Tech Week 2023: Ministry Cycles' Psalm 150 Prototype

Oct 23, 2022 at 17:37
by Mike Levy  


Ministry Cycles Psalm 150


If we're talking high-end frames, we're usually also talking carbon fiber... but that could change in the near future. Ministry Cycles, founded by industry vet Chris Currie, is one of a handful of brands working on frames machined from solid blocks of aluminum, with the two halves of the Psalm 150 being stuck together using aerospace-grade glue. The 150mm-travel Psalm employs the latest version of Currie's 3VO suspension and was designed around a 160mm fork, but owners can bump up to 170mm if they're looking for more.

It's still early days for Ministry Cycles and the Psalm 150 frame pictured here is the first rideable prototype, but Currie does have plans for a limited run of twenty production frames that will be available in the near future.
Psalm 150 Details
• Intended use: Trail / enduro
• Travel: 150mm rear / 160mm front
• Frame material: CNC aluminum
• Wheel size 29"
• 3VO suspension
• Interchangeable dropouts
• Head angle: 65°
• Seat angle: 77.7°
• Reach: 480 / 490mm (adjustable)
• MSRP: TBA
• More info: www.ministrycycles.com


Psalm 150 Frame Details

Why not welded tubes or molded carbon fiber? "I'm looking for a fabrication method that can scale while still allowing for customization, flexibility, and agility," Currie answered before going on to say that it also gives him more control over the manufacturing of his bike, especially compared to following the same route others have that eventually lead to, "big bike factories." Ministry is aiming to produce more frames than most small builders would be able to weld up, but turning to carbon fiber creates all sorts of baked-in challenges, especially when it comes to timelines and, God forbid, wanting to make a quick mid-production cycle update to the design.


Ministry Cycles Psalm 150


All that led Currie to look at CNC machining, but he explained that it required outside help and plenty of homework: "When your goal is to make more than a handful of frames a year, you need to build a team and systems. I finally found a great engineer, Jordan Jackson at Certa Design and Engineering in the UK, to work out the shapes and do FEA so we were sure we had a solid foundation. Then researching the best way to bond, and the different adhesives, and finally finding a factory capable of machining the frames--at a time when aluminum was hitting record high prices--it was one hell of a learning experience. I've been in the bike industry for a long time, but almost none of that ended up mattering. Making this frame meant tearing up the playbook and finding new ways to do things."

Currie actually bonded the two halves of his one and only prototype together himself in his Vancouver, Washington, garage, and told me that the process is pretty straightforward. "I built myself a simple jig for keeping the swingarm aligned during bonding, and the front triangle is designed with multiple self-aligning lap joints, so it just requires a preparation process, and then applying the adhesive in a certain pattern."

"I work through a checklist I created as a series of slides on my laptop because I'm pretty compulsive that way, but as long as you're careful and deliberate, the process has all the drama of super gluing two Lego blocks together--only with an industrial grade adhesive similar to what they use on aircraft and cars. There are a few Henkel products that have really outstanding and nearly identical numbers when it comes to aluminum. I'm still researching but the prototype has been bombproof, so I'll probably keep everything exactly as I have it now."

I am going to argue that the result is one of the most stunning frames out there, with the angular lines and machined finish setting the Psalm 150 apart from pretty much everything else on the trails.



3VO Suspension

The 150mm-travel Psalm uses a dual-link layout called 3VO that's an evolved and tweaked version of what Jamis has had on their full-suspension bike for years. ''The new 3VO suspension is simpler and has a steady, progressive leverage ratio," Currie told me. "It actually goes back to my original, original design from years ago, which uses only two links but was a little too progressive for old-school air shocks." Currie had been using a prototype version of that extra-progressive linkage set-up, called the Prog Rocker, on his personal Jamis Portal for a couple of years, and the Psalm employs that layout combined with a high-volume air shock.




This iteration of 3VO suspension is also simpler than previous versions, with two links rather than three, and Currie has stressed how important it is for his bike to pedal well. ''Unlike a lot of designs that cheat on the center of gravity location or gearing, the 3VO suspension has well over 100% of anti-squat even when you’re in the largest rear cog, and even if you choose to run a 34-tooth chainring," he explained on the Ministry website. ''When it comes to climbing, very few systems can match the efficiency of a 3VO bike. When it comes to balancing sensitivity, responsiveness, and efficiency, nothing is even close.''



Geometry


150mm is what some trail riders want, but it could be enough to be many peoples' enduro bike, especially if they were to put a 170mm-travel fork on it as you can with the Psalm. That relaxes the steering from 65-degrees with a 160mm fork to 64.5-degrees. There are also headset cups that can be rotated to let Currie set the reach to either 480mm or 490mm on his medium / large prototype, and Ministry might also add an option to steepen or relax the head angle further.

At the other end of the bike, interchangeable dropouts let him choose between a 435mm or 445mm rear end. The latter provides 37mm of bottom bracket drop, at least on his first prototype, while the former stands the bike up by 7mm.

The seat angle sits at 77.7-degrees, and Currie has been pleasantly surprised with the prototype's uphill performance, especially given that it's still a few pounds heavier than the final bike will be: "With going from a quicker and steeper 130mm carbon XC bike to this burlier 150mm bike with a 65° head tube angle, I was prepared to lose some climbing ability, but this thing goes up walls. I'm at 77.7° on this bike, and it climbs so much better that it's just ridiculous."




What's Next?

If you want your own Psalm 150, you can find a pre-order link on Ministry Cycles' website that will let you place a deposit, but Currie is capping the first run at just twenty frames and admits that they will be pricey: "I wish I could get around that, and eventually I think we can, but right now they’re just incredibly expensive to make. We’re working on the revised frame now, and plenty of things could also delay production, so we’re talking a deposit that’s fully refundable at any time."

"The mission is really to make things for people, based on what they want, not make a bunch of things and then try to convince people they want them. I have some really strong opinions about geometry and how a bike should ride, but this really goes back to connecting with people and listening. That’s what I want Ministry Cycles to really be about."




Want to know more? I sat down with industry veteran and founder of Ministry Cycles, Chris Currie, to talk about how the Psalm 150 came to life, public development and lifecycle, design flexibility, and so much more. Chris also started Speedgoat, one of the earliest online retailers back in the 1990s, and has spent more than a decade in the marketing trenches at Stans, giving him a unique perspective on the cycling industry and the future.




THE PINKBIKE PODCAST // EPISODE 145 - MINISTRY CYCLES ON ALTERNATIVE MANUFACTURING, GLUING FRAMES, & STARTING A BUSINESS
September 22nd, 2022

Aluminum, glue, and online sales.


Tech Week 2023 is a chance to get up to speed on the latest mountain bike components, apparel, and accessories. Click here to view all of the related content.




174 Comments

  • 154 0
 Jesus built his hotrod. Just ding a ding dang his dang a long ling long and there it was.
  • 28 0
 Came here for this. You're doing the Lords work.
  • 22 0
 It's a love affair. Between Jesus, and my hotrod. And maybe this bike
  • 13 0
 I'm waiting until they release the Psalm 169.
  • 9 0
 But will this succeed or suck eggs?
  • 14 0
 @timinger: Some will Never Believe, but So What? Had a Burning Inside to Test the idea.
  • 10 0
 Hopefully it'll need just one fix
  • 5 2
 All Hail the Dark Lord!!! May he bequeath more metal mastery to us!!!
  • 1 0
 Dear God
  • 4 0
 Jesus built my enduro, it's mainly a love affair between Jesus and my enduro.
  • 2 0
 You assume one would need breath......breath.......breath.., breath extra hard when climbing with those "few extra pounds".
  • 1 0
 @jaytdubs: Few extra pounds!
Hey you can't talk about me that way, at least not right to my face...
  • 109 39
 Machining a tubular structure from billet, lol. If any of my engineering students suggested that I'd probably fail them for choosing the wrong manufacturing method. Still I guess if you get sucked into a parallel dimension where brazing / welding hadn't been invented it might be useful.
  • 72 84
flag haen (Oct 27, 2022 at 11:23) (Below Threshold)
 Then don't buy it and spare us your superiority complex.
  • 141 22
 @haen: It's only a complex if I'm not superior.
  • 24 33
flag haen (Oct 27, 2022 at 11:30) (Below Threshold)
 @HPdeskjet3630: I rest my case
  • 15 6
 I think you have to take the production scale into account. What options you have, weld from simple tubes and make the bike look bad, use hydroforming which i gues is expensive for short runs, use CNC which is easily accessible anywhere or make it from carbon fiber (investing in moulds and trying to find skilled worker or a factory in Taiwan). So maybe you are right from engineering standpoint but you probably missed the economical factor.
  • 24 1
 @lkubica: why would I, a consumer, want to buy a bike that has inferior engineering but was somehow more convenient for the company selling it to make?
  • 30 1
 Keep in mind that bikes aren't just machines. They are also fashion statements for enthusiasts and people with more money than sense.
  • 14 7
 I'm not saying it isn't impressive as a show case of CNC machining. But lets not pretend that bikes using unusual manufacturing methods aren't mostly doing it for the sake of being different. The Atherton bike springs to mind as another (pretty cool) example.
  • 6 4
 @haen: it’s his opinion and I happen to agree with it! If you’re going to invest in that much machining why not create a mold for carbon fiber or thermoplastics
  • 13 1
 @rivercitycycles: Because a mould let you make only one design, using CNC you can make every frame a little different. So it's a great prototyping tool and a very bad mass production tool. It's also probably acceptable if you make tens of frames a year.
  • 1 3
 @Ttimer: I don't know if I want to vote this up or down. I hate the idea that bikes are fashion statements, but if you are also hating on the people with more money than sense (and that talk more than they ride) then you can take my upvote.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: Why not go full additive then? Velo3D make machines that can handle dimensions sufficient for the all of the frame components, and they have a network of companies that own printers and do contract based printing. If you want to go 11 you can get design/analysis tools, define a geometry and a linkage then solve for a generative structure that optimizes for weight or whatever. Machining isn't necessarily cheap and it would be interesting to see how much the two fabrication methods differ in price. The finished product is probably 3.5kg and with one method you are building up from a powder bed with little waste, the other way you are machining this out of a billet that probably weighs 100kg (or more?).
  • 7 1
 @rivercitycycles: And it's totally fair to have an opinion (this is the internet). Based on my experience with injection molding, molds are extremely expensive and they have a very long lead time. You then need to sell significantly more frames than Ministry plans to sell (20) to recoup that investment. On top of this, you have to find a factory with the capacity and skills to build your bike. Specialized has had problems it the CF layup in their Enduro frames and they're not exactly small time. So I don't think CF makes sense for a 20 build run unless you are an expert in CF construction and plan to cut, lay, and cure the CF yourself.

CNC has the advantage that you are not locked into the original design if problems arise like you are with a mold. Yes you can modify a mold but it expensive, slow and there are limits to how much you can change. CNC also allows for great tolerances and repeatability. There are many more CNC shops than bike factories so you have more options for manufacturing. I listened to the PB podcast on this bike and I'm aware he had to have the parts CNC'd in China because he couldn't find a domestic supplier. That could be down to his designs specific requirements or simply not contacting enough suppliers.
  • 3 0
 @st-lupo: They still differ in price by quite a lot, but that pricing gap is closing all the time.
  • 2 0
 @WaterBear: This is not a question of the engineering behind the bike but the manufacturing process.
  • 1 2
 @rivercitycycles: because sustainability
  • 2 1
 @lkubica: Agreed but Pole seems to make CNC work at some sort of small scale.
  • 9 1
 Yo. The dude seemed pretty cool and smart during his pinkbike podcast interview with Levy. It takes a lot to make something different in bike industry anymore. Its pretty cool to see something that Costco or Walmart wouldn't be able to make and sell. Anyways if he grows tired of his productive endeavor he could always get a job as a teacher lol
  • 12 2
 I’m not sure why people are so worked up about this? Sure you can weld/braze frames, thats been proven for decades at this point. Does that means it’s the best way? Probably not. It’s common for these frames to fail at or near the welds. We’ve moved to carbon the last few years and it’s been great in allowing for more complex shapes and designs, but also has its drawbacks in both manufacturing and in use. So now we are seeing some manufacturings try using a method of producing alloy frames but in more complex shapes than hydro-forming allowed, as well as with some alloys that are difficult to weld. Being able to make changes on the fly with prototypes, and even supplying warranty parts for customers (due to damage or upgrades) with this method seems vastly superior (ie. Hope being able to supply parts for their old components). Also it allows for the possibility of bikes and their flex characteristics to be tunes for rider weight within a single frame size. Yes it’s more expensive right now, but I would imagine it also requires a less labour intensive process when you scale, and can be made locally for a more competitive price when looking at other local manufacturers. Saying this is an inferior manufacturing process seems short-sighted.
  • 23 2
 thank god the poor bastard didn't pay attention to teachers like you so today he can have his own bike brand doing whatever he pleases.
  • 10 11
 Alternately pack in teaching you sound fucking shite at it
  • 19 2
 Dismissing and disparaging a totally valid result because it doesn't conform with your ideas doesn't make the result wrong, but it certainly makes you a shitty teacher.
  • 3 0
 @st-lupo: additive of what? Plastic? Metal? Machining is still needed as you can't print machined finishes for bearing surfaces. Then there's the cost of additive machines that size, way more expensive than a 5 axis CNC. Then there's the surface finish, you won't get a smooth finish that you can from machining, hydroforming and carbon moulding. There's a reason Atherton aren't printing a whole bike.
In the no to distant future, I can see full additive manufacturing being much more cost effective but it's not quite there yet for a whole bike and make it financially viable.
  • 5 0
 As others have said, for low volumes and flexibility to change the design, CNC is quite a good idea. With either hydroformed aluminium or carbon fiber the tooling is worth hundreds of thousands for each frame size. You need a huge amount of stock of the different sized tubing for the hydroforming, and carbon is very labour intensive. This is only cost effective with high production numbers.
I think you may need to go back to engineering school (if you ever did at all).
  • 6 0
 @Stredda: Yeah, additive metal definitely isn't there yet, but one of the reasons I'm doing what I'm doing with bonding is because additive is getting interesting for smaller parts.
  • 4 0
 @WaterBear: It's not inferior, it's just different and well suited for the volume of sales that it is applied to.
Not everyone wants a run of the mill Giant, some would like something more unique and that's the market Chris is targeting.
  • 5 0
 @Stredda: It might be a bit closer than you realize and it is maturing a lot faster than you think. 1000mmx600mmx400mm parts with a layer size of 50um. No machine investment because the manufacturer of the printers work with a network of companies that print on demand. The available qualified materials is also expanding Ti, Al, plus various steels even. Atherton is definitely doing something right by printing the fiddly bits and chopping straight runs of tubing to join them.
  • 1 1
 @st-lupo: you can outsource the machining to if that was the case, just get the machine work by someone else with a 5 axis. Once again I haven’t seen a 3D metal printed part that has the quality to serve as what would be normally a machined like bearing surfaces. Also there restrictions to 3D printing requiring supports to be added to the part and this restricts the design and requires a post process removal. You couldn’t just take a CAD model of a bike and print it. Like anything there not one easy solution or everyone would be doing it.
There’s some cool machine centres now that are additive and subtractive all in the one unit.
  • 1 3
 jfc you sound like a wanker
  • 2 0
 @Stredda: Lot of interesting work going on combining additive and machining right now, yep!
  • 3 0
 @HPdeskjet3630: pretty sure they’re doing that for rapid prototyping and the ability to do custom geometry etc
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: have a look at what dimitris katsanis at metron is doing
  • 2 1
 Ask Shimano how well bonding aluminum structures work in the long term. Smile

www.instagram.com/thanksshimano
  • 3 2
 @HPdeskjet3630: @HPdeskjet3630: Let me assure you, your comment was absolutely not "superior". Some of the worst engineers are profs. There's some truth to the saying 'Those who can, do; those who can't, teach.'
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Have communicated with him, yep!
  • 1 0
 Wow the expert has spoken. Absolutely no one here knew that machining from billet is a more expensive method of production. Thank you sir for informing us about what you would say to your hypothetical ignorant student.
  • 2 0
 @bikebasher: And then ask Boeing or Airbus
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Did run into a machinist from Boing on one of my rides, and he was pretty into the bike. Smile
  • 43 0
 Maybe routing cables through your headset would be easier if you could split your frame in half.
  • 8 0
 This also saves riders the cost of a headset press. /s
  • 1 0
 you're a funny man
  • 43 1
 Damn this thing is sexy!
  • 1 0
 If Delorean had a bike, this would be it!!
  • 24 1
 I met Currie out on my local trails a few months back and he's one of the most down to earth bike guys I've ever talked to. After happily answering my barrage of questions, he asked "you want to take it for a pedal?"
  • 12 0
 Hey thanks! Finally got some rain since then!
  • 3 0
 Totally agree. Down to earth guy that you can tell just loves bikes. Fun to talk to him for sure.
  • 1 0
 So how’d it ride?
  • 2 0
 I followed Chris' amazing "Danzig" 3VO development on his old blog. What a serial workaholic!! I think it's incredible to see this bike in its current iteration. Great looking frame. At Outerbike last year, Jamis (Portal coil) 3VO bike was the first demo i tried. Really great. I only wished i tried the lighter, shorter travel version.
  • 1 0
 @steezysam: Working really well. Chronicle of my dev work is on Instagram, ministrycycles.
  • 10 0
 So named because the owner is super religious or because he's a Ministry ( the band ) fan?
Sexy bike though.
  • 16 0
 I'm guessing the band considering their best record was called Psalm 69
  • 15 0
 In the podcast they linked, he said it’s because of the band
  • 19 4
 @babathehutt: Thank the Lord
  • 11 0
 In knowing Chris for over 25 years, it is 100% named after the band
  • 50 0
 1. Bicycles are my religion 2. The band
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: to confirm,
You’re not a religious zealot that has named both his company, and bike with religious based themes?
It’s a beauty bike, love the design and the aesthetic
  • 2 0
 @50percentsure: Did you mean, thank doG?
  • 26 1
 @onawalk: Can 100% confirm I am not a religious zealot. Whenever someone comes to my door to talk to me about religion, I try to talk to them about bicycles instead.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: spectacular,
It’s a great looking bike, and I wish you all the success in the world with it.
Hope to one day get to give it a try!
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Yes. You understood the assignment Wink
  • 1 0
 @Derekat: let’s agree to disagree
  • 4 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: While fully acknowledging that '98 and '99 were beyond special, with so much division in the world already, let's just all agree that the '92 concert was absolutely amazing. It was the first concert my little sister went to, and during their set I was a little afraid we were all going to die. It was seriously magical Smile
  • 1 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: I also went to their concert around that time and had those same feelings. But thinking about all of this now is making me feel old!
  • 5 0
 I always thought the 3VO platform looked like a cool idea, but felt like Jamis was too conservative with their geometry. This thing looks amazing, is more simple and streamlined and if it was painted flat black would resemble an F-117. The rock references are amusing too.
  • 2 0
 Like a Guerilla Gravity, but with more interesting linkage.
  • 2 0
 Now theres a bike I want to see. Smallest Radar cross section possible on a full sized mtb.
  • 6 2
 CNC mill will be buried under a mountain of alulinium chips after cutting that lot out, in turn putting the price in the 3k plus bracket, seems pointless when you can acheive the same in hydroformed tubes welded at way less cost and material wastage, still it looks very pretty
  • 6 0
 You can buy a custom hydroformed tube set for under 3k? Show me where...
  • 3 0
 Your custom hydroformed tubes will set you back over 100k just for the tooling and that's for just one size. If you are doing small volumes, CNC isn't a bad choice.
  • 5 0
 @Stredda: That's pretty darn close to the number I got, yes.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: Yeh show me also, under 3k oh he said 3k plus
  • 1 1
 @Stredda: well I wouldnt get many buyers for 100k perhaps best out source and be sensible like every one else ? just a thought
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: custom hydroformed tubeset it says in the blurb and only 1500 pounds .....win
  • 1 0
 Aluminum is 100% recycled, no waste. It all gets reused. This is extremely common as in every manufacturer that uses Aluminum will recycle there chips back to the foundry and it gets turned back into ingots for making barstock and tubing.
  • 8 1
 A brand named Ministry and they didn't name it Psalm 69?
  • 3 1
 Whiffle
  • 2 0
 Yup, it's a sin. Ministry is just ripe with great references
  • 13 0
 "Psalm 150" just had more travel.
  • 1 1
 Or how about Psalmela Handerson...i'll see myself out.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: clearly should have been psalm 6.9 and used inches. Even moar travel.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Enduro version yes!
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: well now you have to.
  • 1 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: so the longest travel bike you make oughta be called the 119, right? Wink
  • 3 0
 What I find a little weird is that none of these CNC'd frames ever CNC a stem that matches the look and has the exact specs the frame designer wants. Seems like a simple extra that would make the bike more unique and might even save a few bucks over buying 3rd party, they probably have a ton of scrap they could turn into stems.
  • 3 0
 This podcast was so great. Industry veteran being honest about his vision. Also not a zealot, which would totally turn me off. I want one, but have a relatively new and capable 150mm bike already. Hmmm...
  • 2 0
 That is one beautiful frame. Kudos to you on that. That's the sort of thing I'd want. The travel values are right on at 150/160-170. Too bad it's likely impossible to test one.
  • 3 0
 Thanks! Might be able to offer some local test rides in the WA/OR area once the next revision is done.
  • 4 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: So What is the max tire size on that? Looking at it is giving me Burning Inside. It seems to be making it difficult to Breathe. The Al is nice since it will definitely resist Corrosion and hopefully won't even need Just One Fix. I'm sure Thieves would love to make off with it, but with a bit of Grace you could keep riding it to the The Land of Rape and Honey.
  • 2 0
 @Explodo: My Alert Level was high for a reply like this. Should clear 2.6" tires from all brands with rims up to 35mm, though some will Never Believe. So What?
  • 2 0
 @Explodo: @Explodo: Burning Inside - best song!
  • 2 0
 More metal bikes, yes please! Very interesting kinematics on this one, very steady leverage curve. I'd like to try it out. Also, reach-adjust headset cups are great and should come standard on all bikes.
  • 6 2
 The backside of those chainstays are going to be dirt collectors.
  • 8 0
 Just got rain here after another crazy dry summer, and so far no worries, but to be fair that mulchy loam doesn't really stick. I need to find some peanut butter mud to test somewhere.
  • 5 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: Might you consider it a take on in-frame storage? Look at all the fun size/Halloween candy bars you could stash in those stays! Just throw on some Lizard Skins neoprene chainstay wraps to secure your carbs! Wink
  • 11 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Measuring a Snickers now! Smile You could tune the weight balance of the bike by which bars you put where.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: Payday! Har har
  • 1 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: Perhaps a stupid idea - some decent strength tape to simply cover the hole?
  • 3 0
 @DaveRobinson81: Thanks. I would bond a plate over them if it were a problem, but it really does not seem to be a problem. The angle and gravity seems to keep anything from collecting on them.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: I'm sure someone somewhere will have the issue... bonded plates sound heavy and expensive Big Grin I think any of the frame protection tape would be good enough - and also, easy to change! But I do think that you can leave it to the user - good luck with the bike, it looks like a great design
  • 4 0
 It should be a fineable offense to not include a squish video
  • 3 0
 Isn't this the same manufacturing technique as pole? Those seem to hold up fine. Aside from that one.....
  • 2 1
 At least this doesn't have the awful "roughed in" appearance of the Poles
  • 1 0
 @boozed: I didn't own a machine, but I did ride an evolink for about 4 years. I think the industrial look of their bikes is part of what caught my eye. Granted that is totally subjective
  • 1 0
 @grnmachine02: I thought the evolink was welded tubes? I'm referring to the machined surface finish on the CNC frames.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: It is. I was just saying that is arguably uglier, but yet beautiful in some weird way
  • 1 0
 Not saying I’d ever buy an aluminum bike glued together but…. I’m not sure I’d but an aluminum bike glued together. Looks rad though. The Mind is A Terrible Thing To….
  • 3 0
 Recommended rider height up to 191cm and 100mm head tube dont play well together.
  • 4 0
 Looks good
  • 3 0
 very nicely considered bike. looks great too
  • 3 0
 Just one fix, one fix, one fix.
  • 1 0
 Can PB stop misleading people by using "seat angle" as shorthand for "effective seat angle". This bike has a seat angle of 75 degrees. Not 77. Done.
  • 4 0
 Beautiful work!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Thank you guys!
  • 2 0
 There is already a bicycle brand that uses the same construction method. actofive.com
  • 2 0
 Yep. Actofive and Pole make absolutely beautiful bikes, and there are others using CNC as well. Nothing new there, but CNC is the only way I could find to create this bike in the quantities and speeds I wanted. Always happy to talk to welders out there, too! Smile
  • 2 0
 Didn't Pole do this and it didn't turn out well for them?
  • 5 1
 They're still making CNC bikes. They had a problem with their chainstays but that was due to design, not manufacturing.
  • 1 0
 So currently there's what, Pole, acto5 and this Ministry using the same technique? How successful (strength/weight ratio) is it in the end?
(Not talking about the ease to make small batches, modifications, looks...)
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: I don't understand your question about success
  • 3 0
 PSALM 69 69 69 69
  • 2 0
 All these haters couldn’t tell their ass from a hole in the ground.
  • 1 0
 I think I need a slomo squish vid to understand this one...how is the shock compressed? Where is the pivot exactly?
  • 1 0
 Got some videos on Instagram, just ministrycycles.
  • 2 0
 Sweet lordy lord, I hope they keep that finish with the raw bolts too.
  • 1 0
 I could believe in this more if the aluminum parts were forged to rough shape and then cnc'd to finished dimensions.
  • 6 7
 480 is a medium/large? Nah that is defo large. Anything larger than 470 really should be in the large cat. Not even close to a medium (445-460 is approriate)
  • 7 3
 all the +9 ape index individuals downvote me daddies
  • 5 0
 480 was XL in 2018, but I think if you make the bike you get to call it whatever size you want
  • 11 0
 Too many people look at only reach and not ETT for fit. I've ridden some of these modern big reach bikes that feel pretty small when you're seated. And seeing as you spend a lot of your time on these bikes in the saddle, probably best to look at both together.
  • 3 0
 @j-t-g: This comment was approved by crippling lower back pain gang (me)
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: X larges were already going over 500 in 2018
  • 1 0
 Will a tenth of the proceeds be going to a church of choice?
  • 1 0
 I really want a video of that suspension in action
  • 2 0
 Got a lot of development videos on Instagram, just ministrycycles.
  • 1 0
 @speedgoatdesigns, why is "well over 100%" antisquat a good thing?
  • 2 0
 Thats a great question with a super long answer, but if you can get a lot of sensitivity out of the leverage ratio in the right places, the high anti-squat is going to pedel and accelerate well not just in some gears, but in all of them, and with different chainring sizes.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: but that just raises more questions! lol Great looking bike, well done
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: I know! Smile I blather on and on about it on the ministrycycles.com site's Technology page.
  • 1 0
 77.7 is great so why not 80? Please
  • 2 0
 Riding this bike has made me want to explore pushing that envelope, but there's probably a point of diminishing returns. Are you running a steeper ST angle that you're liking now?
  • 2 0
 @SpeedgoatDesigns: I’m riding a privateer 161 with an effective seat tube angle of 80! It’s pretty great when climbing but can be uncomfortable on flat land as you put a lot of pressure on your wrists if you don’t run high a taller bar & stem setup.
  • 2 0
 @haen: Thanks for the info! It blew me away how you can just claw up anything, but yeah, I wonder about side-effects at a certain point. I do feel like a climb I'm not cleaning on the 78, I'm probably not cleaning on anything. Still curious to test more, though.
  • 2 0
 Amen
  • 1 0
 And they are not cheap or light
  • 2 0
 Now that is stunning
  • 2 1
 1000 times better looking than the Pole
  • 1 0
 Finally, someone has produced the holy grail of suspension design.
  • 1 0
 The inside of swing arm should hold a couple pounds of mud
  • 2 0
 I follow you on TikTok
  • 3 2
 No, I wouldn't.
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