Review: Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29

Jul 25, 2018 at 16:58
by Mike Levy  
Mondraker is a bit late to the 29er enduro category, but their new Foxy Carbon XR 29 might be the most eye-catching big-wheeler yet. The 150mm-travel machine is all-new, and it includes a revised rear suspension layout, their Forward Geometry that combines a roomy front end with a short stem, as well as a short offset, 160mm-travel fork, and it all adds to what the Spanish brand says is their ''most innovative, most efficient, and most capable mountain bike.''

With a $9,399 USD price tag, my Foxy Carbon XR 29 test bike sits at the top of the new three-model range. Don't want to spend close to five figures? The Carbon R 29 model goes for $5,399, and the Carbon RR 29 for $7,199. If you want to build your own bike, the Carbon R 29 with an air-sprung shock costs $4,000, and the XR version with a coil-sprung shock costs $4,150 USD. Yup, these are not inexpensive bikes.
Foxy Carbon XR 29

Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
Travel: 150mm
Fork travel: 160mm
Wheel size: 29''
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: 66° / 44mm offset (incl. +/- 1º cups)
Reach: 470mm (med)
Sizes: sm, med (tested), lrg, xlrg
Weight: 29lb 14oz
Price: $9,399 USD
More info: www.mondraker.com



bigquotesThe Foxy isn't for most of us or most settings. If you're a casual rider who doesn't enjoy pushing your limits or doesn't have access to steep, fast, or rough terrain, you still might get along just fine with the Mondraker, but it won't be ideal. However, Big Blue could be entirely ideal if your idea of a great ride includes trails that resemble cliffs and speeds that resemble the pros, two things that see the new Foxy's well-defined traits put it above more commonly seen options. Mike Levy


Contents

Introduction
Construction & Features
Geometry & Sizing
Suspension Design
Specifications
Setup
Climbing
Descending
Technical Report
Pros & Cons
Is This the Bike for You?
Pinkbike's Take


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious





Construction and Features

It's been awhile since I've had a test bike in the garage that attracted as much attention as the baby blue and red Foxy Carbon XR 29 - not a single visit to the trailhead went by without at least a few riders coming up to ask me about the big Mondraker.

Who can blame them? I mean, you can't look at the bike's front-end and tell me that Mondraker's industrial designer didn't smash this one out of the park; aside from the colors, it looks like something H.R. Giger doodled on a napkin after watching some EWS videos.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
If you want a bike that's different, here it is.


Then there's the bike's flat, wide top tube that's barely worthy of being called a tube at all. The frame is manufactured using something Mondraker calls 'Stealth Air Technology,' that is a lot like how most carbon frames are made - in a mold and with vacuum compression - but it sounds like there's a whole bunch of extra steps involved to create this thing. I'll let them describe it: ''What stands out above all is our Vacuum Compression Process method, through which the frame is subjected to a process of fiber compression through a vacuum at high pressure.''

Pretty standard, but then there's this: ''All frames and parts are put through this process after each layer of material is applied. This way, we can remove any potential air bubbles among layers and let us achieve a greater expansion of the epoxy adhesive between the weaves of the fibers.''


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
Even the internal cable guide ports (left) look distinctive. The rear brake attaches via a bolt-on flat mount (right).


There's more carbon to be found joining the two sides of the rocker arm that fits metric-sized, trunnion-mounted shock, and 15mm collet thru-axle pivots are used to hold it all together. You'll also spot threads in the bottom bracket shell, a set of ISCG 05 tabs, and a fender zip-tied to the swingarm's uprights to keep debris from being thrown at the Fox DHX2 shock. Oh, and loads of room inside the front triangle for the biggest water bottles out there. I couldn't fit the two-liter bottle of Mountain Dew that I usually ride with, but an extra-large CamelBak Podium bottle just squeezes in.



Geometry & Sizing

Mondraker was an early champion of the mega-long front center, short stem revolution that's now seen many companies follow suit with their own slightly more subdued versions of the Spanish company's Forward Geometry. Those early FG bikes were pushing the limits when they were first introduced, especially as some came stock with a 10mm long stem, but they seem much less radical these days.

My medium-sized test bike has a roomy 470mm reach that's just 5mm longer than the recently reviewed and also medium-sized Guerrilla Gravity Smash, but quite a bit longer than the 455m reach of the large Orbea Rallon that I also reviewed not too long ago. Who remembers when a "medium" was defined by its 18'' long seat tube? That sure seems like a long time ago now.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
My medium-sized test bike has a 470mm reach that's paired with a 30mm stem. The result is the same seat-to-handlebar length as a more traditional 450mm reach and 50mm stem, but Mondraker's Forward Geometry puts you farther behind the front axle.


The idea behind all of these long front-center, short stem geometries is to move the rider's center of gravity farther behind the front axle, something that can only increase your confidence on hairy terrain, but there's always a tradeoff.

The new Foxy's head angle isn't as slack as you might have guessed, either, at 66°, and combined with a 44mm offset, 160mm-travel Fox 36, although the bike does come with a second set of headset cups that let you add or subtract another degree from that number. The short, 435mm chainstays are worth pointing out, too.




Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
The bike's 150mm of rear wheel travel is controlled by a dual-link design, and Mondraker has increased the anti-squat numbers compared to the 27.5'' version of the Foxy.


Suspension Design

The Foxy employs a revised version on Mondraker's Zero Suspension System, which is basically two short links that rotate in the same direction, unlike a VPP system that uses counter-rotating links. Another difference between the Spanish brand's design and VPP is how the shock is mounted to both the upper and lower links as opposed to just the upper link and to the front triangle. This floating shock design isn't a new thing, of course, but Mondraker has been doing this for ages.

Despite how similar the dual-link layout on the Foxy Carbon XR 29 looks to their previous bikes, it actually uses different pivot locations that, according to Mondraker, were ''specifically developed for 29“ wheels with a snappier response and better pedaling efficiency.''

This began life as a clever aluminum mule (pictured at right) that let them change pivot locations individually to isolate the differences on the trail; computers can't always be trusted, you know. ''This stage has been one of the most interesting ones on the developing process of the bike as we learned a lot by playing with different positionings and geometries,'' Mondraker's Israel Romero explained to me. ''And from there we could eventually decide the kinematics for the 27.5'' and then the 29er, too.''

The kinematics include a higher anti-squat number compared to this bike's smaller wheeled brother which, given that all of the Mondraker bikes that I've ridden have been rocketships under power, should make the Carbon XR 29 a speedy machine. With different pivot locations all around, but the same 150mm of travel, the Carbon XR 29 uses a 205 x 62.5mm shock versus the 27.5'' bike's 205 x 65mm unit.
Mondraker Foxy XR
See how this mule's pivot hardware looks like it can be flipped around? They can, and this was to test different pivot locations on the trail rather than on the computer.



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Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
The bike's shock is compressed between the upper and lower links rather than being bolted to the front triangle. This isn't a new idea, but Mondraker has been doing it for ages.



Specifications

Specifications
Release Date 2019
Price $9399
Travel 150
Rear Shock Fox DHX2 2Pos Lever Factory Kashima, 205x62.5mm
Fork Fox 36 29 Float FIT GRIP2 EVOL Factory Kashima, 160mm
Headset Onoff Titan tapered (incl. steering cups: +/- 1º)
Cassette SRAM XG-1295, 10-50t, 12spd
Crankarms SRAM X01
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle
Chain SRAM 12spd
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 Eagle
Handlebar Onoff Stoic Carbon, 780mm
Stem Onoff Stoic FG 30mm
Grips Onoff Diamond
Brakes SRAM Code RSC
Wheelset DT Swiss EX1501 Spline One 29
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 29x2.5 WT / Minion DHR II 29x2.4 WT
Seat SDG Fly MTN
Seatpost Fox Transfer Factory



Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious










Test Bike Setup

My Foxy Carbon XR 29 test bike showed up completely stock, and that's the way I rode it for the first few weeks until I managed to slice its back tire badly enough that I could almost fit my fist through the gash. Aside from that, and the addition of my pump and tool, Big Blue was ridden how it arrived. I didn't install the second set of headset cups, either, as the stock numbers felt bang-on for the steep, rocky terrain that I spend most of my time on. Sure, taking a full degree off the head angle could have made the bike even more of a bruiser on the way down, but I know that I wouldn't go any quicker, or ride anything steeper if I went that route. The Foxy would have been more of a PIA on the tricky climbs, though, which I don't need in my life.

The Foxy showed up with a 350 in/lb spring that, while being 50 in/lb lower than what customer bikes will see spec'd, delivered exactly 30-percent sag. One thing that I would have changed if the Foxy were my personal bike is the seat post: It comes with a 125mm-travel Fox Transfer that, while working perfectly well, should at least be a 150mm model given the bike's intentions and short, 420mm seat tube. More on that later on, though.

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Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 37
Height: 5'10
Inseam: 33.5"
Weight: 168lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death



Climbing

While it's frowned upon to assume anything these days, I suspect that many riders, maybe even the majority, don't expect much from their enduro bikes when it comes to climbing. You know, they just need to get up to the top at some point, and if they have to dab or walk, it's not the end of the world. But it is the end of my world. I want - and hope - for more from an enduro bike than being able to ''get up to the top at some point,'' and you should, too, even if that's not their main focus. When I first threw a leg over Big Blue, I was hoping for some decent climbing manners, but because the Foxy Carbon XR 29 looks like a mid-80s Buick of a bike in length, I wasn't expecting much in the handling department beyond it being, well, a handful.

But the roomy-ish front-end belies a reasonable 1,210mm wheelbase, helped by the 435mm rear-center and not-that-slack 66-degree head angle, and the Foxy doesn't feel big at all in most situations.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
Don't let the coil-sprung shock and long front-end fool you; the new Foxy climbs exceptionally well, largely due to excellent efficiency.


The bike's steep seat angle goes a long way to masking the medium-sized frame's 470mm reach, and the 435mm chainstays let me put the rear tire where it needed to be rather than just having to deal with it swinging out wide or wherever the hell it wanted to go. There's the 44mm-offset Fox fork, too, and the whole package does feel far more manageable than it looks. That's a good thing because the Foxy looks like it couldn't climb its way out of a paper bag, yet it felt more capable, more willing to do what's required than I ever expected.

It's not a bike that wants to poke it's way up a technical singletrack climb, however, with the key being momentum and you staying on the power. Of course, you can say the same thing about a lot of bikes, but it's really the only approach when you're on the Foxy.

With 150mm of coil-sprung travel, you can stay seated and let the rear-end eat up whatever roots, rocks, and ledges might be in your way - they don't exist to you on this bike - and just concentrate on being on the right line and on the gas. If you do that, the front-end will actually go where it needs to, even if it's ultra-tight, and you'll probably get up whatever it is you need to clean.
Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
If you stay on the gas, the bike will deliver both traction and triumph.

Of course, there are situations where there's no getting around the fact that you're on a 29'' wheeled land yacht. I'm writing this having just returned from Germany to cover Eurobike, so it felt completely normal to throw in a few wheel pivots to get around tight switchbacks on some of Squamish's trickier climbs. But while I'm always down for a currywurst, a good wheel pivot, and a smoke at the top, the bottom line is that I got around those same corners on Orbea's Rallon without having to pivot around on the spot like a German. So yeah, it'll go, but you might need to adapt to the bike rather than force the bike to work for you.

One thing you won't need to do, however, is reach down for the coil-sprung X2's cheater switch. Ever. Just forget it exists. I've ridden a few Mondraker's before, so I already knew about the Spanish's brands preference for an efficient bike, but damn, this thing motors when you put the watts down. That's a big deal because it also goes a long way to helping the Foxy with those aforementioned technical pitches - I know I had more enthusiasm to attack the tech because of the bike's sportiness. Unlike some enduro bikes, it never feels like it's sad that it's climbing rather than ripping a descent. ''Alright, let's do this shit,'' is what it says at the bottom of a long climb, which is what I want to hear.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
You can carry a good amount of momentum on chunky sections of trail, and this only further's the Foxy's climbing abilities.


If you take pride in being dab-free at the top of the climb, and you've honed your technical skills to the point where it's actually something you enjoy doing, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by the Foxy. It's extremely efficient, not the handful on tricky climbs that I thought it might be, and you don't feel like your life is being sucked out of you during a long ascent. That said, less fit, less skilled riders might end up hating life on the Foxy if their climbs are tight and tricky singletracks rather than boring, wide climbing trails. If you have the know-how, the Foxy will be a great partner; if you don't, the Foxy is going to feel like a handful.



Descending

The big blue Mondraker might be the most capable enduro bike I've personally been aboard, but calling it a downhill bruiser wouldn't be giving Mondraker the credit they deserve. The Foxy Carbon 29 combines confidence inspiring geo with a coil-sprung, mega-adjustable shock and class-leading efficiency, and the final product is more interesting than finding someone searching for you in the Missed Connections ads on Craigslist.

That combo of traits makes the Foxy an odd duck, but it's also a duck that loves getting wild.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
I've ridden this rock spine on every test bike, but never with as much confidence as when I was on the Foxy.


If you threw a leg over the Foxy's low top tube and pedaled it around for a few minutes, you'd immediately notice that you're sitting farther behind the front axle than you are on your own bike. The roomy-for-a-medium 470mm reach and tiny stem put your mass farther back within the bike's wheelbase, and the seat tube is shorter than my dad's fuse, too. None of that is new - Mondraker and others have been doing this for years - but it does make for a bike that's ready to be ridden down the side of a building. If you want confidence on the steeps, it comes from Spain in baby blue and red. Squamish is home to some seriously vertical shit, and I've ridden more of it, and with more faith, on the Foxy Carbon XR 29 than any other bike.

And dear God, this bike on fast and rough chunder is a revelation. Big wheels, 150mm of travel, and its geo mean that this thing can smash through all the chunder like a wrecking ball, pretty much for the same reasons that it's so great on the steep stuff: Your body position is farther back, and because of the 29'' wheels. But straight trails are boring and we all know that corners are what counts, right? Of course, and once you're off the straights and into the bends, the story changes a bit.

Berms are the great leveler that make everyone feel good about themselves, but time is made by putting your skills to use on the tricky corners. Flat, loose, tight, slow and awkward, fast and awkward; corners are what counts, no matter what the shape or conditions. When I came into tight corners with some speed, I found that the Foxy responds well to a bit of rear wheel steering, aka skidding, which gets the blue bike quickly pointed in the right direction.

A more cautious approach with less speed, less skidding, and less leaning didn't feel as intuitive and required more effort on the Foxy. It'll do the slow speed jank, of course, but speed and aggression are your BFFs when you're on the Mondraker, as is minding the front-end.
Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
This is the kind of terrain that the Foxy belongs in.

If you don't adopt that attacking style, you might find the bike's front tire not wanting to do its job. My early rides on the bike showed this when I'd nearly lose the front-end unexpectedly. The cause? Nothing more than leaning back, really, which is kinda my go-to move when I get shit-my-pants scared. I did have quite a spectacular low-side while coming through a fast, loose, and gravely corner due to that exact reason, which really is a rider error on my part, but it also underlines how this bike responds best to someone who has a racer's mentality on most rides.

If you're anything like me, seeing a coil-sprung shock probably has you thinking that the bike is a ground-hugging, extremely forgiving machine. Surprise: It's not really either of those things. I love an efficient bike - it's one of the traits that I put at the top of the priority list - and the Mondraker checks that box and then some, but there's a trade-off for that spirited on-power feel in that it's rear suspension isn't quite as supple as you'd expect it to be, especially when you're pedaling over choppy ground. It still feels every bit the 150mm-travel bike that it is, sure, but it definitely also passes a bit more through to the rider than bikes with less anti-squat, and therefore less pep. Me? I'll take that trade-off every single day, which is why I've always liked dw-link bikes and Rocky's Slayer, but you might not.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
The big wheels smooth out a lot of the ground, but the bike's rear suspension isn't as forgiving as some other bikes with similar amounts of travel.


Because of the bike's good amount of anti-squat, Mondraker went with a light compression tune as they don't need to depend on the shock's damping for efficiency, but the Zero Suspension System is also relatively linear... Maybe you can see where I'm going with this: To the bottom, which is where the shock's stroke ended up a bit too often for my liking, despite being bang-on 30-percent sag. ''We choose the 'light' option as the bike's pedaling efficiency is superb; if we chose the 'medium' compression, it feels slightly overdamped,'' Mondraker's Israel Romero said in response to my criticism.

And he's right, too; this bike doesn't need a firmer compression tune for pedaling, but I would like to see more ramp-up. I could run a 400 in/lb spring (my bike came with a 350 in/lb coil), but then I'd get less sag and, well, I don't want less sag.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
It doesn't need to be steep and scary to get the most out of the Foxy, but it does need to be rough. The bike breezes through this stuff with ease.


All that can be summed up by saying that the Foxy's rear-end is crazy efficient, it isn't the best at small bump action, and it's a bit linear for my liking. If that sounds like I'm putting it down, I'm not - it's just the traits of this design. In fact, I'd rather have an efficient, plucky bike that's a touch less forgiving over one that wallows into its travel and doesn't light a fire under my ass. A mountain bike is human powered, and the Mondraker makes my meager legs feel more powerful than they actually are.

The entire package is extremely interesting, especially compared to more traditional, more boring bikes out there. You normally don't see this type of efficiency from an enduro sled, let alone one that feels every bit a downhill bike when the trail (or the speed) get scary. It's pretty neat that way, and it's also more well-rounded than I would have guessed. Even so, this ain't the bike for timid riders.





Orbea Rallon
Same size wheels and 150mm of rear wheel travel, but very different bikes.

How Does it Compare?

The most recent (and obvious) comparison has to be to Orbea's 150mm-travel, 29'' wheeled Rallon that shares those same numbers. Reach and head angle are different, however, with the Rallon's 455mm and 65.5-degree head angle differing from the Foxy's 470mm and 66-degree digits. On scary, knee pad-worthy trails, I had more confidence when on the Foxy, especially when it got super steep. I also had better luck on tech climbs when on the Foxy. But I'd argue that the Rallon was more fun on relaxed trails that don't see me puckering up tighter than a duck's rear-end, and I was likely to play around more when on the Orbea, too.

They're both great machines, but I'd choose the Orbea if my F-word were fun, and the Foxy if it were fast and f-ing steep, which is a different kind of fun.



Technical Report

Fox Transfer Dropper Post: Goes down easy, comes up quick, and it makes a nice 'thunk' sound at top-out so you know where it's at. So the post itself was flawless, but Mondraker could've easily spec'd a longer-stroke version given that my medium-sized test bike sports a stubby 420mm seat tube that forced me to run the Transfer about 15mm above its minimum insertion line. That's not ideal, because while the large-sized Foxy's seat tube would be long enough to prevent this, its 490mm reach is too long for my liking. A 150mm party post would solve this, as would a 170mm dropper, but Mondraker went with the 125mm model to be sure that it wasn't too tall for anyone. But look at all that exposed seatpost! If you're thinking of picking up this bike, you might want to swap the dropper out before you leave your LBS.


Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
Mondraker Foxy Carbon XR 29 photo by Justin Kious
I suspect that most riders will be able to get away with a 150mm, or even 170mm, dropper post. The short, 30mm stem is key to making the bike's roomy front-end work.


Fox DHX2 Coil-Sprung Shock: Today's air shocks are really, really good, but there's no getting around the fact that more seals equal more friction, and coil-sprung shocks will always win on that front. That said, the aforementioned bottoming moments could be easily tuned-out if Mondraker had gone with an air-sprung shock on the new Foxy. I think the coil DHX2 makes a lot of sense on this bike, and most riders will be happy to have it, but I've always been a proponent of air-sprung shocks simply because of the tuning possibilities.

SRAM Code RSC: The latest iteration of the Code combines all the power with all the modulation, and there wasn't even a hint of fading or weirdness at any point during my time on the bike. Proper rotors, too, with a 200mm up front and 180mm out back.



Pros

+ Incredibly confidence inspiring on scary terrain
+ A monster of a bike when the trail is fast and rough
+ Very efficient under power
Cons

- Not as all-around as other bikes w/ the same travel
- Short seattube is too short (for me)
- Relatively linear feeling rear suspension



Is this the bike for you?

Usually, a bike that descends like this will scores poorly everywhere else, so it makes it easy to say that it suits a certain type of rider more than another. But dang, the Foxy pedals well, performs above par on tricky climbs, and crushes descents to boot. But it still feels like a lot of bike on chill terrain, with no getting around the fact that 29'' wheels and 150mm or rear wheel travel (160mm up front) have more of a presence on the trail than something smaller. If you know how to throw a bike around, like to point yourself down some scary shit, and like big wheels, it'd be hard for me to not recommend the Foxy Carbon XR 29.

But this isn't the bike for you if your 'hood isn't full of steep and deep singletrack, or if you know that you're more fearful than fearless.




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesTime for some enduro #realtalk: There are countless machines out there that won't hold any of us back, but there are only a few that have extremely well-defined characteristics and a personality to them. Most often, these are the forward-thinking bikes that you either love or hate; that's how it is when anything, or anyone, has a strong identity. And it's how it is with the Foxy Carbon XR 29, too. Not all bikes can be like this, which is why we have Giants and Treks and all sorts of other options that really do perform well in most settings and under most riders.

But the Foxy isn't for most of us or most settings. If you're a casual rider who doesn't enjoy pushing your limits or doesn't have access to steep, fast, or rough terrain, you still might get along just fine with the Mondraker, but it won't be ideal. However, Big Blue could be entirely ideal if your idea of a great ride includes trails that resemble cliffs and speeds that resemble the pros, two things that see the new Foxy's well-defined traits put it above more commonly seen options.
Mike Levy







Must Read This Week

273 Comments

  • + 119
 9400 $ ?????????????????? HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

buy a commencal or a YT
  • + 47
 yeah its a joke. Mint bike, but I like my YT and it's half the price...
  • + 40
 Who actually buys these things??
  • + 8
 @petrospit: nobody .... you really have to be an industry victim ! Big Grin
  • + 15
 or both...
  • + 14
 @petrospit: the same people ML says won’t suit the bike in the opener. Dirt roadies for points on the shop ride around the lake.
  • + 8
 @petrospit: We have lots of people here who spend way more than that on XCO bikes. It blows my mind. They exist, believe me.
  • + 24
 and you have to swap out the dropper for a longer one. Forward geometry with old school dropper length! 125 drop in a 420 ST doesn’t make sense??
  • + 1
 @Rimrider26: All the models in M size comes with 125mm dropper. There is a post max insertion due to frame/shox restriction.
  • + 23
 As a current Commencal and YT owner, I have to say I know a local shop doing great deals on Mondrakers where they don't seem that poorly priced with respect to the competition (in europe).

I often get a bit angry at "premium" brands which I feel are often unproven or overly gimmicky yet have starting prices of 5k for poorly equipped bikes, but the premium you pay for a mondraker could be worth it: they were/are ahead of the curve on geometry, their suspension is apparently among the best (if not the best), and they just look amazing.
  • + 5
 Especially if you consider that for this price, you can get a top-end Unno bike. And an Unno is on a whole different level of design, engineering and is handmade.
  • + 21
 FWIW it is the top of the line model. There is also a 5399usd carbon model. An even cheaper alu model is introduced for 2019 and from what I saw on french online shop it looks to be on par with commencal TR29 in term of pricing :
www.mondraker.com/ch/fr/2019-foxy-29

That said you can't compare apple to apple to a company that sells direct. I can't test ride the capra or jeffsy 29 at my nearest bike shop, I'd have to order it, pay customs (you can skip that part being in belgium, I can't) and if I don't like it send it back. This is not as convenient so unless you know a friend who has the same bike in your size you can only rely on reviews. If I have a warranty issue, I can't expect YT to lend me a bike while waiting for the warranty return. I'm not saying YT is a bad choice but the customer experience can be different depending on your conditions and all these parameters have a price.
  • + 8
 @bashhard: "And an Unno is on a whole different level of design, engineering and is handmade." But does it mean your riding experience will be better ? Does-it mean the Unno would fit your better ? Does-it mean the Unno will be faster in all conditions ? There is no way to say so and I'm not convinced it is inevitably the case.
  • + 3
 @lepak1corner: yeah I get the interrupted seat tube design being restrictive to the length of dropper. For me the max drop I can get into a frame is a huuuge part of frame choice. Droppers have been One of the biggest game changers as far as parts go in the last 8 or 9 years and if a frame design (that happens to cost as much as this does) can’t accomodate a feature that can transform your riding experience then it’s off my list.
Sorry but other than that it looks/sounds like an amazing bike! .........hell it seems like an increasing number of riders strike a bike off if they can’t fit a water bottle in it!
  • + 2
 You mean buy 2 or 3?
  • + 12
 You can get 2 Canyon Strive's with similar specs for this price....
  • + 16
 9K HAHAHAHAHA! That's a good one. Kiss the back of my balls ,,,, how's that????
  • + 9
 I'm happy though that there is a $5,399 entry-level model!! /eyeroll/
  • + 9
 @opignonlibre: No it doesn't mean that the riding experience will be better. But if it's all about riding experience, I can get a YT or Commencal etc for half the price with quiet even performance.
I simply showed the points that justify the price of an Unno where you pay for the handmade, exclusive bikes.
With Mondraker, you don't have a handmade bike but have to still pay an exclusive price.
  • + 3
 Can you live with one kidney?
  • + 3
 It's okay that you can buy two YTs or three Canyons for the price of one Foxy. But believe me, there's no need to say how lucky you are every time PB reviews one of those pricey bikes. Fortunetely there're still other options for some of us
  • + 25
 @bashhard:

YT Capra 29 AL Comp is 2999€
Mondraker Foxy 29 is 2999€
Both are quite comparable in spec.

MONDRAKER FOXY CARBON R 29 2019 is 4 999,00 €
YT Capra 29 CF PRO RACE is 5,199.00€
MONDRAKER FOXY CARBON RR 29 2019 6 299,00 €

There are much more differences in spec on the carbon models. Capra CF Pro Race is XTR compared to NX and GX Eagle on the aformentionned carbon Mondraker, only 11speed, a bigger 511% range but with a way too big chainring for most people who don't stick to fireroads. You have to factor in the LBS service that is provided by purchasing a bike to a LBS (being able to test the bikes beforehand, get support on warranty issues, the typical free suspension/transmission services for the 2 years before going out of warranty).

Personnaly I think the YT is a more cost effective option if you are wrenching yourself and are looking either for the lowest or highest end models. In the middle or if you know nil about bike maintenance and feel more comfortable to deal with a local bike shop the mondraker are not necessarily over the top as long as you are not looking for top of the line carbon models.

I'm personnaly looking for an al carbon trail/all mountain bike and both the capra 29 and mondraker foxy 20 al figure in my short list. Honestly I have a hard time spending 3000€ on a bike I can't even test and I don't have any knowledge of people riding the capra 29 in my area while I should be able to test ride the Foxy 29 in a few weeks. I have used xtr 10s, xx1 11s and gx eagle on my previous bike and don't think the groupset and shock level is as relevant a parameter compared to geometry and suspension setup.

So mixed feelings. For sure I won't spend 9000€ on a bike.
  • + 8
 @74NZ: and never in stock!
  • + 2
 @iqbal-achieve: points? This will get you points? Haha
  • + 3
 @GDPipsqueak: Yes, plenty of us with killer jobs and money to burn! Now Where's that yeti sb130!
  • + 1
 @bashhard: Totally agree! I'd love to take that unno for a smash!
  • + 1
 @neeed: YES YOU (WE) CAN
  • + 4
 @opignonlibre: you nailed it! So many potential negative points on direct brands. I have to be able to demo my bikes..
  • + 11
 @bashhard: As far as I know, every carbon bike is handmade; it can be made in Small batch in Barcelona or in bigger (but not that bigger, cuz' you know, mondraker is not Specialized or Trek) batch somewhere in taiwan, but still, handmade.
On the quality side it's still to prove that EU carbon labor (on bikes) is far better than Tawanese
  • + 2
 @petrospit:
Take a look at Ymmitos, just after the katechaki bridges, between 12:00 and 14:00 every Sunday. Lots of spoiled brats with very expensive bikes, usually driving Dad's or Mum's SUV... You may see more at the top entrances of the trails there, getting stoned, before descending with their ID tag between their teeth...

Yep, they DO exist. Every new season with a new boutique bike, unscratched... Good for the industry!
  • - 2
 @petrospit: Who buys these things? Dentists
  • + 7
 @bashhard: Unno is just a bike from another bike designer with a design firm. Every carbon bike is handmade in the exact same process as Unno, just Unno's are made in-house in Europe, by a company that before the Unno project hadn't made anything carbon in-house before. They are boutique and perfectionists and have done an excellent job at marketing that, but they are just another set of engineers making what they think is the best product they can produce. Whole different level? maybe, maybe not.

Don't get me wrong, if I had the money, I'd support Cesar and Unno (Every interview with him has been awesome and I like what they're doing); but if I had that kind of money to spend on bikes, I'd probably buy a Mondraker too and who know's if I could ever tell the difference between the two.
  • + 4
 450mm reach on the small ?!
This has gone out of control!
  • + 3
 @endurocat: true to a degree imo. Taller riders may we’ll be happy to see these numbers but the shorter riders (myself included) are simply not catered to by Mondrakers sizes. I’m 5’6” and have up until this year ridden mediums forever. Now I’m downsizing to smalls (which is fine, at my height those are the bikes I always should have been on but they were too small in the past) but there are a number of manufacturers that have just applied the MOAR REACH mantra across the board and the bikes are just too big for the smaller guys.
Sure more wheelbase is fast and stable but it’s not gonna be fast when you need to lift the bike over something and it’s just too big for a shorter rider to manoeuvre like that...cus you’ll hit said object head on and die.
I think rather than simply adding 2” to all reach as most have done it would be more appropriate to increase the sizes of the smaller sizes a tad and exponentially increase each size right up to xxl. There are a few clever folks who’ve observed and done this, Cy Turner being the one in my head.
That way shows a lot more thought and consideration for improving the ride of all riders than just following gimmicks and trends.
  • + 2
 @petrospit: I would, if I had the money Smile
  • + 4
 @iqbal-achieve: So people who have $$ to buy this are not strong riders? Not a lot of logic to that statement. Are they stupid expensive, yes, that does not mean everyone who owns or has owned a Mondraker is a Lottery winner or a "dentist" and a poor rider.
  • + 1
 @downhere67: I don’t like that mtb has become such a fashion centric sport. Mondraker enjoyed success with Fabien and the forward geometry, they’re now looking for the next way to sell and it is basically to appeal to the Garda crowd of dirt roadies who care more about what you’re riding than what you’re doing with it. Anyone who needs a 10k bike to stay competitive will have support. The only people who will buy this thing are fashionistas.
I’ve been moderate on this subject in the past but it’s going too far. It’s not what I got into bikes for and it’s stinky horse shit. f*cking look at me and how big the dick on my head is everyone.
Ps I’ve had a Mondraker. It was too big. And poor quality. I’d say I was definitely unlucky when I bought it, far from a lottery winner.
  • + 1
 @bashhard: plus the top built on the unno is way better than the mondraker. the unno frames are very pricey but the built kits are reasonable in comparison to other brands IMO in the boutique sector.
  • + 2
 @ciszewski: If I had the money, I will buy these Uno and Mondraker too. They look really gorgeous! But I am really interesting (and I believe for some people too) how many XR version they sell a year?

There's also no way their frame is vacuumed after each layer is applied. The frame will be vacuumed once after all the layup are applied. Just marketing BS... Maybe brands expect people to pay more to their overpriced bikes because of these marketing BS. There's no "special carbon fiber" technology that belongs to a certain brand. The material and procedures are all the same as those brands that produced at the same factory.
  • + 3
 @iqbal-achieve: I agree with you on why we get into biking, not for the look but for the fun factor and it can get you fit (if I stop drinking beer). I do see that road "snobbishness" seeping into mountain biking but it was only a matter of time.

I too have owned 3 Mondraker frames, had amazing time with the Summum and loved the foxy, too bad I went through two rear ends in less than a year and they shipped them to me in Canada no questions. For me to opened my eyes to the idea of the longer reach and I realized that I was on the wrong sized frames for years. That is why I bought a Pole.

10 grand bikes do not make one competitive, I agree but it seems like we apply car logic here. A 100 grand BMW is sweet but the speed limit is still 100 km on the highways regardless if I have 500 hp.

The job of marketing is to get people to buy something most of the times we do not need. There will always be those who have the "best " or most "expensive" regardless of their skill.
  • + 4
 @ciszewski: You know that Cesar and Unno are behind Mondraker's Forward Geometry and Zero suspension so they arent exactly new.
  • + 2
 @vid1998: yeah I know. Definitely not new to design. Cero is a big firm with plenty of experience. But they are new to carbon manufacturing themselves, that’s just fact.
  • + 1
 Cons:
From the side, the seat tube looks like a dog penis.
  • + 5
 @iqbal-achieve: you say this isn’t what you got into bikes for, but how does any of this change your personal biking experience? Don’t buy the 9k bikes. Not too many other people are, either. And if it’s just a bunch of rich squids buying them, as everyone here seems to posit, then there’s no way they’re on the same trails as all you hardcore types. There — problem solved.
  • + 1
 still a butload cheaper than a (basically the same) UNNO. But yeh.
  • + 1
 good comment stole it from the old review?
  • + 1
 @bashhard: You do realize Cesar Rojo the guy behind UNNO had been at Mondraker before he started his own design studio
  • + 1
 @GDPipsqueak: a 10k XC bike will weight less than 22lbs and still handle the stuff being ridden in the review, so I think there is more value/dollar in the super expensive XC bikes at least.
  • + 15
 #$@%#$@ Pinkbikers.... Why the heck would I want to buy a YT?

When you were kids you guys must have all had posters of a Skodas an Hyundais hanging in your rooms because they are really cheap right? No one ever had a Ferrari a Lamborghini on the wall, right?
  • + 1
 @lepak1corner: that's a major design fail right there.
  • + 1
 The interrupted seat tube limiting the dropper length I mean.
  • + 2
 @TheR: I take your point completely - up until recently that’s exactly where I stood but it seems that ignoring the issue isn’t making it go away.
  • + 1
 @bashhard: First of all..you cant get a "top-end" Unno bike for that cash....you have to spend a bit more...ridiculous, I know, but thats a fact. Second ...I really doubt that it would be any better than the Mondraker and third ... the spanish bike is still one of the best looking plastic bikes out there, even when the design is a bit older.
  • + 1
 @Skooks: Don't get me started on the dropper housing grazing the shox's body and alloy models unable to fit a coil shox. Those are a definite design failure.
  • + 1
 @michibretz: I had this huge poster of Christy Canyons with her huge everything everywhere. Always thought the Ferrari posters were compensating for lack of something or everything.
  • + 1
 Who's even buying bikes nowadays???
  • + 1
 @ShempHoward: Then to put it in a way you might understand -- you had pictures of Christy Canyons, not Amanda Bearse or some other Plain Jane actress.
  • + 1
 @iqbal-achieve: I get you, but what's the issue that needs to go away? That some people have expensive bikes? That they make expensive bikes? I take it in the same way I take the existence of expensive cars. They make them, people have them, but I don't. Maybe I will someday. Maybe it's not worth it to me. But it's really a non-factor in my own driving experience.
  • + 1
 @TheR: I guess it’s just that I don’t wanna see the shift go any further toward the materialistic. Like 90% of punters in the ski resorts, the sport for them is simply to be seen in the right kit, even at the right resort. I don’t want mountain bikes to become like skiing. But I worry it’s inevitable.
I got into bikes to spend as much time riding as I can; not as much money as I can. And I fear there are more and more aligned with the latter which isn’t a great thing for those for the former.
I see too much gimmickry and tricks to get (mostly uninitiated and unskilled) people spending when I’d like to see and hear people talking about genuine ways to improve bikes. Again, the very same happened to skis and snowboards. It went so far people were selling shit that plain didn’t work but the crowd buying it had no idea, they wanted ‘new’ so bad.
But I dunno. If it’s gonna grow this is the way it’s got to be.
  • - 1
 @downhere67: Cars are not bicycles, and bicycles are not cars. Not even remotely close, don't compare the 2. Poor analogy.

When bicycles, and parts, start reaching automotive/pleasure craft levels there is a problem.
  • + 2
 @ShempHoward: Haha, I first wrote that but than went for pre teenage version of room decoration instead to keep things nice an clean...
Anyway, that's kind of the same thing though... you were not interested looking at picture the girl working the cash register at the local grocery store even though she might have been easier to get...

I rather look at the bike porn Wink
  • + 2
 @m1dg3t:
A Nissan Versa will get you to work every morning just like a YT or Canyon will get you through a ride just fine but that does not mean i want them... so in that regard they are exactly the same....
  • + 2
 Canyon should do a Christy Canyons special edition.
  • + 1
 Or a KTM/Husky/Beta. Jesus this sport is getting rediculous.
  • + 2
 Why buy a ferrari if you can buy a fiat panda?
Youre a stupid moron. If you dont like the bike or the price, just leave it at that. Dont f*cking whine around.
  • + 1
 @Mugen: I’m picking up a 2018 alloy foxy for a comparable price to an alloy Bronson. I’ve been eyeing the mondraker foxy for a while but never wanted to pay the asking price. but I think I’m going for it now that it’s discounted.
  • + 1
 @michibretz: Can you ride a poster?
  • + 1
 @DavidGuerra: you talking about the pornstar poster that @ShempHoward suggested? i am sure some folks tried. .. lol
  • + 1
 Now your talking
  • + 1
 @vtracer: Not quite correct, Cesar's design studio designed (still does?), the Mondraker, which are made at Astro Engineering in Taichung, who also make a lineup of great "open mould" frames that use this same suspension design. As used by the likes of KTM, CTM etc. UNNO is similar in suspension by the looks (small changes in linkages make a big difference though I know). And he makes his frames literally in the design studio in Barcelona, which is bloody impressive!
  • + 1
 @petrospit: People who want something different and have great taste? LOL
  • + 63
 Everytime I read new bike review on Pinkbike these days, I learn that the bike climbs exceptionally well, and it's exceptionally capable when it comes to descending.
  • + 93
 We should be happy that mountain bikes have gotten to that point ... Isn't that what we've always wanted?
  • + 17
 The conclusion was remarkably negative as well from Mondraker's point of view. Basically saying you shouldn't buy the bike unless you live somewhere with lots of burly trails you have to pedal up and you have enough skill to maybe not have to buy your bikes in the first place.
  • + 5
 Mountain bikes are cool.
  • + 10
 27 or 29 – not an easy decision. Because both YT CAPRAs are dialled into a perfect combination of aggressiveness, speed, agility, and handling, there's no obvious 'right' answer. Your riding style, preferred terrain, and - last but not least, personal preference are the deciding factors.

$4299 complete/ currently 25% off make that $3225. Pretty sure you would beat or destroy somebody just as easy on the Capra over a Moonraker for 9g's. Take that extra $6100 you just saved and buy a used BMW to get to the trails.
  • + 3
 @ShempHoward: this article is about the Mondraker Foxy 29 XR. Just sayin'.
  • + 6
 @opignonlibre: Are you serious, I had no idea ,,, big thanks.
  • + 4
 @Spark24: if all these new bikes really climb like a goat and descent like a hawk, than definitely.
However, for the sake of a useful review, it would be nice to describe the qualities relative to comparable modern bikes. I don't believe all modern bikes perform the same.
If every review reiterates the same lines, than there is no comparison to go by.
  • + 2
 @ShempHoward: You replied to "Everytime I read new bike review on Pinkbike these days, I learn that the bike climbs exceptionally well, and it's exceptionally capable when it comes to descending." by a post coming from Mars about YT bikes completely unrelated. I'm glad I helped you. Sounds like a number of YT fanboys are playing with the up/down votes buttons like their life depended on it too. Funny people. 8-)
  • - 25
flag ShempHoward (Sep 3, 2018 at 7:06) (Below Threshold)
 @opignonlibre: Who, I think you need a mental evaluation little guy. Probably a colin cleanse also because your full of shit. Btw I don't own or plan on buying any of these bikes. Have insider deal with undisclosed company and pay pennies on the dollar. No it's not YT but I would grab the pro model for $3200 any day over this ugly as bike.
  • + 14
 But I love it how Levy initially states that anybody buying an enduro bike isn't expecting it to climb very well. Shit, with all of the pinkbike reviews I'm expecting my next DH bike to climb like an XC bike. I'd never expect an enduro bike to actually climb like an enduro bike these days, pfft.
  • - 3
 @ciszewski: Your next DH bike will cost less, weigh the same and have similar capability but be able to actually blast a proper trail. DH slipped in and made euroduro bikes look even more silly.
  • + 10
 I agree, but I thought that this review did a really good job of describing the bike's comparative strengths and weaknesses within those parameters. There was an extended discussion of exactly where it shined climbing (putting power down efficiently) and where it didn't (tight terrain). Similarly, there were multiple points for where the bike excelled and where it didn't and the tradeoffs made. And multiple direct comparisons were made to a recently reviewed bike.

Overall, I thought it was a very good review and more useful than some we read on here.
  • + 1
 I didn't take away that it was exceptional going down. That would be the Wrecker, etc. I like how he highlighted how they've (and many others) have taken these long travel 29ers and made they decent pedalers by sacrificing a little bit of downhill plush. I thought Mike did a good job showing that.
  • + 4
 @Mac1987: It appears we're approaching the MTB singularity and only changing standards can save us!
  • + 6
 @ShempHoward: Then, put that money into fixing your used BMW's engine and electrical issues
  • - 2
 @scary1: Fortunately I have a 2017 so no issues here but good luck fixing your.
  • + 1
 @bzx but only if you descend fast...
  • + 1
 @Spark24: if that is the case, I'm sure the bike industry will save us shortly (and multiple times...)
  • + 16
 The most beautiful top tube seat stay combo I've ever seen on a full suspension bike. Stunning.
  • - 6
flag colincolin (Sep 3, 2018 at 2:13) (Below Threshold)
 Not as stunning as that price.
  • + 7
 That straight line is broken the moment you get on, I'm afraid.
  • + 7
 @Toutacoup: That's fine by me. I can't look at it when I'm on it.
  • + 2
 @Toutacoup: that's fine, you only get to stare at it when you're not riding it anyway.
  • + 12
 " fiber compression through a vacuum at high pressure." If there's a vacuum, there's no pressure. If there's high pressure, there has bo be some fluid involved, and no vacuum.
  • + 17
 That sentence ("high pressure vacuum") is indeed nonsense, but what it *might* be trying to say is that the carbon+epoxy piece is vacuum bagged and inside a pressurised vessel to achieve > 1 atmosphere of pressure differential.
  • + 0
 I don't know mondraker's process, but I guess it's possible to pull a vacuum in the layup and compress it with a bladder.
  • + 1
 Was just about to comment the same thing, did make me giggle
  • + 16
 composite professional here: I think what they are trying to describe while being deliberately vague is that they "debulk" each layer of pre-preg material on the mandrel/internal form with a vacuum bag setup to remove air between the layers before pressure bladder moulding it like every other bike. Its a good technique. I've seen between the layers of plenty of bikes and most are pretty ordinary with trapped air in the moulding process.
  • + 3
 @watermouse: Pretty standard to debulk every few layers though in aerospace, not worthy of a new marketing driven "Stealth Air Process" naming!
  • + 3
 @phutphutend: Standard in the aerospace industry sure, but not common at all in the bike industry. De-bulking adds a lot of extra labour to the process, but produces a better product. I'd say it is definitely a marketable product differentiator.
  • + 10
 i honestly don't get the whole long front centered bikes when they require extra effort to prevent the front from washing out in a turn. Sure they make you feel comfy and safe on steeper trails but cornering is everything to my riding and ive tried a longer centered bike and it was poop without having to deliberately try to put as much weight as possible on the bars. I have no such issues with shorter bikes. I confess my bike wont feel as stable at speed as these but i guess the trend now is moving away from fast turns and agileness and more about rolling straight lines faster.
  • + 3
 Yeah, they just make you lean forward to keep traction in the front wheel vs leaning back on a more traditional bike. Having learned to ride on 90s Norba bikes, I constantly have to think to myself "lean forward" to ride these bikes. I prefer a more moderate reach.

The ultra steep seat tubes are fantastic for pedaling up, but they make seated pedaling while descending more difficult, which can be a detriment for long race runs.
  • + 9
 @dthomp325: why would you seat while pedaling downhill ? It isn't a road bike.
  • + 1
 @opignonlibre:

Cuz it coool Gotta have ball to
Hump that '!'
  • + 2
 @opignonlibre: fatigue, some of us need some support for our bums even while going downhill
  • + 2
 I'm actually a bit relieved to see this quote in the review:

"They're both great machines, but I'd choose the Orbea if my F-word were fun, and the Foxy if it were fast and f-ing steep, which is a different kind of fun."

It seems like one of the first admissions I've seen that maybe we've hit the limit of long and will see people looking more for a balance of fast and fun.
  • + 1
 Agreed. Ive been sizing down on bikes lately and having a blast. Long front ends cause washouts for me. While stable and fast, they're nowhere near as fun as a shorter bike to me. I remember riding my first 165mm bike, and i felt like a rock star. My skills didntnimprive at all, but all of a sudden i could tackle chinky stuff witgout thinking about it. I think people are starting to feel the samenwith a long bike. Many riders dont have good cornering skills, but the long wb and long reach make them feel invincible when bombing straight down hills.
  • + 1
 @opignonlibre: You pedal while seated because it's much more efficient and gets you better times on long stages.
  • + 9
 Stopped reading when I saw the prices. $4100 for a frame/shock, bikes starting @ $5400! Are these guys on crack?

How the hell do NO reviewers make these same comments? - That was rhetorical. They're all in the back pockets of the industry.

It's getting ridiculous. A half year, or close to it, of wages for the average person for a bicycle!
  • + 5
 Well its clearly not marketed at those customers.. there's no shortage of people with money in the world dude. There's PLENTY of lower priced very competitive bikes on the market.
  • + 2
 @davetrials: I don't have a shortage of $$$, OR common sense.

I am fully aware that the industry covers everything from $500 up to $18k bikes. When I see the ever MASSIVELY increasing cost, and accompanying marketing push, of what I consider 'enthusiast' bikes you can bet your bottom I'm going to say something. That said, I buy 2nd hand unless absolutely necessary as even the cost of parts has increased significantly over the last 8 months or so.

If my wages tracked with the increase to cost of bicycles I'd be filthy rich.

Downvote me all you want.
  • + 3
 @m1dg3t:
It´only reaonable man.
What is happening atm is just ridiculous. People even justify those raises in price, while a few years back we were at a point were we were singing the praises of how we finally have competitively priced and great working bikes.
At the moment the industry is trying their damned hardest to get back to cheap bikes with shit components or enthusiast level bikes for insane amounts of money.
The mid level sector is dead, with Fox Performance forks and shocks being the new middle class standard and companies expecting us to pay 6000 plus for bikes with fully adjustable and functioning suspension components, which is just stupid.
While there are a quite a few competitively priced direct sales companies, many of the established shop brands lost their grip on reality and have tried to become boutique brands only thorugh price increase, not actual quality and performance increases.
  • + 2
 @Loki87: that raise you mention is imaginary. Compare current high end bikes to high end bikes of 15 and 30y ago and factor in the inflation and income evolution and you'll see that bikes aren't significantly less or more affordable than they used to.

Besides new mountain bikes have price ranging from 300 to +12000€ with myriads choice between these. It's
up to you to decide or not how much money to spend and if that particular characteristic is worth the premium price over a cheaper model.
  • + 2
 $5400USD for an NX build, revelation fork, and MT-500 brakes (which are apparently deore level but I can't even find them on Shimano's website). For reference, my similar quality carbon fibre bike has an equal or better parts spec all around (XT drivetrain, Pike, Deore brakes) and listed one year ago for $4000 USD.
  • + 1
 The new SB150 with the X2 option is $3800.

The Trump tariffs have increased the costs of things built in Taiwan, notably.

Hey, maybe our old bikes will hold value better as new frames increase in cost?
  • + 1
 Exactly why I purchased a less than year old Giant Reign SX for under $1900usd shipped. Roughly 50% depreciation in 8 months or so. Unlike the Mondraker in this review, Giant didn't bother with the climb switch on my 2017 bike. Damn thing keeps setting PR's on the tech climbs and making it up stuff I couldn't on my 9+ pounds lighter XC hardtail. Paint quality is as poor as YT though Frown
  • + 1
 @big-red: Don't overlook that on the $9400 build you get Dt Swiss ex1501s LoL

What a joke.
  • + 1
 @SunsPSD: The current cost of bicycles has nothing to do with Donald Trump. It has everything to do with all the people who are willing to pay the inflated prices for what ever asinine reasons.
  • + 8
 We need to make sure that we are talking Seat tube angles while we are talking Reach numbers, as they are both very much connected in the feel of a bike. A Bike can have a long reach with a steep STA and still feel shorter than a Bike with short reach and slack STA while pedaling in the saddle. And while we are at it, can the bike industry please make up its mind on where we are measuring STA. The new default is actual, Vs Effective to the intersection of B.B. and Stack height. But it seems a guess on who uses what. Please sort that out
  • + 2
 Re: STA and reach, isn't that what TTTL tells you? Stem length also affects your seated reach but can be changed to some degree. I think of it as:

TTTL+stem length = butt-to-hands/seated reach.

Effective STA = where your weight is relative to the BB for climbing in the saddle
  • + 8
 This is world class writing: "They're both great machines, but I'd choose the Orbea if my F-word were fun, and the Foxy if it were fast and f-ing steep, which is a different kind of fun. " and so is "..or if you know that you're more fearful than fearless. " Great writing. Love to see well written well constructed journalism here. Good!!
  • + 2
 Thanks Smile
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: after this review (more so than other bike reviews lately) I really believe I know how the foxy behaves and more importantly how it'd benefit (or not) my riding if I got one. Thanks!
  • + 12
 Anyone else ever get a reply from there customer services.
  • + 6
 Mondraker's custom service is remarkable, I cracked the front triangle of my old 2013 dune alu and got it replaced through a different reseller than the one originally bought to bike to, without questions asked from both reseller and Mondraker.

I then sold it and am now a lucky owner of a 2017 Dune XR carbon that I could thoroughly test on my local trails before writing the big fat check, I knew exactly where I was going, thanks to the local shop. (I litterally bought the test bike)

I could also have those damn SRAM guide brakes replaced when the lever stopped coming back without spending a dime nor going through the disassembly myself (with internal cable routing it's not as effortless as it used to be)

So yes, the catalog prices are crazy AF but comparing them to the ones of direct selling brands like YT or Commençal isn't fair:

- nobody pays the catalog price, even on newest models, resellers can always make commercial gestures if you are kind enough
- ability to test the bikes easily
- easier to take advantage of parts and frame warranties

This being said my next bike will probably be a Commencal or YT because their price points are just incredible, I just wanted to show some love to the nice influent and innovative brand that is Mondraker.

This is a pure "hate it or love it brand", special looking bikes with both special and demanding personality, but if you decide to ride the way their bikes decide you to do, you won't feel a single regret :-)
  • + 0
 @SMASH3D: "- nobody pays the catalog price, even on newest models, resellers can always make commercial gestures if you are kind enough"

It is quite seasonable (supply vs demand) . Nearest Orbea bike shop told me -20% if I order it before he buy his 2019 stock. It all changes when you wake up in spring, bikes are already ordered by the shops and in limited supply in the importers warehouse so you won't necessarily have these discounts (and shop will wait for summer to discount the old stock again).
  • + 1
 yes, they helped me no end with my Summum.. at no cost even though i'd bought it used
  • + 1
 I had a 2015 Foxy frame that cracked at the chain stays. Broke it on a Sunday at MSA and had a new rear end in Ontario by the following Friday (never would have gotten that from Trek). I have had two Summum's that had no issues at all but I would be nervous to buy trail frame again considering there is no distributor in Canada and not sure if those guys from Colorado importing them to the States would help.
  • + 10
 Linear kinematics + coil = nonsense. Especially if the bike wants it fast and rough.
  • + 1
 Not really. Linear suspension means that you get the same spring rate everywhere - and you usually run a higher coil rate with this setup. This in turn means that you get a lot more midstroke support. With progressive suspension (tuned for the same bottom out force for this example), you usually have less midstroke support, in exchange for a firmer feeling bike that is more responsive when you pump or really drive through the bike.

Just depends what the rider prefers. A lot of dirt bike guys are used to linear suspension feel, and like the same on MTBs. DJ/BMX guys that are now into MTB seem to prefer progressive.
  • + 1
 @phops: I get it. But whenever you want to jump, you have to keep in mind to be clear as possible, every mistake as casing or overshooting leads to harsh bottom out. Can't be good for the shock or the rest of a bike in longterm.
  • + 1
 @pulDag: You won't bottom out if you run a higher rate coil.
  • + 1
 @phops: I don't know a single MXer that prefers a pre 1981 dirt bike rear suspension. That was the last time the Jap manufacturers had a linear leverage ratio, before they added Pro-Link, Full- Floater, etc... Before progressive linkage ratios were added to dirt bikes, you could either have a bike that was supple on the chatter, or one that could handle big jumps, but not both.

The reason I knew the Foxy 29 needed an air spring for progressivity, was by looking at the rear suspension leverage ratio online.

The only time I totally linear rear suspension curve works well with a totally linear coil spring, is for light/ medium trail riding with no jumping, which is why KTM still uses the PDS (no linkage suspension) on their trail bikes.
  • + 8
 I 100% want one for the 5% of the time I get to ride the type of trails I love.
  • + 1
 Amen. It's as if buying one will mean I'll get to ride those trails more often but in reality that's not the case. I end up riding the same damn boring flow trails close to home.
  • + 5
 Guys, I've been very broke/ poor, and I've been quite comfortable. The price isn't really an issue for many people, don't judge them for that. I spend darn near every waking moment that I'm not running my business, thinking about mountain bikes. In the end, that fancy frame isn't going to cost me enough extra to worry about. When I look at the years of enjoyment and fitness I receive from my bikes, and then I can still sell them and get 40% of my money back, it's all a bargain in this relatively short life we have to enjoy.


Even though we have a local Mondraker dealer that has delivered about 4 of these, there were none to see in my area cause fast Enduro racers keep buying them up within minutes of arriving. I spoke to 3 very fast guys that run the Foxy 29 and they were all pretty over the moon on the Foxy 29. These are guys that ride a lot of bikes.

I read every bit of info (there isn't much) I could find on the Foxy 29 and quite a bit on previous Mondraker models, and the geo REALLY appealed to me as I can finally have a bike that fits me. (at 5'11" on a Large Yeti 5.5 my current bike feels 1-2" too short in the tt to me among other issues) As did the Mondraker's known climbing prowess as extended long climbs can really beat me down. I'm a fast descender, but would like to be more confident on the steeps.

So I ordered an XR frameset sight unseen. (I have premium components on the current Yeti that I will use for the build.)

I felt the coil shock choice was purely fashionable and a regrettable choice by Mondraker, but I really wanted the blue frame. So I found a used quality air shock that fits the bike and has already been sent to Avalanche to be set up for this frame. This review reinforced that I made the correct decision about this.. PS. One take off coil shock for sale! Seriously.

Also, the 42mm offset of the Rockshox forks helps weight this front end better than the speced 44mm offset Fox, so that's the fork I'm going with. Combined with my 175mm dropper, CF wheels, etc. it will be a quality build.

Thanks so much for the quality and realistic review Mike Levy. It's the most thorough review of this bike I've seen yet and really helped me feel more confident in my expenditure for a frameset that I will not see until November. I feel this bike will be the right overall fit for my strengths, weaknesses, and preferred terrain and will assist me in becoming the best mountain biker that I can be.

~ take care

PS. I had the SB130 on my very short list. But I already have the dimensions of that bike and the ETT is 1mm off of my current 5.5, which is simply too short for me.
  • + 1
 Sounds like a neat build. Let us know how it turns out!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Can you get the Foxy 29 front end to stick and execute a fast flat loose turn without an intentional rear tire slide through good body positioning?
I'd be bummed if the back end always 'over-rode' the front end and understeered. Would probably swap to a less aggressive rear tire if that happened to try and create more chassis balance.
Thoughts?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I've got my own Foxy 29 (frame up build) now running on Avalanche tuned Rockshox suspension front and rear.
It is truly a phenomenal bicycle. I'm coming off of a Yeti 5.5 (frame for sale btw) that I really enjoyed but I find this bike to be a significant step up in all regards.
My size large (before pedals/ tools/ bash guard) weighs 28.1# with real tires which is Impressive as well.
Take care.
  • + 4
 Great review. I reviewed the 27.5 Foxy XR a few years ago with nearly identical impressions (compared to other bikes at the time). Still holds quite a few of my personal records.

I often feel a little pinch when i see people calmly riding Mondrakers on easy trails- such a waste. Those bikes revel when at high speed, loose and aggressive riding (and obviously, a little hefty on the more casual stuff)

Wondering how it would compare to the Dune, especially going down.
  • + 3
 A new Dune is brewing for 2020 model.
  • + 5
 Former Foxy owner here. They absolutely love being at high speeds, to the point where you feel like you're riding a downhill bike until you run out of travel and things get sketchy. However, they also love to crack at the rear triangle, which is utterly absurd for a bike designed to go as fast as these are. It's unfortunate, but I doubt I'll ever have another Mondraker.
  • + 2
 True, rear triangle is absurdly weak for that much of asking price.
  • + 1
 Yeah... "most capable mountain bike"? Interesting...
  • + 3
 @AlanMck: I wonder if the linkage bolts have improved either? The stock hardware was absolutely balls on mine, with poor tolerances in the Allen key recesses and soft material employed. High cost when the inevitable replacements were required as well. Ended up turning down some 12.9 8mm cap head bolts to suit.
  • + 0
 @AlanMck: yeah, I've heard of a few that cracked or had pivot hardware issues. I do assume mondraker have improved this over time. Shame, cuz the rest of the frame is top notch in terms of quality.
  • + 1
 @surrealguy: 2015-2017 lower rocker uses 10mm I.D, 6900RS bearings of which prolly found in most hub bearings. I had them replaced every 3mths or so. Such flimsy rear triangle + the fugly PF BB. In the end, I hanged the frame on a wall of shame.
2018 uses 15mm I.D 6902RS bearings and collet bolts.

Sure long TT seems to work better but not that long.
  • - 2
 It's like an extremely over priced euro version of the Giant Maestro and made in the same Chinese factory.
  • + 0
 @ShempHoward: Try it, it feels so vastly different to the Maestro, mainly because it is inherently different.
The maestro is a sort of DW ripoff, with a floating rear triangle but non floating shock. In the mondraker, the shock floats as well, i.e - not directly connected to the front triangle.

The maestro feels very active, noticeably more under power, even bobby to an extent (especially standing up). The Zero Suspension is much more stable under power, sometimes feeling a little harsh. Mike really described it very well.

Not to mention how very different Giant and Mondraker's geometries are - Giant have been pretty conservative with their trail bikes until now, even sporting outdated long stems. Mondraker have been at the forefront of the "modern" geometry trend, going longer and lower with the shortest stems, well... ever.

Sorry to be honest, but you could've picked a better comparison Smile
  • + 2
 @foxinsocks: I only picked it because I have owned and or rode literally every bike from both companies. Maestro feels way more refined and willing to go into orbit. I did like the dune but it reminds me of a Khs as does the summum, which isn't a bad thing. All bikes mentioned perform great but some cost 9k versus 5k for marginal difference in handling. Someone in Taiwan is having a good laugh.
  • + 2
 @ShempHoward: I dont know. I've had my share of mileage on Giant bikes, and i can't say the difference in handling Vs. the Mondraker is "marginal". But let's agree to disagree? Smile

I wouldn't pay 9k for a bike regardless, i'll give you that.
  • + 2
 @surrealguy: Preach. My Mondraker experience makes me pretty cynical about the hype surrounding Caesar Rojo and Unno since he was the designer. Whoever signed off on my Foxy couldn't engineer their way out of a paper bag. I should say, the thing rode amazingly well, which makes it even more of a shame really. Summum seems a good bike, some mates have them with little issue.
  • + 2
 @AlanMck: it is very tough to get tooling or layup changes done when working in China. Unno controls their whole production process and also uses carbon not used in China.
  • + 3
 @kleinblake: The aluminium bikes crack with even more frequency, the rear triangle of the first 27.5 Foxy is embarrassingly poor and designed by said engineer. The carbon lay up also has little to do with the fact that the linkage bolts gradually come loose no matter what you do.
  • + 3
 i think i prefer the look of the test mule (what i can see of it anyway) also bike prices are crazy nowadays. There is no way its worth spending this kind of money when there's so many equally specced cheaper bikes around. Im tired of having carbon touted as if its still some space age new tech when its been out ages and honestly i would rather have an aluminium bike with a few grand lest cost and live with a slight (sometimes less than a 50gram) weight penalty in extra weight. Also forward geometry bikes and seats slammed as far forward on the rails just looks rubbish.
  • + 3
 I like how Mr.Levy mentioned the different riding position and the different way you have to ride these longer bikes. Ride centered or slightly on the front even on the steeps or else you will lose the front end. Be aggressive and the bike will go around anything.
I'd also like to see him test a Pole or Nicolai but I doubt that will ever happen. They do come in "shorter" reach is the "S" size Wink
  • + 1
 Pinkbike receives a Pole Machine as soon as Pole has sent out all remaining orders of normal customers Wink
  • + 6
 do revisit in 9 months time when the foxy is falling to pieces of on its 4th replacement frame.
  • + 1
 Hey, for 9K, they have built in their own warranty replacements!
  • + 1
 I rode it for some time now, no issues so far:-)
  • + 1
 this may have been true in the case of the older generation aluminium frames (I've had one - or let's say 3 - myself), but certainly not in case of current carbon models - haven't heard of a single case of a broken Foxy 2018 bike.
  • + 1
 I think the 2015-2017 Foxy Carbon has been pretty robust. Cheaper models with aluminium chainstay have had problems, right?
  • + 2
 I had a YT Capra 29 CF Pro and hated it because the finish on the frame was really cheap (chips all around the bottom bracket and headset) and the rear end was mega flexy.

Sold it and paid the extra for one of these, frame quality is twice is good and rides really well. Definitely recommend them. Prices less than Santa Cruz’s so not that outrageous.
  • + 1
 How did you find the rear end of the Capra29 compared to the Foxy29?
  • + 5
 That " thing" that hold the rear brake in place look like an afterthought...
  • + 1
 Pretty sure it's just a flat mount adapter, nothing too strange.
  • + 2
 Just like Levy said. I am lucky owner of the "R" version, got a great deal on it. It is a super relaxing ride on our local trails, every jump seems to be small. It really wakes up on downhill tracks. One of the things not mentioned here is it loves to get in the air, especially sending long low senders. Yeah and you have to literally lay down on the handlebars to get most of the grip, insane feeling. This bike scares me sometimes, I love it. Lifetime frame warranty as well.
  • + 2
 seems like you size the bike for yourself looking at the reach measurement and what you are used to mike. i think your complaint about the seat tube is because at your size i think after looking at the size chart you should be on a large. but looking at the reach number it prob scared you and you sized smaller. just my opinion
  • + 1
 Agree to disagree on that one. I've ridden bikes in the 490-500mm reach range (the L Foxy is 490mm) and they've always felt too long for me. But I do try to keep an open mind Smile
  • + 1
 The entire point of the Mondraker is that you don't need to up-size to get a proper tt/ reach while sacrificing other aspects of fit. They already extended these geometry numbers for you.

Don't up-size on a Mondraker!
  • + 2
 I think you are too tall for the Medium and if you had given the Large a try you wouldn't have spent 3 paragraphs talking about the length of the dropper post. The point of Forward Geometry is not having you size down to get the reach number you think is right!
  • + 2
 Hmm, I'd disagree on that one. All this different geo has pretty much made referring to bikes as small, medium, or large outdated in a way - it's all about that reach number. But the 490mm reach of the large is too long for my liking, and I know that because I've tried many bikes with similar numbers Smile
  • + 2
 @mikelevy

I know you addressed the short dropper and the picture of the transfer beyond minimum insertion is great.

It is hard for me to tell how long that seat tube actually is though. Can you comment on how far you could have inserted the post before you ran out of insert room? Can you get to the base of the ‘A’ in transfer for example. I’m thinking you would be OK with the longer 150 dropper but might be close to hitting the limits of insertion into the frame. What do you think?
  • + 1
 I don't have the bike in front of me right now, but I did take some measurements months ago and I'm pretty sure that I could have gotten away with a 170mm dropper, and a 150mm would have worked easily. I'm also running 170mm OneUp dropper on the Unno Dash that has a 455mm seat tube length, which is much longer than the 420mm on the Foxy.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: What do you think about the Unno Dash, are you going to post your review soon?
  • + 1
 @forestek: Fun bike. Review soon... Crankworx and our Field Test moved it back a bit.
  • + 2
 I have had a couple of dune carbon and ML is absolutely right, it is a fast and technical inclined bike that demands a lot, rallon is more fun but a very long reach gives confidence and speed. Sometimes I miss that long reach, not in whistler or Squamish which has the cleanest trails out there, but in the fastest local trails. Rallon climbs better for me on size L
  • + 2
 Spain VS Spain and the winner is... Spain!
  • + 3
 'And the seat tube is shorter than my dad's fuse, too' Haha! @mikelevy thanks for another enjoyable read. Just because I'll never pay that much for a bike doesn't mean I can't get some value out of reading about it.
  • + 1
 Smile
  • + 1
 The obvious question: would the air shock builds make this a better all rounder? The geo is almost spot on with the Ripmo, which is well regarded as an all-rounder and I can speak from experience, great at slower speeds and tamer trails. Don’t get me wrong, the coil option looks dope.
  • + 1
 Just turning up the LSC/HSC on that coil shock and/or going up in spring-rate by a step or 2 will make it more trail worthy - less pedal bob and more efficient power transfer.
  • + 1
 The linkage is pretty similar to Trek Full Floater. It's a rarity to find yourself clicking the firm lever for climbs.
  • + 2
 @lepak1corner: You are right that both ends of the Full Floater design move, but on the Full Floater the lower shock mounting point moves away from the upper one, as the suspension compresses. On the Mondraker the lower mounting point moves toward the upper. Both manipulate the shock rate by having dynamic mounting points on either end of the shock, but one is increasing the rate, and the other is reducing it, vs. a fixed mounting point on the front triangle.
  • + 1
 Yup, I think the bike would have ridden even better with an air-sprung shock.
  • + 1
 @phops: I'd argue that's a band-aid fix, though. I don't want to run even less sag, and shouldn't have to. And I also don't want to run more compression damping. All I needed was more ramp-up, which an air-sprung shock provides Smile
  • + 0
 @mikelevy:

Trail riding isn't exactly a performance oriented affair. The whole point of having the compression adjustment settings is that you tune the suspension for the descents, where suspension performance plays a big part on the feel of the bike, but then you make it stiffer for the climbs and not give a shit about what its actually doing. You aren't going to be setting KOMs on climbs or twisty segments on an enduro bike anyways. So id consider an air shock on an enduro bike a bandaid in itself.

However, if you wanna get technical, suppose you take a coil shock and set it up (preload and rate) for 2 points - 30% travel for sag at your body weight, and 100% travel at max bottom out force. Then you take an air shock and set up the psi and the spacers to match those 2 points. You will find that at the sag point the coil shock actually has a higher spring rate, which translates to better pedaling efficiency, whereas the air shock is generally more compliant, but then ramps up hard to meet the point at 100% of travel.

If you try to stiffen up the coil shock with spacers to match the spring rate of the coil shock, you get a very stiff platform that is super hard on big hits and likely doesn't use all of the travel.
  • + 1
 @phops: Why can't trail riding be a performance-oriented thing? I know it's not a race, and a trail ride is different for everyone, but I certainly want to crush climbs and descents, not just the descents. And I don't EVER want to have to reach for the cheater switch - I want a bike that's awesome up and down without needing to hit the pedal-assist switch Smile
  • + 1
 For those complaining about the price. You can easily get 20% off straight off the RRP. I purchased my 2018 Dune XR for US$5930 when the RRP was US$7900. This was pre-ordered through the distributor.
Not everyone can or wants a YT or Commencal. Mondraker are a boutique brand just like Santa Cruz/Yeti with very similar pricing at least here in AUS. Noticeability pricing seems very high in the USA. A Foxy XR in AUS retails for $11200.
  • + 1
 A Foxy XR Carbon 2018 costs around SGD7600/USD5428 compared to UK5400/USD6900/SGD9528 where I'm at.
  • + 4
 Saying this bike is too expensive compared to budget bikes is like me blaming owls for why I'm so bad at analogies
  • + 1
 Yeah, pricing is a touch crazy... I demoed this bike though (the RR) version, and it's the fastest, best accelerating, and confidence inspiring bike I've been on in a while.
Sure, people will b**ch about the price, but I truly believe they made something special here. And if you're not happy, Commencal, YT, Guerrilla Gravity and MANY others make affordable bikes
As far as the linearity of the suspension, I demoed it with a DPX2, and I think an air shock is better suited for this bike, at least for my trails.
  • + 1
 @stab0905: Unless you timed your trips it's all conjecture. I would even go so far as to call it placebo effect.
  • + 2
 @m1dg3t: well, the confidence inspiring is not a conjecture, that's just feeling.
The fast acceleration is just a trait to the bike. Kinematics are very efficient.
As far as fastest, yes I agree, it's a conjecture. I could show you times on Strava where I pr'ed on trails I've ridden dozens of times, but I don't really trust Strava.
  • + 1
 The frame is seriously pretty but that over excited pricked ears trail dog look of the front end makes me think nope. Add to that the cost, the lack of vertiginous chunk around me and my expanding middle age... spectacular nope. But thanks be to Huey that a bike like this exists and a few lucky punters will be out there trying their hardest on them...
  • + 1
 Great review being pretty leveled regarding the pros and cons... Highlighting the fact that the Mondraker has to be ridden differently is an understatement though, diving into a turn with full commitment over the front wheel takes practice, allowing the rear to drift, and then committing to the shift of weight towards the rear and pedaling out is a lot to think about.... but when you have it dialed ? there is not a bike like it ! On my third Mondraker (Dune XR 27.5), the Foxy 29 could be my forth.....
  • + 1
 Not a fan of the look of this bike - the Rallon is prettier, ML's comments re the kind of riding that suits this bike ring true for most modern long, long travel enduro bikes I think. If you aint going really fast they don't feel as if they're working properly. As for the value - its poor value, especially when you'd want a longer dropper post than the 125 they stupidly specced this thing with.
  • + 1
 I have to agree: that grey and orange Rallon is quite the looker.
  • + 1
 As a tall 6-4 dude I like these longer reach bikes, it really helps me out. But as of late, they are also getting REALLY long. Heck of Mike struggled with this in a medium/large (I can't remember) then imagine what it's like for us on the XL. Just too long of a Wheelbase to have fun on as a daily driver.
  • + 1
 at some point there has got to be a bike that in fact pedals like its a 150mm bike and doesnt ascend well. what even are they using for a metric of ascending well? an xc bike? a full on session? come on, be more specific.
  • + 3
 Yeah at some point they should just keep a a benchmark hill with a steep and long enough climb, mount some garmin vector pedals to the bike and ask a rider who is known for keeping is overall fit and weight pretty much dialed all year long to ride that same hill at a specific average power on every bike they review then publish the time sheet. That rider could be called The Stig.
  • + 1
 Agreed, I don't think we're hard enough on these all-mountain bikes when it comes to climbing. I think it's because we keep expecting these slack, long ass bikes to climb like shit, but they really don't. A big part of reviewing is to keep things relative, so I always judge a bike compared its peers, not bikes that have different intentions.

But yes, we need to get tougher now that everything is pretty damn good Smile
  • + 0
 Ive seen a lot of new/intermediate riders qanting a coil shock for cool fsvtor, aesthetics, or to keep up with trends. I guess its easier to look at a bike and see a coil and feel good about yourself than it is to properly tune an air shock. Dont get me wrong, coil shocks dedinitely habe their place, but the adnustability of an air shock cant be beat.
  • + 0
 Sounds like this bike has shit loads of suspension platform. Yes the opposite of ground hugging performance. Not my cup of tea not all. This is the going trend for current suspension set ups on Enduro bikes. This is why I have absolutely no interest in any current offering of bike. They are nice to look at.
  • + 2
 Yup, to each their own. I'm a big fan of bikes that get a move on like the Foxy, but I can see why many others would prefer less anti-squat.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy:
Yeah I like a DH feel in an Enduro package.
  • + 1
 That's a very pretty silhouette, but presumably it only keeps that line in that specific size, or does the XL have the same lines, but with a stupidly massive seat tube extension?
  • + 1
 Thought Mondraker has gone 29er Enduro with this but this sounds more trailbike! Would prefer a Geometron or Pole if i want a long reach but a 29er that is capable of both trailriding AND enduro!
  • + 1
 Much better pedalling than the Speci Enduro, which certainly helps.
  • + 4
 As a German, I feel slightly offended by this review.
  • + 1
 Sorry.
  • + 3
 Anyone read the bloody review?! You want the best.,You pay the most, this bike leads the way..
  • + 1
 It looks like my back would hurt just looking at the Geo. Top tube length is so long that you are probably gonna be in a really hunched pedal position.
  • + 2
 Anyone else picture Garth from Wayne's World doing Foxey Lady whenever this bike comes up in an article?
  • + 2
 Even on Dune, I feel the stack is very low on stock bike. 2x10mm spacer ain't enough. Compensated with 38mm riser.
  • + 3
 How does it compare to Meta AM 29?
  • + 0
 im betting the meta am 29 would be better..everything i have read says there nothing short of amazing.......oh and its several thousands cheaper. if i had the money it would be the bike i buy next. i should add ive owned 3 commencals and still have a meta sl 1 from 2013 as my main bike of preference so im totally into there products. I skipped the 27.5 ones as they didnt have a link between the rear seat stays and some people said they had issues with shock pivots because of this but this has been remedied on the meta 29.
  • + 1
 Best looking plastic full susser to date. Stunning. Now offer it in all black please!
  • + 1
 Great entertaining read man! How does it stack up against the new Yeti SB 150 and Scott 170 bikes?
  • + 1
 I've got no time on the Scott, but there is an SB150 review coming up. Very different bikes Smile
  • + 1
 It's safe to say that while those other bikes are highly capable, they are both more smash down at high speeds type of bikes. I think the Foxy can serve as a very aggressive trail bike whereas those other two are going to be a handful on the local trails. But heck I haven't ridden any of them so...
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Between the Foxy 29 and sentinel with both being great tools for steep descending which during your riding has felt livlier? (Although wish you could've ridden both with the same shock...dpx2 or X2 but only dpx2 fits on sentinel! And they put that dhx2 on the xr version you rode...)
  • + 1
 I prefer the metal mule. The plastic top tube on the production bike looks well snappy!
  • + 1
 Wow, not much point of a dropper when your post is that high out of the frame. OneUp to the rescue!
  • + 1
 The Yeti SB 150 in the XX1 build costs 9500$ though!
Why so much hate for the price?
There is the RR and the R for less!!!
  • + 2
 Nice looking bike but go fk yourself on the price.
  • + 1
 The thin top tube doesn't have enough stiffness to stroke the suspension well. I felt this bike is using rigid fork.
  • + 2
 Um..... "I could almost fit my fist through the gash". Filthy.
  • + 2
 This, Yeti SB150 or Scott Ransom??
  • + 7
 The race of "which is gonna crack first" between the Mondraker & Yeti would be a great battle.

The sequel could be "which warranty is gonna f*ck me hardest".

I'd buy the Scott Smile
  • + 2
 @HobNob: As far as I have heard Scott bikes are build too light and crack often Big Grin
So then none of these three?
  • + 1
 @HobNob: hopefully the new Yeti design is tougher.
  • + 2
 @HobNob: yeti just announced lifetime warranty. So there’s that.
  • + 1
 Do you hate money?
  • + 0
 why its compared with orbea??
its should be compared to bikes from same category I mean Geometron and pole. not with bikes for people with T-rex syndrome.
  • + 1
 Bcos both are Spanish?
  • + 2
 'Cause PB commenters want at least "some" comparison. Doesn't matter if totally off.
  • + 1
 Both bikes have the same intentions, same wheel size, same travel... The comparison makes sense, much more so than ultra-rare bikes like the Nicolai and Pole. The comparison was more about how both bikes are made for the same task, but use radically different geometry.
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike.

We all spend a lot of ,$$$ on toys we ride in the woods.....good time to be alive
  • - 2
 Damn near 10k for that?? Whoever pays this kind of price is an idiot. I just put an order in for a Nukeproof Mega 275C off CRC...3700 for a carbon frame, fox factory suspension and cut drivetrain. Anybody care to explain why I’d be better off dropping an extra 6k for this?
  • + 1
 Cuz it magical !!!!!!
  • + 0
 @mikelevy , how did you find the 350mm BB height on the steeps? did you feel it could be lower?
  • + 1
 Felt fine to me.
  • + 2
 Far too cheap for me..
  • + 2
 Nice but that mule...
  • + 1
 Hi Mike.How does the foxy comparwith the smash?
  • + 0
 Gonna go out on a limb and say a brand new KX450 $7000 then another $3500 to build a Smash and you are $1K over this. Not bad........
  • + 1
 Different kind of bikes. The Smash is much more playful, but the Foxy goes faster.
  • + 1
 That's bloody good looking bike!
  • + 1
 Take a stroll around Squatch Bikes in Brevard...whole damn shop rides em
  • + 1
 470 reach/medium..holy crap.
  • + 2
 Yup, the idea of a medium being a medium and a large being a large needs to be thrown out the window.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: yup, and let's make the push for seat tube angle measurement
Standard ala radon and others.
Measured at full extension and/or at 125/150/170
  • + 1
 @mikelevy , How did you find the stack/bar height?
  • + 1
 I really do like that trail!
  • + 0
 get one for a steal here with a much better build than there 9399 option.
www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2430687
  • + 1
 @mikelevy what is the bottle cage/pumpholder you're using ?
  • + 1
 The cage is just a random one from the shop, and the pump and holder are from OneUp. Best mini-pump out there.
  • + 0
 looks like a Unno! hahahahah
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 It doesn't, but isn't the same guy behind the Zero Suspension system and Unno?
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 @stab0905: Yup, you're right.
  • - 1
 9399 for a bike ? You're out of your mind !
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