Specialized Command Post IRCC - Review

Nov 30, 2015 at 0:39
by Mike Levy  
Specialized Command Post IRCC


Specialized has released a few different iterations of their Command Post over the years, with the IRCC model reviewed below being the latest version that allows the rider to fine-tune the height of their saddle by way of ten micro-adjust positions once you've lowered the post by 25mm. Specialized calls this their Cruiser Control technology, and it should be a big step forward over the IRCC's predecessor that offered three set seat heights. The mechanically controlled, air sprung Command Post IRCC is available in 75, 100, and 125mm travel options, as well as 30.9mm and 31.6mm diameters. The 125mm, 30.9mm model I spent my time on weighed 586 grams on my scale, including the new SRL remote but without any cable or housing. MSRP $350 USD.
Command Post IRCC Details

• Intended use: having fun
• Travel: 75, 100, 125mm (tested)
• Travel type: indexed
• Adjustable air spring
• Cable operated
• Routing: internal
• SRL and grip-mount remotes incl.
• Diameters: 30.9mm, 31.6mm
• Weight: 586 grams (post and SRL remote)
• MSRP: $350 USD
www.specialized.com / @Specialized



What's Inside

Just like Specialized's earlier Command Post designs, the IRCC employs an expanding collet system that locks the post into position by engaging with notches machined into the inner wall of the post's lower tube. The purely mechanical design uses a wedge that sits inside of the expanding collet, and pushing the thumb lever extracts the wedge from within the collet and allows it to relax inwards away from the notches. This frees the post to move up or down through its travel. Release the thumb lever and the spring-loaded wedge retracts back into the collet, forcing it to expand outwards into one of the notches and locking the seat post into position.

The IRCC features a three-stage travel system: the top 25mm of travel is non-indexed, meaning the seat is either all the way up or lowered to the first indexing point at 25mm. Below that is 45mm of micro-adjust, with ten different positions to choose from in that 45mm (making it 4.5mm per position). The bottom 50mm of travel is non-indexed, so you're either running the post fully lowered or up 50mm so that it locks into the lowest micro-adjust position. Got that? Good.


Specialized Command Post IRCC
  The cable attaches to the actuation arm by way of a small barrel, but the slotted housing stop means that it takes only a few seconds to disconnect everything.


An air spring that runs between 15 and 20 PSI provides rebound, and the valve at the post's head can be accessed without removing or angling the seat back, not something that can be said of all of the internally routed posts that feature a head-mounted valve. And speaking of routing, the IRCC is only available in an internally routed setup - that's the IR in the name while the CC stands for the ten-position Cruiser Control design.

Specialized has decided to go with a single-bolt head, a decision that is obviously going to save some weight over to a dual, opposing-bolt setup. Anyone who's used a seat post with a single clamp bolt knows all too well how coming down hard on the seat can cause it to tilt back, regardless of how crazy you get with the hex keys, but the IRCC's single-bolt setup is very different than what Specialized's used to employ. Rather than wedges that are supposed to lock into place but often don't, the IRCC's rail clamps squeeze down onto the post's head that's shaped like an arch. The saddle angle is determined by where the clamps sit on this arch, and the design should resist unwanted tilting no matter how hard you come down on the seat.
Specialized Command Post IRCC
One bolt but no slipping.


The IRCC includes Specialized's awesome SRL remote lever that mimics the position and feel of a shifter's thumb paddle. That means that anyone who's ever operated a front derailleur should feel at home using the SRL lever, but Specialized also includes their standard grip-mounted remote that will be the way to go if your bike has a front shifter on it - the SRL remote won't work for you, sorry.




Installation

The Command Post IRCC I've been using came stock on a 6Fattie test bike and was performing flawlessly, but that's no reason not to take it off and mess around with it. That also gave me a chance to re-install the seat post, which turned out to be easier than making a smoothie but slightly more difficult than pouring yourself a bowl of cereal. Do you own a set of hex keys and possess a small amount of common sense? Then you've got this.

The cable and housing run through the frame, and then the cable is clamped into a barrel that sits in the actuation arm. The housing stop is slotted, and the barrel can be popped out easily, so you can disconnect the seat post and remove it in about twenty seconds, but without messing up the cable tension settings. And speaking of cable tension, setting it correctly is only a matter of pulling it slightly snug and tightening down the tiny set screw in the barrel with a 2mm hex key - thankfully, you can use 3mm key to hold the opposite side so the barrel doesn't spin in your fingers. Any tension adjustment can be done via a barrel adjuster at the lever, but the IRCC isn't finicky in that regard.



Performance

The first thing that any rider using the IRCC is going to notice is how its SRL remote is invisible. Well, it's obviously not invisible, but it is exactly where you'd expect it to be when you need it; no reaching, no unwrapping the thumb any more than is necessary. I'd agree that most companies are pretty dialed on this front, but the SRL remote feels like the best of the bunch, probably because I've spent twenty years pushing the thumb paddle of a front shifter and that is exactly what the SRL has been modeled after. Specialized's tiny grip-mounted remote is also nice, but the SRL is next level.

The IRCC's action is smooth, but it does have a distinctly mechanical feel about it. That's to be expected - it is a mechanical post, after all - and I'm a fan of the positive, 'ka-chung' action that won't leave you guessing as to what's going on beneath you. The return stroke is extremely fast compared to everyone but Fox, and while it'd be easy to make a joke about the Command Post being the least expensive way to get a vasectomy, I've never had any issues with it in that regard. The post goes up quick and puts the seat back where you need it in the blink of an eye, which is exactly what it should do. It also makes a noticeable topping out 'clunk' that lets you know the job is done. No guessing here.
Specialized Command Post IRCC
The SRL remote looks very much like a shifter, which isn't an accident.

Lowering the IRCC is a cinch, and it was never difficult to get those last five or ten millimeters of travel just by staying seated, even at its maximum air pressure of just 20 PSI. The Cruiser Control system is neat, and I appreciate the ability to micro tune the seat's height in a 45mm window, but I'm not sold on the CC function only being accessible once you've lowered the post by at least 25mm. Maybe I'm a weirdo, but I find myself most often looking for the seat to be just a handful of millimeters lower when I'm faced with a technical or steep climb that I might need to dab on or could benefit from a bit of extra confidence. But to access the IRCC's 45mm micro-adjust window, you need to lower the post by at least 25mm. The final 50mm of travel to bottom-out is non-indexed. When I'm descending, I usually want it slammed for maximum fun levels, or dropped by 35mm or so for rolling terrain.

Ideally, I'd like to see the 45mm of Cruiser Control micro-adjust right at the top of the post's stroke for fine tuning, with a more noticeable indexed middle position right under that, ala the original Command Post.


Specialized Command Post IRCC review test
  The latest Command Post is easy to set up and use, and it has proven to be a reliable option as well.


The latest Command Post receives a perfect grade when it comes to reliability: no hiccups and no serious issues. The post's mechanical internals and quick return speed weren't affected by chilly riding temps, either, which gives it the leg up over most hydraulically controlled dropper posts. And as for side-to-side wiggle, there are maybe two or three millimeters of play at the seat's nose, which is basically nothing.


Issues

As mentioned above, I found myself wishing that Specialized had put the Cruiser Control function at the top of the post's stroke, but I might be in the minority on that one. My only other real gripe is that I wish a 150mm travel option were available. The 125mm model I've been using will be more than enough for a lot of riders, but having spent most of the year on a 150mm dropper, I found myself noticing how the seat was 25mm closer to my underside than I'd prefer.




Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesReliability is still the big issue for dropper seat posts, and if a dropper can prove its worth on that front, it's a winner in my books. The Command Post IRCC does exactly that while costing less than most of its competition. And while I'd like to see more travel and a change up to the micro-adjust positions, it is definitely worth putting on your shortlist if you're looking for a new dropper. - Mike Levy




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178 Comments

  • 209 4
 ATTENTION SHOP EMPLOYEES: DO NOT PUT 30PSI IN IT AND HAVE CUSTOMERS TEST RIDE WITHOUT KNOWING THE BALL BUSTING CAPABILITIES. While I'm sure they all got a good laugh I'm fairly certain it cost me a few thousand potential grandkids.
  • 64 0
 First time hitting that lever while hovering over the seat was the biggest mistake I'd ever made. Couldn't have gotten a worse first impression of dropper posts hahaha
  • 7 8
 This new post doesn't come up as abruptly as the older models. I have never had it come up too fast, it is always where you want it without a delay, but not so fast it hurts.
  • 48 1
 True, I built an enduro with one of these that would lift the back wheel off the ground when you released the post
  • 4 1
 Can I sue them for GBH?
  • 59 0
 I re read your posts with a very high pitched voice...
  • 22 0
 Grievous bollock harm?

Genital bashing harassment?
  • 7 0
 Goodness, bollocks hurt
  • 33 0
 General Ball Hammering
  • 13 1
 I had two non-mtb'ing friends visit to ride my local trails. Rented them demo spesh bikes with this dropper post. Showed them how to lower the seat and provided no additional instructions as to how to raise the seat - hilarity ensued.
  • 6 1
 These comments are priceless lol
  • 2 1
 I finally fine tuned the air pressure in this thing to come up at about the same speed as a reverb, after many, many, many painful attempts...but about 5-7PSI and you're golden.
  • 20 2
 something is very funny about paying Specialized $350 for a kick in the ass...
  • 2 3
 I want this dropper post because I need one with offset, but I can imagine myself getting scared everytime I push the button lol
  • 3 1
 In all seriousness if you inflate to 10ish psi it's fine. That "event" happened once but never again after I bought the bike.
  • 2 10
flag mxben13 (Dec 3, 2015 at 12:06) (Below Threshold)
 AT LEAST YOURS COMES UP, I OWN A 13 MODEL AND I LITERALLY HAVE TO YANK IT UP, NO MATTER WHAT I DO - REBUILD, LUBRICANT, NEW SEALS. POS.
  • 5 18
flag dirtworks911 (Dec 3, 2015 at 12:42) (Below Threshold)
 Anyone who voluntarily rides anything Specialized doesn't need nuts cus they'll never use them. lol lol lol
  • 7 1
 @mxben13 Maybe if you stop yelling it at it will cooperate.

I stopped in to the local Specialized shop a few weeks back to look at Stumpys and Cambers. Dropped the post once and popped it back up. I don't think I would be exaggerating terribly much in calling the return stoke "violent".
  • 4 2
 Why get this when a KS Lev Integra exists? Return speed is fast, but gentle. Also infinite.
  • 6 0
 We had a customer bring in a first gen command post and when you hit the lever, not kidding, the post topped out hard enough to lift the back of his 42lb trail bike a solid 3 inches off the ground.. He had like 65psi in the post.
  • 2 0
 All of you guys need to but like 12-15 psi in the post, it doesn't need to go to the max haha its all recommended pressure. Pressure to preference but I know im not setting my tires at 45 psi just because thats the max on the sidewall haha
  • 1 0
 @dirtworks911 not to sound like a total "fanboy" here, but please tell that to Nicholi Rogatkin. Im sure you ride JUST like Semenuk cause you have a Session!!! Because the bike does ALL of the work for the riders. (I pray you have the mental capacity to detect the sarcasm)
  • 2 3
 @Schy, Nicholi rides specialized because they pay him to do so. Just like Semenuk with trek. I never said the bike makes the rider and I never said I'm just like Semenuk cus of my session. (I'm just like Gee cus he rides the 27.5" version; to be read with sarcasm.) What I was really doing was poking fun at these "superior riders" who will proudly boast about how their specialized is the best in existence because they ate up all the marketing bullshit they were given by their specialized shop (specialized being the very company that silently took back all their bullshit "650b is only a fad and we'll never make a bike for this useless wheel size" comments a few years back.) Funny how a company will gladly try to sell you something they apparently don't even believe in... ...and when it comes to riding, these same riders who have been fed all these lies have no idea what they are even doing on a trail. Those are the people my comment was directed towards.
Ps, I know each brand has those types of people but it seams that there are a little bit more than average on the specialized bandwagon.
  • 2 0
 The respect I have towards a big company like Specialized AND Trek (I have over 15 models of each brand of bike, including Cannondales) has to do more with the funding they have to put into research and development. So go ahead, buy a SANYO television because EVERYONE has a Samsung... pfft.
  • 3 2
 @Schy, wow dude. You've got a ton of bikes, how do you manage to keep up with your weekly fan letter writing to Rogatkin, comments on pinkbike, and ride all those dang bikes? Like dirtworks911, I too can't support a company that bashes on a wheelsize only to put it into their own production a few years later. Looks like they gave up on creating a 29er that's fun to ride and realized 650b is just what people were looking for. PS, the reason why people buy Samsung's is because sanyo is complete shit...just like your comments and probably riding ability too
  • 1 0
 That supports my comment completely. Sanyo=Less Sales=Less funding for research and development.
Samsung=More Sales=More money for research and development.
Do you understand the concept?
If you're completely concerned with my riding abilities look at my youtube videos from when I first started...
I own a successful business that allows me time and money to dedicate to my passions. Thank you for your concern Smile
  • 2 0
 Loving it. People hate when you go to school for engineering, because sadly for you whole concept of the bicycle is built around advancements in science, physics, and engineering... Maybe concepts you dont understand??? You'd rather get into the logistics and get your panties in a bunch Smile I will continue to dump thousands into these companies because I love the sport. Not because 650b or 29er, hell I'll invest in all 3 because I love bikes!!! By the way I have all the time I want to write my comments because I work for myself. Smile you guys have fun while I'm out riding for my health Smile not to bash I just dont see how any of your comments are very constructive towards a conclusion. Mine is
More funding for R&D = More engineers
Please agree with me on this one...
  • 1 0
 @Ride-More: Gross Bodily Harm? Great, now i want to rock some GBH!
  • 61 7
 Everyone hitting their nuts with the seat are a bunch of Joeys. Why would you ever literally hover over the seat with your nuts deliberately dangling in the impact zone?
  • 45 1
 some people have big balls.
  • 54 4
 It's why Danny Hart doesn't use a dropper...
  • 3 1
 If you're used to an infinite adjust dropper I can see how you might wind up in the danger zone
  • 35 1
 What is never mentioned in the reviews of the Command post is that you can flip the saddle clamp around and you have either 25 or 10 mm of setback.. Worth knowing.
  • 1 0
 REally? I was going to complain that I don't like how much setback mine has, but if I can adjust it....
  • 4 0
 yeah, flip the clamp round and hey presto! its in the install instructions, but NO ONE ever mentions it.
  • 3 1
 I guess that's what I get for not reading instructions fully.
  • 1 0
 Actually, according to Specialized own user manuals, the IR model's clamp can be flipped for 20 or 10mm setback. The IRCC model is NOT reversible and set at 10mm.
  • 1 0
 @dad2emk: I wonder why the change from the IR to the IRCC in terms of the seat clamp? Did something change?
  • 31 0
 Hey Specialized, the reliability makes it interesting. 150 or even 175mm drop would make a sale right now.
  • 18 0
 175mm please! I'm 6'3" and used to have to max out my post height for climbs then slam it to go down even with the 125mm dropper. I have a 150mm now and its almost right
  • 8 1
 Yep 175mm please...150mm not enough!
  • 23 0
 Sounds like a horrid conversation with a girl haha
  • 10 2
 Size of a dropper is not as important as the sustained rigidity.
  • 1 1
 Dayum they have 75, that's the shit ! I sold my 125 reverb cause couldn't reach the pedals, new 100 reverb is going my way 4 s reason ! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Yes, and incremental adjustment near the top, not in the middle! Mike and I can't be the only who see that as bizarre.
  • 8 0
 I've been servicing these for a little while now and I must say that I admire its simplicity. I've had a good amount of experience servicing most other posts. This Command post is nice and simple to do at home, hardly takes any time, and the service kits are cheap.
  • 2 0
 Same with the Gravity Dropper. Makes you realize how over-complicated the rest of them are.
  • 8 0
 Totally agree with you Mike about having the tuning range at the top of the travel. Actually I liked very much the limited adjustments of previous models. Not much to think of and focus on the riding.
  • 7 0
 Have the original Command post 2012, works great till this day, easily serviceable no fuss no muss and has never
let me down period. Out of all the remote posts ie; rock shock, lev that come through the shop for service the Command post seems to be the most reliably and durable. Single bolt seat clamp has never given me a problem with it not being tight enough. Just my .02
  • 1 0
 I think when you get one that works keep it. Got a "12" command post and has been rebuilt twice. Got a couple XFusion posts on a deal that still work and we just love them. . . . . . Go figure!
  • 11 1
 They should have a zero setback option
  • 6 0
 See my other comment
  • 4 0
 I seee, thanks
  • 1 1
 Specialized typically designs their bike frame geometry with a setback seatpost in mind, so their dropper post is done the same way.
  • 2 1
 @jfloren - Maybe so, but Specialized doesn't make a bike with a 31.6mm seat post, so why would they offer the Command Post in that size? They're clearly trying to market the post to the masses, not just Specialized bike owners.
  • 11 2
 Very dissapointed guys, you should Post some puns !
  • 9 0
 Command Post, here. Acknowledged. Pun team, you're clear to engage.
  • 3 0
 were you let down by the lack of puns?
  • 7 1
 Yeah they really dropped the post on this one.
  • 3 0
 @Jim-laden perhaps you will adjust to this setback.
  • 8 1
 Not even remotely funny guys
  • 10 1
 Cool
  • 19 0
 Whip
  • 12 1
 cool cool cool - Abed
  • 30 0
 Cool Hwip
  • 4 0
 Been having a problem with mine on my new enduro expert. When I press down on the seat you can hear the seat post clicking in a way....even at all positions. I don't think its those notches, my local bit shop didn't help me at all, said it was just a loud seat post? Any other guys have problems like this? Spent $6k on a new bike, wish i could have a $350 part on it work properly and quietly.
  • 2 0
 That's sounds like the seat clamp bolt, the post/frame interface, the collar, or the seat rail bolt needs some grease/cleaning. The post will click as it moves through the range and the first sit as it settles in the new position. But if you are getting clicking otherwise it's not a bad post, just one needing TLC.
  • 3 0
 do you have a small amount of play in the lever? If there is not then sometimes the collet is not completely locked out in the groove and the sound that you are hearing is the collet. If that does not fix it then take it back to the shop and have them send it to spec. they have an unconditional guarantee. I have the same post on my bike and we have 5-6 demo bikes and none of them make that noise. I think that its either the tensoin in the lever(should have about a 1mm wiggle) or just a bad post.
  • 1 0
 There is almost a buzz through the middle of the travel. Thats to indicate the cruser control position. Not sure if that might have been what you are talking about either.
  • 2 0
 Greese up all the external bits and see if that works. It is just kinda a loud post though.
  • 1 0
 mine does the exact same, you end up with a solution for this ?
  • 2 0
 @adamskii: the click when you sit on the post is the brake settling into the preset slots. It's just a very basic post mechanically.
  • 6 0
 Along with Newtons 3rd Law of Equal and Opposite reaction, can I hit the lever mid corner to make the post pop up and push the wheel into the ground for more grip?
  • 5 0
 That's Gwin's secret! Write it down on Bike Radar and people will discuss for months.
  • 3 0
 just make sure you have sturdy side knobs on the rear tire, otherwise it's a drift button.
  • 7 3
 Don't forget to measure the psi when the seat is lowered! 20psi at full extension is a whole lot more psi once you squash it into the lowered position.
  • 3 0
 This is not true for at least the IR version. I've just got a command post so checked this and the manual says the seat must be in the " Pressure must be set with the seatpost in the fully extended (Power) position"
  • 2 0
 Have had a Command post before and it lasted me 2 years with not too much hasssle... only bit I don't like is the single bolt seat attachment for the seat rails. For a bigger guy like me it always ended up angling up or down when you least wanted it too.
  • 3 0
 I also think Specialized kind of missed the point with the micro adjust. Sometimes it's great to drop just a centimeter or two, from the middle of the travel it goes all way down.
  • 1 0
 I used one of these on a day long Specialized demo and agree with just about everything here, except that the mechanism was really "laggy". I'm used to my KS Lev, which is immediately responsive upon hitting the lever so I can make an adjustment up or down. I found the Command Post to have a short, but noticeable, lag between when I hit the lever and when the mechanism engaged so I could make adjustments. It was most noticeable when releasing the post back to full length, I'd hit the lever and there was a significant lag between when the lever was hit and the post began to extend.

I'm sure this is something you could get used to, but it was really disorienting for me and it was enough for me to miss a few adjustments I tried to make.

I also agree and noticed the micro adjustment window being misplaced.
  • 3 0
 I have experienced none of this, either on my personal bikes or the 5 or 6 I've set up for the sales floor in my shop. My bet is that the cable was slightly too loose.
  • 2 0
 That post needed service. Specialized IRCC has a 70 hour service interval.You don't have to remove the post and it takes 5 minute. Lazy demo driver.
  • 1 0
 KS Lev DX on my bike right now and I prefer it to anything else I've used.
  • 2 1
 Am I the only one that wants a dropper post with a 2 button remote? One would work like a traditional dropper remote. The other would pull the seatpost down an inch or so with each press. There's a lot of trail segments with abrupt changes between steep climbs and steep descents. It can be difficult at times to maintain flow when the trail suddenly switches directions and you're trying to sit down and lower the seat while pinning it on the downhill. I would love to be able to make all the adjustments from the handlebars so I could maintain riding position at all times. First world problems, I know...
  • 1 0
 You would need energy stored somewhere to overcome the spring force to bring the seat down. Trek seems to be playing around with this solution

www.vitalmtb.com/product/feature/Trek-Invents-Automatic-Dropper-Seatpost-No-More-Sitting-Down-Required,335
  • 1 0
 I just hold the lever down and let it go where I want it. The command post takes very little force to push down.
  • 1 0
 @bikingthomas - The DOSS post from Fox has two levers, with the smaller lever dropping the post down to the cruiser position. It won't take it any lower - hit the other lever for that - but it does make finding the cruiser position easy.
  • 1 0
 Great review. Did you get chance to test it in cold weather (50 degrees and below)? I have a Command Post from last year and although I am extremely pleased with it, the post always becomes stuck down, or returns extremely slowly when exposed to colder weather... Any suggestions on this? @mikelevy
  • 2 0
 @kdstones - Yup, I used the IRCC post is weather from -5C to about 10C (23F - 50F) and it didn't return any slower. I know that Specialized was recommending a different grease when things got chilly, but I've never needed it.
  • 1 0
 I've owned Command Posts since they've been out. I have three, including the model just before this review.

Slow return in cold.... The older models were more problematic in this regard. To fix, first, just run a few more psi. Then, if still needed, I remove the valve core and inject a few cc's of heavy oil, followed by a few squirts of WD40. Cycle the post while upside down a few times and you are good to go for a few rides. Flip and cycle the "oil bath" should it get sticky again,

Great posts.

The three positions are better however.
  • 1 0
 WD40 contains solvents,i wouldn't recommend putting it in your dropper post.Use some light oil if you have to,I have had good results servicing the Command post with Slikoleum.Never slows down the return in cold temps.
  • 1 0
 Can you access the air valve in the post with just a shock pump? Or does it require a special pump?
  • 1 0
 Specialized actually has a "Cold Weather Tune" for their command post. I did this to mine and it works fantastic in the winter.

service.specialized.com/asc/Content/Tech%20Pubs/Technical%20Bulletins/TB0208A_revA.pdf

It is also a great idea just service your post. You will need a strap wrench on the newer models to get to the internals. Its super easy to do. Just use some Slick Honey and a good amount of Fork Oil. Mine is super fast and i just leave the winter tune in year round. Rocket slick.
  • 2 1
 A few people on here are saying the height range is not good enough!! Dont forget, you used to have to get off of your bike and undo the quick release to move the saddle up or down, do it back up and get back on your bike!! You will want the bike to turn corners for you next
  • 1 0
 I have the first model of the Command post. It's great most of the time. I bought it used (since 350$ in Croatia is quite a bit of money). It's really easy to service it. Just open it via a strap wrench and grease it. It has mechanical actuation so it's pretty reliable, does not drop when you don't want to and no bleeding. The things I hate about it is the actuation mechanism where the cable meets the lever under the saddle (they redesigned it in the next model with the cable going through a barrel) and the constant slipping of the saddle, that is really annoying.
  • 1 0
 Has anyone experienced issues with losing the air pressure in those posts? Mine post has started to lose air recently. It has come to a point where I have to inflate the post after a few cycles. A friend of mine experienced similar issues. Anyone?
  • 2 0
 I can second this review awesome post. The cool thing is the barrel adjuster is more like a contact point adjustment for how far into the stroke the lever actuated the post.
  • 3 0
 I have an older external cable version of this and it's still working fine.
  • 3 2
 Air value accessible without unscrewing anything but the valve cap - somebody xplanied what a pain in the ass that can be otherwise to doublecheck. Nice - cause when I expect it to go full erect, it better perform.
  • 2 1
 Umm, that'd be "air valve" accessible......
  • 6 4
 I don't get the allure with hidden cables. It makes them tougher to get to. Seems like it's only for people who don't actually work on their bike.
  • 3 1
 Wait till you have snapped the cable mid-ride and you will be wishing it was hidden!
  • 2 2
 So I'm stuck on the side of the trail fishing it through the frame? No thanks.
  • 1 2
 Exposed cables are no big deal on frames that either have bosses for dropper posts or have bosses in the right places (sometimes FD bosses work)...but the zip tie method both looks and works like ass.
  • 2 1
 The point of it being hidden is it doesn't get broken in the first place! If your running a hydraulic post your toast and if its wire it may be finished as well. Prevention is better than cure!
  • 2 1
 On my external, on the lowest setting, the cable housing loops out and brushes your leg when you pedal seated (granted, you don't pedal often when seated in the lowest position) and its super annoying.
  • 5 1
 Change your cables once in a blue moon and they won't snap mid ride.25 years of mountain biking and i've never snapped a cable.
  • 3 3
 "One bolt but no slipping." If it's the same as the older version then I call BS on that. Mine slipped a ton.

Also. Unless they've improved the new version the reliability is iffy at best. Every time I'd put air into the post (it leaked a lot) the schrader valve would come with the shock pump when I unscrewed it thus loosing all the air.
  • 4 0
 Totally different design to the old one, they do not slip at all.
  • 2 0
 Put some carbon paste on before clamping it, works wonders.
  • 2 0
 The one on my command post looks like this one, and never ever slips
  • 1 0
 First, the Schreader valve has a 5mm hex built in, so when it comes out, you can snug it down really well. Mine came out once, and never since.

Because the whole post is the air chamber, this makes for a very large air volume for a post, combined with a relatively low pressure, and a few PSI lost can cause the post to not raise. Making it seem like maintenance is frequent. 2-3 pumps of air, and it's back up and running. Compare this to a Reverb, where you either have to remove the post (sometimes not easy if the hose is trimmed short) or remove the seat, and have to inflate to 250psi!

My post, the IRc, has yet to slip. The new "alien head" post is different to the old. I also seat bounce and land seated occasionally, something that would surely cause the old style head to slip.
  • 3 0
 if your "old style" head is slipping try some carbon installation paste on the wedge peices.It worked for me.
  • 1 1
 My first dropper- a fricken reverb, failed after I stepped over the bars one day, but only the bar ends and pedals touched the ground.
Since the bike was fairly new, my LBS sent the Reverb back for a replacement.
In the interim I bought a KS Lev, and since then(2012) have never looked back. All the rags seem to rip on the Lev, but since I've had nothing but TOTAL reliability from it, I'll keep buying them thank you very much.
As far as Specialized is concerned, their POS seat clamp has ejected me off the end of my bike enough times(I ran the stock Command post for a month or so on the several Enduros I've purchased) so that they could sell a 2 gram, platinum Command post and I wouldn't give it the time of day.
  • 1 0
 @ mike levy, what pressure would you recommend for the best performance on the command post?I just got a command post and I'm trying to find a good setup. It seems to me less is better.
  • 4 1
 How long 'til a review of the fattie.
  • 5 0
 A few weeks out, I think.
  • 1 0
 Good news. Looking forward to it.
  • 6 7
 Raliability issuez... we need frames accepting larger post diameters, 40mm or so. Go get a fork with 28,6 stanchions and try to resize charger or RC2 damper to fit in it. Guess how reliable and well performing that will be. Larger tubes will also make it possible to make lower frames. @RichardCunningham I call for your expertize here!
  • 2 0
 Why would you need to adjust compression or rebound on your seat post?
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns then sidewalls would have to be thinner to keep the weight down, making them weaker to impact strikes
  • 2 2
 @TheRaven - I meant that if you put a lot of parts into a narrow compartment, requiring tighter tolerances, that's structure is additionally less rigid, putting stress on those internals, then things SEEM to be less reliable.
@hamncheez - SID gained 50g when moving from 28.6 to 32mm. And that fork is the most sensitive weight-subject in the bicycle suspension world. Make it too heavy and angry mob will get you. Chill out Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Waki, you are correct that a larger diameter post would solve some real issues - like making the post stiffer and stronger so it can handle the stress of being extended farther out of the frame. And larger diameter tubes could reduce the internal air and hydraulic pressures required to freeze the post in place and extend it.

But, there are good reasons to keep dropper posts small as well. The lower part has to be thick enough to resist "hoop compression" so it won't distort or shrink and bind the stanchion when clamped in the frame. There has to be enough thickness to provide for keyways and threads, and to be able to hold bushings at their intended tolerances - all those areas add weight, and none can be made thinner, just because the post has been scaled into a larger diameter. More metal/more weight.

In addition, smaller tubes have less swept area for seals and bushings, so the designer can call out much tighter tolerances to minimize saddle wiggle, knowing that the extra friction that may be created will be easy for the spring and rider to overcome. The sliding parts of a larger diameter post would require more precision to manufacture and, presumably, more maintenance by the user. It can be done, and probably will, but my prediction is that the larger format droppers will weigh and cost more than what we have now, and produce similar reliability - they would, however, allow for greater extension.
  • 1 0
 That makes total sense @RichardCunningham, Thank you
  • 3 0
 When does the Magura dropper post come out?
  • 2 0
 As much as I enjoy my command post, I really wanted to try out that marchozzi one. That thing was beautiful.
  • 1 0
 My 2016 Stumpjumper came stock with this dropper on it, hasn't lost any air pressure or performance in 5 months. I run 24 psi for my own safety....
  • 2 0
 Is this the only dropper with an offset?
  • 1 0
 i think so
  • 1 0
 Giant and 9.8 have one with setback, but I ended up with the command post. IIRC, it was the lightest.
  • 1 0
 The 9.8 Fall Line also has an offset head option. 25mm IIRC
www.9point8.ca/index.php/products/sesatposts/product/69-fall-line-dropper-post
  • 3 0
 Thats fine.
  • 2 0
 Haha, relieved to have your approval.
  • 1 0
 Havent read the article yet, but first thing I noticed... Seat angle? The image kind of scares me
  • 2 0
 9.8 fall line its 30 more dollars and way better
  • 1 3
 Pound and a half of shit waiting to go wrong . All for a mere 350 bucks! awesome! I guess if i owned one of these i would have to defend the damned thing! I think ill just save...... A pound and a half!!!!! bwahahahahahahahaa.
  • 2 3
 My KS Lev Integra Seatpost is a royal pain in the ass - no pun intended. Sticks like crazy. Might switch it our for this Specialized...
  • 10 0
 you probably need to rebuild it. Just a clean and re-grease like you would lowers on a fork, usually does the trick. If parts are worn, they can be obtained through your LBS or online. Check out the rebuild video on the KS website for step by step instructions.
  • 6 0
 My KS Lev and then Lev Integra were always flawless.. unlike Reverb..
As said earlier, just service ther "lowers" once in a while, and they will perform great.
If seatpost got sag, you can even fully rebuild it with no much effort. It's really simple inside.. unlike Reverb.
There's guide, how to fully service KS seatposts: forums.mtbr.com/all-mountain/ks-lev-diy-cartridge-rebuild-899659.html
  • 2 0
 a lot of the KS Levs are coming sticky out of the box. At least the OEM ones.
  • 2 0
 Mine was sticky out of the box, if by sticky you mean it won't extend on the button after it's been stood for half an hour. I wish it only had three positions actually. I find myself only wanting fully up, two inches down or fully down. All that no-man's land in the middle is too confusing for me.
  • 1 0
 Yes jaame - exactly. Won't budge after sitting for 15 minutes or so. I agree regarding 3 positions - I test piloted a bike with the Command post and it was great - snappy and to your point, 3 positions was enough. All this infinite adjust I find unnecessary. Think I'll be switching...
  • 2 3
 I have a Rase seatpost
Its old
Never broke
Head wiggles and I don't care because that does no harm
Adjustable from 9" down

Mines set at 7"
  • 4 0
 Your haiku sucks.
  • 1 0
 Im on my third one!! Air seals keep leaking! And I never go over 20 psi.
  • 2 0
 best post evah
  • 1 1
 intended use: having fun....lol

i dont use dropper post and still having fun...
  • 1 0
 specialized lineup rejected on Indonesia market (for next year)
  • 5 4
 Cool Beans
  • 1 2
 Now SRAM and Specialized tied up, No Sram Clamp no specialized Dropper.. just saying.
  • 1 0
 Fortunately those standalone clamps cost like $10. I love it, it matches up perfectly with my Matchmaker Guide lever.
  • 3 3
 these are lame buy a 9.8 dropper instead
  • 2 1
 agree 9point8, RF/Easton posts are similar in operation but give you infinite adjust (if that's what you like) and 150mm with a choice of straight or layback heads.
  • 1 0
 RF/Easton ?They bought the right for internals from 9.8.A company of that size should be able to develop their own technology,but no they just threw some money at it and slapped two different logo's on it.Now that's lame.Heared nothing but great things about 9.8 though.
  • 1 2
 Why havent these been made out of carbon fibre yet? It would be so much lighter, stiffer, stronger,better! ;-)
  • 2 2
 Command Post- the budget trailside vasectomy!
  • 1 0
 I like mine Smile
  • 1 1
 dat seat angle tho
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