36... even a 10-25 would be fine! I just want a closer range cassette that will fit on my wheels
  • + 7
 My favorite part is how everyone is rehashing the same arguments for when the industry went to a 9 speed; then to a 10 speed; then to a 2x; then to a 1x; then to an 11 speed.

You guys are going to lose your collective minds when SRAM releases its 12 speed 10-50 cassette later this year. I predict top comment will be "Why would I pay $xxx for this when I can just convert my existing 11 speed to a 50t with OneUp?"
  • + 2
 No, not loose my mind but will shake my head when so many people blindly eat up Sram's spiel, line up to buy it then moan about the cost of replacing it after too short a life span.
  • + 88
 Looks like they found the starter ring for my 89" Honda Civic.
  • + 18
 Or maybe they stole the rear sprocket from this..... www.oldminibikes.com/forum/photopost/data/582/medium/IMAG0167.jpg
  • + 7
 I got 99 problems but my 89' honda crx still runs!
  • - 9
flag rrolly (Mar 21, 2016 at 9:45) (Below Threshold)
 problem #98: you still drive your '89 crx
  • + 2
 It is pretty huge that is for sure! Like your mum's willy!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 63
 Increase your chainring size by 4 teeth, and gain range on both ends of your cassette. This means a higher top speed, a better average chainline and legs for days on your next backcountry epic.

Full photos here:
www.pinkbike.com/u/oneupcomponents/album/Shark

Full range comparison here:
ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb13277597/p4pb13277597.jpg
  • + 13
 How is the chainline better?
What happen if you slightly backpedal on the 50 cog?
  • + 30
 Not for me, but I love that you guys are continuing to innovate and offer options at good prices! Keep it up!
  • + 8
 I think you are going to use more the middle gears, so your chain remains straight more often.
  • - 1
 the mountain biking industry is going through puberty at the moment. like any change, the first feelings will be negative but as the new standards become more "standard" people will be able to focus more on the benefits.
  • + 74
 Puberty was in the 90s... we're in full on mid life crisis at the moment.
  • - 3
 @mojomaujer chainline is only better if you change to a larger front ring meaning you need to use a larger rear cog for the same gearing.
  • + 1
 Running a large chainring is not going to work... New 1x specific bikes dont have clearance up front i.e. Sc hightower max chainrimg size is 34.
  • - 2
 thats 4t more than a 30t thought which makes a difference. so if you don't use the 11t etc and find the 42t enough then you can get the 50t and move up a size at the front to make more use of the gears. I don't use the 11t but I'm not fit or stong enough too. I would'd buy this
  • + 0
 You could buy this @poah to replace the xpander your not selling.
  • + 2
 I've ran OneUp 42t cogs with my XO 10 speed for nearly two years. They have been trouble free. I hope something like this is in the works for SRAM riders. I would love to go back to a 34t ring up front and still have all the range if not more so.
  • + 4
 It's just an option guys, nobody is taking your 11speeds away Wink

Great job OneUp! I still have to buy radr cage damn it!
  • - 1
 www.pinkbike.com/u/oneupcomponents Next question...could a SRAM 11 speed shifter/derailleur work with a 11 speed XT cassette? Could it be pushed (B-tension adjustment or whatever mod) to work with this hack not unlike the way the ten speed stuff was pushed? As I mentioned, with my adjusted 10 speed XO kit I've had no problems at all.
  • + 0
 No.theres tiny magnets in the end of the xt teeth and they're set at mag field north.sram use mag field south on their pulley wheels.sorry.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns - you are going to have to start protecting your satire pieces from copyright infringement before they steal ALL of your ideas for free.
  • + 1
 ^satyre please.
  • + 1
 his spelling is correct
  • + 2
 ^The irony....ha ha
  • + 61
 So let me get this straight...

1)You don't have enough range in your gearing.
2)You don't want the "problems" of a front derailleur.
3)You instead want your rear derailleur almost dragging on the ground.

My head hurts.
  • + 19
 Just buy, "upgrade", and do not question.
  • + 18
 i cant see how this is really better than my inexpensive 2x10 (11-36 and 24-36)
  • + 18
 I have the new 2x11 shimano xt drivetrain. It's flawless. Love it. 1x is not for me. I don't really understand this obsession with 1x drivetrains.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Mar 21, 2016 at 15:21) (Below Threshold)
 Ekhem this looks like a long cage from Shimano. Looots of bikes have them, particularly those with the front mech in order to cover for a longer chain Blank Stare I believe front mechs are for a limited group of people with greatly dominant fast twitch muscle type. I can easily imagine using a granny ring in Anne Caro style, without front mech. The front mech is going to be dead outise XC Marathon world in a matter of less than 5 years. So many were swearing by tripple chainsets which were a one big contradiction. If you need 22t to crank up then you simply cannot utilize the 42t.
  • + 2
 Get a job wako
  • - 1
 How are you dealing with your debunker complex Mojo? You should get a bit smarter about it since you can't get any reward from your assumptions in the bike world, no matter how exciting it feels for you to conjure the plots of hidden cooperations between companies. Also your boring "get a job" is really pathetic. Unlike you I have a great paid job, that I enjoy, I do something meaningful everyday. I am a relatively strong rider, despite having two small kids, something you have not a tiniest clue about. I boost with confidence based on real life achievements, and you? What are you? A lost hormone slave in the last phase of human larvae state, with a whole world of things to learn about. The key of trolling is to piss off the trolled person, and you are merely a fart. Get lost until you grow some penis and learn how to use it.
  • + 5
 ^unless I've got my wires crossed I think he's a Gurkha from Staffordshire.
  • + 50
 Next one-up should come out with a leg day routine instead of adding more teeth
  • - 4
flag viatch (Mar 20, 2016 at 21:41) (Below Threshold)
 OR use a smaller chainring, duhh !
  • + 16
 OR just get an e-bike. (Could any comment on PB be up for more negative props?!)
  • + 5
 Apparently not.
  • + 14
 @iian. Damn it. I tried so hard. Let's try again.... 26ers are dead... long live the 29er!
  • + 3
 Balls.
  • + 45
 It should be called the Dragon cage, as in "Drag on the ground."

Not recommended for use on 26ers.
  • + 4
 Just out of curiosity, does anyone know how much longer this cage is compared to the original Shimano one?
  • - 30
flag jewsef (Mar 21, 2016 at 1:32) (Below Threshold)
 People won't use a this on a 26" as 26 is dead but the people who use them can't accept this and they are also the people that hate change and also moan about everything being too expensive so will never fork out the $125
  • + 5
 125$ buys a new pair of chainrings, chain, and xt cassette for the 2x9 on my 26'er.
  • + 32
 Think alot of people are missing the point here. I think it for people who want more top speed, but don't want to loose on climbs. Ie. My 30 front 11_40 is fine for me but I do top out at 30mph which is fine for me as I don't have any decents were I need to pedal any faster and I can climb everything. But if I lived some where like the alps I'd need more top end speed so id go up to a 34 but still be able to climb the same stuff. Plus alot of new bikes are 1x only, so all the 2x people stop moaning it was never designed for you anyway. It's horses for courses nothing wrong with giving people of options.
  • + 20
 If you lived in the Alps you won't need more top end because it is steep over here. If you want to go faster on the descents over here you just let go of your brakes! More top end is only necessary if you ride flat or road.
  • + 8
 Jerome once said "If you're spinning out zee gears on a 36 or 38-10 you're out of control." Dan atherton runs a 32t and just tucks if his spinning out because it's faster. 36 or 38 only make sense for the road. Sure the chainline is better, with the big chainring but having a derailleur that hangs to down to ground seems like a silly trade off.
  • + 27
 What's with all the negative comments? It's always good to have another option. If you want to do long, steep, technical climbs (eg., what you find around Squamish or North Vancouver) then this could be for you. Not everyone wants to climb up the fire road.
  • + 5
 Or you could ride a 2x
  • + 1
 Long, steep climbs, yes. Technical, no. You need some momentum, good line choice, and/or some trials-like moves to get through tech spots, not a lower gear. Too little speed and you will set your foot down. This is a gearing setup for those who want to turn on the music, turn off the brain, and sit-and-spin their way up a steep fire road. I don't think low speed and high torque is a good solution for climbing up greasy roots in North Van or Squamish. That's a recipe for spinning your rear tire.
  • + 21
 Good grief it’s not about getting an easier gear, it’s about getting more top gear! It’s about a broader range and not running out of gears while descending while still having that granny for the climbs.

That said, I just installed the XT 1x11 and am running an Absolute Black 32t. I plan on getting stronger and moving to a 34t to get more top end rather than an easier gear. For now, anyway.
  • + 2
 Yes you're right and the same can be done by keeping 2x, using and maintaining it properly. Watch the XTR Di2 Syncros demo video to learn how easy it is to use a 2x crank properly.
  • + 2
 You think I (or others) don’t know how to use a 2X? I’ve been using a 3X since I was a kid that’s not the point of going to a single ring. I’d rather run a 1x9 than go back to a 2X but I’ll take the bigger cassette too thank you very much.
  • + 22
 I wonder if we'll look back on this and laugh?
  • + 20
 I'm laughing right now!
  • + 4
 We will all probably be laughing in 10 years when deraillers are a thing of the past (or confined to XC race bikes)
  • + 2
 Why wait?
  • + 1
 £££ and not having enough of it to buy a new frame (and new wheels)
  • + 21
 I rather have this than an e-bike when I'm 80
  • + 9
 When I'm 80 I want a hoverbike!
  • - 1
 i feel terrible writing this, but clearly you've never ridden an e-bike.
  • - 3
 I agree, since 75% of riders who condemn e bikes do so never having ridden one. They are not for the lazy and the US Forest Service studies show they don't cause any more damage than regular bikes. If you think maneuvering a 60 pound e bike at elite XC racer speeds is easy and no fun have a word with yourself and go try one.
  • + 16
 Am I the only one who thinks adding more and more weight to your back wheel with bigger casettes is not such a good idea? What's so bad in having a front derailleur, two chainrings, smaller casette, same overal weight as with these dinner plate monsters up back but more centered and not unsprunged.
  • + 8
 Exactly- a front derailleur is better than this shit show. 1x11 is marketing bullshit for flatlanders. Cool idea, but many people are realizing they want more range, and the solution is worse than what they were trying to avoid in the first place.
  • + 3
 The tradeoff for that extra unsprung weight for simplicity of shifting with the same range is something each rider has to consider. Most people who go single front ring don't go back. I know I won't. If I lived somewhere with longer climbs or faster descents I would definitely consider something like this. As it is I am happy with 11-36.
  • + 1
 I would rather go back to a three ring set up. At least its compact. The beauty with a 42t ring is that you can get it to work with a Zee mech which has a short cages. I've always hated long cage mechs.
  • + 3
 Exactly, why not just move 1 or 2 cogs back to the front where they belong and use fewer slightly wider than rhythm step spaced cogs on the back? Its the same number of chain wheels and a far more robust system.
  • + 20
 Well boys... time to bring on the 58t
  • + 22
 26" ain't dead.
  • + 7
 50 ain't dead
  • + 6
 No thread should be left without at least one 26 ain't dead post.
  • - 3
 11sp for life!
  • - 4
flag b26-4-Life (Mar 21, 2016 at 13:23) (Below Threshold)
 26 is definitely dead
  • + 1
 You probably shit l sit down to pee, oopsi mean pedal damn autocorrect.
  • + 1
 26 posts ain't dead!
  • + 19
 That derailleur is hanging on for dear life!!!
  • + 8
 *hanging on for der life
  • + 1
 Yep, get out your wallet and buy a box of those derailleurs. Shimano is silent... silently loves Oneup for increasing replacement sales of their most expensive derailleurs.
  • + 14
 It's like the bike industry forgot about derailleur cage size and cassette weight. This setup weighs as much as a double ring setup AND uses long cage derailleur. Don't care how much easier it makes a climb, if you have to use babies leg to shift to the cog, go back to the drawing board!!
  • - 2
 In the big picture, you're complaining about a quarter pound. My SJ Evo with their 45t expander weighs 25.5lbs. That's carbon frame but alloy wheels and heavy fat tubeless tires. My Tracer 275A with their 42t (10-speed) expander weighs 30.5lbs. That's with a 160mm enduro fork, DH wheelset, and big fat tubeless tires.

It's hilarious when I hear these weight complaints about a cassette that weighs 100g more yet is mounted on 2000g wheels with 1200g tires. It's just dumb.
  • + 10
 You know what's even more hilarious? That rocks and roots somehow stopped being a problem, so it's OK to have your shifting apparatus hang as low as it was 6 years ago.
If you need that big of a cog, stick with 2x10, you're not gaining anything with single ring setup like this.
  • + 3
 @TheRaven My Krampus 29 hardtail weighs 32lb. IMO its not the weight that's the issue it's that rear mechs are not the right solution for an off road bike.
  • + 2
 I can't say that the rear derailleur concern is not valid, but in 17 years of riding i've lost one rear derailleur, and it would have happened no matter how low the derailleur reached.
  • + 6
 In 26 years i've bent and twisted more deraillers and hangers than I care to remember. With a gearbox though there's nothing to snag.
  • + 19
 April fools already?
  • + 13
 God this is getting to the stupid stage. Change for changes sake. Hurry up and get the Taniwha into production please Rob, I am over derailleurs and all the shit that goes with them. We are now hanging more weight onto our overly heavy wheels and tyres( read 650 B) ffs. I guess we really are as stupid as the marketing moguls are telling their respective boards
  • + 1
 Yes, I realize a BB using a gear box based on the Alphine IGH would be a completely new product but Shimano has that technology and they can make it compatible with the steps frame interface. Gearbox specific frames being one hurdle. The other hurdles development and production costs would be offset by the increased sales created by switching from derailleur based systems to the IG systems. More IG units = lower cost per unit.
  • + 16
 still rocking the old school 30/36 10 speed. its called out of the saddle climbing
  • + 18
 I'm still on the 9 speed.
  • + 18
 Sturmey Archer 3 speed here
  • + 14
 I got one gear and if I can't man handle it, I'm walking.
  • + 4
 Less is more!
  • + 2
 24/38 11-36 2x10, works great, the 3x8 on my hard tail commuter was great too. Even with 3 different brand chain rings and a shadow Alivio it didn't drop chains was quiet smooth and robust. Most of the 1x bikes I've been on sound and feel like mix masters just like the 2x and 3x systems do when cross chained. People have forgotten what a drivetrain is supposed to sound and feel like.
  • + 11
 Hey Mike, as always your reviews and articles and well written, unbiased, and a joy to read. Whatever side of the fence you are on this concept, you've laid out the pros and cons so that we can make an informed decision one way or the other. Well done!
  • + 11
 It seems like you made a typo writing the ratios down. You probably meant :
'' Shimano XT 11 - 42 is 381.81%, a SRAM XX1 10 - 42 and 420%, and the OneUp'd XT 11 - 50 cassette offers a wider 454.54% range. ''
  • + 5
 Pinion P1-12 600%, Pinion P1-18 636%.
  • + 3
 Let's go bike industry, get the range up to OVER 9000!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah usually Mike makes typos, today it was math fail.
  • + 10
 So many damn fools who think low gears make you weak. Obviously none of you have any very steep trails to climb. I climb steep ass hiking trails with downhill tires (up to 4 pounds per tire), so this type of thing makes tons of sense. However my 2x suits me fine and I probably don't need a 20t front 50t rear... but it'd be cool to try for climbing scree and shit, as higher cadence climbing offers more control in the chunder.
  • + 10
 And I thought the 42T XX1 cog was huge.

Ultra long cage derailleur? No thanks.
  • + 10
 ...sometimes it is better to push your bike walking, than pedalling and not moving at all.
  • + 15
 Actually, millions of people pay millions in gym membership fees to do exactly that every day.
  • - 1
 E-trainer is the future of the fitness industry... in your spinning class December 2016
  • + 11
 Isn't SRAM rumored to be releasing a 10-50 tooth rear cassette soon?
  • + 4
 It doesn't matter. Hopefully we'll have gearboxes by then. If not, then I'll wait for a gearbox instead of buying a 10-50 12spd cassette.
  • + 1
 @abzillah I doubt we'll have gearboxes by next weekSmile
  • + 1
 I can wait.
  • + 7
 Eagle vs Shark?
  • - 3
 10-50 sounds like a sharknado
  • + 6
 I used their 42t sprocket in my 1x10 conversion last year. Really god quality, lasted well, and amazing customer service when I had an issue with the 16t they also supplied. Unrelated to the 50t ring reviewed, but can't recommend OneUp enough.
  • + 8
 So I can pair this with a 24 tooth chain ring, a 27Plus Minion DHR 2 and go climb walls. Sweet...
  • + 1
 Exactly!!
  • + 8
 If you need a 50, seriously, just push your bike. Even then, you might not make it to the top.
  • + 6
 You'd probably get to the top fast walking than on the bike!
  • + 5
 Isn't the point of riding a bike, to ride a bike? I prefer to pedal as much as possible uphills, even if it's less efficient than walking. It still seems to end up being faster than walking a bike too, and is much much more technical and challenging.
  • + 7
 It gives it a Walmart look. Honestly, if this is needed, then why did those folks get rid of their granny gear? If you got mountains to climb, stay with a 2X.
  • + 8
 2X is sweet... better chain line most of the time, than 1X. Love muh 20t front ring.
  • + 7
 I considered a wide range cog it for a while. Then I switched off my brain, rode my bike more and got bigger thighs.
  • + 4
 I would imagine indexing is not great. Having too long a chain for the smaller sprockets probably causes some sluggish shifts. I have a 1x10 11-42 which shifts just fine. Also a XO1 which is even better, but a 50 t just seems a bit much. I would prefer going to a 2x10 w/o a doubt.
  • + 4
 Alot of elistist a*sholes here... Some people only have time to ride once a week due to family, work, etc and were not born aerobic freaks of nature. Many new bikes wont accept a front derailleur so where does that leave the weekend warrior?
  • + 3
 Though I appreciate OneUp's efforts in giving us more gear range, I think I've had it with adding more weight to my rear wheel and go for a gear box instead. With that being said, I can't wait for Zerode's trail bike to go on production.

www.pinkbike.com/news/zerode-taniwha.html
  • + 7
 fuck that shit, I'll get off and walk
  • + 1
 walking is more fun than riding?
  • + 5
 Not in Arizona. There are way too many rocks that would love to eat that derailer for breakfast!
  • - 2
 I am pretty sure that majority of mountain bikers in Arizona ride such long cages since XC/Marathon is the biggest chunk of our sport and most of those bikes sport long cages to accomodate chain length for double and tripple chainsets as well as maxing shifting smoothness.
  • + 1
 Not right now, Waki. It's almost 4 in the morning here.
  • + 1
 I'm just kidding. Honestly, I feel lucky that you even commented on my post. Thank you. You have made a fellow pinkbike users day!
  • + 6
 More teeth on the cassette = bigger chainring. I'm in!
  • + 2
 Bring back the 40 tooth chainring!
  • + 5
 Fuck chainrings, bring back the penny farthing!
  • + 3
 Cant fit a large chainring on most newer frames.
  • + 3
 f*ck that, get gear boxes standard already(and not the derailleur in a can ones either)!
  • + 6
 And to think it was only two years ago I finally gave in to 9spd! Lol
  • + 7
 Haha well 9 speed is an excellent drivetrain!
  • - 1
 It is now, but the first year it came out, I went to my local shop n purchased all the XT stuff(cassette, rear der., shifters, chain) to make my bike 9spd. I put it all on and was so excited. The first time I stood up to sprint for a jump, on the third or so pedal stoke, the chain snapped! My knee slams full force into the fork(dual crown)! Also the chain didn't snap as in come apart. It ripped two outer link plates in half! I took everything off and took it back to the shop exclaiming "I want my money back for this garbage! After a good argument, I won...

This put me off from 9spd til recently... 9spd might be a nice drivetrain(now), but IMO(and others I know), 8spd still the best!
  • + 2
 Maybe this is old news, but couldn't you have a single shifter that switches both a front and rear derraileure? You would just keep switching and it would instantly engage the other mech as you reached the end of the range. Electric seems very doable.
  • + 3
 Di2 does that, it's called synchro shift.
  • + 2
 really, one shifter, that's interesting. I've not paid all that much attention to Di2 cause it's years off my budget, but I have heard great things by friends who've tried it.
  • + 5
 I run 2x10 and have absolutely no problems with it. So what? Let everyone use what he wants
  • + 2
 Yup. Call it the "Colorado conversion." Guys with Sram 1x11 are running 28 teeth up front to grunt up high altitude climbs. Some are saying 1x11 is not a true mtb option unless you don't mind walking. I'd rather be able to peddle than walk a climb any day. There is little need to peddle while descending in my neck of the woods. I could care less about spinning out at speed. Definitely interested in this set up. I could see that cage taking a beating though!
  • + 1
 I see this as really becoming a great option when Shimano drops their 11-46 XT cassette on the market. Then the tooth jump is 4T not 8T.
It's hilarious to read the comments about these large cogs as each successive increase gets such vitriol. Then everybody buys them. The fact is they work.
I run one of their 45T setups now on my 11spd XTR setup and they work great. I to like to stay on my seat and could careless if walking is faster. I am not hiking for a reason. My knees are trashed.
You guys should be happy I am not on an E-bike right?
  • + 3
 Its not about being weak, its about adding more higher range gears by going up to a 34 or possibly 36T chain ring instead of sticking to a 30 or 32T. Read the article for fcuks sakes!
  • + 6
 What about chain slap in the smaller or smallest cogs???
  • + 3
 That's what I'd be concerned about mostly. The chain will feel sloppy and there will be no chain tension while descending...
  • + 1
 Will be like a skipping rope on the low end on the cassette.

The fix ?

Some one will come up with the DCD Mk2 and call it's innovation.
  • + 3
 This is weird, I used to run a 2x9 setup of 11-34 cassette and 22/36 chainrings.....never had a problem getting up anything.....i can't help but think this is fashion led and nothing else.
  • + 1
 I am running a state of the art 9-cog (32-11) cassette on my Glory, with only 7 working, coupled to a 36T front something Truvativ ring. Uphill is a blast once the 32 engages and it is too easy to pedal, downhill I just leave it in the lowest one that engages. Why on earth would anyone, who considers himself a sports-nut/-aficionado need a 50T cog, while a 34 front is present? Not that I really care, as I have owned 2 cassettes on my 4 bikes in the past 9 years so far, still in perfect working condition, but this stuff is just wacky Big Grin
  • + 1
 Every one of these percentages are wrong: "XT 11 - 42 is 281.81%, a SRAM XX1 10 - 42 and 320%, and the OneUp'd XT 11 - 50 cassette offers a wider 354.54% range"

Why did you subtract 100% from each of them? Gear range for XT 11-42 is 381, XX1 is 420%, and OneUp'd XT 11-50 is 454%.
  • + 1
 To further explain this with a 30 tooth chainring and XX1... 30/10 = 3.0 and 30/42 = .714 ... 3.0 / .714 = 420%
  • + 1
 Bit early, April 1st isn't for a couple of weeks yet...

I'm sure a few years ago I saw a prototype trials bike disc brake with a bloody great disc brake track actually attached the the rim of the wheel with a conventional disc brake caliper mounted up near the tyre for extra braking power. Sooner or later we're going to have sprocket teeth attached to the rims for ultimate climbing power.

When will ridiculousness end?
  • + 3
 Will one chain even fit with this? Not that I'm hating. I barely had enough links on a new chain to fit my 40t rear and 34t front and get full travel.
  • + 1
 I do appreciate this trend , but there is one thing that I really want to have addressed - keeping the mech cage as short as possible. I dont need 50T. but perhaps cage just a wee bit longer to be fine with about 42t. I like my Zee ,because its short and therefore providing more ground clearance.
  • + 1
 I also love my Zees as they're short and cheap and work well up 42t. Next step will be a Pinion (or similar) though.
  • + 1
 I have Zee and 11-36 XT cassette, and was considering getting the Sunrace 11-42 and go from 30T to 32T up front when it wears out, but was under the impression that it won't shift well unless I get the Radr cage? Now with the current price of the cage, I may as well just get XT 11spd M8000 derailleur. Imho they should drop the price of the cage some as I fail to see how it makes sense to buy one these days if for just about the same money you can get get a new mech without any messing around. With all that said, if I get new chain, cassette and mech then I may as well just add the shifter and have full XT 11 speed or maybe by fall even SLX 11spd.
  • + 1
 Kryten, im on a hardtail so chain growth isnt an issue with Zee + 42t. Full sus will probably work - I guess you could take up the slack of the 6 extra links (36 to 42)(probably on chainring) and cycle through the travel and have a pretty good idea if it will work or not. As for 11 im going to keep with 10 as its cheaper to replace cassettes and chains.
  • + 2
 Well, you don't need to change your derailleur in order to move up to 11sp, but you will probably need the extra take-up capacity for the chain, and you will definitely want the increased offset of the upper pulley wheel that the Rad/RadR cage's will provide if you are going to go to 11-42. The pulley offset brings that upper pulley wheel up closer to the small cogs so you still have good chain wrap, and crisp shifting in the small cogs, while allowing for the pulley to rotate out of the way when going into the 42t cog. I like the short cages and more durable mech's as well, and have been using a Saint rear derailleur with a Rad, then RadR cage and a 11-42 spread for the last 2.5 years. First on a LTc, and now on a Nomad, so the chain growth is there but the RadR cage provides plenty of capacity. This combo does not leave me wanting anything else out of my drivetrain, and when the cassette and drive bits wear out, I can put on a nice inexpensive 11speed xt cassette and a 11 speed shifter, and keep my Saint derailleur.
  • + 1
 metacomet . thats great. I would still preffer shimano to come up with zee2 short 11sp mech though but your approach is solid too
  • + 5
 Eagle vs. Shark haha! I see what you did there One Up.
  • + 1
 Making 1x more accessible to everyone is a great for everyone. This is great for people who ride near mountains or hills and ride uphill on single track. Fireroaders need not apply. It also lowers the 1x prices for all of us. Also, can you imagine what the torque on a 50t would do to an aluminum free hub body?
  • + 1
 Oneup has taken Shimano's low end Mega Range from its 15.00 freewheels so you can put it on your expensive bikes and cassettes. Of course your legs don't like the 8T change. Shimano's Rythm Step philosophy keeps gearing changes around 3T average. Obviously Shimano doesn't comment on using their derailleurs max size cogs and total range difference. You might get it to work briefly but the extra stress will affect the derailleur quickly. Take Shimano's word for it not mine or Oneup's. This is another step in the progression of trying to get 1x to work as promised. Looking forward to mid drive e bikes driving gear boxes into mainstream by providing a BB interface for them... oh yay another set of BB standards on the way!
  • + 1
 The backpedal issue on the 42T is a shimano cog shape problem. All shimano 42's do that regardless of whether its the final cog position or shifted inboard one cog thus its not a chainline issue. Also One-Up has a 10T mini-cluister option available that works with a new freehub body they developed with Hope (versions for stan's and DT hubs will exist also) that replaces the three smallest cogs with either a 10-12-14 or a 10-12-15.
  • + 1
 I still have a wider range with my 10 speed 9-42 Leonardi cassette, (only 250g) and 20-32 2x up front. Also less sprung weight on the rear wheel, so better suspension action. Also more ground clearance up front than running a 34. All of that weight on the rear end is probably more weight than a 2x system too.
  • + 5
 It's just the opposite, if u have a wide range, u don't have to switch gears every 3 seconds. And I'd rather turn my left hand a quarter turn and ride up the mountain than walk. It's not really complicated to change gears with either hand. Having a higher high and a lower low just gives u more options. Having a dinner plate on my rear wheel with a 1x just to try to match the spread of a 2x system is not the answer. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
  • + 2
 So I guess this is how you add back all of the weight you saved by dropping your shifter and front derailleur when going to a 1x setup. This thing is 90g, added to a 450g cassette. XT 11-36 10spd cassettes were like 330g.
  • + 1
 1150 x 34 is just a still less range than 1140 with a double 26 and 36. So I am not sure why people are complaining about "too much range". The double will always have an advantage but this gets close and depending where you ride can be a benefit. By the way: Shimano is coming out with 1146. And One-up has its own 10 cog close to market.
  • + 5
 Go Pinion!!!
  • + 2
 give me a proper geometry on a 29er fitted with a 12 sp. gearbox ... get my cah and let me go. And laugh at these pricey option bouncing in the back of your bike ;-)
  • + 2
 I really wonder how much caidence you would need on a 30 to 50 tooth setup to be faster than an average person hiking. Someone that know math do this!
  • + 3
 Doesn't matter, pedaling is always faster.
  • + 2
 At first I thought this was an April fools joke, then realized that it is still March. This chain ring is the byproduct of the obesity epidemic.
  • + 3
 Isn't Shimano already coming out with a cassette that has a 46 ring already? Is 4 more teeth really going be that different?
  • + 2
 at first i was like... where is the disc on the other side... and then i saw the brake caliper Big Grin and looked closely and then found it ! shying behind this monster Big Grin
  • + 2
 I wonder if this will work with the new Shimano XT 11-46 cassette? It would be nice to have a 50 without the huge 8 tooth jump for those long high country days.
  • + 3
 need that 34 x 11 gear for hammering down the road from fromme. thats the only time it would ever get used
  • + 1
 I'm really struggling to understand where mountain biking is going with this gear range stuff? Crazy easy gears don't make climbing any faster. Going slower makes balancing the bike harder. Is this ENDURO?
  • + 2
 So many fools. Many suspension designs suffer from a baby 30t or 28t ring up front. This solves that problem, letting you run a 34 or even 36t up front. No need to 'man up'
  • + 2
 Folks just watch this space, we have something quite revolutionary on the way. Good to see so much enthusiasm for gear box bikes.
  • + 2
 All these people complaining about wimps and leg strength...... increase your chainring. You can get more range up/down or both by just changing your chainring. !!!
  • + 3
 the chain is probably too long when your in the hardest cog at the rear............
  • + 3
 My thoughts exactly. Lets see a pic of the rig with the chain in the little gear.
  • + 1
 I think this is solved with the extra long cage. Those were my thoughts as well. Better make sure you have enough slack for chain growth as well.
  • + 1
 That's also my primary concern with this design as well. That long cage is going to create a lot of leverage over the tension spring, and your chain is gonna be bouncing like mad through rocky terrain, even if it is keeping tension on it through the full range. In the smallest cogs, the cage will be folded back under on itself and will not be tensioning the chain very effectively.

I am very glad this exists though. Will be nice for a lot of folks in a lot of places. I don't see it as a cure for a lower climbing gear, as people seem to be focusing on. I see it as a cure for those that need to maintain their climbing gear, while moving up to a larger chainring in order to gain a higher top end. Places where you might be riding for a long ways on pavement or fire roads to access singletrack. I don't need it for where/how I ride right now, but I have lived and ridden in places where this would have been very useful.
  • + 4
 But why? I'm waiting for a 60 tooth.
  • + 1
 We will need bigger wheels for that. 36er here we come.
  • + 3
 Lots of hating. Honestly I feel like One Up knows the market. The Dentists want more teeth.
  • + 1
 I've never blamed poor gearing for having trouble riding. Usually it's lack of fitness! Damn chicken fried steak and sausage gravy screwed up my ride again!
  • + 3
 Not it is just becoming ridiculous.
  • + 0
 As a somewhat roadie, a wider range is appreciated.

I like to spin a decent cadence, but still have a big enough ring, (32/34) to rip it on a couple trails.

Wait till SRAM drops its new drivetrain next year!
  • + 1
 Someone should stop this nonsense trend in bike manufacturing. Bigger is not always better. I'm sticking with my 26 and 24 inch wheels and 9 and 10 spd cassetts.
  • + 2
 I dont get the whining.... more range and it works. Whats the problem again?
  • + 3
 Never skip the legs day. Never!
  • + 3
 Was I asleep for ten days?
  • + 3
 Lol, another nail in the derailleur coffin
  • + 3
 Don't like it? Don't buy it.

Problem solved you whingers and whiners.
  • + 1
 none of the yank blokes on this blog know what 'whingers' are mite educate them cobber !
  • + 2
 unfortunatly that method doesnt work for a person who wants a 26" bike with modern geometry. ofc this works here but in other parts of the market that doesnt work and the market races on without you. im all for widening options but the problem comes when new things replace old things instead of being alongside them
  • + 3
 Now I can climb Mt. Everest
  • + 4
 I don't need this.
  • + 3
 My goodness, find a new sport.
  • + 4
 maybe danger frisbee?
  • + 2
 Now you're talking!
  • + 3
 Do some squats or something. You should not need a gear that low
  • + 1
 Agreed! Buy a dirt bike you lazy Fat F*^$#.
  • + 2
 come to wales or Cotswolds find out what climbing is
  • + 6
 After I've been riding for 4-5 hours I'm pretty much happy for the smallest gear I can get
  • + 1
 Try coming to Scotland if you want hills. Or mud or rain. Or midgies. It's up to you actually.....
  • + 1
 I lad those wee beasties are a pain in the arse....... the midges that is
  • + 3
 Face palm for mtb I quit Where my bmx
  • + 3
 Isn't sram putting this out as a factory option soon
  • + 5
 Yes. The only advantage here is that it won't be quite as ludicrously priced as Sram's
  • + 1
 Is there any research on making the back wheel so much heavier? Seems strange to move the weight from the center of the bike (chainrings) to the rear wheel (cassette).
  • + 3
 Oh no!!! The cogsuckers are coming once this goes mainstream!
  • + 1
 Two questions:

- Will this work with a "regular" Sram 11sp rear derailleur?
- If yes, will the shifting be sketchy, like when you put a 42t cog on a 10sp setup?
  • + 0
 i can almost guarantee it'll shift like shit
  • + 1
 I've just made a 52 tooth version at work on a milling machine .... no I haven't, but someone will ... soon
  • + 1
 50t... this shit is getting ridiculous, or people are just really out of shape...
  • + 1
 Another vote for stupid hack mod, shit chainline, backpedal chain derail. The Freds will gobble this up tho...
  • + 1
 We are putting alot of unsprung weight were it shouldn't be with the heft of these cassettes and derailleurs.
  • + 1
 Do you know how much your rear wheel and tire weigh? Mine are 2300g together. 100g makes no difference.
  • + 2
 50 tooth shark, I'm going to need a bigger hill..
  • + 1
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeA8PUIOzUc

Compatibility shimano 11v and sram 12v, correct and precise operation.
  • + 2
 That rear mech is dead in about 3 days maybe sooner.
  • + 2
 Throw this on your 36" steed; bigger circles are better...or something...
  • + 2
 That cog trend begin to be ridiculous. Go to the gym!
  • + 2
 that cage is begging to be ripped off by a rock...
  • + 2
 More like Jumped the Shark.
  • + 3
 single speed baby
  • + 2
 Couldn't they round up that chainring to 53!??
  • + 2
 Thats next in the world of mountain bike innovations. A bar mounted, cable operated chain shortener system. Pull that lever, and it takes all the slack out of the chain! That or a derailleur with a cage that adjusts its length dependent on where it is in the range of cassette. SRAM, Hire me!
  • + 2
 Anything requiring a gear like that, I'm happy to walk up.
  • - 2
 seriously where the hell are you guys riding that you need this? hill so steep you flip over backwards if you stop pedalling but you still want to make it up anyways? 10 mile ascent with no break cause a cougar is chasing you over east coast shale and roots? geezus christ. if its that bad, just get off your bike and walk.
  • + 1
 Lol
  • + 9
 It's called Colorado. Many people I know here would benefit from this. Higher (larger) front ring for top end/long descents and still easy enough gear to pull up long climbs at 6000-10,000+ feet in altitude.
  • + 7
 @bman33 yeah totally agree. I've never been to Colorado but I've ridden some trails that are scary steep and in the moment could use a big ring. Plus I can't imagine grinding steep slopes at 10k altitude with a smaller(ish) ring!
  • + 1
 Not for me but a good idea. 11-36 eleven speed would be more useful for me.
  • - 5
flag SztAmaas (Mar 20, 2016 at 22:20) (Below Threshold)
 Where this ring is needed... There is uplift service too...
  • + 2
 I live in Colorado and run a 10-42 with a 30 up front. I'm not massively fit but do just fine. While I know that you can gain a bigger range, I'm never spinning out on the descents, in fact I spend more time braking than pedalling. Where I do think this might be useful is for people who ride park and trail on the same bike, as I am close to spinning out at times when throwing in a stroke or 2 before a big jump. I generally ride a DH bike at the park so not enough of an issue for me personally to want a bigger range.
  • + 3
 Just get a triple. You kids have been brainwashed by all this bs.
  • + 3
 Who wants to run a triple at a DH park?
  • + 2
 @catweasel yes but also who is going to run a 50t at a park. I used to run a 36 and still got many looks about the pieplate on the back
  • + 1
 I live in CO too and run a 11-36 with a 34t up front, I honestly cannot even imagine running a 50t...spin to win?
  • + 1
 +1 on a regular 11-36 for Colorado. I've seen 70 year old men 12,000' up on multiple passes and trails riding fully rigid single speeds, not joking either... These guys show there's definitely not a need for anything relatively close for 50t rings...
  • + 0
 i run 34t to 11-36t as well. i'm not at 10,000 feet, but i think i've only shifted into the 36 ring like once in my entire life. also, i have (hike) climbed mountains a bunch over 10,000 feet going straight from sea level, that altitude takes all of about a day or 2 to get acclimated to, so i mean... if you live there, its no different, if you're visiting, you'll be fine by day 2 or 3. *shrug* so much negatives for a joke... lots of sensitive baby-legged people i guess.
  • + 2
 I get the idea but it's ridiculous Smile
  • + 2
 Just another Fad. Getting as bad as a footballers haircut now.
  • + 1
 How much torque can a freehub body take? Im running 42-11 with a 28t front and cant possibly see the need for this!
  • + 1
 This is silly. With this I hope that people and manufactures finally realise that gearbox is the only and right way to go.
  • + 2
 the engineers have known this for a long time however its the complete wrong direction for the financial men. kick the businessmen out of the workshop!
  • + 0
 Seriously 50 teeth Eek I don't think anyone will ever need something that big unless your going straight up a 90 degree wall !!!!!
  • + 1
 To much to ask of most bikes with short chainstay lengths
  • + 2
 Enduro cog!
  • + 1
 Why not put that 50t up front?! Im sure Peaty can relate. #backtothefuture
  • + 1
 when i saw the pic i thought....daaaaamn...DJ ratios have gone insane!
  • + 2
 Climb all the things!
  • + 1
 And here I am a bike shop mechanic still rolling on a 1x10 11-36...
  • + 1
 bottom out in the 50t ring? that's a GNARLY climb.....
  • + 1
 Ok If going up the eiger one a week I suppose.
  • + 1
 50t, you are defeating the purpose of the climb
  • + 1
 Why are there 11 cogs on the separated picture?
  • + 1
 50? wow...dassabeegwon...
  • + 1
 coming soon 8*60 !!! Smile Smile Smile
  • + 1
 Damn I just bought the 45! If I wait till the fall the 55 will be out.
  • + 1
 OneUp might as well just start making full cassettes at this point.
  • + 0
 At this range, and e-bike is becoming a better option!
  • + 1
 If you must.
  • - 1
 If u need anything bigger than a 40t you are not riding you are crawling up the side of a cliff
  • - 1
 I'll stick to my 10sp 11-36 cassette with 38t chainring. work on your glutes and quads.
  • + 8
 I'll stick to my 11-32 cassette with 38t chainring. Work on your tolerance, people are different.
  • + 0
 More chain, more cage, more cassette, more tires=more weight.
  • + 11
 God only knows how you do it Sherlock..
  • - 1
 none of my "epic" rides involve epic climbing.
but i can see this setup workin for some riders.
  • + 1
 go to the gym!
  • + 0
 freds on freds on freds
  • + 0
 C'monnnn!
  • - 3
 I don't need this shit in my life. If you can't ride up hills, practice or find a different sport. Don't inflict this stupidity on the rest of the human race
  • + 2
 I can ride up hills and I don't need a big cassette to do it, however all of my trails are on MOUNTAINS, so I have a big cassette for that.
  • - 2
 Mate, the biggest mountain in the UK is in the same area and the hills near me aren't too shabby either. Ever heard of the fort William world cup? Well then. 34t it is. Get fit
  • + 2
 Are you kidding me? The biggest mountain in the UK is 4400 feet. That's what we call a small ski area. Sorry, not even close.
  • - 1
 And of course you live at sea level
  • - 1
 To chyba do wjeżdżania na K2 bo niby kurwa po co...
  • - 2
 if you need this, you should get a eBike
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