Pinkbike Poll – Electronic Components on Your Mountain Bike?

May 2, 2017 at 13:20
by Mike Levy  
While our sport may be about singletrack, flow, being out in nature, and many other things to all of us, the technology that we employ to enjoy all of those things is also a big part of mountain biking for some people. There shouldn't be any shame in being a technophile, either; you're not a weirdo just because you got riled up about the V10 29er or Cane Creek's new Helm fork. But many of even the most enthusiastic gear dorks seem to doubt the idea of batteries and servo motors being put to use to make our bikes better.


Shimano XT Di2 review
  It's heavier, more expensive, and a royal PIA to install, but Shimano's XT Di2 offers shift consistency that a cable-operated drivetrain can only dream of.


If you're still arguing that electronics can't improve our steeds, you're dead wrong; Shimano's XTR and XT Di2 drivetrains offer an atomic clock-level of shifting consistency that a cable operated drivetrain simply won't ever be able to match, even if the price, weight, and also the installation of the groups leave plenty of room to improve. Fox's Live Valve electronic suspension is also showing that there's a place for computer-controlled action when it comes to your fork and shock. Sure, one could contend that the advantages don't yet outweigh the disadvantages when it comes to the above components—I'd agree that they certainly don't for most riders—but the performance of the latest battery-powered gear is enough to convince me that the benefits will soon become too great to ignore, especially when it comes to system integration.


Shimano XT Di2 review
Ready for LED displays in your cockpit?
Fox Live Valve
Fox uses electronics for their Live Valve system to lessen the compromises between pedaling and suspension action.


Back in April of 2013, we ran a poll asking you how you felt about electronic components on your bike. The result? Readers overwhelmingly voted against batteries, with only 829 votes out of 7,272 saying ''Yes. I want it all—electronic shifting, suspension, seat post. Bring it on.'' That's just over 11-percent of you, which is less than I would have guessed. There were 3,383 readers, or nearly 53-percent, who said that electronics have no place on a mountain bike, and 2,610 readers (35.8-percent) were undecided.

Now, four years on, it's worth seeing if opinions on electronics have changed at all.


Is there a place for electronic components in mountain biking?




262 Comments

  • + 285
 I've got enough things beeping, blinking and buzzing in my life.....sure as hell don't want to do that to myself on my bike.
  • + 52
 LOL Exactly! Why would I want to bring life's frustrations into an activity I enjoy doing to ESCAPE them. No I haven't tried and and no I don't want to.
  • + 18
 biking is from getting away from the rat race and electronics, and the repairability of an electronic on the trail, armed with zip ties doesn't look like it would work too well i think ill pass
  • + 71
 it's like an electric fishing reel... sure it can be done, but why?
  • + 17
 i bring my phone with me when I ride so I've already succumbed to our electronic overlords. I think what's going to put the electronics thing over the top is when they go completely wireless. I couldappreciate the benefits of NO wires/hoses/cables whatsoever.
  • + 5
 @thinkbike: driverless cars, apparently it will soon be a thing, personally , nah !
  • + 9
 This, I used to use Strava. But started to get too obsessed with segments. The main reason I go biking it to get away from it all. Plus it's hard to trail bodge a dead battery...
  • + 16
 I bought my xtr DI2 used- excellent deal and I damn love it. It's not all crazy beepy techy-- just a simple set up, clean accurate crisp shifting everytime- no adjusting, no replacing cables and no mud exposed to my cables, battery charge lasts forever. Everyone of my friends who's tried my set up want it. I wouldn't cop it- it's actually pretty nice and doesn't take away from the main essence of cycling unlike ebikes.
  • + 1
 @pigman65: It already is a thing. Look up BMW Autonomous driving.
  • + 1
 @thinkbike: THIS IS SO TRUE. Could not have said that better.
  • + 2
 Imagine missing an epic day because you forgot to charge. Or an electric issue. No thanks.
  • + 8
 @sevensixtwo: Imagine missing an epic day because you forgot to change a broken derailler cable. What's your point? The battery life is supposed to be longer than a month.
  • + 3
 I'm 110% against electronic drivetrains, with wires and batteries and shit. Well, that is, unless it's eTap on a road bike. That shit is amazing. When SRAM brings out a wireless rear mech for 1x11 mountain, I have a feeling that will look pretty damn cool.
  • + 3
 Running xt di2 for the first time, perfect every shift and you can silence the beeps. I won't be going back...
  • + 7
 @espresso90: A close friend uses Di2 because of a loss of function in her arm - it's the difference between being able to change gear and not. The syncro function is particularly cool, and useful if you struggle with your left hand!
  • + 2
 I'd be all over eagle e-tap though
  • + 12
 as a dentist, i disagree
  • + 11
 I don't want anything electronic on my bike to distract me from crushing Strava segments.
  • + 2
 Nope (drops mike).
  • + 0
 I can't shift to make it up the hill because my Shimano Di2 computer needs rebooting ????
  • + 2
 If money is no object, then sure why not... but the for me there are opportunity costs associated with such a setup that outweigh the benefits when compared to a much less expensive but equally effective mechanical drivetrain.
  • + 9
 @Pedro404: I wouldn't miss an epic day because of a cable. I'd just fix it.
  • + 3
 @BCDragon: I've been doing some special training to improve the strength in my left hand...
  • + 2
 @MrPink51: that's what I'm waiting for. It'll be the first and only e-group set on my bike ever.
  • + 1
 @espresso90: You can turn off the beebs via the PC configure portal, easy.
  • + 3
 @sevensixtwo: I wouldn't miss an epic day because of a battery. I'd just charge it / use a backup one.
  • + 2
 Bikes will run the same course as cars did. Computers in cars were impractical, expensive, and hell to work on. Now, you can't find a car without it. Electronic derailleurs, and suspension will drop in price and will soon make sense. Wireless shifting and fine tune adjusting with your phone to your suspension. We already have numerous wires on our bikes, and electronics will make them disappeer. The only downside is you need to be an electrical engineer just to work on your own damn bike. Love it or hate it, it's coming.
  • + 2
 @Trouble76: I have been saying for years, "The only thing they cannot do with electronics is what they can't think of to do with electronics." Electricity, and all that flows from it is man's greatest achievement. Cepn maybe for fire, but that was a LONG time ago dude.......
  • + 2
 @MrPink51: Got eTap on my road bike and it IS awesome. I too am waiting for a 1 x eTap, come on Sram!
  • + 3
 @richierocket:

I feel bad for mike - seems like an innocent victim
  • + 64
 Riderless bikes could become a thing..
  • + 103
 Sitting on the couch with a cold beer in hand while my bike is out racking up Strava KOM's for me...perfect!
  • + 9
 Steering and Braking assist would be good too. Just like playing F1 games in easy mode.
  • - 4
flag tigerteeuwen (May 5, 2017 at 12:03) (Below Threshold)
 @lentzs45: sounds terrible.
  • + 48
 My bike is already riderless too much as it is.
  • + 1
 Video games.
  • + 52
 Just wait until our bikes besome self-aware...
  • + 10
 Sky-Bike We're all going to die....
  • + 5
 They basically are. synchroshift, live valve .... Now, If my bike would just post to instagram for me.
  • + 4
 It can just abuse me for not hitting jumps or being slow.
  • + 2
 i'd like a remote drone control on my bars so it can film my life's journeys
  • + 8
 everyone here knows that the zombie apocalypse will be proceeded by an emp... that means your Di2 bike gets knocked out with all the other electronics #whentechnologyfails #dontbeasittingduck
  • + 23
 Anyone can ride whatever they want, I am not buying one. I don't give a flying crap as long as mechanical SLX/XT level is available. Same goes to stupid cassettes. You can have 15 speed 9-64 EA-gull and I won't care. You may talk bullshit stories of the most effective cadences and hurting knees (that you fkd up by poor life choices) and I won't care. As long as I can buy something with max 42t for 11sp and 36t for 10sp you can have a 29" rim mounted cog. SRAM has already aborted what I consider the best rear mech ever made and that is X9 Type2. So yea, please toss electronics on all bikes. Give it to them. Just still make mechanical ones.
  • + 3
 What made the X9 the best?
  • + 3
 Yep. Been on a X9 type 2 RD and a X9 10. Spd shifter for 3 years. Zero issues and unbelievable shifting. Never touch it unless changing the cable once a year. Wasn't aware they stopped producing it.
  • + 2
 Yep... I want to wax poetic about it but I won't. Just yep.
  • + 3
 @tigerteeuwen: the crispy feel (personal) shifting precision, great finish quality and robustness (survived 3 der hangers and 2 changes of pulleys) perfectly straight, clutch better than Shimano (IMHO- have XTR now to compare), excellent lock of clutch making super easy wheel removal/installation. All at price sitting between SLX and XT. If they would still be making it would not die on a fkng ridiculous unexplainebale going into rear wheel In the middle of a climb (it survived one accident like that before) I would still be running 10sp.
  • + 2
 @BigballmcCall: I have an x7 type 2 and the clutch has totally stopped working. A far cry from the perfect rear mech.
  • + 1
 @Noah353: that's not good. The first version was adjustable, not sure on the type 2's.
  • + 1
 I loved X9 on my hardtail. Then I got XO1 on a new bike. After thrashing it for 6 months I hopped back on the hardtail and honestly it was like the shifter cable had been replaced with a wet noodle. I've never found Shimano shifters and RDS that feel or sound satisfying so will be mechanical until SRAM comes up with something better to try.
  • + 1
 My type 2 x9s worked super well. Sometimes the clutch lost performance but all you had to do is tighten it every now and then. Loved them. Then they changed it for a 2.1 clutch which you couldn't adjust anymore (they made a pin go through the screw so you couldn't screw it anymore). The reason for the pin? "So you can't mess with it" apparently. Too bad because they felt like shit right out of the box. Switched to shimano XT this year, not sure if it will be better but f*ck it, I ain't giving any more money to a brand who's idea of improving is literally making their products worse.
  • + 1
 In my humble opinion, the best feel ever has been delivered by 9 speed SRAM X0 shifter and rear mech combo. Very distinctive and precise up and down shifts: cling! clang! clong! I ride rather rocky trails with many ups and downs, I need the feedback, I don't like to guess if the gear is on. My 10 speed X0 shifter with X-type 2 rear mech was rather close. I tried 10 speed shimano clutch equipped rear mechs with XT shifters: Zee, SLX, XT and XTR. They weren't as good. They worked better than any 9 speed shimano I had (SLX, Saint, XT), but not as well. My current 11-sp XTR is just whatever. Honestly. It doesn't offer anything more. If I ever see a used X-9 Type2 with middle cage in good condition, I am grabbing it! And I will definitely not replace my XTR rear mech with another XTR if it dies. The action and finish quality on that thing is a joke considering how much it costs. I will get SLX 7000 and just replace the pulleys with XT ones. Unless the 11sp Zee or Saint come out.

Saint is theoretically a good rear mech, it's robust and rigid. In theory. In reality it is good only if you have the direct mount hanger. What is the point of making a gigantic parallelogram if there is a thin shadow plate between the rear mech and the hanger?! A plate that gets bent easily (I trashed the thick one on 9sp Saint, what chance do you have with the thin one on 10sp Saint), and is hard to get as a spare! It's a joke...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: agreed...X-9 / X0 combo 10 speed for the MFW.
  • + 23
 Shifting maybe, suspension hell no...

My buddy's Di2 battery died overnight because he accidentally leaned the bike against the wall resting on the shifter slightly... We went on a ride the next day and he didnt realize the battery had died. Ended up with a single speed 6" bike haha.

Where I live you could find yourself walking 15-20 miles back to the nearest trailhead or paved road. Going electric on a remote backcountry ride... bring extra batteries and maybe a sleeping bag haha.
  • + 7
 Another reason why you should hold out for SRAM eTap. It has motion sensors that put the system to sleep if the bike isn't moving.
  • + 12
 @Banjopickin While you bring up a good point regarding the battery, electronic shifting seems like it provides minimal benefit, whereas I think electronic suspension will be a game changer. With adaptive suspension, you could design a bike that fully locks out your shock and fork to pedal, pump, brake, and corner with the support of a rigid bike yet still soak up all the bumps by opening up your dampers in a matter of milliseconds. The bike could even tune itself to an extent while you ride if they integrate something like ShockWiz into the system. Plus, it allows frame designers to minimize pedal feedback by not having to rely on anti-squat for pedaling support. Obviously the technology is still in its infancy, but I bet it's only a matter of time before that's the one of next big things.
  • + 1
 @dlxah:

But what if I want to tune the shock myself? What If I dont prefer the way the suspension automatically adjusts? I could see for the novice rider how this would be helpful but not all riders are created equal and I still like the option to tune my suspension myself. Plus I have already heard nightmare stories of electric shifting going bad... only thing worse than that is if you fork and shock bite it and then what?
  • + 2
 @Banjopickin: I don't think you'd have to lose customization to make it work. Seems like a well-designed suspension would allow you to customize your various settings but still allow multiple modes.
  • + 1
 @Banjopickin: I'm definitely with you on that, and I would hope that you could still tune the suspension yourself. I would also hope that the suspension will default back to fully open in the event of any failures (e.g. dead battery). It all depends on how they design it. This is just theoretical at this point, and I'm just an armchair engineer Smile Well technically I guess I'm a real engineer but not in the biking industry.
  • + 5
 @Banjopickin: carburetor vs efi. Pretty soon the next generation will just assume it tunes itself
  • + 1
 @dlxah: @sjdeweese:

Most riders I know dont know how to properly tune suspension when only given 3 variables... Sag, low speed compression and rebound.

I doubt the bulk of cyclist would care to take the time to figure out electronic anything, especially something as complicated as suspension setup. The design would have to be 200% idiot proof or else it would cause many more issues that it prevents.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: yep and you can easily carry a back up battery in a pocket if you want. Etap is the holy grail for me. Just waiting on prices to drop before adding it to my roadie
  • + 1
 @dlxah: I can't wait for electronic suspension to come to mountain bikes (no idea how it will be implemented though). When electronic suspension was first used in F1, the Williams cars would qualify 1-2 seconds faster (a wide margin for F1)! The wikipedia article on the car is a good read (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_FW15C)

It does make me worried that in the future, too many "rider aids" may take the influence of the rider out of mountain bike racing, however, I think it is much less likely than in an equipment dominated sport such as f1.

Otherwise, I think for the everyday casual riding consumer electronic suspension will only just make it easier to go faster, go smoother, and have more fun.
  • + 1
 Ehh not quite the advantage difference that makes a wedge between carbs and efi, it's not like a derailleur goes out of adjustment due to altitude and temp. My cable mech doesn't need crap, ever, and I don't really botch shifts, doesn't give me any advantages really.on the carb thing,Me and my dad especially have owned lots of carbed vehicles, and really haven't been an issue, pump the gas(if that) hit the key, instant start. Angry attackers,hold it to the floor crank it and dump the clutch when it fires.Dad's a bit of a carb wizard though, and efi can definately be justified. Laptop vs smelly hands and screwdriver

@sjdeweese:
  • + 1
 Crap, I see you were talking about electronic suspension, not derailleurs.I'd still do my suspension manually but I see what you're on about there.
@sjdeweese:
  • + 1
 @Banjopickin: Then don't buy electronic suspension you berk.
  • - 1
 @thelibrarybiker: The Williams F1 suspension introduced in the early 90's wasn't strictly suspension, as i it didn't use springs, just hydraulic rams with sensors in all four corners designed to keep the car level and at a precise distance from the ground, this could never be implemented on a bike in the same way, i don't understand how you thought it could.
  • + 2
 @deadmeat25: I don't think the comment was about that exact technology, just that things once dismissed as unnecessary or silly get wide adoption once they show an advantage.
  • - 1
 @DrPete: Williams F1 active suspension was never dismissed as unnecessary or silly by anybody, ever, the post i replied to didn't even suggest that, did you read the right post? Because you may as well have just replied by posting a cake recipe.
  • + 1
 @deadmeat25: Wow, you enjoy being a dick. That much is clear. Have fun with that.
  • + 1
 @dlxah: Yes. Step 1) With internal sensors similar to shockwiz, suspension could be made speed sensitive and position sensitive. Step 2) Add in some gyro and accelerometer type sensors on the frame and a 'TALAS' type system, and the suspension could adjust travel, sag/ride height and damping on the fly. Step 3) Then add in some forward scanning terrain sensors and the bike could see the bumps coming and adjust damping _before_ impact rather than milliseconds after. Step 4) fully active suspension with hydraulics actively lifting the wheel over bumps.
Steps 1-3 are manageable with quite low power requirements, step 4 obviously less so. Build a linear alternator into the fork and it could perform some or all of the damping duties while providing ample power to control the actuation of servos driving hydraulic damping circuits..
  • + 21
 The beauty of the bicycle to me is it's purely mechanical function, not needing to be charged, or has to be added. It needs basically* nothing except you. This is coming from someone who loves motorcycles and cars, if you want more complication go with those. I don't see any advantages to electronic shifting, especially not at the price point. Are your fingers really that weak? Is your brain really not able to handle the multitasking of shifting and riding? Then you're probably the same kind of person who killed the bliss of manual transmissions in cars. Why not just make the bike ride itself and you can watch it go round and round, that'll be easiest and you won't even have to balance!
leave batteries to cell phones. I've never had a cable failure in my life and it works perfect, is adjusting a derailleur twice a year that hard? Takes 2 mins.
Sincerely,
Mr.crabby
  • + 2
 Amen !
  • + 1
 You'll miss the small miracles with electronic shifting and a digital display, there's nothing better than looking down on a hard climb and finding you weren't on the 42T.....
  • + 1
 @KiwiXC:
You could run that cheesy gear indicator on some shimano shifters for that lol, maybe that will be the next thing, a big dial gear indicator on your bars so you know how extreme you're going
  • + 1
 And a dial telling your rpm like a car, with a redline section for pushing it to the max
  • + 2
 I drive a manual car and love electronic shifting on my bike...
  • + 1
 At least you drive a manual trans, although that doesn't necessarily mean you want to drive it. Il give you an upvote anyway


@PhattyMatt:
  • + 17
 This is what it boils down to for me:

Merlincycles.com

XT Di2 shifter, rear D, and the things in between to make it go. $733.68
XT shifter, rear D, and an XTR cable. $168.00

Is Di2 cool? Yep! Is it that cool? Not a chance.
  • + 14
 I currently use Di2 Ultegra on my road bike. My next MTB will have Di2 of some kind variety XT or XTR and Fox suspension. I think those that knock it may not have tried it. Sure there are some pluses and minuses to using E-Shifting, but I think Shimano has it dialed.
  • + 9
 I've got SRAM Red eTap on the road bike and am patiently waiting for Eagle eTap. My first exposure was to Di2, though, and I thought it was the dumbest thing ever---until I rode it.
  • + 2
 @DrPete: Etap blips on an MTB flat bar would be top shelf.
  • + 1
 @cmcrawfo: No kidding! Only trick there would be that the wiring would be a pain. perhaps a slightly larger blip-like shifter with a transmitter and battery built in... That, or just a nice little rocker switch setup for the right hand only.
  • + 2
 I was surprised by how incredibly precise it was but it wasn't enough to get me excited about cables and batteries just yet. I would have thought getting rid of the cables would have been an important design goal. I won't be rushing out to get this on my next bike but maybe the one after?
  • + 5
 I'd been running Di2 XT (XTR saves 30g on the derailleur, the rest is the same) on both of my mtbs for the past 3 months. I've still had to adjust them every once and a while using the display when shifting starts to feel off. I was hoping to never have to mess with it.
XT Di2 is also about ~140g heavier (including wires, battery, display, shifter, and derailleur) than my previous XX1 mechanical shifter + derailleur. The wires, display, and battery are $$$, especially the stupid little wires.
It's nice not to have to worry about the flaws of a mechanical cable, but not sure the trade-offs are worth it. I like it and will keep running it, but I thought it would mean I never have to adjust anything, and that hasn't been the case.
  • + 1
 @lukehmail: That's a bummer. I thought Di2 was supposed to automatically trim out anything that's off.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Just the front derailleur, I believe...
  • + 2
 Same. Have Di2 Ultegra on my road bike. Unsure if I'll run Di2 on a mtn bike with 1x11 drivetrain, but would strongly consider it for a 2x11 rig. Right trigger for all shifting duties and the left for a dropper remote. Shimano Di2 road system could use some improvement on the chainrings. No real need to have two buttons on a dual ring road bike. SRAM is a little more sleek from what I've been told but haven't tried it myself.
  • - 2
 @calledtocreation - those who knock it may not have tried it - good bluff. For pre-school kids. I rode a road bike with Di2 and really, honestly I couldn't give a less fk. I mean if luxurious shifting quality stands for huge portion of your experience of riding a mountain bike in nature then I can see where you are coming from. And to some extent I feel sorry for you Wink
  • + 3
 @mattsavage: whats a front derailleur?
  • + 1
 Samsies (Ultegra Di2), it's amazing.

Maybe a bigger deal for road bikes because (a) mechanical shifters on drops are rubbish, way worse than a trigger shifter; (b) all proper road bikes have front mechs; and (c) I tend to work through the gears a bit more on the road...

While the cost difference for XT still seems prohibitive at the moment, etap will make a lot of sense, 1x12, no wires.

And yeh I get the "ride your fkn bike and stop worrying about tech message, thing is my current enduro bike is the best AND funniest I've ever had. Gimme more tech that lets me have fun please. Bring on the future!
  • + 1
 @Altron: What's so bad about mechanical shifters on drops? And how are the shortcomings solved by electronic shifting, which (aside from adding 'blips') has basically the same ergonomics just with less lever throw? The only shifting 'problem' I ever have is getting stuck in a high gear when I have to slam on the brakes if a car decides to pull in front of me to turn, or stop to give way on a turn when I would have shot through the gap. And that problem is nothing to do with the shifters, it's because I've had to stop pedalling before I dumped the gears, so I have a standing start in 50x11.
I'm not a luddite, I switched from downtube friction shifters to indexed shifters on my road bike in 1986, and got in on the ground floor with first generation STI on my MTB when people were still arguing about the relative merits of different thumbies and whether suspension forks would ever catch on.
I'm much more interested in hydraulic brakes on a roadie than electronic shifting.
  • + 9
 I literally just finished a ride with a buddy who has an XTR Di2 derailleur. It broke at the bottom of a descent and he had to hike out.

I don't think I'm interested in hanging expensive electronics off my bike. Even if it works perfectly, I'd rather be out less than $100 for a new derailleur than $300-$600. Mountain biking breaks things. He's sponsored so it wasn't a big deal, but not for me.
  • + 3
 This is the big thing for me too. I think it's awesome tech but my mechanical stuff shifts fine and given I just run 1x10 on my trail bike still, I can get a shimano clutch mech for $50 if I accidentally blow one up. Same reason I don't run carbon rims, I can't afford to replace them when they inevitably explode. Sure they perform great but the cost is excessive.
  • + 8
 "It's heavier, more expensive, and a royal PIA to install, but Shimano's XT Di2 offers shift consistency that a cable-operated drivetrain can only dream of." It is writing such as this that makes the bike media seem like a shill for the industry. Pushing an expensive solution to a problem that doesn't exist. For c&^%t sake, haven't MT. Bikes gotten expensive enough anyway?
  • + 1
 Except that both the reviewers said they wouldn't buy it with their own money and would stick with mechanical. How exactly does that equate to them shilling for the industry?
  • + 1
 @dsut4392: Fair point, but I was referring to that line specifically and not the overall review (which I didn't bother to read because I couldn't get past the canned tagline).
  • + 2
 @apoc99: I sound like a shill but you didn't read the review? Weird. You should read the review and then comment on whether I'm a shill or not. You'll discover that both Vernon and I are quite critical of Shimano's Di2 system and that neither of us recommended it.
  • + 9
 Simple answer:

If I'm paying for it - mechanical.

If someone is giving me a free bike and unlimited free replacements for broken or worn components - electronic.
  • + 7
 Tesla cars learn how and where you drive and automatically adjust the ride height of the car based on GPS location. Imagine your suspension going full squish right before the gnarly section and firming back up for the pedaly bits after... I know that's way off for mountain bikes but the tech exists to make it happen. Maybe I just want that because I've started too many enduro stages with my suspension still in climb mode. Smile
  • + 0
 ^^^^^^^^^^ NOW WE'RE THINKING ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
  • + 1
 Fox and Lapierre have had something along those lines for a couple years, or at least they were working on it.
  • + 1
 Called this year's ago, wouldn't even need to be GPS. Just a level sensor that knows when the bike is pointing up or down an with the bikes speed an dropper position.. adjusts the suss
  • + 1
 Ran a SID XX on my hard tail. It was only a press of the thumb away but still rathered setting it to a middle ground than something constant changing. Only ended up locking it up for flat sprints if I thought about it at the time.
  • + 6
 Logic is quite simple: I love mtb outdoor, as such environment and not destroying our planet is one of my concerns, battery are highly polluting, so is electricity production. If mechanic, manpowered solutions exist they will always have my preference.
  • + 3
 Good point not mentioned by anyone else. I liked the romantic idea of me saving the planet on my bike, until I realised I just drove 40 miles to the trail head in a 3.0litre diesel. We humans really are parasites, but every action we take leaves a shitty footprint. The industrial processes of building your bike and tyres is environmentally harmful. I wish it wasn't true, but it's a fact, oil goes into your tyres and your metal components were mined from the ground.
  • + 3
 @yeti-monster: have to agree with you, also if I can head to my trails not using the i try to. That being said, as for anything trying to not make out footprint worse is the best we can do. Sure biking isn't as green as barefoot hiking, but the metal can be recycled contrary to carbon, batteries and whatever is used to create electricity.
  • + 6
 I really wish Pinkbike had existed back in the day when we still connected with 28k modems, just so we could review the comments sections of articles talking about how in the future we'll have 28lb 160mm trail bikes with 65 degree head angles, carbon bars and rims, 1x12 drivetrains, and dropper seatposts.
  • + 5
 I rather see electronic shifting,then electric motors, I hate specialize for the Levo, I heard its fun to ride but so was my old Honda CR 500 dirt bike,remember the old Honda three wheelers, fun. I say electronics on your bike is like steel or carbon they each have a purpose for different riders.
  • + 2
 The Levo is fun as hell but when I rode it was a mix of joy and guilt. I don't plan to buy one but it was fun to demo.
  • + 5
 There will always be a class of components that are just piss-off expensive. If you just need to dump money into your bike, then there will always be a way. I'm glad for this, because that's the innovation that makes mid tier components get better and better all the time. So if it weren't for Sram Eagle and XTR, we wouldn't have gx and XT at such good quality for the money. If that means electronic shifting takes over the top tier, I'm cool with it. If it ever trickles down to the current XT price range, maybe ill try it. But I don't feel a need to switch
  • + 1
 True words
  • + 3
 Most definitely words.
  • + 5
 In wonder if there was a poll back when a cable actuated derailleur came along, instead of needing to pedal backwards and use your hand to drag the chain onto one of the other two cogs? "Do we really need ANOTHER cable on the bike just to shift gears? Isn't this sport about getting away from all the stress and complexity of horseless carriages and marconi-sets? Getting off to shift is a great opportunity to have a smoke and hydrating with some wine!"
  • + 4
 Yeah I want my bike to have to need frequent software/firmware updates! You know the kind that have the doomsday bugs built right in so just in time for you to download another update the functionality becomes all weird, slow and bug ridden forcing you to have to update?? Oh man I can hardly wait for that to happen to MY BIKE!!! Keep your software developers away from my bike please! I'm already gonna be forced to ride great big wagon wheels when I buy my next bike wether I want them or not so why not put a crap load of software into the mix too??
  • + 4
 Im all for electronics (not talking about power assist) IF They have a notable performance gain, are not overly complicated, are dependable, reasonably priced, and have batteries that are reasonably light and last long enough that i dont find charging them to be a hassle.

so, for now, i think ill wait.
  • + 3
 My gears shift when I need them too. When I smash my rear mech on a rock and need to replace, it costs me about £50 for a new XT 10spd. I can't understand how the small benefits of electronic shifting are worth it costing me £250 everytime I need to replace a broken derailleur
  • + 2
 I get where you're coming from, but if you're smashing derailleurs into rocks often maybe the £250 sting would help you learn some bike handling lessons ;P
  • + 3
 We are supported by Shimano, I just want to be up front and transparent. Having said that, it gave me the opportunity to try the XT Di2....

I was just like all of you in the sense that I just wanted good 'ol mechanical drivetrain, didn't need or want batteries, concerned about battery life etc.

We have about 5 bikes Di2 so far, including 2 of my own. We've been riding there extensively in all weather conditions on the North Shore for past 2 months.

So far, it's been plug & play and everything is perfect and feels great. We're still running on first battery charge on all bikes too.

That has great value for me. I've been very pleasantly surprised.

DB@EB
  • + 3
 Why does the title say, 'electronic components on YOUR mountain bike' while the poll is asking if there's a place in all of mountain biking for electronic components?

Sure I believe there's someone out there that will buy electronic components. I also think that if I offered a Gucci branded Fox Shock there would be people who buy that. Would I buy it? Fack no.
  • + 7
 if there's one thing i'd like to keep without electronics, it's my bike.
  • + 4
 Totally mate - I'd give up riding if my bike had wires - the one thing I like about fixing it is the mechanical nature and the fact I can fix any bit of it anywhere with minimal tools. I love BMX for this reason. Shit has hardly changed for 40 years but the riding still progresses.
  • + 3
 There's a reason why some manufacturers​ binned electronic components (lefty Elo).

If you can see the problem you can fix the problem. If you can't see the problem you can't fix it. (Unless of course you know how to bodge electronic hardware, firmware and software on the side of a mountain while it's pissing down with rain and your fingers aren't listening to your brain).
  • + 3
 It's like 29er downhill bikes. There are obvious performance advages. It's only a matter of time before downhill teams digitally map every downhill track and then auto-calibrate the suspension for each section as the riders descend. Thing is, that only applies to the 1%. For the average joe, I'm not interested in giving up playful 27.5 wheels for the monster-trucking 29ers just as I'm not interested in giving up oodles of $$ in exchange for whatever performance benefits electronic drive trains may offer. Now, should electric stuff not come at a financial cost or weight penalty, you might see more people swapping out their cable-actuated gear.
  • + 12
 And yet you were willing to give up playful 26" wheels for 27.5? :/
  • + 2
 I've spent a fair bit of time working on DI2 now in the workshop, and I just love how crisp and consistent it is. And it doesn't really need charging all that often, sign me up! It also isn't really that heavy... Fitted to some carbon wonder-bikes and they still feel light as a feather.

Also, wireless dropper post? Yes please.
  • + 2
 I'm not super well versed on the whole electric shifting thing, but in regards to the 'dead battery' issue, I wonder if there is a way to pull power from hot brake rotors. I cant imagine the electric shifting takes that much energy, and I would think the heat from heavy braking could at the very least help extend the battery life.

anyone with more engineering knowledge have an answer to this?
  • + 1
 The batteries keep their charge a very long time. You only draw power to shift. A shift takes what a second at most? Let's say on a three hour ride you shift 300 hundred times? That's only 300 seconds. That's five minutes. How drawn down is a mobile phone after a five minute call? I get months between charges on my cross bike.

That said, I don't find modern mechanical shifting to be so inferior to my DI2 that I am considering changing my mechanical bikes.
  • + 1
 Harvesting the heat energy would be tricky, using something like F1 'KERS' would be more elegant. Or use a linear alternator built into the fork.
  • + 2
 All I want is an electronic dropper post made by Shimano/PRO with the battery integrated into the post. Make it customizable as well, so you could setup it up for the first click to drop the post 50%, second click 100%, third click, raise it back up.
  • + 1
 you sir are extremely smart
  • + 2
 You know I have these things called a thumb and index finger. They really work well. They actuate the shifter when my Brain tells them to. It's usually because my legs are screaming at my brain this hurts make this shit easier.
  • + 2
 My brother has Di2 on his road bike and it is badass, but for a MTB I think I'd pass. Largely because electronics remove ease of maintenance at home.

If my drivetrain has some issue, I can figure it out and fix it. If a electronic drivetrain were to have some issue, whether it be software or with the internals, I am far less likely to be able to fix it. That means cost associated with getting a capable tech to work on it, or replacing it.

I like not really worrying about blowing up a rear mech, even if I grumble about the $70 to replace it. The only thing to take one out for me so far was a sizeable rock. Add the risk of faulty/worn seals around electronics, and battery life* and it gets more worrisome.

*As in how long the individual battery remains in good shape, not its charge. Basically, how long until I have to replace the battery entirely.
  • + 2
 i havent adjusted my gx 1x11 drivetrain in a full year. it shifts exactly the same as it did when i bought the bike a year ago. i avg about 30-40 miles worth of trail a week from april-nov. i ride a hardtail in all conditions i can and any trail short of a full on downhill trail. theres not any trails like that around here anyways. there are people that ride more, i know. however, i ride as much as i can and not once has the gx drivetrain let me down in a year. no dropped chain, no ghost shifts, no stretched cables, nothing but reliable service. i do not want a heavier, more complicated, more expensive system that requires batteries to work without offering any real improvement. you can argue superior shifting if youd like, theres very little real difference between quality shift components in terms of actual shifting these days. in contrast, 1x11 made sense to me. good range, good shift jumps between cogs, lighter weight. yes, its more expensive but theres a tangible benefit
  • + 2
 right - when electronics can do this, then i am in ..

1 Auto detect terrain and my abilities and strength and adjust gears automatically - meaning I do noting
2. This also applies to auto inflating and deflating tyre pressure based on GPS, terrain detectors, - auto - i do noting
3. Shocks - again, data fed via wireless form extensive databases will know terrain, elevation, ground type, weather, dry or wet and adjust all suspension accordingly .. I do noting

So, once all this is done and sorted and all i have to do is just sit on the seat - then cool - I am in, - just cant wait for FULL AUTOMATION .. its what we have been waiting for right?? .. right ??, self powered, self adjusting, all knowing bikes .. hell f*ck and shit balls, one day we may be able to do it all virtually - can not wait !!!!!... Luddite number 1 out!!
  • + 2
 There should be an option that says "yes there is a place for them in mtb, just not for me". A parallel example: no one would say that there is no place in mtb for enduro bikes. Burly long travel bikes that pedal decent? Thats rad. But at the same time, theyre not for me. I dont have the kind of terrain that would make one fun (for me at least). I prefer goong slower on a hardtail, but right at the bikes limit. I sont need a bike that ill never ride past 20% of its capability.
Same thing. Electronic shifting, etc.....has a place, is very cool and is not at all for me.
  • + 2
 The bike industry is just screwing consumers as we now live in a culture where we get what we want and pay for it later.
There used to be a burgeoning market in older components and you look now- I have a 26" bike and was looking st getting an older but better frame maybe 2012/13 what ever, but there is nothing available through retailers. What happened to the millions of 26ers that weren't sold?
Years ago you could get a massive choice of last few seasons stock - now , cuz they want to sell you the new stuff there's nothing ? Where is it all? Where are the millions of unsold 26 Hardtail frames for an example??
The industry is controlling the selling of "outdated"product and forcing the purchase of bullshit new standards that make other stuff obsolete.
  • + 3
 Mp3 player: check
Bike lights : check
Im ok with electronic stuff.
A.I. CPU running my suspension and shifting.
Not to mention my variangle stem and telescoping top tube.
Thats a way off in the future.
Sounds cool though.
  • + 2
 My watch is a Casio G-shock. Probably ten years old now. All digital, no moving parts. I wonder what the mechanical equivalent would cost. And by equivalent I meant something equally robust. It would cost a ten fold, at least. Now also include the countdown alarm, stopwatch, dual time. If that would exist (the mechanical equally robust equivalent), it would be a might piece of precious gear. All my previous watches (also Casio, but not G-shock) broke in a few years. Now on this one the casing also starts to crack, but for the rest it is still going strong.

See, those shifting units are delicate pieces of fine mechanics. In a pretty harsh environment. And if you get the dirt and moist in there it could cause accelerated wear or even cause it to jam and/or crack. Electronics are much easier to protect from the environment and vibrations. Of course they're also more of a black box. But really, if a mechanical watch or mechanical gear shifter breaks while out in the dirt, would you be able to fix it? The only mechanical shifter that's relatively easy to service is a grip shift. But even then when you're out on a ride, you probably can't do much. All you can do is lock the mech in one position and ride it out. But current Di2 rear mechs look like you could do with those too, provided you brought your zip ties.

So yes I believe chances are fair it will eventually catch on in cycling. Not only because accuracy and durability is superior (at least according to that PB test) but mostly because it will simply be cheaper to design and produce. That is, in higher performance mountainbike riding (Deore level and higher). Grip shift is so simple that it will probably always be the preferred option for the less demanding market.
  • + 2
 They are not "black boxes" they are simple ratchet mechanisms. This comparison is apples and oranges. It works for watches, sure, because your watch doesn't have to move anything with force.
  • + 1
 ... but people still pay six figures for old analog watches
  • + 1
 @silvbullit: By "black box" I meant electronics with chips and stuff. As for trigger shifters, sure these are ratchet mechanisms. The thing was, as a end user can you open these, fix them and put them back together? Probably never had to, but I expect the same goes for these Di2 shifters. That said, I broke a 7s grip shift on my cargo bike (in Switzerland...) two weeks ago. The nylon disc with the slot that pulls the cable cracked. Yes non-electronic components moving anything with force break too.

I think electronic shifting is in kind of a transitional period. They basically took a conventional derailleur which works by moving the parallelogram and had that actuated by a servo instead of by a cable. That's the only thing moving something with force. And I expect it to be up to it considering the wide application of servos in other fields. But that servo is the endpoint of that electronic chain. For the rest (between shifter buttons and servo) I think the comparison to digital watches is apt. And after the servo it is just a conventional derailleur. Of course this could change eventually. They won't have to stick to the parallelogram approach. Eventually they may be able to use these control systems to limit the range of the cage independently for each gear position, just enough for the suspension to move. Now this kind of combinations would make sense but of course it is also something new that could fail.
  • + 2
 Electric shifting connected to Strava! Think automatic upshift when a segment starts and the a release of gears when a segment is completed! Computer modulated braking to get through corners faster. Ha! But in all seriousness, definitely not opposed to having electric stuff on my bike when the time comes. And that time is when it's close in price, easy to install and manage and when it fully integrates with a bike and people know how to work on it.
  • + 2
 I think we should all try and make educated choices in this day and age. As consumers we decide what the market produces. I am in now way an environmental purist or example to follow (I got a phone, I own a car, I eat meat...though less and less) But I do try to make the right choices when possible. In the case of normal bike versus electrified bike the choice is pretty clear. (Unless you are replacing your carbonbased mode of transport, in which case "E" is still a huge improvement) I'm speaking of Ebikes in general but all added electronics require more resources and charging. Until all charging is green its a no no for me. Keep bikes as pure and environmentally sustainable as possible!
www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/business/batteries/congo-cobalt-mining-for-lithium-ion-battery
  • + 2
 i'd jump on a magura vyron, but it annoys the crap out of me for having a NiMH battery instead of a lighter and denser li-poly/ion, so it could last longer per charge, and have more charge cycles.

but it'd be neat if all suspension, gears, seatpost and/or drive unit could all be integrated and not need a ton of buttons and controls to control everything, and it'd be neat if suspension could have electronic damper and rebound control and have a built in shockwiz that way the suspension could adapt to what you're riding on and how you are riding.

also ferromagnetic dampers would be sick on a bike.
  • + 1
 Pretty cool, but the magnetorheological fluid is hheeeaaaavvvyyy
  • + 4
 yup, last thing I want holding me back from a bike is the bike itself. more electronics = less user serviceability = less ride time.
  • + 2
 Why not?
I don't understand all this anti-electronic and high tech to our mountainbikes? Don't we want constant change in technology and advancement in our material world all the time? Better fridges, safer cars, faster smart phones, etc, etc? Why can't our bikes be the same?
I don't appreciate all the ludites crying on these forums about electronic is scary, 26" wheels are better...
Embrace technological advances! It's fun! You would be riding a no suspension, cantalever brake bike from the 80s still if we didn't buy this stuff to make it more fun!
Go buy an awsome bike, ride the f*%# out of it, then buy a more amazing bike, repeat!
  • + 1
 I do agree with this one.
  • + 2
 @siderealwall2: well last year the battery charge on my Di2 lasted about as long as a shift cable lasts if I am running a mechanical drive train, about 5 months, at 300 km of riding per week. And yes where I ride is hilly and no I am not an amazing rider and never have to shift. I shift all the time. Di2 is an awesome experience. The battery charges overnight in between all those other post and pre-ride checks ie evening post ride: check bike, lube chain, plug in charger, go do other shit; morning pre-ride: wipe excess lube off chain, check tyre pressures, un-plug charger, go ride. Too simple.

Whomever at Pinkbike thinks it is PIA to install needs their head checked. Easier than threading a cable, plug in, check firmware with app, index rear derailleur and go and ride. Knock the derailleur slightly during a ride, pedal gently along a fire road and re-index back to perfect.

Total game changer and worth every penny as far as I am concerned.
  • + 1
 I demoed a mountain bike with Di2 a couple of months ago. It is hands down the best shifting experience I've had. Do I want it? Hell yes. What's stopping me? The cost. It's still considerably more expensive than traditional shifters. I think as part of a new bike I will probably go for it, but as an upgrade to my old steed, I'll give it a miss unless it comes down a lot in price.
  • + 1
 I don't like the idea of having to charge my bike up. Maybe an electronic gearbox powered by some kind of dynamo system might be an idea i could buy into. Although i'd imagine having to give up a lot of pedalling efficiency for the extra reliability.
  • + 1
 The only person I know with Di2 only still has Di2 because his frame doesn't accommodate mechanical cables. In 2 years of roadmriding he's had 2 40mile rides as single speed. Also 2 new reach mechs, a new front mech and had to have new wires once. Cost is eye watering to fix it each time. That's on a road bike. MTB bashed about, not thanks. Weakest point from looking at his issues is cable to mechs, snag and pull them out and they are screwed, will never be reliable again.
  • + 1
 The big issue with electronic shifting is rear derailleur cost. Having a component so often smashed or broken that's so expensive doesn't make a lot of sense.

Considering the added parts (solenoid etc.) that are integral to an electronic rear derailleur, I don't see how the price can come down to make sense for anyone who rides hard enough to break the things sometimes.
  • + 1
 No for shifting, dropper posts, etc. Yes for suspension. It makes sense to use electronics for suspension control where the ability to perform thousands of calculations a second can make a difference and a loss of power fail-safe mode means you're stuck with good old normal suspension. For shifting, the cost doesn't outweigh the benefits and a loss of power means no shifting.
  • + 1
 The only electronic device I would consider putting on my bike is data acquisition. The quick feedback so that you can test different settings or see your performance over certain sections of trail, that's pretty cool and can make me a better rider.

Critically, I can take it off or completely ignore it, without it impacting my ability to ride. DAQ is like a fancy stopwatch; not every ride has to be about being faster.
  • + 1
 3 weeks ago during a race I crashed and bent my rear derailleur hanger and the derailleur itself. I somehow manged to get 4 gears out of 9 switching the derailleur with a spare one from another bike and borrowing a cable from another racer. It worked out fine allowing me to compete. No way i could have repaired an electronic mech. I don't even want anything battery powered on my bike ( exept the bike itself if it is an ebike).
  • + 1
 Like most of you guys, I thought these electronic drivetrains, such as DI2 were just marketing shams. But I have recently had the pleasure of spending a week on a bike kitted out with a 2x11 XTR DI2 drivetrain, and I can't stop thinking about it. During my ride time on it, I was never punished for shifting late into rock gardens or punchy climbs, I could shift whenever I wanted due to the increased force of the servo motor providing the shift versus a cable. As well, the shifts were very quick and precise, quicker than any mechanical drivetrain I have ever used, and I have tried just about every drivetrain out there. And now, back to the one problem with electronic drivetrains, you have to charge them. Although a charge will most likely last you 500-700 miles, you do have to plug a cable into the head unit to keep your drivetrain shifting. The only reason why I don't see myself buying DI2 in the foreseeable future, is because I don't have $1500-$2000 to spend on a drivetrain.
  • + 1
 I'm all for innovation but if it comes in the form of non-recyclable or very difficult to recycle products like most electronics or carbon fibre, then quite simply, fuck that shit. I break a lot of stuff on my bikes, and when it can't be fixed it bothers me that I have to just get rid of it, but at the end of the day most of it is easily recyclable. The same cannot be said for electronic goods. Before people reply saying electronic goods can be recycled, I know that they can, however the process is costly, and in most countries that is in done in, the working conditions of the workers involved aren't good, and most electronic goods are not recycled because it is not cost effective.
  • + 1
 I leave this e-shift for the roadies. I'd rather have a retrofitted mech rd with external cable pulled servo (using a couple of cr2032 battery) being tucked into the chainstay. Cost less replacing a banged up mech rd than a di2 one.
Give another four years....

Wonder how long does it takes to charge a di2 on a solar powered powerbank?
  • + 1
 There is not really a reason for electric shifting for 1x. In 2x, it takes you from 1 to 22, one shift at a time, even changing the front deraileur on its own. If you know how to setup things with cables, no problems at all. And also cheaper to maintain.
  • + 1
 I'm at a point in life where I really want to reduce the little annoyances. Crunchy shifting is one of those things, and it wouldn't need to get much cheaper for me to go Di2. If I was starting a drivetrain from scratch, I'd probably go for it. If I was the type of rider that tore a derailleur off every weekend? Probably not.
  • + 1
 I'm fine with electronic shifting and I don't mind automated suspension, but for some reason I can't get behind a seatpost at the moment. I bet it's a gotta try out before I'm sold but I when it comes to this whole subject, the main issues are: battery life and reliability. If it enhances the ride while still maintaining back country reliability, than we have a winner that is hard to argue against. I'm not fully convinced yet to go all in.
  • + 2
 Sure, no problem. Just get the price, weight and durability superior to the mechanical versions. AND there has to be a mechanical bail-out setting for if there is some sort of failure.
  • + 1
 We cannot hide from the fact that during the last years, electronics slowly increased BUT there are already so many arguments in the comments. My heart is bleeding when I see more and more LED lights getting attached to a bike, so that the core value of biking - get the f*ck out of your chair and get your primeval dose of adrenaline - is going to be destroyed by the way future robot components influence us subtly and tell us what is best for us. Maybe i like my bike like it is?! If not, I set it up again or bring it to the bike shop. I will keep my 2016 Canyon Spectral until I'm old and grey and tell my grandchildren: This was my purest form of biking. No electric assistance and everything mechanic.
So please go to hell with everything beeping/flashing.
  • + 1
 Having owned a magura vyron e-dropper I can safely say it'll be another 4 years, if ever, before I try anything like that again. Great idea, wish it worked but it was terrible to use on the trail. It's now gathering dust while the Transfer is doing a great job.
  • + 2
 I'd gladly see electronic components be developed, and spend my money on them, if it means the bike industry stops obsessing over changing wheel size and hub spacing....... just saying!
  • + 1
 If you don't want electric shifting, that's fine. My mountain bike has old, beat to hell xt 10 speed. My cross bike has 11spd di2.

No matter how perfect my xt is setup, there is absolutely...no...comparison. You forget about whatever weight gains you might see when you're CONSTANTLY and relentlessly BURDENED with absolutely PERFECT shifting.

As for the cost? It's an obvious deterrent. I was fortunate enough to come into my di2 secondhand. 3 years later? Still perfect. The same can be said for very few used bicycle components that endure such regular use.
  • + 1
 Batteries that never die? Nope.
Forget to recharge my f-ing bike...no ride.
Chance of getting the one shifter that has issues...meh
Chance that I get the one unit that does like one of my past watches/phones/electronics and mysteriously gets water inside it's "waterproof" case...meh

Or...I could just leave my bike in the shed, car, rain...and always shift, gritty or finely tuned. 30 minute ride or 4 hours back in the woods.

It's awesome technology, but just not freaking practical when you take into account everything else.
  • + 1
 Can honestly say in over 25 years of cycling MTB and road bikes I've only ever had to change 2 gear cables because they have stretched, frayed or rusted in a way that gear changers were compromised and then two cables cost the combined price of £5. A hell of a lot cheaper then d2i

and let's be honest anybody whose ever tinkered with electronics knows the price of building the d2i systems circuits and motors will be very cheap about £5 max especially when your buying in bulk. The whole system probably costs shimano £30 max to build package and ship so until they drop the price to under £150 I ain't interested one bit
  • + 1
 Hell no! It's retarded, it's only slightly better! And way more potential problems​, only solved by spending even more money, the vast majority of stuff is fine for pros with a mechanic and​ a truck loaded with spare parts, otherwise nobody would ride sram junk
  • + 1
 It's an interesting topic. There is up to a certain degree, but there must be a limit where if you have too much electronics on your mountain bike, it's no longer a mountain bike. Similarly with E-Bikes, most regard E-Bikes to be mountain bikes, but there reaches a point where your E-Bike becomes a motorbike, not a mountain bike.
  • + 1
 Electronic shifting doesn't bother me (the way drivetrain assistance does) but it also has very little appeal. I guess I don't spend enough on my bike for this to be something that I'm psyched to do. I'd rather have a better wheel or suspension or something.
  • + 1
 Im not against electronics at all and I dont understand the grumpy attitude of hating everything with a battery, I just dont see the point of it right now. Perhaps one day electronically controlled damping like what sports cars have could be really great, but electronic shifting is a solution to a problem that doesnt even exist. So far all the electronic products are luxuries I dont need.
  • + 4
 It looks like soon we will need bicycle programmers along with the mechanics, just the same way it happened with cars.
  • + 1
 All I want in life is to have wireless dropper and derailleur. That way I only have two cables on my bike. And I reckon that would look sooooooo goood. I'm all about them clean lines.
  • + 0
 I give up trying to understand people. That poll should have yielded 100% for the no-way option. Bikes are people-powered unlike everything else in life and they need to remain that way. A battery pack is no different than a little gas tank strapped to your bike.


Unless you have defective thumbs, in which case I am glad the market finally came to your rescue.
  • + 3
 the answer is: it depends. not for me but maybe yes for some other riders out there
  • + 2
 Has anybody who complains about difficult installation ever actually installed a Di2 system? It is literally just plug in in any configuration and go ride.
  • + 1
 Still rockin 26" wheels, 9spd, and QRs over here... dont think any electronics are making their way onto my bike anytime soon, only electronic bike part in my budget is a K2 smart shock!
  • + 1
 For now no ! I'm so hard on my bikes that I don't see myself riding with anything electric for a more years.
Plus I like to ride in rain, snow, water and other liquids (I went there).

Give me a few more years.
  • + 2
 I do use my phone's stopwatch to check on my DH practice runs, but when I see people with electronics all over their cockpits, I think Dentst. Or worse.
  • + 1
 ....and you'll need solar panels on it to keep the battery backup charged
  • + 2
 "Ready for LED displays in your cockpit?"

I had a LED display in my cockpit of my first $200 worth "mountain" bike which my parents bought for me 20 years ago. It was called a cyclocomputer and it was showing my current and average speed, distance and time...
  • + 1
 @Extremmist: We all had those in the 90s Goofy, right?
  • + 1
 What's worse than being a dentist? If you are a dentist then You likely dig in people's dirty ass mouths, and then to get away from that you go MTB riding only to realize that all these dirty mouth people hate you because you buy expensive shit for your bike. Mommas dont let your babies grow up to be dentists
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: I'd still like to get something simple that would show me the current speed and distance.
  • + 1
 I foresaw the industry killing off the granny gear. But it didn't happen. In fact the touring bikes out there are cooler than ever. So, yeah bring on the electronics. I'll still have a bicycle.
  • + 2
 Only Electronic thing I want is a Electric Pinion Gear box that will shift under some type of load, not even asking for full load.
  • + 1
 I'm running Di2 for racing. It's an advantage. It shifts faster and more accurately, all while you're really cranking on it. That's what high end products are all about. nuff said.
  • + 1
 I know someone who has bought an electric shifter for her arthritis in her hands. They might not be for everyone but it's definitely keeping her riding! They have a place that's for sure.
  • + 3
 Let me know when my bike can give me a happy finish at the end of a long dh run.
  • + 3
 I'm good. I don't need to rely on charging a part of my bike. I wanna hop on and go.
  • + 4
 PC LOAD LETTER!?!?

Only a few of you will get this. ;-)
  • + 2
 I think theirs a place for this on a road bike but I would not bother with it on my mtb
  • + 2
 Bring on the batteries and bring on the motors, just so long as neither is actually engaged in the driveline.
  • + 0
 I don't agree with you. The E-bike is the only honest use for battery on a bicycle. Then People spend thousands on making the bike lighter, in hope they will experience a faster bike. Ti and alloy bolts, carbon rims, bars and single ply tyres for 160mm of travel. That's ridiculous. Get a fkng motor on it, because that's what you really want - a faster bike taking less effort to ride. Or just ride a normal bike and STFU
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I will agree that adding a motor is certainly a more efficient way to make your bike faster, but i dont think anyone is actually arguing against that. Its the trail/land use issues that are the real problem with e bikes...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Also what about safety? An electronic suspension system or brakes, could have a real impact on safety. They would likely allow you to go faster as well, but i dont think every rider is just trying to go as fast as possible. Its not really like the improvements from E shifting are about making you go faster...
  • - 3
 @FullLotus: you don't know about trail access how it will turn out. Policies are made by friends of friends. One day mtbers may be the big part of the lobby. Hiking is for grumps. In 10 years big percentage of them will be dead.

As to safety - most people riding mountain bikes around the world ride hardtails and have no fkng clue about anything. All people getting hurt in bikeparks ride bro bikes
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: What... are you even talking about? What happened to you man. I feel like you used to make great posts that were widely supported... Now it just seems like you are trolling.
  • - 1
 @FullLotus: what I meant was that people are going to get hurt no matter what. No, active suspension will not save people from getting hurt on bicycles, there is nothing that can cure someone from effects of riding downhill in terrible stance with constantly applied brakes, looking under the front wheel. As to trail access, Geezus Christ, you guys in US are so fkng sensitive... what the hell?! It's like mentioning gender to a rather unattractive student on one of your universities. What the fk is wrong with you people?
  • + 1
 For those whom never been on a Di2 or Sram red system You've been missing out big time! Perfect shifts and chain calibration ever time, free downloadable upgrades and more!
  • + 2
 Come judgement day, I want my bike to escape on, not for it to turn on me Wink
  • + 1
 all the batteries on bikes should be for lights , the industry will force it on us and that's what we will have to deal with it if we want new stuff
  • + 1
 If I can't follow my own cranks on twitter I'm not satisfied. Just kidding. The bicycle needs battery-op anything like I need butt implants.
  • + 1
 I don't even have a rear shock because I hate maintaining pivots and sending my shock to California every few months to rebuild it due to cavitation noises.
  • + 1
 This may be great for some people but I'm not one of them. I don't mind using a little muscle to shift my gears I'm not a pussy!!!
  • + 1
 Analogue forever. I am wifi, 3 and 4G free when I am riding. Filling up with O2. Expunging all the crap. sales sales sales marketing marketing marketing.
  • + 1
 There's a joke in there somewhere about O2 having no signal... Razz
  • + 1
 Am a fan of the electronic dropper. Used one while my reverb was in for warranty repair. Just chuck it in and your good to go.
  • + 2
 Its a no for me. I like grabbing a fist full of gears all at once and grind that shit in.
  • + 1
 yep this.
  • + 1
 i m waiting for electric brakes and then we will have ..... a bike with NO CABLES !!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Electric brakes would be terrifying.
  • + 1
 @COEnduro: You mean brake-by-wire? F1 cars use them to slow down so rapidly that it would make you throw up the food you flushed down the toilet yesterday...
  • + 1
 once the stuff gets a little cheaper i will totally be converting to electronic shifters.
  • + 1
 Not really fond of the idea that I will need to charge my bike to go for a ride...
  • + 1
 I'm bad enough at trying to repair non-electrical bike parts already thank u very much
  • + 1
 Here are the bicycle arguments recently. "We should put motors on the bikes, but no they're not motor bikes!"
  • + 1
 No thank you, even though I know it performs well I prefer everything to be straight up mechanical.
  • + 2
 Electronic gear box...call me those are dialed in
  • + 1
 E-pinion, dreaming of it!
  • + 1
 I don't like to have things on my bike that I cannot fix myself...an I'm no electrician!
  • + 1
 When it finally goes wireless AND is reliable in all conditions, then we'll talk.
  • + 1
 When we put powerful servos and trigger style electronic shifters on a Pinion gearbox, I'll be ready.
  • + 1
 "Hey buddy, wtf happened??? ...aaah, my batteries just died..boo" ...no thank you!! ...maybe on a night ride
  • + 3
 Etap xx1 hopefully
  • + 1
 Like electric cars going driverless....bikes are soon to be biker-less! Biker-less E-duro!
  • + 1
 all for it. It'll make mechanical shifting out of date and will then make it cheaper for us cheap bastards
  • + 1
 i couldn't care less either way

whatever works better and/or is more accessible
  • + 1
 Why all the hate for something you'll never be forced to buy? Oh yeah, you're f*cking retarded.
  • + 2
 wireless gearbox
  • + 1
 I don't want them and I don't need them.
  • + 1
 Makes me want more single speed...
  • + 1
 Flip phones and GripShift fo life!
  • + 1
 Investing in the derailleur at this stage is pointless.
  • + 1
 That headset cap is way out of alignment.
  • + 1
 Sorry
  • + 1
 Electronic seat post, yes please. Shifters? Meh. Suspension... No thanks.
  • + 1
 Where is the "meh" option?
  • + 1
 You Do not Need a Vapor {-, -}
  • + 1
 I'm just waiting for Sram to do E-tap for MTB.
  • + 1
 Electric shifting is such a gimmick
  • + 1
 when i'm 65 ----------------- maybe ??????
  • + 1
 Electronics give me a chubby Wink
  • + 1
 Give me a wireless dropper
  • + 1
 Never. That's how the government gets ya!!!
  • + 1
 Perhaps if powered by my own bodily gases.
  • + 1
 Aren't companies supposed to do market research before making products?
  • + 1
 if they were to make drive terrain chainless...i coud be in
  • + 1
 Soon to be wireless, cable-less....electronic braking up next!
  • + 1
 I want cheat my dropper post for sure..
  • + 1
 if i have to start charging my bike i am going to be pissed
  • + 2
 Options!
  • + 1
 My bike may be plastic, but it's analog.
  • + 1
 Electric Brakes
  • + 1
 wallet says no.
  • + 1
 I like my lights?
  • + 1
 No thank you!
  • + 1
 Never...
  • - 3
 Batteries need to last 4 times longer and be 1/4 the weight.
4 more years for me.

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