Riding Troy Brosnan's World Cup DH Bike - Crankworx Whistler 2018

Aug 15, 2018 at 15:02
by Mike Levy  



Troy Brosnan rode this exact Canyon Sender to a second place at the Mont-Sainte-Anne World Cup, just 0.321 off the win, less than a week ago. It was boxed up by Troy's mechanic shortly after that performance and then put back together for me to ride here in Whistler, BC, during Crankworx, and nothing's been changed since MSA. That means it has the same suspension settings, same tires and tire pressure, and the same geometry as it did during Troy's close call, only it's me piloting it instead of the Australian World Cup racer that's usually behind the handlebar.

''Don't bring it back broken,'' was my only instruction from Team Manager Gabe Fox, which made sense as Troy needed to race the rowdy Crankworx Garbanzo DH on this very 34lb 13oz bike later in the afternoon. No pressure, though. And no changes, either; the idea was to experience a top-ten World Cup bike, and to see how it fared under someone with less than World Cup-level skills.
Bike Details

Intended use: World Cup DH racing
Travel: 200mm
Fork travel: 200mm
Wheel size: 27.5''
Frame construction: carbon fiber, aluminum
Production frame, custom linkage, custom wheelbase
Head angle: 63° (adj. between 62° and 64°)
Size: medium, 440mm reach
Fork pressure: 150psi, four tokens
Shock pressure: 240psi
Handlebar width: 750mm
Weight: 34lb 13oz (w/o pedals)


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Check out those bolts, the modified thumb paddle, and the Canyon direct-mount stem with Troy's initials on it. Special touches all around.


Of course, if Troy's Canyon can handle a World Cup race run down the infamous Canadian track, it can likely laugh off what I'm about to dish out. Ever seen footage of Mont-Sainte-Anne's 'Motorway' section? Picture a rough "dirt road" that's littered with baby head rocks - if babies had sharp heads that could slice up a four-ply tire - ruts, and holes. ''In my race run is the only time that I didn't brake check into it, and I was shitting bricks,'' Troy said with a casual laugh about the near-50 mph speeds.

It's more than just scary, though, as the Motorway's high speeds make it difficult to balance bike setup with the rest of the course, which is much slower and full of momentum-killing holes. ''It's really tough to set up suspension there because it's just so damn fast that you want it to be a rock,'' Troy explained. ''But because it's so flat and you're trying to flow the whole time you're trying to carry momentum.''

That still translates to a relatively stiff suspension setup, especially compared to what an average rider would prefer. No surprise there, though.

bigquotesMont-Sainte-Anne is fun, but it's kinda scary at the same time.Troy Brosnan
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
''Troy, I know you're really fast and stuff, but do you actually like how Vegemite tastes?''

Troy weighs 68kg, or right around 150lb, which is 15lb less than what I come in at, and his rather special BoXXer World Cup had 150 psi in it, just like it did during his last race run. He likes a fair bit of progression, too, with four Bottomless Tokens to keep him from clanging off the end of the stroke during those inevitable brick-shitting moments.

Troy was a bit coy when it came to what sort of hardware is inside his BoXXer, although it does sound like it's mostly production-based: ''Yeah, straight off the shelf. We've got a little bit of a secret modification in there from RockShox, but we're not giving that away. The tune itself is stock, but it's just something else that's a little special.'' BlackBox stuff reserved for a chosen few, I suppose.


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy's BoXXer apparently uses off-the-shelf internals, but he did admit to there being something special going on inside. With 150 psi and four volume-reducing tokes, it's far firmer than most 68kg/150lb riders would ever require.


''Everyone always jumps on my bike and goes 'Oh, the suspension is so stiff, but I still use all of it, so...'' Troy replied when I said that his suspension was so stiff. And with his high-speed compression set to just a single click from closed, and his low-speed about eight to ten out, it is a relatively firm setup for someone of Troy's size. But not for someone of Troy's speed, of course.

There's more suspension trickery out back, too, with a BlackBox-spec Super Deluxe RC World Cup shock that's put to work by a very custom, very team-only linkage on the otherwise production Sender frame. ''The link is more progressive. It's not our most progressive link that we've had made - that one was a little too much for me - this one is in the mid-range,'' he explained when I asked about the obviously not stock, very shiny links. It's not as ramp-up-y as it could be, though: ''Mark has used the more progressive link for a little while, but he's gone to the same link that I'm on now; the mid-progressive one. He just felt like it had a bit more mid-support where the most progressive [one] gets the support at the very end of the stroke.''


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
One guess as to what isn't stock. The silver linkage provides more progression that Troy likes, but it's not the most progressive linkage that the team can use.


That support that Troy's looking for comes in handy at absurd World Cup speeds, especially with the air-sprung shock that the Australian is partial to.

''I've been on air since Fort William. We ran a coil in Croatia and it just wasn't working for my riding style, so we went to air and it felt like I can pump the bike a lot more, float a lot, and stay light on the bike. It allowed me to tune it to how I want it,'' he said of his riding style and suspension preference that calls for 240 psi in the Super Deluxe shock.


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
The back of the bike is more forgiving than the front, with 240 psi in his BlackBox-spec Super Deluxe RC World Cup shock.


Carrying momentum is a big part of Troy's dynamic and lively riding style, and he says that it's why he prefers higher than average tire pressure as well, with 28.6 psi in his Minion DHF and 31.8 psi in the DHR. Both are also sporting Maxxis' proper DH casing, as you'd expect, but you won't find any foam tire inserts here: ''Straight tubeless, and I run a fair bit of pressure. Just to keep rolling really good.'' For reference, I'd likely run somewhere in the neighborhood of 21 to 23 psi in the same tires, despite weighing 15lb more than Troy on a good day.

His rubber is on a set of Mavic's 27.5'' Deemax DH wheels that certainly felt like they had far less spoke tension all around than anything off-the-shelf. Then again, they went through a four-minute and twelve-second war only a few days prior. ''If you don't damage a wheel in a race run, you're not going fast enough. That's how we look at it,'' the Aussie said of how it is in his world.

''It's worse when you're starting to get up to pace, and you don't have your exact lines. So when you're still kinda searching for lines, but you're trying to go really fast, it's really easy to smash something that you didn't know was there. That's when you break stuff,'' he described.

A closer look revealed some ''missing'' dust seals at the hubs, very likely to help with that all important rolling speed. Don't think it matters that much? Troy lost in Mont-Sainte-Anne by just a third of a second, and this season has seen multiple races decided by similar margins.
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Tiny details like this, no dust seals on Troy's hubs, all add up, even if it's more mental than anything.

And about tight margins, that brings us to the ol' wheel size topic that everyone loves to read about... With times so tight and the need to find any possible advantage, have Troy and Canyon looked into a 29er downhill bike? ''I did at the start of this year,'' he admitted, which shouldn't come as a surprise these days, even if it didn't end up working out for the Aussie. ''After the first World Cup, we gave it a shot... I have too short of legs. It's very hard for me to get over the back of the bike, and the rear tire was smacking me in the bum the whole time. It felt really good because you can just plow stuff, but that's not my riding style. For me, it's not any faster.''

So, with a poppy, playful riding style, and a vertically challenged inseam, there doesn't seem to be a big-wheeler in the immediate future for Troy.


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy uses a 36-tooth chainring, an X01 DH derailleur, and a non-XD SRAM cassette.


Troy's drivetrain is rather conventional, with a 36-tooth chainring up front, a set of carbon cranks, and an X01 DH derailleur moving the chain over a 7-speed cassette. Not a matching X01 DH cassette, however, but rather a standard, non-XD SRAM block on a normal freehub body and with a custom aluminum guard between it and the spokes.

A set of Code RSC brakes grabbing 200mm rotors slows the bike down, and Troy prefers to have the levers sit pretty close to the grips. That would usually mean a bite point that's very close to the grips as well, but Aaron Pelttari, Troy's mechanic since 2015, has these bled to feel quite firm and with minimal free stroke - I like.


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
See that silver insert at the axle? The production bike's insert lets you pick between long and short chainstay settings, but this one allows Troy to run it in the middle of those two.


Aside from the custom linkage, Troy's frame is a standard, medium-sized production unit with the exception of one other special touch that allows for some extra tuning. The stock bike comes with a flip-able insert that lets riders choose between a 430mm or 446mm rear-end, but you'll find a set of custom inserts that allow Troy to run his axle dead in the middle of those two settings, at 438mm. Hey, when you start getting regular World Cup podiums, you can be picky and ask for special touches, too.

Enough with the details, though. Time to hit the lifts.







If you had asked me how I expected Troy's bike to perform before I did a handful of runs on it yesterday in Whistler, I probably would have told you that it was going to be sprung very stiffly, be very slack, and make me feel very not-pro. I've ridden more than a few of these kinds of bikes in the past and, to be honest, that's usually the gist of it. You probably didn't need a crystal ball to know that - these bikes are set up for the fastest, bravest, and most skilled racers in the world to ride at 110-percent during a race run, not for someone like me to skid his way down some rough and rooty singletrack in the dust.

But that's exactly what I did, and Troy's Sender was far from being the pro-only sled that I was expecting.

Alright, first impressions. Troy's 750mm wide handlebar feels surprisingly natural, so maybe my skinny shoulders don't need the 780s that I usually prefer, but I couldn't get along with how far back Troy likes to roll his handlebar. It's not a crazy amount, mind you, but just enough for me to feel like his Ergon grips were angled down slightly at their ends.

When it comes to his brakes, it's almost like he asked me how I like them before he set his up, with a close lever position and an extremely firm bite point that makes my own well-bled stoppers feel squishy in comparison. The power was there, too, as it would be with 200mm rotors and four pistons inside each Code caliper.

Troy has the standard headset cups installed rather than 1-degree slacker option, so his bike is sitting right around 63-degrees up front. That's a pretty normal number these days, and I'd describe the handling as surprisingly playful rather than the floppy flier I had readied myself for. The 440mm reach, which is around 10mm shorter than my go-to number for a downhill bike, certainly plays a role as well. ''When I'm barely touching the ground is when I'm going fast,'' Troy told me earlier in the day, so maybe his Sender's impressive agility shouldn't be a shock to me at all.

Rather than being a ground-hugging machine that's fast but not fun, Troy's bike wants to jump from line to line across the trail, and it's relatively easy to make it do whatever needs to be done. At my speed anyway.
Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
With a 440mm reach on the medium-sized frame, the bike felt small when the trail got steep. On the flip-side, it also felt exceptionally agile.

I'm sure the difference between my speed and Troy's speed is also why I just couldn't gel with the high tire pressure that he likes. Sure, the bike rolls like the dickens, but the 30-ish psi and ludicrously dry and dusty conditions had me skating around a bit too much for my liking, especially on the dust-covered hardpack. Of course, if I was riding as quick as Troy does, I suspect that his preferred tire pressure would have worked better for me... But I wasn't. And I can't.

Of course, a big part of this special Sender's agility is surely down to suspension that's far, far firmer than I'd ever want, but that didn't translate to a rough and unforgiving ride like I expected it to. The trails in the Whistler Bike Park can be summed up in one word right now - massivebrakingbumpseverywhere - but Troy's machine didn't rattle me to pieces. In fact, it was incredibly composed and forgiving, even up front where I only used about 150mm of the BoXXer's stroke, despite being 15lb heavier than Troy.

I suspect that it would have taken a second story roof and an uphill landing for me to squeeze out 200mm of fork travel, but I wisely decided against it despite Kazimer's insistence.


Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Troy's bike was set up quite firm, but it didn't pass any harshness through to my hands and feet.


With 150 psi and four Bottomless Tokens in his BlackBox fork, it ramped up quickly and kept me well off the end of the stroke. The stiff travel and aggressive ramp-up also create a firm platform for Troy to push against as he pumps and pops his way down a track. I wasn't exactly pumping and popping like the Aussie, but I can certainly see why Troy sets his Sender up like it is, and why that works so well for his riding style.

It's a similar story at the back of the bike, too, and although it was running a bit more forgiving setup than up front, I still never came close to using all of the Sender's 200mm of travel. And much like the front end, the back of the bike sits into its travel up until a certain point, and then works hard to keep you from going much deeper until it's really needed. But I can't stress enough that both ends of Troy's machine felt incredibly active, supple, and controlled, much more so than other downhill bikes I've ridden that were set up specifically for my weight. Interesting stuff.

Must Read This Week

131 Comments

  • + 70
 You guys have every reader's dream job. Colour me green Smile
  • + 6
 Great bike and article,

Troys custom linkage is so crazy thou I wonder how/if hey will change it for production as surely mud clearance is an issue, the bike was meant to be built around an air shock but that was before metric shocks popped up!
  • + 4
 With all the blackbox magic, they still need grip tape on the shifter. Setup of the week. HSC 1 click from closed LSC 8-10 out. F psi 28.6 ,R psi 31.8
  • + 52
 “the rear tire was smacking me in the bum the whole time. It felt really good”
:o
  • + 21
 “both ends of Troy's machine felt incredibly active, supple, and controlled”... are we still talking about mtn biking?
  • + 20
 All these uber low tire pressures for Enduro and quests for rim protection. Proper tires, proper pressures= no problems? I wonder how many riders are using 20 psi in a tire as "fork suppleness".
Still great review, nice to hear the specs for a lighter rider too.
  • + 6
 You don't have to ride up 2000 vertical meters for DH racing though.
  • + 10
 Cant understand the low pressures some people rave about. Tried that on 2.6 " tyres and it was a disaster under hard cornering. Now I'm back to close to what I ran on my old bike with 2.35's Troy knows!
  • + 4
 30psi isn't that much despite that i also add 10 pounds
  • + 1
 @Clarkeh: Yep, that's a good point, maybe skip the DDs and keep the PSI!
  • + 1
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: I wouldn't do that. my latest MAXXIS rear tire don't have it and I have cuts almost through the tire. I just waiting with my tubeless repair kit to go on and I am only a weekend-hero. The tire is almost on month old.
  • + 17
 Just out of curiosity will you be changing anything on your set up after this ride? Do you think you would ride faster with his set up give a day or two on it? Also I think it’s a very good suspension tuning point that tougher terrain actually requires stiffer suspension. Seems counter intuitive but it works.
  • - 4
flag mollow (Aug 16, 2018 at 9:17) (Below Threshold)
 How is it counter-intuitive? That's what I always assumed...

"Oh here's a really rough trail let's setup my suspension softer so I bottom out everywhere" -No one ever
  • + 5
 Hhmm, not really. But I might tinker with my brakes a bit, just to get that firmer bite point that Troy had.
  • + 25
 @mikelevy: an article about how to make brakes rock solid would be great, maybe with some advices from pro mechanics. A super good bleed doesn't seem enough sometimes, the power is there anyway, but the feeling is quite important too IMHO and I feel it influences my riding and speed.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: I recently had a play with one of the Trek factory bikes; I have saints, it had saints, they are not the same saints... The feel was out of this world, I’ve spent hours tinkering to try and achieve it - not even close.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Just add some glitter too your brake fluid?
  • + 17
 What if brosnan just said those pressures to get his competition to run more pressure/less traction #thebrosnantireconspiracy
  • + 3
 Tinfoil hat time
  • + 4
 @Waldon83: @mikelevy what if he’s really running 40 psi but doesn’t want his competitors to know #thebrosnantireconspiracy
  • + 11
 Love that YZ450 style shock shuttle. Man I was pulling for Brosnan at the last WC, what a burner run. Good to see him back at the top.
  • + 6
 When was he gone? He's the most consistent podiumer of the last decade
  • + 5
 @mollow: do toilets really flush the opposite direction down under?
  • + 7
 @fecalmaster: that's a question only the fecal master could answer
  • + 2
 @fecalmaster: only on Sundays
  • + 9
 I couldn't get past the part where Levy described how fast Troy went through MtSaintAnne's motorway and used the inbred Murican mph, instead of the proper Km/h like an educated Canadian.

Was the rest of the article good ?
  • + 15
 You think a BRITISH Columbian would be more than happy dealing in MPH. (The original).

Not some invented Euro-metric rubbish.

Maybe you are from Quebec.
  • + 15
 @kelownakona: Are you taking mph with you in the Brexit? I'm sure the rest of the logical thinking Europe would be more than happy for you to keep it all to yourselves.
  • + 20
 Put your handbags down ladies.
  • + 3
 The pictures were nice.... ?
  • + 9
 mph is just faster.
  • + 15
 Metric=scientific. Imperial = #Fakemeasurments
  • + 6
 @fartymarty: mph is slower because you need a lower number to describe the same speed. 100kmh looks faster than 60mph, three digits vs 2
  • + 4
 @kelownakona: imperialness never made much sense mate.
  • + 9
 @Boardlife69: The Imperial System is fine until you run afoul of Darth Vader.
  • + 1
 @ColquhounerHooner: Sure it does. If you can't deal with fractions, dividing by 12s and 16s, then you shouldn't be using the measuring device anyways. Tenths are boring! Wink
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: but imperial makes SO much sense. "I declare the length of my foot as a new unit of measure that's only divisible by 12!!!!" oh yup makes perfect sense
  • + 2
 @davec113: was more of a sideways dig at poms.... Anyway, l don't get how a litre of water is exactly 1000 grams and fills a 100 mm cube and then boils at 100 °C, l mean, how?
  • + 4
 @ColquhounerHooner: because 100 is a nice number to divide things by hence the units are arranged in a way to make it work out
Imperial is based on the length of a barley corn...
  • + 2
 @kelownakona Enjoy riding the trails on your horse (the original) and not on some invented bike rubbish.
  • + 1
 @Will-McCurrach: Is that a metric or imperial barley corn?
  • + 10
 daaaaamn that was a hell of a bike check
  • + 5
 It's always interesting to read about the different setups and special touches for top racers. With all the attention on XL 29" bikes for quite a while now, this review was refreshing.
  • + 8
 So, @mikelevy, was that down-country enough for you? Wink
  • + 11
 It was probably so stiff he could put Eagle on and climb it like a trail bike
  • + 2
 No bottle cage mounts tho Frown
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: but you can strap your fanny pack with two bottles in it to the sliders between the crowns. And that’s a game changer since you can reach for them mid ride. You can also have all the snac... protein, energy bars and diabetic meltdown substanc... energy gels, stacked there in front of you to pick and choose at the most optimal moment of the climb.
  • + 6
 I don't know why but "Troy's machine felt incredibly active, supple, and controlled", made me blush.
  • + 4
 Good article. It’s a shame they won’t sell the progressive links to the public or better yet ship the bike that way. Sounds like this thing rode awesome, but they don’t think they average person can handle it.
  • + 5
 Surprised they weren't displaying or running the cheeky smooth gear on the smallest cog for that chainless feel, vital had some coverage on it I believe
  • + 1
 Yeah, that was rad. Surprised some of the teams don't actually try it.
  • + 2
 Can we get some info on f+r rebound please? I figured out air pressure, tokens and compression on my rig but can't wrap my head around the rebound. What does Troy run? What should normal people run? Faster/slower?
Awesome article Mike! This bike is really drool worthy.
  • + 1
 I don't think I ever have had my DH bike setup properly for my riding style. Every time I ride I am messing with the rebound or compression. I'm pretty set on tire pressure with between 20-25 psi. Just once I would love to have some professional help setting it up.....just so I can mess with it again.
  • + 4
 15lbs over Brosnan’s weight, and only using part of the travel. Brosnan must be a beast.
  • + 7
 Newsflash one of the fastest racer of all time is a beast
  • + 4
 why the standard cassette, and non XD? hub choice? ease of modifying gear choices for different tracks?
  • + 6
 We have two options of cassette for Troy, a mini xd version and the standard version that you see in this article. This is the cassette that was raced in msa..
  • + 1
 @AzzaP93: does this have a wider gear range?
  • + 3
 I like that they have a custom dork disc on there! Looks way better then the nasty plastic ones for sure.
  • - 5
flag mollow (Aug 16, 2018 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 @loganskis: its so there's space for his aluminium guard dumbass
  • + 5
 Great read,good job!
  • + 4
 Who will be the first to tell Troy his bars are too narrow lol
  • + 2
 Since when was high 20s/low 30s psi is regarded as a lot? 150 psi in the fork on the other hand, holy moly
  • + 3
 That's a lot of tire pressure for DH casing rubber, and especially for a guy who weighs 150lb.
  • + 0
 when nerds started thinking it was important to be as low as possible "for grip" --- how are you supposed to drift with 11 psi in a 2.6" tire??
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: im legitimately curious why you think that's a lot?
  • + 2
 @laxguy: because it is? Unless u run tubes, there is no apparent point going to 30psi when ur 150lb, it reduces the grip and feels harsher.
But I'm pretty slow so I wouldn't know if this kind of setting feels right while riding at Troy's speed.
  • + 1
 @zede: oh right, tubeless. carry on...
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: So doesn't all this mean that Sag is irrelevant?
  • + 3
 Let's talk about those "Mavic" hubs...
  • + 2
 Not very "MAVIC-esque" indeed...
  • + 1
 You mean to tell me this whole time that the industry's insistence that 29ers, and NOT the rider itself, are faster has been a fabrication?
  • + 3
 Where did you read “industry” saying that? I think it was the little man in your head Smile
  • + 3
 What's up with the Avid calipers? Where did the red Sram ones go?
  • + 2
 Seems dermax come back to normal spokes. I know, I know, it s been for a while but needed to say....
  • + 1
 What do you mean "back"? I can't find any proof that Mavic has *ever* produced a j-bend spoke Deemax wheelset. Here's the original Deemax from the late 90's - straight pull spokes were a major feature:

www.vintagemtbworkshop.com/uploads/1/6/1/3/16132778/4231886_orig.jpg

They used a yellow painted EX729 rim, proprietary hubs and were not tubeless. Some of the custom/pro deemax versions of that era were built with narrower and lighter EX721 rim.
  • + 1
 @redsled137:
2020 range according Mavic mecanics without tubeless
  • + 3
 Where can I get a top cap like that??
  • + 2
 Wow, seems like the shock shaft would get pummeled to death by debris! Needs a little fender.
  • + 2
 Awesome article! Now do some EWS bikes!
  • + 3
 Excellent paint scheme
  • + 1
 Uniquely interesting concept and article! Who is the lightest top-20 downhiller?
  • + 3
 Just a guess, but probably Laurie Greenland.
  • + 1
 He has a dork disc on his cassette lol
  • + 1
 It’s also the spacer for the 7spd block. Stock gx dh cassettes come with them as well, albeit in plastic. It’s just more chain insurance
  • + 1
 It’s not a dork disk, It’s a custom made hub with wider flanges, this is a gx cassette with a cnc spacer on the freehub body Smile
  • + 1
 Ok then, i stand corrected.
  • + 1
 it's like a fairytail come true..
  • + 1
 Thats a 36 up front not 34...
  • + 1
 So doesn't all this mean sag is pretty much irrelevant?
  • + 1
 Well, does he actually like marmite?
  • + 3
 Course he doesn't, he's not pommy. Vegiemite mate, reckon he has it for breakfast.
  • + 1
 750mm handlebars look really go well with you in the picture.
  • + 2
 Great article
  • + 1
 Too bad he cant run a 29/275 mix match wheel set.
  • + 0
 SWQ1`
  • + 1
 the pedals...
  • + 1
 Mike is so good he doesnt need them..
  • + 0
 99.99% my next bike. Unless they ruin it by making it a 29er.
  • + 4
 99.99% my next bike. Unless they stick with the uncomfortable 27.5er Big Grin
  • + 0
 jesus this air pressure tho
  • - 8
flag MoonboyMTB (Aug 15, 2018 at 19:04) (Below Threshold)
 huh? i have to run about 45 psi for DH (tubeless)
  • + 11
 @MoonboyMTB, unless you weigh 250lb, I think you might be doing it wrong.
  • + 5
 @slumgullion: stop shaming, maybe he is a power lifter. Snatches 250lbs (of bacon into his mouth)
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: snatch is Olympic tho
  • + 1
 @slumgullion: i weigh 190. And I pretty much always ride DH at race speed.
  • + 2
 @MoonboyMTB: “race speed” lol
  • - 2
 MADE IN CHINA
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