Park Tool MT-40 Multi-Tool - Review

Nov 30, 2015 at 15:40
by Mike Levy  
Park Tool MT-40 review test

Park Tool's blue (what other color would it be?) MT-40 multi-tool is on the large side of thing when talking about pocket-sized helpers, but it certainly packs a bigger punch than a more race-focused multi-tool. The $54.99 MT-40 includes 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm hex keys, both a T25 and T35 Torx bits, a flat blade screwdriver, a nifty C02 inflator, and a burly chain tool that rivals what some people use in their home shops. All of that adds up to 235 grams on my scale and a not so small package, but its flat shape should mean that it won't be too bothersome in most pockets. www.parktool.com
MT-40 Details

• 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm hex
• T25, T30 Torx
• Flat blade screwdriver
• 11-speed compatible chain tool
• C02 inflator
• Keyring holder
• Dimensions: 8cm x 5.5cm x 2cm
• Weight: 235 grams
• MSRP: $54.99



Park Tool MT-40 review test
Sturdy feeling aluminum side plates sandwich the MT-40's tools.
Park Tool MT-40 review test
The opposite side is home to the MT-40's chain tool and thread-on C02 inflator.



Performance

Multi-tools come in all shapes and sizes, so it's easy to get what you need without having too little or too much, but I feel like they should be split into two distinct categories regardless of how many tools they include. One group consists of multi-tools that should be thought of as nearly disposable given that they seem to last about one season before they fall apart, and they often have tool bits that don't fit snug enough or are so flexible that you're worried they might snap on you. The other, higher-quality group is comprised of tools that you might have in your backpack for years on end - they're always there, they don't rattle apart, and the bits fit properly, so you're not worried about rounding off every bolt you touch.

Park Tool MT-40 review test
The 8mm slip-on adapter slides onto the 5mm hex key and is held on via a spring-loaded detent.
Park Tools' MT-40 fits into that second category. The tolerances of all of the hex keys are spot-on, so much so that I wouldn't hesitate to grab the MT-40 when I'm working in the shop. Each key can also be rotated out from the tool body easily, but without them being so loose that they rattle around and require snugging up. The 8mm slip-on adapter that slides on over the 5mm hex key is a clever way to save some space, and it functions just fine for a trail-side repair, but I think I'd still prefer a standalone 8mm key as I keep expecting to lose the adapter. The thread-on C02 inflator is interesting, and it's worked pretty well the couple of times that I've needed it - simply push it onto the valve firmly and then thread the C02 canister into it until air begins to flow.

Park Tool MT-40 review test
The C02 adapter threads onto a short stub next to the chain tool. Thread it off to use it, then thread it back on when you're done.
Park Tool MT-40 review test
The MT-40's chain tool feels extremely sturdy.


Most pint-sized chain tools can make you feel like you're drunk and like you have the largest hands in the world. They can be finicky to use due to companies trying to make them as small as possible, but that's not the case with the chain tool on the MT-40. This thing feels super solid, especially the fold-down handle, but it doesn't make for a lightweight multi-tool. I'll take that tradeoff any day.

As impressed as I am with the MT-40, I was surprised to see some of the plated hex keys have a bit of rust on them already. This might be down to how I'm carrying it, slipped into a bib short pocket up against my back, where it probably sees more than its fair share of salty sweat.


Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesYou can find lighter and smaller multi-tools, so look elsewhere if you're all about having the smallest package possible. But if you want a sturdy feeling multi-tool that you'll probably have for years on end, the kind of multi-tool that you hesitate to lend to other riders for fear of not getting it back, the MT-40 is it. - Mike Levy



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62 Comments

  • + 81
 Hello winter. Multi tool reviews. Come back DH! Come back...
  • + 7
 I here ya.

Where's the southern continent's goodness? You know, the palaces of various paved streets and stairs that make up the crazy life of urban downhill?

Pinkbike, please.
  • + 5
 Haha! I came to the comments to say just that. I guess we can look forward to some inner tube reviews this winter too? Better than nothing honestly
  • + 21
 If it's gonna rust in the pictures it's definitely gonna rust in my bag.
  • + 9
 Might be dried blood...?
  • + 1
 If the inner tube reviews include those new schwalbe plastic ones that are like 50% lighter I will be into it.
  • + 0
 Someone should make a non rusting tool package for biking, you can see that some of the keys are already starting to rust on this tool. It's just a suggestion
  • + 3
 I could be wrong but the reason that hasn't been done is simply because tool steel is the best type of metal to use for things like this because it won't flex too much and won't permanently deform when it does. The trade off is that it rusts
  • + 2
 that non rusting tool package is called a plastic bag. I like zip-lock best, but glad will do.
  • + 21
 What Mike is saying, that if you are a man, then definitely must buy this, otherwise...

"if you're all about having the smallest package possible"

And we all know I would do anything to get rid of my smallest package.
  • + 2
 I can't believe I had to scroll this far for smallest package comments. Man, that made me laugh.
  • + 1
 Seconded! LOL.
  • + 9
 I wish Park Tool would stop doing the 8mm as an adapter for the 8mm. the 5mm allen isn't that strong, and when it's drilled for the detent spring and retention pin/ball it's basically like swiss cheese. Try loosening something like a bolt on rear axle to change a flat mid mountain and if the axle is in there at all tightly it's going to break the tool.
  • + 2
 Buy the Blackburn
  • + 7
 What about the obvious rust spots on a tool after just 1 season? That to me points to poor build quality?
  • + 4
 They'll blame it on being pre-production and they might have a point. But at least it's been used and not just looked at to test.
  • + 3
 I'm still yet to find a multi tool that doesn't rust after sitting in my bag for a season. Living in Wales doesn't help - my bag is very rarely dry.
  • + 5
 Goldbond medicated powder will help with your bag's moisture issues...
  • + 1
 Isn't that for your bollocks? @VwHarman
I'm not even sure we get that here!
  • + 1
 For the bullocks indeed! Casper the friendly giggleberries after coating them in the Goldbond, but dry like socal trails the rest of the day!
  • + 4
 Crank brothers m17 has never served me wrong. Where as my park ib2 came apart in my pack a few times, the bolts work themselves loose, and the chain tool sucked to use. I think park makes great shop tools but there are better multi tools on the market.
  • + 3
 EVERY time I go to Mountain Co-op I buy a bike related tool as taught to me by my "trainer" about 15 years ago and I now have a lot of Park tools. This was the best advise anyone ever gave me.....buy a few tools every time you go there.
  • + 3
 Sooo many chain tools don't have the second cradle for loosening the chain links when they bind after repair. I was hoping Park would have thought of that Frown But otherwise they still make the best tools.
  • + 1
 I paid $35 for my park tool last year. It completely fell apart in my hand and pocket when I tried to use it due to a loose stem. Half of it is still on the mountain. It lasted about 3 laps before disintegrating in my pocket....
  • + 1
 give park a call, their customer service is excellent.
  • + 1
 Happened to me with an older generation tool. Park sent me a new one, no questions.
  • + 4
 had my topeak alien for ni on 20 years ,now that's long and loyal service not a spot of rust either .
  • + 2
 Ditto. I also have a rust-free Topeak Alien XS that is at least 15 years old. I bought a very nice looking Lezyne tool about a year ago, and that has rusted to bits. Just replaced that with another Topeak.
  • + 1
 I've had a Park split one for the same time , great tool.and no torx in sight
  • + 5
 Why can you not review some mud/ winter tyres or something?
  • + 5
 I would love to see a review of mud.
  • + 1
 @toop182 @losmarauder Singletrack Mag did it a while ago.

The difference between Clagg and a few other british mud types. haha
  • + 2
 I used to think park made quality products across the board until I had a decent sized collection. I have to say it's quite a mixed bag with a fair bit of crap.
  • + 4
 Topeak mini 20. Only tool that has a 10mm hex. and it's gold. Gold!
  • + 3
 "so look elsewhere if you're all about having the smallest package possible."
  • + 2
 This is just what I need to go under my ultra tight lycra i.imgur.com/FbCjo2b.gif
  • - 1
 I don't get it. No T25. The 8mm set up in unique but you'd be better served to dump the C02 adapter and run a T25 and a real 8mm. C02 adapter is kind of pointless. You still have to carry the cartridge separately and you'd be better off just getting a thread on adapter and keeping it with the C02. Beyond that... less and less people can even use C02. Can't use it on modern tubless set ups... or so I'm told. LOL! Me... I say meh....
  • + 1
 But it does have T25. Am I missing something?

Also, you can't use CO2 when you have a complete blowout with tubeless, but you can when you burp -- you know, when you burp enough to only leave about 15 pounds in the tire and you need 25-30. Also, on long rides in the middle of nowhere (Porcupine Rim in Moab, for example), it's just a good idea to carry at least a spare tube and some CO2. I thought this could be a useful feature.
  • + 1
 True... carry a tube and some sort of pump is always smart.

I missed the T25 somehow.

I still don't understand the point of the C02 adapter on the tool. You have to carry 1 or 2 cartridges anyways. If you're going to carry that you might as well carry the pump portion with it... and likely the tubes together. It just makes the tool bulkier than it needs to be. And if you're someone that carries a traditional pump and doesn't use C02 it's even further pointless.

C02 and latex sealants are a no mix situation unless you want to sealant to clump up/freeze and fail. But for burp refill since there is air in the tire and you can let the sealant roll to the bottom of the tire while you inflate from the top... I can see that.

Either way... just my opinion. Don't see the point for adapter on a tool like this.
  • + 1
 Why can't you use them on modern tubeless setups?
  • + 3
 C02 reacts with the latex sealant. It freezes it. It clumps up and fails.
  • + 3
 I would never take this tool to a park.
  • + 2
 Holy shit that's expensive for a multi tool
  • + 1
 Love my Topeak Hexus, great wee tool and has decent enough tyre levers built into it as well.. oh and its like £15
  • + 2
 Not sure what I was expecting
  • + 1
 "Don't buy cheap tools if you any tools that last."
  • + 2
 Want* goddamnit, I'm on my phone
  • + 1
 Ha! See, no bottle opener in This one...
  • + 0
 My "Park Tool" broke pretty quickly, and it was while using the Allen keys to tighten a hex, but I think it's a cheaper model than that one, with more tools (like tire prys).
  • + 1
 Also have a Topeak one that's been more reliable.
  • + 1
 lifetime warranty? i sure hope so for $55
  • + 1
 Welcome to every single tool made by park.
  • + 3
 Park makes some nice tools and the chain tool on this one looks pretty good, but their pricing is out of line - like, snap-on out of line. My strategy is buy mastercraft-equivalent for anything I can, which has decent return/replacement policy (same with sears), buy cheap OEM for things that you rarely use but can't do the job without (things like a headset press or star-nut setter) and splurge on the rare item that is bike-specific yet gets used relatively frequently, something like a dedicated chain tool (oh, I'm so sick of dinky little cheap-ass chain tools). Jenson & Price Point have decent house brands and some of hte Filzer stuff @ MEC is passable. I'd love to have 100% park but it ain't gonna happen in my lifetime - the upgrade/purge cycle is multi-generational
  • + 2
 T35? C'mon Mike!
  • - 1
 @nubbs

yeah, T35 seems redundant on a multi tool?

T25 most common used size for rotor bolts, control clamps and some finishing kit like Zipp

personally I prefer the Park AWS-10 hex key set, if I am taking any tool with me, and generally don't need to take tools to as my bikes are very well maintained; I can count the number of mechanical issues I've suffered on 1 hand in the past 10 years; predominantly tubeless tires failures caused by broken glass bottles on the trail. Most recent was a spoke snapping on the DT Swiss factory wheels on my road bike, piercing the tire/tube and not something that could be solved on the road.

If you are breaking chains (and needing an on-trail chain tool) something is wrong with the chain tool used to install your chain, or you have a damaged drive train (cassette / chainrings) that is causing secondary damage to the chain and causing it to fail.
  • + 1
 Use of a chain-tool trailside can be positively invaluable when you suffer serious derailleur damage in a crash. Shortening the chain for a single speed ride out is a superior option to a long hike. I'm not sure that a smooth round barrel is the ideal shape for that inflator. It would be nice if it had 'wings' or at least a flatter oval shape to facilitate threading it onto the valve-stem and cartridge threads.
  • + 1
 @b0bg

good point about crash damage on the trail requiring chain repair! Although in my Whistler experiences, mech damage is normally rolling back down the mountain to the nearest bike shop or the hotel room
  • + 1
 Rusty MT-40
  • - 3
 I love this....but i would love it more if it was made out of carbon fibre.
  • + 13
 Do you work for a steel company or something? All you ever do on pinkbike is bitch about carbon fibre
  • + 4
 Or bitch about pinkbike...on pinkbike.

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