Rocky Mountain's 2017 Slayer - First Ride

Aug 24, 2016 at 23:37
by Mike Levy  




After a two-year hiatus, Rocky Mountain's Slayer returns as a slack, 165mm-travel machine that the Canadian company says is designed for everything from enduro racing to ''bike park laps and big mountain lines,'' a claim that's reinforced by all four models being spec'd with 170mm-travel forks. The 1x-specific frame is carbon fiber from front to back, including the rocker-link, its chainstays and seatstays, and it also employs a new version of Rocky's Smoothlink suspension layout.

The 2017 Slayer will be available in four flavours, kicking off with the 730 MSL that goes for $4,199 USD, and topping out at $6,999 USD for the 790 MSL. All of those models are assembled around the same carbon fiber frame that's also available on its own for $3,199 USD with a Fox Float X2 EVOL shock. Two frame color schemes are available, a yellow / dark blue color combo or a matte red / dark gray.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
Slayer Details

• Intended use: enduro / all-mountain
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 165mm
• Fork travel: 170mm
• Full carbon fiber frame
• Ride-4 adjustable geometry
• Clearance for 27.5 x 2.5'' or 26 x 3.0'' tires
• Di2 + internally routed dropper compatible
• 1x-specific
• Sizes: S / M / L / XL
• Weight: 29.7lbs (770 MSL, size large, w/ pedals)
• MSRP: $4,199 - $6,999 USD, frame only - $3,199 USD



Rocky Mountain Slayer
Rocky Mountain Slayer

Rocky Mountain Slayer
Rocky Mountain Slayer
The Slayer lineup starts with the 730 MSL at $4,199 USD (above left), with the $4,999 USD 750 MSL (above right) being the next step up in price and spec.



Rocky Mountain Slayer
Rocky Mountain Slayer

Rocky Mountain Slayer
Rocky Mountain Slayer
The Slayer 770 MSL (above left) retails for $5,799 USD, while the top of the line 790 MSL (above right) commands $6,999 USD.


Rocky Mountain Slayer
Want to build your own Slayer? The frame, which is available in either color and includes a Fox Float X2 EVOL shock, sells for $3,199 USD.


The Return of the Slayer

The Slayer name is especially revered by those who know what a double-double is and pay for one with a toonie, but it's also a name that's been strangely absent from Rocky's catalog for the past two years. Before that, there was the old platform that saw a horizontal shock attached to the downtube and driven by a swing-link, which came prior to the last iteration of the Slayer that employed a rocker-link and a vertically positioned shock. There was even a slope and jump-specific model, the Slayer SS, that had a lower stance, steeper angles, and less travel.

The Slayer's evolution over the years to match changing riding styles and attitudes is worth its own article, one that you'll be able to read soon, but it's the brand new version that we're dissecting below.


A Slayer from 2008 on the left, and a 2011 model shown to the right. The name may be the same, but the product has transformed over the years.


2014 and 2015 saw Rocky focus on their Altitude platform instead, a 150mm-travel bike that was up-forked with 160mm or 170mm and raced on the Enduro World Series by the likes of Florian Nicolaï and Jesse Melamed. Despite good showings by Florian and Jesse, it could be argued that the Altitude was a bit under-gunned at some of the rowdier EWS events. Then again, I'd say that the Altitude's middle-of-the-road package is what has allowed Rocky Mountain to go so aggressive with the new Slayer; the 2017 bike can focus on full throttle enduro racing instead of having to do double duty as a burly trail bike.

''The Altitude is a ridiculously versatile bike. For lots of enduro tracks, especially some of the non-EWS regional events, we see it as still being a great option for many riders. But yeah, the Slayer's identity was always pretty clear as a proper smash-through-all-the-things enduro / all-mountain/ big-mountain bike,'' said Brian Park, Marketing Manager at Rocky Mountain, of the Slayer's intentions relative to the quicker handling, 15mm shorter-travel Altitude.

Case in point: the Altitude's head angle at its slackest sits at 66.2-degrees, whereas the Slayer can be raked out to a downhill bike-ish 64.75-degrees. Smash-through-all-the-things indeed.


Jesse Melamed bike check
Rocky Mountain's Jesse Melamed and his 150mm-travel Altitude (with a 170mm fork) at last year's EWS round in Scotland. Matt Wragg photo.

A bike like the Slayer is also important for a company to have in its catalog, even if the number of trail and cross-country machines they sell likely dwarfs the sales numbers of a pure enduro race bike; the pig in the window and all that. ''The market itself may not be huge, but there has never been a more asked-for model in our range than a new carbon Slayer,'' explained Park of the demand for the Slayer's return. ''And we think people are going to be fired up on this bike.''

So, are you fired up?



Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga

Slayer Specifics


Maximum Carbon - Absolutely everything is new about the 165mm-travel Slayer, despite it sporting the same name as its predecessors. The carbon fiber frame, which is made in the same factory as Rocky's other carbon bikes, features similar design language to their Maiden DH rig. A traditional looking twin-triangle layout and vertically mounted shock makes it stand out from the company's less well-endowed bikes that employ a toptube-mounted rocker-link and horizontal shock.

Much like its bigger brother, the Slayer also sees carbon fiber used for its rocker-link and both chain- and seatstays, and it also receives the pared-down Ride-4 geometry adjusting chip at the lower shock mount. More on the bike's geometry farther down.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
Just like the Maiden, the Slayer's rocker-link, chainstays, and seatstays are all made out of carbon fiber.



Bearings Over Bushings - With one-sided hardware at the chainstay and seatstay pivots, the frame is impressively sleek looking. This wasn't done for appearances alone, however, as Rocky says that the smooth lines also make for a narrower Boost-spaced rear end that provides more heel clearance than even non-Boost bikes. Riders with petite kicks like myself probably won't notice this, but those with flipper feet should be happy.

Most of Rocky's full-suspension bikes feature a variation of their bushing-based pivot system, with the Maiden downhill bike being the only rig that had the full bearing treatment. The 2017 Slayer also uses sealed bearings at all pivot locations, but Rocky went this route due to the aforementioned search for clearance.

''The move to bearings on Slayer came about from our desire to make the back end narrower, even with Boost spacing,'' Park said of the slim, one-sided pivot design that wouldn't have been feasible with had they used bushings. And speaking of bearings, the upper shock mount sees more rotation than the lower shock mount, so they've also used bearings at this location in an effort to reduce friction.
Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
Nice lines. The one-sided hardware isn't just for looks; Rocky says that the Slayer's Boost rear-end offers more heel clearance than non-Boost bikes.


Future Proofed From the Past - Tire clearance isn't an issue on the majority of contemporary all-mountain and enduro race bikes, but the Slayer has even more room to spare than most. It can easily fit 27.5 x 2.5'' rubber, but what if I said you could also run 26 x 3.0'' meat? What goes around comes around, and what's coming around soon is a new generation of wide 26'' rubber that supposedly comes close to matching the outer diameter of a wide-ish 27.5'' tire, thereby not messing up a bike's geometry. Rocky Mountain is not spec'ing any of their bikes with these tires, but they did have a set of 26 x 2.8'' Maxxis Minions on hand that were mounted up to wide Stan's 26'' rims. They looked odd, and a bit like old Nokian Gazzaloddis crossed with a tread pattern that actually works.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
There's room for those three-inch-wide Gazzaloddis that you've been refusing to throw out.


To be clear, Rocky isn't pushing this but rather only responding to what they see coming down the road. The mention of 26'' x wide rubber is definitely worth a few good eye rolls, and I don't expect it to become overly popular, but Rocky Mountain is future-proofing their new Slayer just in case someone wanted to go the short and fat route. They're just another option.


ISCG 05... ish - The Slayer is 1x-specific, so those holding onto their front derailleurs will need to compensate by using one of the many pie plate-sized large cogs on the market. And with no need to accommodate a derailleur, the Slayer's designers moved the bike's main pivot out into that real estate to create more frame rigidity. The only issue is that this was where the upper chain guide tab would call home, so now there are only two lower tabs that are still spaced like a standard ISCG 05 setup.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
A wide main pivot means that there's no upper ISCG 05 tab, leaving the two lower tabs. A small, chainstay-mounted guide is included with the bike.


e*thirteen has a two-mount guide out there already, and Rocky says that other companies will be releasing them shortly. You could, in a pinch and with a saw, probably modify a standard chain guide to work as well, but I never said that. Either way, the bike comes with a tiny bolt-on guide that sits atop the Slayer's chainstay, and some sort of taco-style protection can be bolted into the two remaining chain guide tabs. You'll have to get one of those new guides from e*thirteen if you want a lower slider.


Adjustable Geometry, Not Suspension - Rocky Mountain's trailbikes feature an adjustable geometry and suspension setup, referred to as Ride-9, that lets the owner tune the bike's suspension and handling independently by, you guessed it, nine different ways. It's a neat system, but I'm also willing to bet that a lot of riders don't take full advantage of it. The Slayer sports a simpler version, called Ride-4, that tunes the bike's geometry without changing its suspension action. It provides just over a degree of head and seat tube angle adjustment, as well as 15mm of bottom bracket height change, while suspension ramp-up can be tuned via volume spacers as required.



Rocky was one of the earlier brands to start using relatively steep seat angles, and that continues with the Slayer; they've also designed the bike with a short seat mast that provides room for the new long-travel dropper posts that are coming out. I have legs that don't quit, but I still couldn't run a 170mm-travel dropper on some bikes. That shouldn't be an issue on the Slayer, however, as I had quite a bit of post exposed when on both the large and medium-sized bikes.


Rocky Mountain Slayer




The Slayer's Suspension Explained

Rocky Mountain has long applied the Smoothlink moniker to their full-suspension designs, and many have come to associate that name with an axle pivot that sits above or close to in-line with the bike's axle. This is obviously not the case on the 165mm-travel Slayer, however, as it's using a more traditional looking four-bar layout where the pivot sits well below the axle line. Yet the Smoothlink name remains. Asking if the change has anything to do with the expiration of the Horst Link patent seems like a reasonable question, doesn't it?


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
The rocker-link and vertical shock give the bike similar lines as the Maiden, and a very different appearance to the rest of Rocky's range.


Park replies to that challenge: ''Today we use Smoothink to describe our design philosophy and the ride characteristics we try to achieve with every model. In general, that means that our bikes are more supple during climbs and across a wider range of gears than our competitors, while having a controlled end-stroke and the typical Rocky Mountain ride feel of being more capable than the travel indicates. At this stage, we let the chainstay pivot fall where it needs to fall in order to achieve the anti-squat, axle path, chain growth, rate curve, anti-rise, etc. that we're looking for.''

In other words, the name doesn't define the design.

There are also only so many ways to get the job done, of course, which can lead to the age-old ''looks like a Session'' comment that's taken on a life of its own. ''The suspension kinematics of today have moved past the dogmatic battle between FSR vs. VPP vs. DW, etc.slow,'' expounds Park. ''Suspension design is a game of millimeters, and while some systems may look similar, riding them will quickly set them apart.'' Rocky says that they focused on creating support at the Slayer's sag point, something that can often make for a lively feeling and relatively playful bike, and that the Slayer's suspension ramps up in a moderately progressive curve. The idea is consistency over the whole stroke instead of a sharp ramp-up at the end of it.
Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga
The dropout pivot is located well below the bike's axle line, but Rocky says that it's still a Smoothlink design.

All four of the complete builds come with metric-sized, air-sprung shocks from either Fox or RockShox (the frame includes a Fox Float X2 EVOL), and the shocks on each frame size have size-specific air volume tunes - the larger the frame, the more volume spacers are in the shock's air can. Rocky also says that the design doesn't depend on the rider having to use air to hold the bike up, though. Want to bolt on a Vivid, Fox, or Cane Creek with a coil on it? That will also work just fine, I've been told.








Handling

I was supposed to only have the Slayer 770 MSL for an afternoon a rip down from Whistler's notoriously rough Top of the World trail into the rawness of Khyber, Kush, and BC's that would eventually deposit me at the newly opened Creekside portion of Whistler.

You're probably thinking that a single lap isn't enough to glean much from an unfamiliar bike, but this particular route packs in more vertical, more rocks, more roots, and more chunder than an entire week's worth of shuttles at most locations around the world.

On top of that hand-cramping lap, I also snuck off with the 2017 bike to log another day and a half on the mountain that included more park riding and a few long, nasty climbs up Whistler's neighbor, Blackcomb. You know, because mountain biking shouldn't always require a chairlift, even in Whistler.

Through all that I learned something important: the Slayer is basically a downhill bike. Not really, of course, but its angles let you approach trails like you're reading a choose-your-own-adventure novel in which you never perish.
Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga

It might be 20mm short on travel, but if you can ride a downhill rig quickly, you'll get along well on the Slayer. That's not something that can be said of all mid-travel bikes, either, but it's a machine that rewards an aggressive, over the handlebar kind of style that keeps the bike's front-end on track. It gave me the confidence to turn into a rough, rooty corner - of which there are a few thousand on that TOTW, Khyber, Kush route - at any point, concentrating more on the carrying maximum speed than worrying about getting caught up on anything. I imagine the rocks and roots might have been more worried about me than I was about them.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga


Let off the gas, however, and the Slayer can feel a bit overwhelming, especially on terrain that does more traversing than descending, or if you are simply just riding slowly. FYI, this is not a bike to piddle around on. It can feel a bit unwieldy in those moments, but it's hard to fault the Canadian company for the Slayer's all-or-nothing mentality when it comes to handling; doing so would be a bit like giving the Tragically Hip grief for not putting out jingly radio hits. It's not who they are, and the Slayer ain't no jingly radio tune that everyone is going to love.

What it is, though, is an extremely confident and capable handling machine that a skilled rider is going to go really, really quick aboard.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga



Suspension

First off, the bike's angles are such that you can often smash into the ground at a similar speed as you would on a true downhill bike, and even faster in some circumstances, which obviously puts the Slayer's suspension in a bit of a spotlight. In a weird way, much more is expected of it than what you'd hope for from a DH rig; not only does it have to take in and dissipate a metric shit-ton of abuse (no pun intended), but it also has to be efficient and not steal away any of the playfulness that can make a mid-travel bike such a hoot to ride. Being a proper enduro race bike can't be an easy life.

The 170mm of travel that comes courtesy of the Lyrik reminds me a lot of an up-sized Pike, which isn't a surprise given the similar internals. At around 170lbs and as a solid expert-level rider who's going to choose the fun line over the fast line every day of the week, I can't tell you that it's remarkably more rigid than its lighter weight brother, but quicker riders with more meat on their bones have said as much. The important thing, at least in my mind, is that the Lyrik's damper and air spring aren't going to leave anyone asking for more, regardless of their speed or meat.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga


The back of the bike performs a lot like Rocky says it will: the Super Deluxe shock never clanged off the bottom of its stroke, even when running closer to 40-percent sag than 30-percent, but I also never felt like I was coming up short on travel. There's enough sensitivity on top for the Slayer's rear-end to feel stuck to the deck in most circumstances, which certainly provides a welcome amount of traction when combined with big tires run at low pressures.

While there's traction for days, especially when braking on the loose, dusty rocks and steeps sections that make up a lot of Whistler's side-country trails, I wasn't overwhelmed by the Slayer's suspension when it came to high-speed chatter and square-edge impacts. In my mind, it felt like a bit more feedback was coming up through the pedals and into my feet than I expected.


Rocky Mountain Slayer Photo by Margus Riga


I was on the 770 MSL model that comes with a RockShox Super Deluxe DebonAir RC3 shock that lacks the high-speed compression knob of the Fox-sprung bikes, an adjustment that might have let me dial in some more forgiveness. Also, it emerged after my time on the bike that the shock's air can had extra volume spacers in it, meaning that I could have also been spending too much time in the shock's stroke where it began to ramp up. This would certainly take away some of the air spring's ability to move the rear wheel up and out of the way of rocks and roots.

It sounds like I need another go on the new Slayer to fine tune my setup, and I'm not exactly crying in my beer over that fact.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesFor 2017, Rocky Mountain has stopped trying to strike a compromising balance with a single machine that can be both a trail bike and an enduro race rig. Yes, the Altitude is capable, and it has shown well on the EWS circuit while also being able to do double-duty as a long-legged trailbike if that's what tickles your fancy. The new Slayer, however, has the geometry and an attitude that really just wants to smash through all the things. It makes zero apologies for being solely for riders who go KOM hunting on rowdy descents, or for those who race enduros. - Mike Levy





Visit the feature gallery for additional high resolution images





About the Reviewer
Age: 35 • Height: 5'10” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 165lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None • Instagram: killed_by_death

Mike Levy spent most of the 90s and early 2000s racing downhill bikes and building ill-considered jumps in the woods of British Columbia before realizing that bikes could also be pedaled for hours on end to get to some pretty cool places. These days he spends most of his time doing exactly that, preferring to ride test bikes way out in the local hills rather than any bike park. Over ten years as a professional mechanic before making the move to Pinkbike means that his enthusiasm for two wheels extends beyond simply riding on them, and his appreciation for all things technical is an attribute that meshes nicely with his role of Technical Editor at Pinkbike.



273 Comments

  • 111 8
 That's sexy! Love these hidden bearings (said no mechanic ever). Wow. Even such a detail brings something new and fresh to the table. I can't wait for my friend to get it as a test bike to his shop. Super nice frame! Now please Rocky mtn: a promo video with Thomas Vanderham and Wade Simmons.

Love it!!!
  • 67 0
 @WAKIdesigns we got half of your promo video covered anyway! Check out "Return to the Rockies" on the PB homepage.
  • 12 6
 @RockyMountainBicycles: thank you! I am looking forward to ride this bike! I am sure my local RM dealer will have it as test bike. I shall insist! BTW Sweet geo on Altitude, very eager to get rowdy. Too bad Fox CTD suspension ruined some of the feel.
  • 6 1
 Already ordered mine, 10/10 stoked after reading this review.
Witch size did you run on the test?
  • 3 0
 Absolutly beautiful lines. I just can't ogle at her enough.
  • 11 27
flag torero (Aug 25, 2016 at 5:31) (Below Threshold)
 Meh... More plastic
  • 5 0
 @Hulleland: Weight: 29.7lbs (770 MSL, size large, w/ pedals)
  • 4 0
 Aweome bike.
  • 22 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Based on the tone of most of your posts, its really hard to tell whether or not you are being facetious.
  • 9 4
 @rallyimprezive: how dare you? Big Grin I was serious. I love this bike and can't wait to try it.
  • 5 0
 @WAKIdesigns: air slapping with a white glove can lead to serious consequences
  • 11 0
 Whoever designed that bike, give him/her a goddam raise.
  • 7 2
 @RockyMountainBicycles: @RockyMountainBicycles: Wow! That is a beautiful bike! Aesthetically, one of the best designs of the year. you really need to pat yourself on the back for this one. In the past, I've always appreciated the Slayer's design in respect to other bikes, but this is above and beyond.

In the past, I have not like the way the Slayer felt -- it was as if the center felt too high, but that doesn't look like that's an issue here. The only concern I have is whether this is just way more bike than I need. I'll be buying a new bike soon, and definitely want to give this one a try. Great job.
  • 5 6
 Ok ok, @RockyMountainBicycles - since no one else posted this here, I will take the honor of pasting this link to celebrate the arrival of your latest bike:

m.youtube.com/watch?v=uLfvDG3B79s

Slaaaayeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeuuuuuuur!
  • 6 2
 @WAKIdesigns: idgi, why are you so excited about a mini Norco Aurum?
  • 9 2
 @RockyMountainBicycles: okay, you guys REALLY need to explain the lack of a downtube protector. I was annoyed that there wasn't one on my thunderbolt BC but its fine because its a rowdy trail bike. But not having one on a carbon enduro bike??? WTF!
  • 3 1
 May freeride never die. Sign me up.
  • 2 3
 @ratedgg13: just make one
  • 8 1
 @VFreehd: If I'm paying however stupid amount of money they are charging, there is no bloody reason I should have to make my own.
  • 67 4
 Looks like it would slay a session.
  • 16 16
 Do you have concession for those jokes?
  • 9 1
 @WAKIdesigns: He did no demo so he will be fine.
  • 4 3
 @squarewheel: are we talking of maidens growler?
  • 9 0
 let's not take away the Glory of the Session jokes.
  • 3 0
 We'll have to revisit this next Tues-day
  • 53 0
 Looking at some of the recent releases, it seems most manufacturers are now eschewing a mini-DH philosophy for their enduro bikes. Compromises made in the design of the all-mountain bike from a few years ago are just not enough to be able to slay today's EWS tracks. This means we now have bikes that pedal relatively well, weigh in or around 30lbs, and can smash all but the most difficult DH tracks. It is an awesome mtb era to be in.
  • 7 1
 Another consideration is that ews has become a specific fitness/conditioning niche now. As the top guys/girls get the training dialled their ability to push a bigger bike up the hills and through longer stages etc is increasing. Rude setting new standards in conditioning will only mean the others will have play catch up. Its all adding up to, as you said, to bikes being much more capable down and up. :-)
  • 15 1
 @slowrider73: yea but rude isn't pushing a bigger bike up the hills...
  • 11 4
 I would go as far as saying some of the sections of the EWS looked gnarlier / more technical than some of the WC DH races this season so its no wonder they are pushing the travel up.

As you say, now they can get 165-170mm travel around 30lbs with correctly designed suspension and decent dampers you have one hell of an all-round bike if you lean towards harder riding.
  • 18 0
 It makes me wonder if it's all going the wrong way and that soon companies will be pulling out of Enduro race programs because they can't sell enough of these bikes to make them profitable, like some brands have with DH
  • 9 1
 @Creg: With these 160-170mm bikes being so useable I cant see that happening any time soon - More than enough people at my local trail centre (that is easily ridden on a 120mm HT) are riding around on 160mm bikes.

Though I suppose in the case of Santa Cruz you do see far more Bronsons than Nomads.
  • 9 0
 @Creg: This line of discussion came up on another thread.

On the one hand, you've got the halo effect from people like Rude riding Yeti, where him winning helps the whole Yeti line not just the SB6C, but on the other, you've got what @Racer951 is saying, how many people are getting a worse experience slogging a 170mm bike around a tamer trail centre than if they'd be on mid travel bike?

In the early days of 'enduro' it seemed like the bikes were slap bang in the middle of XC bikes and DH bikes, now they are looking more and more like 'pedalable DH bikes' which many may replace a DH bike with, but in no way come close to the acceleration and snappyness of an XC/Trail bike.
  • 7 0
 mike levy never mentioned how well this thing climbs, unless I missed it. This bike certainly has my attention with its geometry numbers and build for the price, but I still need something that can climb acceptably.
  • 11 0
 @hamncheez: We're biased, but with high anti-squat values and a steep seat-tube it climbs shockingly well for a 165mm bike. Closer to how an Altitude climbs than what the numbers would suggest. We for sure should have had media do a big grind on the bike at some point, but it'll be cool to see what people say about climbing on their long-term tests. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @Racer951: Can confirm. Of my 6 riding buddies that have santa Cruz I'm one of 2 on the nomad vs the bronson.

Then again when we ride new steep trails I always get the "Better let the nomad go first" response from the BROnson dudes. I'm not that far behind
  • 4 1
 Looks like a great freeride bike too me. Check the altitude of you want a trail bike.
  • 5 0
 couple thoughts for a couple different people.

@Verbl-Kint Eschew means to avoid, I think you meant to say espouse. took me a couple read-throughs to understand what you meant. /grammerpopo These mini-DH sleds are definitely my favorite segment ATM.

@Creg To continue what I was saying above, these bike are awesome, but they fit in an odd niche: something like 80%+ of the MTB market are on a single steed. The problem with these bikes is they're great if you pair them with another bike, but hard to justify as your only bike. They're good enough to ride park on, but if you live close enough to a park to ride a lot, a DH bike or park bike are better choices. If you don't live near a park, odds are your terrain isn't gnarly enough to justify this over an Altitude(as shorter bikes are getting way capable as well,) & access to your trails is likely to have enough climbing to make the better uphill manners more than worth the concessions on the downs.

These bikes are great paired with a short travel bike(I'm running a 29er hardtail personally) to keep flat trails from being sloggy & boring, while still having a bike that lets you go to a bike park a couple times a year(without renting) & still have something for those trails that call for more than your short travel steed.

There's also those of us that live on mountains that might be more accurately described as "piles of sharp rocks with trees sticking out them." When you live places with lots of chunk, that extra suspension means a lot.

But when you gather together all the riders that are able to afford more than one bike, & all the riders who would choose something this big as their only bike(& don't opt for a DH or park bike instead?) That's definitely not a huge market.
  • 2 0
 @groghunter: Hit the nail on the head there. If you want to have 2 bikes it's good to have enough differentiation between them that deciding which one to take is easy, as long as you have the terrain for the big enduro bike
  • 1 0
 @pistol2ne: I'm trying to decide between a Bronson and Nomad right now. What year Nomad do you have? Can you keep up on the flat sections? what about the climbs? Cheers.
  • 2 0
 @RossHac: I have a 2015. I typically keep up with the bronson crowd on most stuff. The bay area is kinda lame now with how tame it has become. If I lived in Canada I would for sure prefer the nomad. Here, there are very few trails that really warrant as much travel as I have, although those are the ones I requirement. I do travel to tahoe a lot and it's nice to have there. I just spent 4 days in bend riding with Bronson crew and kept up fine. It would be nice to have lockout if you can get it.

Sorry for the long run on sentences and hope this helps.
  • 36 1
 You are a Canadian website talking about Canadian bikes.mwhy are the prices in US dollars. - speaking as a Canadian!
  • 39 1
 Not sure why the CAD prices weren't included in article, but here they are:

Slayer 790 MSL — $6999 USD / $8799 CAD
Slayer 770 MSL — $5799 USD / $6999 CAD
Slayer 750 MSL — $4999 USD / $6199 CAD
Slayer 730 MSL — $4199 USD / $5199 CAD
Slayer MSL Frame — $3199 USD / $3999 CAD

Outside of North America please contact your Rocky Mountain distributor for pricing. Cheers!
  • 8 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles: if you make more paintjobs like the element below on the slayer/altitude and add downtube protectors, I will sell my bike and buy yours immediately!

keyassets.timeincuk.net/inspirewp/live/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2016/06/xElement999_RSL_Profile.jpg
  • 34 2
 @RockyMountainBicycles: How do you explain the € prices? The frameset costs 4200 € in Europe, even tough 3199 USD are 2840 € and 3999 CAD are 2750 €. That leaves over 1450 €!!! for shipping and taxes
  • 3 7
flag Extremmist (Aug 25, 2016 at 3:03) (Below Threshold)
 @dbodoggle: I'm sure you will find a company that will custom paint your bike if that's what's important for you.
  • 14 1
 @jmrmuc: 4200.....you could buy a very good enduro carbon complete! bike and save money for trip
  • 3 2
 @jmrmuc: shipping, taxes (VAT is usually included in the listed price), customs/import duties of Asian bikes entering the EU, and covering the large costs of doing business in Europe (paying distributors/subsidiaries)
  • 23 2
 Shit is getting ridiculous. No wonder brands like YT and Canyon take the market.
  • 12 1
 @Stylexxx: Or travel to the US, buy the bike there, enjoy the trails, and come back home with your new toy !
  • 4 1
 @ka-brap: the VAT is included in the import duties as a import turnover tax. Also the VAT doesn't really count as a argument because the 4200$ also include VAT which you have to exclude first (because they are selling to another country) to get the real import price. However I don't know how much the VAT in Canada is currently, so there might be a difference.
  • 6 1
 @RockyMountainBicycles: $4000 CAD just for the frame/shock!
  • 3 1
 @TheLittleFox: With €1450 saving it would be worth it... (you can buy a return flight from Dublin to Vancouver for less than €600)
  • 15 4
 It's because Pinkbike is Americentric.
  • 6 10
flag DJ-24 (Aug 25, 2016 at 6:34) (Below Threshold)
 It's because Pinkbike is Americentric.
  • 4 0
 @Extremmist thanks for the suggestion. I dont know what i'd do without you.
  • 8 0
 A quadrillion Philippine Pesos. #thirdworldpickle
  • 2 0
 the US and Canadian prices don't include any tax/VAT is my guess where the euro prices do. in the states its added at the till which really wrecks my head any time I go over there.
  • 1 0
 @richardsouthernextreme: because usually there is not just one tax but several. For example sales tax (VAT equivalent) city tax, and county tax. Also if you mail/internet order you not pay sales tax across state lines unless the business is conducting business in your state of residence. The last bit many states are trying to fight because they feel they are missing out on a big chunk of revenue.
  • 5 1
 @MrMiyagi: YT and Canyon ain't that cheap for us in Canada.... Same here, euro bikes are crazy expensive!
  • 1 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles: Any chance there will be an alu version? Super dialed this new Slayer, congrats!
  • 3 0
 @imho4ep: ya that's crazy for a frame and a little ridiculous. Carbon is not some crazy exotic thing hell aluminum frames were rare too at one point now they are a dime a dozon Just get on with it and drop the act carbon is carbon whoopty do drop these insane prices already!!!!
  • 26 2
 Ah come on no one is going to comment on the 26+ tires coming to you in the not so distant future!!! I for one look forward to them! Sub 1000g 3.0 tires with decent tread hell yeah!
  • 3 0
 I knew it, 26+ a whole world of possibilities - for me anyway! and I love that adjustable shock mount - Karpiels ideas coming around again??
  • 3 0
 ha! I knew it was going to start soon! This bike just popped on my radar in a major way... way to go @RockyMountainBicycles
  • 7 8
 I prefer the 26 inch wheel for pumping through trail irregularities. I also find that they accelerate out of corners faster. Then there is the lighter more playful handling they provide... So the ability to run the Slayer with a 26" rear wheel would really dial it in for me.

I'm wondering, with the ride 4 set into its highest position, whether a 26 x 2.5 rear tire would work (with 27.5 x 2.5 up front)?
  • 4 0
 it is called the surly instigator and it has been around a while
  • 6 0
 @mountaincross: I'm sure that would work great. It's only 12mm in height difference, so it would basically be the same between the two (650b at low vs 26 at high).
  • 1 3
 This was done years ago and failed miserably.
  • 3 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: I don't think Double Wides and 3" Gazzas really count.
  • 3 2
 @wallheater: I'm talking about Minions and every other DH tire that were available years ago in sizes 2.7-3.0. Most people here got into riding after that was tried and failed.
  • 4 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: They only failed because of the weight! 1600g tires are only good at going DH at speed! Changing direction, re-accelerating and braking with super heavy tires isn't great. Plus back then rims were 700-1000g each! A modern 500g 40mm aluminium rim or 400g carbon rim with a 800-1000g tire will work way better.
  • 4 1
 @SintraFreeride: The weight didnt matter too much back then like it does now. When you get to a certain width, they don't turn well and also are much harder on the side walls. Too wide and they don't handle as well on high speed rough terrain.
  • 3 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: Really? That isn't my experience at all. On rough terrain especially rocky terrain I find they work(ed) great. You are able to plow right through stuff which you'd struggle with a 2.35 tire. Heck I remember the brocklyn Machine Works guys raving about those tires. They pushed the 3.0s gazzaloddis so hard they managed to rip knobs off them. And those were some hard durometer tires!!!
  • 27 2
 I said 26" will come back and everyone neg propped me
  • 25 2
 and does it climb? can't wait for the review
  • 25 4
 Nevermind the other 80% time of your riding,it's all about the downhill.
  • 6 3
 @nozes: So you must climb faster than you descend. Not sure I hit that % even with a chairlift/uplift. Agree with @conv3rt: would like know if this thing can climb or do we need to push it up the steeper bits? I get the feeling it's more of a park ride unless you have legs of steel.
  • 1 3
 In fairness wouldn't it be 50/50 in most cases unless using a chairlift? I mean, it kind of has to be if you start and stop at the same location no?
  • 2 2
 @DARKSTAR63: well, no not really. It takes considerably longer to ride uphill than it does to go down. So, an 80% uphill/20% downhill timesplit sounds about right to me. Maybe 70/30 if you really push it on the ups
  • 4 0
 @nozes Around here I really enjoy earning my turns (I like the challenge of climbing up gnarly sections to test my fitness and skill). I agree about the descents but, like many others, I like a good climbing bike too. I'll always take the 'better at descending trade-off' but feel like these days that trade-off is less and less. I've seen one of these in person and it's the best looking rocky I've seen in a long time, maybe ever. Looking forward to learning more.
  • 2 1
 I didn't tried too hard to evaluate the percentage,10 minute climbing to 2 minute descent is my kind of terrain where I live.
For me,for my trails and even most of the enduro races in Portugal it's way "too much bike". I see it as a park bike you can race enduros on,and that's not a bad thing,I guess.
  • 3 0
 The reviewer specifically mentions he took it out of the park to test its uphill characteristics, yet never tells us how it faired pedalling up...
  • 1 0
 If someone is buying a 170mm traveled bike, I hope they're not buying it to climb. This bike can take on some serious trails, it's pretty much a DH bike. If someone is looking for a bike that can climb, they would be looking at 150-160mm travel bike.
  • 1 0
 Yeah. I ask because they mention climbing in the article. and also, anyone could have said that about 150-160 bikes a few years ago. Now you can ask a lot of one of those. In fact when one doesn't climb well it somehow feels obsolete
  • 1 0
 @kjjohnson: I'm joking around but I'm also talking distance and elevation not time. What goes up must come down. My rides are a 50/50 split of climbing and descending even if the descents are much "shorter". This bike is clearly for that latter bit, if you are concerned with outright climbing performance it's likely not for you.
  • 1 0
 @DARKSTAR63: fair enough. I too start and end at the same elevation. Sometimes I just can't ignore my own literalist tendencies
  • 23 3
 put a real BB on it and I would get one.kill pressfit!!!!
  • 4 0
 Here it is lol, ahead of his time inspiring April Fools articles in 2018. Beautiful work @mikekazimer @urbanhukk69
  • 1 0
 @WGPE: The difference is I would have a Slayer today if it had a threaded BB.
  • 16 1
 Nice!! But, just like the maiden we need an ally version for poor people
  • 13 0
 it´s a little bit expensive
  • 16 3
 Seriously nice looking. But a Press-Fit BB..? deal-breaker..
  • 12 0
 4k CAD for a frame, ouch. And I'm in your target market and neighborhood.
  • 8 0
 Give me an aluminum bike any day if the price of a carbon bike is 7-8k. Carbon frames seem to be a money grab from bike companies.
  • 12 0
 @rockyflowtbay: like commencal for the price of the base slayer with shitty components, you get the world cup version decked out in eagle lol
  • 3 0
 @hardyk: nailed it.
  • 5 0
 Support Devinci then. $2800 Cad for carbon Spartan frame. Support a company that still supports Canadian manufacturing.????
  • 2 0
 @ukr77: aluminum frames are manufactured in Canada, not carbon
  • 2 0
 If these prices weren't premium, I would be all over this bike. Too bad. Frown
  • 12 2
 The return of 26 is coming.
  • 7 0
 This bike should come with an axe. Or a mace. A mace, yeah that's better. Aluminum head, carbon fiber handle. Make it happen Rocky Mountain!
  • 46 2
 We spent our marketing budget on test bikes and a launch video when we could have just thrown a mace into every bike box?! Damn it.
  • 10 1
 @RockyMountainBicycles: Its these type of customer relations that makes me want to own one of your beautiful machines.. The new Slayer is a work of art, goods job guys!
  • 3 5
 @RockyMountainBicycles: can I send you my old 2012 slayer frameset and you send me one of them new ?
  • 7 2
 Dear Rocky Mountain- what the f**** is going on with the prices in Europe/ Germany?
Can you explain why the Slayer 730 Msl costs 4,199 USD (currently about 3700€) and the price here in germany is 4799€ (currently about 5400 USD)?
  • 7 3
 it's called VAT. thank Frau Merkel and EU for that Wink
  • 4 0
 What's the VAT there? About 20%? Add on a little bit of shipping and some margin for a distributor and I wouldn't be surprised if RM is making less profit on bikes sold there than in North America.
  • 6 3
 @strasznyzbigniew: the VAT has nothing to do with current politics or the EU. It's been there since decades.
Also Canada has a VAT too (I don't know how much it is) so you have to exclude this tax from the 4200$ first since they are selling to another country. You see the gap gets even bigger...
  • 6 0
 @prevail: Actually we have a sales tax that is added at the time of sale and doesn't show in the MSRP pricing (unlike the VAT which is reflected in the "sticker" price). It varies from 5% to 15% depending on the part of Canada.
  • 3 2
 @prevail: yeah, I know. VAT in Canada is 5% according to wikipedia - compare that to 19% in Gemany or 23% in Poland. Did ya count import tax? Smile
  • 3 2
 @strasznyzbigniew: If you import goods to the EU you don't pay VAT but an import turnover tax (which is the same % as the VAT). Depending on the country from which you import you have to pay customs fees which is around 15% (15%+48,5% if the bike is from China Big Grin )
  • 3 0
 @prevail: I thought you pay customs on import (between 5 and 15% here in PL) and then VAT on sale to customer? As customer when I import stuff I had to bay both: let's say I import 1000$ frame from US, that's 1,100 after average customs, and 1353 after VAT. 35% to my gov't! That's f****n ridiculous.
  • 1 1
 @strasznyzbigniew: it depends on wether you import the frame yourself or through a distibutor. If you import it youself, for example (although I know it's not possible) if you buy your frame directly from Rocky Mountain in Canada and they ship it to Poland, you only have to pay the import turnover tax. On the other hand, if you buy your frame over a distributer in Poland, you pay (indirectly) for the import turnover tax and , because it's a transaction inside your country (distributer -> Poland, you -> Poland), you've to pay also the VAT.
If you trade over boarders, even in the EU, there is no VAT. For example if I own a bike shop and you would buy a frame from me I'm not allowed to include VAT on the invoice.
  • 5 0
 Oh ma this bike is sick! and what's this:

Clearance for 27.5 x 2.5'' or 26 x 3.0'' tires

I called it!! It's a bit early I think if they want to make a name for 26" wheels again but I knew it would happen. f*ck you bike industry. I love it.
  • 5 0
 Way to go Rocky Mountain!! My Pipeline and my Slayer 70 might just get another sibling in the stable after all. A HUGE thank you for continuing the offerings in the normal 26" range, from those of us who still have at least a few more wheel sets on the backup rack in the garage. We'll not go out quietly.
  • 8 0
 What are bike mortgage rates these days?
  • 9 6
 I'm thinking about this new crop of 170mm enduro machines, about Knock Block, about the Lyrik and 36 and that Fox Float X2... Look at the spec and geometry of this bike. It seems to me that we are approaching a point of convergence. I predict that in the next few years, at the epitome of enduro's ascent but before the advent of adaptive geometry, downhill and enduro will at last collide. Either enduro bikes will wear dual crown forks... or downhill bikes will go extinct. Discuss?
  • 3 1
 interesting points. personally I don't want a dual crown on my 'enduro' bike... cross ups etc Also, my bike is bloody long, and a dual crown would not help it on switchbacks and the like. That aside, I'd like to try a boxxer on my rig for a few cheeky dh runs.
  • 21 0
 I think that enduro and its many future technologies will win some downhillers over, but I just can't see all of the park rats ditching dual crowns and DH specific bikes. I am also a believer that downhill bikes should feel like bobsleds, and enduro bikes should definitely not. Furthermore, freeride never dies.
  • 10 2
 I don't think DH bikes are going anywhere, as cool as Enduro bike may descend the DH bike is just still a better choice for lift/shuttle minded people. It skips more obstacles, weighs into corners better, heavy/light sinewave is longer, plows through sht like nothing else and has the biggest error margin out there. Yes sales of DH bikes will surely continue to drop in favor of Enduro bikes.

The funny bit is that because of that 120mm hiatus that people get involved in these days, we tend to forget how incredible are those bikes at climbing. Get a quality shock like CCDBcoilCS or FloatX2 and that thing just goes for thousands of vertical feet.

I am waiting for a new breed of XC bikes like the fully that @Unno made. 90-100mm of travel, 120 fork, dropper skinny tyres and aggro pedal friendly geo to demolish Strava boards.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: giants new anthem is a trail rocket. 27.5 110 rear 120 front 68 head 452 reach in large. Some of the newish 29ers out there too like Norco optic etc etc. Seems like ALL classes of bikes are getting much more dialed geometry; even hardtails are jumping on the long low slack thing. Tis exciting times to be a mtber :-)
  • 2 0
 @Bluefire The comment you made on adaptive geometry is an intersting concept for the future and one i think will be explored more. Weight of a bike is an adaptive aspect that is related to strength and fitness when on the flats and ups. Geometry on the other hand will have the same limits for everyone. No matter how strong/fit you are a 64 head angle etc etc is going to be hard work on the climbs but if that can be changed on the fly to a more climbing friendly geo then bing up you go.
  • 3 0
 @Bluefire:
Personally, I doubt it. Downhill and enduro are very different race formats, so a bike that's optimal in one will never be optimal on the other. For example, an enduro racer needs to be able to finish the liason stages with enough energy left to attack the special stages, and that already means an enduro bike needs to climb much more efficiently than a downhill bike if it's going to be competitive.

Not only that, but enduro bike design is much more volatile than downhill. Downhill's been sitting on 200mm of travel, HAs of 62-65 degrees, narrow-range cassettes, etc. for several years now. In contrast, race-winning enduro bikes can have anywhere between 130 and 170mm of rear travel with a potentially different amount up front, cassette range just keeps getting bigger, dropper posts are now as complex as shocks - not to mention the Strive's Shapeshifter system, and Foes and Liteville playing with mismatched wheel sizes, and that weird Tantrum bike with the Missing Link linkage that came out the other day... And that's without mentioning Boost, Plus, or Metric. Enduro bike design is like the Wild West compared to downhill. It's anyone's guess what enduro bikes are going to look like when the design landscape starts to stabilize, but I wouldn't bet anything valuable that they'll look like downhill bikes.
  • 5 3
 @Jubbylinseed: It is not that hard to make a climbing DH bike with 200mm of travel. If you think about it, many current DH bikes could be made uphillable (as long as seat tube angle allows) Toss in a wide range cassette, dropper post and lock out on the shock and off you go. You can even lower and harden the fork using a fricking strap between arch and lower crown. Please remember that if you eliminate bobbing with some form of lock-out, the biggest factor in climbing becomes the tyre weight and Enduro guys already climb for hours on 2 full on DH tyres.
  • 5 0
 as in intense uzzi, knolly delirium, banshee darkside... you can have 1 bike, 2 builds.. and get fit
  • 10 1
 No doubt Enduro bikes are inching upwards and doing so with more versatility and agility. But the real killer of the DH bike in my opinion and experience is the Bike Parks/Ski Resorts. The vast majority of trails being made are easier and better suited to the Enduro - more pedal/less technical. They're killing too many trails with dirt paving. Outside a few runs here and there, it's getting tougher and tougher to justify owning a DH bike over an Enduro.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Wonder where you got those views from...
  • 3 2
 These burly enduro bikes will never kill off downhill. But they will & have killed off the "freeride" bike. There's really no more reason to make/buy an "SX-Trail" or "Demo 7" style of bike. Modern enduro bikes are lighter & stronger, with the same amount of travel.

Enduro killed freeride.
  • 8 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I'd like to add this new Slayer to the stable, but I spent all my money on your Downduro Conversion Kit...
  • 1 2
 The thing preventing this for me is the lack of a burlier long travel 29er fork. The 36 is a good all-arounder but insufficient for a bigger rider in the bike park. With all the new long travel enduro 29ers it's just a matter of time until a bigger fork comes out.
  • 5 0
 @neimbc: Couldn't agree more. The perfect example are the trails off the Pass at Jackson Hole. The original, single track DH trails with kinda sketchy jumps on the side have all been bulldozed over for wide, smooth berms and tables. If it weren't for the braking bumps you could ride an aggressive trail bike on all of them.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I run a dropper post on my DH bike and 36 tooth cassette. My buddy is running a dropper and 10-42 cassette on his. Just need a steeper seat angle now.
  • 1 0
 @slowrider73: Canyon Strive with Shapeshifter already does this. Ahead of the game?
  • 2 0
 @Magik-Mike: The kona magic link, or the new version of the Tantrum did this before.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: ratchet strap for the fork
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: what's strava?
  • 5 0
 I really like the all-black version that was being tested at La Thuile. Any chance of releasing a limited amount of all-black frames? @RockyMountainBicycles
  • 4 0
 Matte black with gloss black decals would be sweeeet!
  • 4 1
 I realize you are basically paying for a frame with some random junk parts on it, but 4200$ for a bike with NX on it is crazy.

If you actually ride that bike the way it's intended the drivetrain and wheels will be unusable within 30 days.

Guess that's the point though. Amazing that 4100$ is a "cheap" bike now.
  • 3 0
 Pretty cool! I've gotten a lot of rides on my 2011 Slayer in, a lot of them in the rockies! I may not be an Enduro champ but I appreciate having 165mm rear travel for when I mess things up, most bikes have moved to 150mm rear or less. I really appreciate the idea of being able to run 26+, it makes perfect sense to have both options, brilliant! Also the Frame looks really pretty, I'm so lame in my group having a Glossy frame when everyone else is Matte (hee hee) but then they see how the big bike descends! shame our exchange rate is so low right now, 4200$ Can for a carbon bike with a nice build would be good! Hurray for Return of the Slayer! (also the video was awesome!)
  • 3 0
 Woooo, some good news about 26 x 2.8 minions and other new 26+ from other brands! I've wanted some big 26 minions for years now. The old 26 x 2.7 ones are pretty undersized and only measure 2.5". Didn't think it would happen. Running old-skewl 1800g 26+ tires for a couple years now and they are amazing however a bit lighter wouldn't hurt. I don't want any of these flimsy weight weenie plus tires though... need some dual ply 26+ for the gnarly rocky terrain. Triple ply 26+ is pretty fun right now, punctures are no longer a possibility.
  • 7 0
 Well done Rocky.
  • 2 0
 Hey Mike. Nice review. I have the 2011 Slayer and am super exited about this new development. Any chance of a comparison to the handling of the 2011 model? For example, I would certainly not call the 2011 model basically a downhill bike as I've done numerous xc, climb intensive and cruising rides without once thinking I should be on something else. Despite that the 2011 was for sensational in the descent. Be cool to get your thoughts. Thanks!
  • 5 1
 Lucky you, I still ride the 2006 Slayer... Smile
  • 2 0
 Ever look at carbon vs aluminum bike specs for the same price range? You get infinitely better parts spec for the same price.... I was looking at a Santa Cruz joplin for the girl friend, 5000$ carbon frame and deore parts...what the hell?

Cruise to the Rocky store, instincts xt build manitou fork, aluminum frame mid 3000$
  • 3 1
 Nice to see some Shimano spec too. I prefer Shimano because I seem to have better durability from their stuff versus SRAM. I see numerous bikes that I am interested in as my next ride but am turned off by the SRAM kit that I know I would be replacing sooner rather than later.
  • 5 0
 Looks like I'm waiting yet another season for press fit to go away for good.
  • 6 2
 Rocky used to be my #1, but they've been slipping with the Maiden and the Slayer. Took them 2 years to make a 2014 Norco Range...
  • 2 0
 I was genuinely curious how the marketing people at Rocky were going to spin their inevitable move back sealed cartridge bearings in their pivots....i just got my answer: ''The move to bearings on Slayer came about from our desire to make the back end narrower, even with Boost spacing,''
  • 2 0
 I'm so with the paint job comment????????
Plus the article could have dogged out the old slayer frames, in fact it's one of the oldest rocky mountain bikes, with the pipeline ;-)
  • 2 0
 I still ride a Slayer SS, it's a little heavy compared to today's bikes but rides like a mini DH bike. I love it, I sold my DH rig because I really had no reason to ride it over the Slayer.
  • 1 0
 This new generation of All Mountain bikes with 170mm of travel... Probably too much to still consider them "trail bikes". Personally for me the 165-150 travel range is my sweet spot. I only need more than that on very rare occasions. Even when I visit my bike park there's only one or two trails that aren't rideable with that travel.
  • 3 0
 I have owned a Slayer in the past, and loved it, too bad I'll never afford another.
$5000 for a base model with shit components, yeah right.
  • 3 0
 With zero bb drop in the high setting, a 26" x 2.5" tire would give it about a 340mm BB height, in case anyone was wondering.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I love the fact that those new 'bigger enduro' rigs have this awesome slopestyle-bike look, but longer and slacker. It looks so cool that the seatstays are in line with top tube. Awesome!
  • 1 0
 Tomorrow I got the chance to see the new Slayer in real. Thank you my dear LBS! Usually we are the last when it comes to a introduction of a new product. And even the prices are lower than expected. RMB is one of the most expensive brands here. CHF 7'999.00 for the top build while the frame kit goes for CHF 3'999.00.
  • 1 0
 It's exciting until i saw carbon only, and the price is just so high. Starts at 5k Canadian, oh man! It does come with some nice stuff, but I would be a whole lot more excited to see a base build in aluminum that I could switch my older slayer gear over too and more cost effective like my slayer 30 was when I got it a year old in 2012. Maybe made in Canada aluminum frame like devinci? It's like houses in Canada, 600k seems outrageous until suddenly it was normal, my bike group guys seem to think 9k is normal for a bike now, holy Moses!
  • 1 0
 Am I seriously the only one who hates the 2 different shades of red?! The matte is nice but the 2 together clash so horrendously I can't believe someone a) designed that...if you're going to break a color rule, make it better not worse 2) someone approved it. Matte white would look so much better for starters. Urgh.
  • 2 0
 I ride a Dixon with Fox 34. Was thinking of switching the 34 a 36 to hit bigger drops. Now I think 2017 Slayer 790 MSL but... After $7K does it climb as well as a Devinci Dixon? Can the Slayer handle WBP?
  • 2 1
 OK, small deception from RM right now, on the paper though:
- not a word about an aluminium version, 'cos remember: a lot of riders will never ever buy a carbon bike, for excellent reasons by the way, and not only because it's (too) expensive.
- I agree with many comments: press fit BB is a dealbreaker, no compromise about that. Stange decision from RM.
Conclusion for now: my good old 2008 Slayer SXC is the version I prefer, not only because it's the most beautiful aesthetically.
My dream: that RM makes a updated version of the SXC, with a slacker head angle, 650B clearance, and canadian handcraft!!!
  • 1 0
 Be mindful buying a Rocky Mountain with their warranty. Right off their policy. Make sure you don't do anything in the video they advertise the bike to do.

You take great personal risk and shall forfeit the warranty, as outlined in
the Warranty Table, when you ride in extreme terrain as depicted in
mountain bike videos. I.e. ride "trials" style courses, ride ramps, do stunts,
ride on BMX tracks, ride in the city down stairs and embankments, or ride
in other similar terrain. It is important to note that bent components,
frames, forks, handlebars, seat posts, pedals, cranks and wheel rims are
signs of accidents and/or abuse.
  • 1 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles why no downtube protection on a 4k+ (€) frame? i would be really interested in this bike/frame for 2017 or 2018, but no downtube protection is simply unacceptable by today's standard!! i hope to get an answer from you guys, cheers
  • 3 1
 I want that 770,damn I wish RM still had bikes in Bellingham so I could demo one easily! I'm in the market for a new trail bike damnit!
  • 2 2
 Wow, a Slayer....Slayer...Just keep saying it.... it keeps looking better and better......who cares how much it is ... it's a Slayer...It HAS to be so...so...so..sick.... I mean look what they called it...Slayer....Boy I bet I can "send it" with a Slayer....
  • 5 0
 fucking slayer
  • 2 0
 Best bike name period. SLAYER!
  • 4 0
 looks like DJ hardtail Wink great frame design with simple lines.
  • 4 0
 looks just like a norco range!
  • 1 1
 Some elements of Ellsworth Truth in suspension design , taken a bit further . Rocker tilted downward much more with Horst link . That increased tilt is being used by many - Transition - to create a firm pedaling platform .
  • 3 0
 This Slayer can really thrash some metal!
  • 2 0
 Loving the 750, finally a brand speccing RS forks and shock and shimano cogs
  • 2 0
 "he carbon fiber frame, which is made in the same factory as Rocky's other carbon bikes," -which is where?
  • 2 1
 considering price tag must be made directly in canada lol
  • 5 3
 $7K for a carbon bike with aluminum cranks seriously ?? , and good god the frame cost is spendy
  • 4 5
 uhmmm... excuse me Canada...

For the sake of clarity, and since no one else seems to want to broach this delicate topic.

A Double-Double is in fact, a tasty and affordable fast food hamburger from the gloried chain, In'N'Out Burger. Revered by both Democrats and Republicans alike.

What is a "double double" to you guys? And what is a "toonie"? Actually, I don't care....

Cool bike though, well done!!!
  • 15 0
 Dear America,
A double-double is a Canadian institution: a Tim Hortons coffee with two creams and two sugars. A toonie is our two dollar coin. And yes, you can buy a decently sized coffee for less than two dollars. Suck it Starbucks, and In'N'Out.
Now if you will excuse us, we have a wall to build in preparation for your next election - because you people are crazy.
Sincerely,
Canada
  • 5 1
 @ratedgg13:

damn... now I feel like an idiot! I lived in Buffalo, NY for 5 years, and we had Tim Horton's everywhere. Ironic, because now I'm in SoCal, where the OTHER Double-Double resides...

And of course I know what a Toonie is, we used to cross the border into Niagara Falls back in college because the drinking age is 19 up there.

DISCLAIMER: Toonies are NOT great for the strip clubs. The dancers tend to get a little annoyed when you try to stuff cold coins into their butt cracks.

Sincerely,
'murrica
  • 1 0
 This thing is beautiful! Gorgeous, capable looking bike. Haven't had a proper ride on Rocky Mountain's suspensions, but once I do then this may be my next bike!
  • 4 2
 Rocky mountain slaying this shit
  • 3 1
 Slayer from 2011 was sick
  • 2 0
 Subliminal messaging on the top tube? Calling all Jason Voorhees....
  • 2 0
 HOCKEY?

Now that's what I call a mountain bike.

TACO TOWN!!!
  • 1 0
 The hockey mask is a nod/wink back to the marketing of the 2006 Slayer. encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRzhFayCkDWzgNUX48887SUV24D4ul652t7szlZFqx6WxegXI9ZpQ
  • 2 0
 Looks sick, but I just wanted the matte black one in the leaked pics...
  • 7 5
 It becomes really hard to find an aluminium frame nowadays.
  • 6 2
 Commencal, Transition, Trek, Specialized, Giant, and the list goes on...
  • 3 1
 @dbodoggle: I'm looking for something Nomad-like: threaded bb, ~65 deg. HA, non-boost, 170mm front/back frame with bearings that do not need too much attention and I just can't find anything that fits the bill. Had my hopes high for the Slayer.
  • 5 0
 @Skinnyman: Canfield Balance with a 170mm Lyrik up front? ("only" has 165mm travel in the back, though)
  • 4 0
 @santoman: Yep, a great option! Currently it is on my list along with Banshee Rune and Nicolai ION16, but none of them have a place for a water bottle :-) I'll try to find a frame-only option of Giant Reign SX as well.
I would just be very interested in understanding the motivation of biking companies for flooding the market with carbon.
  • 2 0
 @Skinnyman: it's called "money"
  • 3 0
 @Skinnyman: If the Rune is on your list, put the Uzzi on there as well. Alloy and a ripper!
  • 1 0
 @Skinnyman: Is the ION not boost? About carbon, I guess part is that the consumer digs it, and part that manufacturing more complex shapes must be simpler.
  • 2 2
 @strasznyzbigniew: I'm not sure money is the reason. Usually it's better to increase sales volume versus price of the item. I have not seen a single company care about recycling of carbon and what I personally see in places I ride is that the carbon frame makes one ride much worse than aluminium. Dudes on nomads for 8k$ barely get 1ft of air and rock gardens make them stall, while 10 year old konas hit double diamons no problem :-)
  • 1 0
 @countzero1101: Alloy and a ripper for sure, but waaay too much for my mediocre skills :-)
  • 1 0
 @Skinnyman: it's even better to have high volume with high margins - and I think that's happens if you don't include aluminum at release. You've got a point with that carbon stuff though - I'm on my first carbon frame and after weekend in polish mountains (no groomed trails here in PL) I was pretty scared when I looked at the down tube. Got some protectors, still riding hard Wink Also, it is way easier to design carbon frames - designers are not constrained with tube shape and welding limitations - look at Banshee Legend BB/Shock area - not good for reasonable weight.
  • 2 0
 @santoman: ION is non-boost www.nicolai-bicycles.com/shop/ready2ship/ion-16-123456-2016.html
Carbon may have advantages in ease of manufacturing of complex shapes, but probably ~90% of potential buyers theoretically do not care about that.
  • 1 0
 @strasznyzbigniew: Maybe you're right about releasing carbon first in terms of profit, but still it would be cool if someone produced a read on frame materials. I'm just a weekend warrior and so are all the people I know and I don't have a single reason to go carbon even though I've been looking for it super hard.
  • 1 0
 @Skinnyman: What I meant by complex shapes (and I might show my ignorance regarding bike-manufacturing processes) is that, perhaps, if the designer wants to go with something very intrincate, then welders with very particular skills will be needed. These might not be so easy to find. OTOH, I guess that once you have the molds, the manufacturing process of carbon frames is, admittedly withing a skilled set of workers, relatively simple. BTW, if you build a 301 MK13 with a 170mm fork you will get a HA around 65deg and that is also not boost. Since it has the same rear-wheel travel as the Nicolai, I guess you would be OK with that AND you can fit a water bottle!!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 @santoman: Yep, a great suggestion, thank you! But I've tested it and could not get the rear suspension to be sensitive enough (I've got an injured knee and a recommendation from doctor not to ride down the hill at all). A perfect bike had I been 10 years younger :-) And 601 is a bit out of my price range.
  • 1 0
 @graeme187: Thans for a suggestion! I've looked at it some time ago but dismissed it because i could not find a frame-only option. Will give it another shot!
  • 2 0
 @Skinnyman: sorry to read about your knee. I also have a busted one. My solution: avoid going to the doctor! Good luck with the bike search. BTW, it might not be as nice as a Canfield or a Nicolai, but the Swoop that someone suggested above is a hell of a deal! Cheers.
  • 1 0
 @graeme187: If only Radon would sell/ship to the Canary Islands...
  • 1 0
 @Davichin: really? I'm sure they would if you called them surely?
  • 2 0
 @Skinnyman: The Rune V2 (now V2.5) is a fantastic bike that does everything really well. It's DH capabilities are at the top, however it climbs surprisingly well. Banshee had the Rune V2 out in early '13 with the geo that every other bike now has before anyone. I rode a Rune V2 and Nomad 3 back to back on the same trail. Both were equal in their handling and descending however the Rune actually out climbed the Nomad. The Nomad weighed 3 lbs less but cost over $5000 more. The only bikes I have ridden (and I've demoed everything) the last few years that pedaled as well were the Evil bikes.
  • 1 0
 @Skinnyman: I've owned the Nomad3, Banshee RuneV2, and now the 2016 Canfield Balance. The Balance is the funnest bike of the 3. Climbs so well with the anti squat attributes and descends with complete confidence. The 16.5" chainstays make it very playful and easier on sharp corners. No Boost, No PFBB, No Carbon, No BS. Highly recommend the Canfield.
  • 2 1
 no mention of Knolly?
  • 1 0
 @dbodoggle:
  • 1 0
 @Skinnyman: rune has place. my riding buddy has one and he place the bottle on downtube. it works if only it gets wee bit muddy , but definitelly there are bottle mounts..
  • 1 0
 Not really. Banshee has all that you need.
  • 1 0
 @graeme187: I emailed them regarding the Slide 150 HD 10.0, which is on sale right now, and their answer was:
"Because of shipping-restrictions made by our logistic partners we will not be able to send complete bikes to your requested country" which is odd, because the Canary Islands are just another Spain´s province (and they would sell/ship to any other Spain´s province)...
  • 1 0
 @graeme187: I've never even heard of Radon bikes, that bike is priced really well with superb components, holy cow, I'll have to look into it. I wish the new Slayer wasn't so $$$, my current Slayer might have to be my last *tears*
  • 2 3
 wonder why the position it so close to the maiden and not more in the middle towards the altitude (like the old slayer)...nice one, but to specialized for me (own all three slayer generations)....
  • 2 0
 This bike is superb! Perfect and pretty in many ways!
  • 1 0
 Based on BB drop... BB is 340ish in low and 355ish in high? @RockyMountainBicycles or Mike could provide BB height numbers?
  • 2 0
 26 inch 3.0 tires and who is selling them now days...
  • 3 1
 Just an option for the future. There are some great 26+ tires in the pipeline from several companies.
  • 3 1
 I'm probably the only person out there that still rides a 2008 slayer
  • 2 0
 I ride a 2007 slayer 30!!! Still love it.
  • 1 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles: what are the anti-squat and leverage ratio characteristics?
  • 2 0
 Found my next bike. Then I saw the price.
  • 1 0
 So the class of 17 DownDuro bikes are: Slayer, Reign, Nomad, Troy?, Process 153.... What would be your choice and why?
  • 4 2
 Knolly Delirium...cause I bought one. I bought one, because it's ridiculously solid, stable, gorgeous to behold, good customer service, destroys the downhill roughage, is playful, gets uphill good enough, and it's a personal preference. I also think this new Slayer is an awesome looking bike. I've always admired the brand. I'd definitely be interested, in a parallel universe, where Knolly didn't exist.
  • 1 0
 @FreerideFanatyk: I'm sure the knolly is a great bike, I've always liked the look of them and they seem to have a pretty solid reputation, but they don't sell them in my town. No knolly, transition, or Evil to be had.
  • 1 0
 Please tell me which trail you were riding in the photo that's at the bottom of the "handling" section!
  • 1 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles for the large frame, what length is the Reverb with the 790 model?
  • 2 0
 Already ordered, can't wait.
  • 1 0
 Looks amazing - might have to be my next bike!- any idea what the frame weight is on that rig?
  • 1 0
 Nice! No get me really excited..... When are we gonna see a resurected switch?
  • 1 0
 So it's Jason from Friday the 13th? And here I thought they named it after the American Heavy Metal Band.
  • 2 0
 Take my money Rocky mountain.
  • 5 4
 How are you gonna name a bike 'slayer' and not give it a rad paintjob
  • 1 0
 I have been waiting so long for this bike!
  • 3 1
 PF BB......
  • 1 0
 best name for a bike! reach a littlebit on the short side
  • 1 0
 The reach is huge on this thing, are you sure you are not looking at the "rear centre"?
  • 2 1
 good bike, but for whis price i must bee slayer >8-[
  • 1 0
 Nice bike but the old slayer from 2004 is also cool
  • 1 0
 How are they running XTR rear derailleur with XT 11 to 46 cassette?
  • 1 0
 ? I know xtr cassettes only go to the 40 and Shimano at the launch said racers should prefer the closer ratios over the bigger range. However I'm sure they just dialed in the b tension and it works just fine. Mechanically speaking it's really not all that different from the XT one.
  • 1 0
 i want the red one the pink one and the brown one too but no fox shox
  • 3 1
 Mmmm, plastic.
  • 1 0
 I Cant wait to see Carson Storch's custom slopestyle version!!
  • 1 0
 Yeah I was gonna say this looks way better then his proto, hoping they're upping his slope bike with this frame as a base.
  • 2 1
 Kinda looks like a Reign and a Slash had a baby...
  • 2 1
 This will be my next bike!!! "my mini maiden"
  • 1 0
 Love dat red...there will be blood!
  • 1 3
 I've been in the bike industry for close to 20 years and Rocky Mountain has the worst warranty customer service I've ever experienced. No matter how good their bikes look and ride, I will never buy another Rocky Mountain.
  • 1 0
 I'm real happy with my Altitude Rally...It's a beast of a bike
  • 1 0
 oh ya I'm for that frame... maybe, the Antidote's are dam nice too
  • 1 0
 Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiik! bike!
  • 1 0
 DAYUMMMM BABY DAYUMMMM!!!
  • 1 0
 @RockyMountainBicycles does it not come with the new fox X2 climb switch?
  • 1 0
 2008 Slayer was classy, but 2017 is huge!
  • 2 1
 Wow!
  • 2 1
 THIS IS SO RAD
  • 3 3
 They specced a Yari on a 4000+ dollar bike?
  • 1 1
 Grrr, looks great, sounds great, no alloy version?
  • 1 1
 Better than a Turner Fucking Flux!!
  • 1 0
 Gazzaloddis FTW !
  • 1 0
 " or a Truax... "
  • 2 3
 The skies will be raining blood on this bike!
  • 5 6
 Pressfit BB - dealbreaker
  • 3 6
 yo rocky mountain norco called they what there pivot back
  • 3 1
 look like a ........ range
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