The Wild Scurra 2 Enduro Linkage Bike - Eurobike 2017

Aug 31, 2017 at 2:56
by Mike Levy  
Eurobike 2017


Scurra


Okay, let's pretend to be an open-minded bunch for this one, just for a few minutes. The Scurra 2 is the ''most unique enduro bike,'' according to the company itself and, with a wild linkage fork up front that's controlled by a Magura shock and paired with a dual-link rear-end, it's hard to argue with them on that point. The fork is home to a 29'' front wheel (the rear wheels is 27.5'') and it delivers 170mm of travel, while the back of the bike has 200mm on tap. No, this is not your average enduro machine

First things first: what the hell is going on with that fork?

Suspension forks are pretty damn good these days, and I wouldn't say that anything from Fox, RockShox, and the rest of the gang are holding us back, but Scurra believes that depending on bushings is a silly way to going about things when you need your suspension to be as active as possible. Stanchion tubes sliding in and out of bushings feels smooth to me, and fork arches and axles seem to do a decent job of creating a stiff chassis, but this small Austrian brand says that they can do better with their 'Trelever' linkage fork.

They cite the evolution of motorbike rear suspension as a good argument for investigating a linkage fork: ''... rear suspension also designed with telescopic forks - plungers (just like front suspension nowadays), but as technology progressed, forks were replaced with more effective ideas - the first: simple swingarm. At the end of the 1950s, the rear wheel swingarm, known since the 1910s, replaced that construction of the straight-travel spring suspension. And finally, the last development by mountain bikes - 2 systems based on parallelogram technology: the 4-link suspension and virtual pivot point.''

Taking that thinking, Scurra designed their Trelever linkage fork. The idea is that the sealed bearings offer way less friction than a bushing-based design of a traditional fork, and they can also control anti-dive and the front axle path to make it to their liking. The fork activates a Magura shock that's located directly in front of the rear shock, a layout that Scurra says keeps the bike's weight centered.
Scurra


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Scurra
Scurra


The dual-link rear-end delivers 200mm of travel, also controlled by a Magura shock, and the geometry can be adjusted via a cam system without having to loosen any bolts: simply turn the cam with a hex key to change its head angle, bottom bracket height, and a few other numbers.

The aluminum frame kit is made to order in medium, large, and extra-large sizes, and the retail price is around €5,000. That's a big chunk of money, no doubt, and it will get you the frame, Trelever linkage fork, and two shocks.


Scurra


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194 Comments

  • + 168
 I think it would be a helluva lot of fun to give this a rip. It's got two wheels, pedals, a seat and handlebars. That's a pretty good recipe for a good time in my book. I wouldn't buy one but good on them for pushing the envelope.
  • + 17
 Post the first part of this on every ebike article Smile
  • + 46
 How dare you mention fun, it is a mountain bike that does not follow the norm and should be analysed and promptly shot down in flames.
  • + 20
 Designs amazing concept fork, use's sub par magura air shock . . . face palm
  • + 13
 Want to make fun of it but also want to take it for a ride. Likely won't do either. Scrolling down now to read the mockery.
  • + 2
 I agree, it could be fun to check out. But for the cost of entry on a totally unproven platform I doubt there will be many takers. And Magura? Must not have been able to get a pro deal from anyone else.
  • + 2
 @deadmeat25: Ebikes are fun. Motorcycles are fun, even if they're slow and have a goofy throttle. This bike looks fun too.
  • + 23
 Because why be a little weird when you have the option of being super weird?

I'm really curious as to how well it rides.

(And I'm always amazed at how many pinkbikers care more about looks than performance.)
  • + 9
 You must be new here. Welcome to PB, where it's not how good you ride, it's how good you look in the lift line.
  • - 1
 @Boardlife69: Lift line? Whats that? Oh! Like skiing. Funny, I always ride to the top of my descents...
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69: that's not Pinkbike that's Whistler.
  • + 21
 Funny how they refer to the evolution of motorbike rear suspension when they designed the front suspension of this bike. Why didn't they look at the evolution of front suspension of motorbikes instead? Maybe because after decades of experimenting with linkage designs, they also ended up with standard telescopic forks?
  • + 18
 Motorbikes mostly don't have as much space for linkages and secondary shocks as mountain bikes
  • + 10
 I know this is only one bike out of hundreds, but Honda has sacked off telescopic forks in favour of a linkage design on the 2018 Goldwing.

www.topspeed.com/motorcycles/motorcycle-news/honda-is-finally-resurrecting-the-gold-wing-for-2018-ar177216.html
  • + 7
 @haroman666: bmw uses telelever forks on some of the motorbikes, i had a k1200r with it and it was bloody brilliant, the most noticeable thing was the front of the bike didn't dive under braking, therefore not upsetting the geometry of the bike, allowing faster cornering etc etc...
  • + 4
 As far as I understand it, there *have* been some linkage front suspension motorcycles that were not altogether unsuccessful from an engineering standpoint - see the racing model I mentioned above, the Bimota Tesi. The designs just don't catch on with consumers, engineering improvements be damned.
  • - 1
 @ad15: Moto GP is possibly the pinnacle of motorbike design. I don't see any of it there. Brake dive is an issue. We chose to deal with it in favor of a good total sum of solving other issues. Nobody gets everything. Telescopic forks just came out as the best compromise for variety of challenges. Mutations are welcome, it's just very few survive.
  • + 4
 @WaterBear: The current BMW range has several bikes with telelever front suspension, including the rather legendary 1200GS.. i see more of that model of bike coming through town than any other put together, don't see anyone having issues with it here...
  • - 3
 @ad15: how big was your town again? And you don't see a difference between tens of kilograms of metal on a vehicle powered by 500ccm engine and a mountain bike? Yea that solution could be great on a transport bicycle with electric motor. Quite brilliant. When was the last time you were on track with this?
  • - 1
 It's really all about weight. That is what matters more than anything on lightweight vehicles. Adding a 5lb fork to the front of a MTB is a huge disadvantage. Your wheel just plows INTO stuff, instead of OVER stuff. The absolute deal killer with this design is the weight. NOTICE THE REVIEWER DIDN'T EVEN MENTION IT. Obviously, that was on purpose.
  • + 3
 @allballz:
I read im another article that the whole bike weighs 14-15 kg and the fork and front damper weigh about 2,5 kg. That isn't much and compared to a standard fork. you have the advantage that you can use carbon on this construction so it has the potential to become as light as standard fork maybe
  • + 23
 Kill it with fire quickly!
  • + 87
 Serious question: Why does this make you angry?

This is never going to replace a fork completely so it doesn't threaten your comfort zone. It just gives you another option and something interesting to test and make a decision on if you care or just ignore if you are happy with a fork.
  • - 33
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 3:51) (Below Threshold)
 @Patrick9-32: "Here's a bad idea! How much time, and effort can we possibly spend on it!? Oh I'm so jazzed!"
  • + 36
 @Kramz: 1- How do you know it is a bad idea until you build and test it? It being different doesn't make it bad. There might be downsides to this but there are also upsides. Whether the downsides are stronger than the upsides is the real question.
2- Is anyone forcing you to spend the time and effort on it? If the answer is no then why do you give a shit?
  • - 17
flag iwasjustridingalong (Aug 31, 2017 at 4:05) (Below Threshold)
 @Patrick9-32: before they make it an eMonster
  • + 52
 @Patrick9-32: The MTB industry was created by just adapting a cobbled together road-type / clunker bike, its form / function has evolved at snails pace - we have only started looking at wheel size over the past 10 years and look at the controversy that still causes, some people still think 26" was a size chosen by a higher being, not something used due to convenience and nothing else.

You cant expect goons that whinge about wheel size like the above to think any form of development that doesnt comply with their pre-concieved ideas of how a bike should look is a good idea.

"Kill new ideas with fire" - Im so glad the whole world isnt made up of people like, we would still be in caves.
  • - 23
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 4:07) (Below Threshold)
 @Patrick9-32: "falling down an endless pit of failure"......."Have a wonderful time while everyone steps around"
  • + 18
 @Kramz: Dont be so hard on yourself, im sure you have some merit.
  • + 26
 I tell ya what would be tits: that thing up front and a single pivoted chainstays supported on a suspension fork mounted to a pivot near seatpost clamp!
  • + 4
 @Patrick9-32: Serious answer: How can anyone think that was ment serious. It's a pop culture phrase expressing my gut feeling. I could have also written "nuke it from orbit". Wonder if that would have been taken serious as well?

My opinion is that it's ugly and I stand by that. I have no idea how it would work/ride and to be honest don't really care. I'm happy with the bike I have. Smile
  • + 9
 The lord of light wants his bike back.
  • - 10
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 4:25) (Below Threshold)
 @Racer951: Grade 2 shouldn't even count as merit. I learned about unsprung mass in grade 2 from a car magazine.
  • + 6
 @Patrick9-32: In answer to your question 1...It actually may not be a terrible idea. BMW has been using their patented Tele-lever suspension on the front of their motorcycles for a long time now, and companies like Bimota popularized the linkage-driven front suspension idea probably 3 decades ago with their original Tesi and later iterations.

In other words motorcycles have been experimenting with this for literally decades now. It's never caught on with consumers, but the advantages are supposed to be the same as what they said in this article - controlled dive, separation of braking and steering forces.

Never had the good luck to try one myself. They tend to be exotics or just regular BMWs Big Grin
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: That would warrant a nuke from orbit Wink
  • - 1
 @Kramz: Good to hear you gained your engineering 'knowlege' from a car magazine. Well done.
  • - 14
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 4:46) (Below Threshold)
 @Racer951: I was like 6. Potatoes gonna potate, potatoe.
  • + 14
 @WaterBear:
Girvin.
Amp.
Lawwill.
Whyte.

Mountain bikers have been experimenting with linkage forks for decades, too. I had an Amp. It worked well, but the bearings would wear out too quickly, and were difficult to replace.
  • + 4
 The bike seems fine. Just get that front brake hose routing sorted.
  • + 2
 @Kramz: Well that just sums things up doesnt it, opinions formed as a 6 year old dictating a grown mans understanding.
  • - 9
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 4:54) (Below Threshold)
 @Racer951: Potatoes can't figure out 6 year old common knowledge.
  • + 5
 When someone tells Redalp to hold their beer.......
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm sure Manitou wouldn't mind bringing that thing to life for you
  • + 6
 Hmmm, here we are. One more brat, shortsighted by the current “acceptable” mainstream bike fashion Nazis.
For your info, the same comments were directed towards the telescopic forks, once upon a time when they first appear (ah. Along with all those “expert” opinions on how much energy you are going to loose by the fork’s action!!!)
So,
Keep your negativity to yourself.
  • + 12
 @uncajohn: bike fashion nazis... I want to draw that
  • - 6
flag Kramz (Aug 31, 2017 at 5:22) (Below Threshold)
 @Racer951: It's not like the bike doesn't work I guess, like idk, beggars can't be choosers, and I'm sure pretty well anybody would be more than happy to have the bike. I don't even like it, and I'd be happy to have it.
  • + 1
 @SJP:

yeah I had the carbon one...sweet. It was "rebound" replacement to a Lawill Leader on a build. The air shock failed on the Lawill first air up.lol
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Honestly I'm shocked you haven't. I think we are due another wakileaks?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: like those 90's manitou FS's
  • + 0
 @L0rdTom: Yea, like a piece about new shock length standard not discriminating any unit system: will come in centi-inches... not to mention new metric chain link spacing - that will fk up the industry

@Tocomotion - I was just enterained by the idea of putting swing arm in the front and fork in the back... front wheel drive has already been done too
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Ah the metric chain link spacing. You remember under which article I wrote that? Was fun to write. It probably won't f*ck up the industry. They expect the same arguments used for onepointfive, boost and whatnot will hold there too. So far so good...
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: There's a reason why you don't see this on the front of MotoGP and World Superbike rides, and its got nothing to do with consumer acceptance.
  • + 5
 @Racer951: ""Kill new ideas with fire" - Im so glad the whole world isnt made up of people like, we would still be in caves." Actually most of the world "is" made up of people like this.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: 26" wheel size.
Actually, they chose 26 because the 700cc wheels of the day and the technology available couldn't stand up to the beating.
  • + 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: you can rest assured that all the Freeride stuff you (hopefully) saw in NWD and Cranked movies wouldn't be the same with bigger wheels. If you like to play the game of parallell universes, be my guest. It's what happened we are here.

@Darknut - honestly? That argument by such design? And you take that joke out of context like that? You can pull out "how about you ride a bike with cantilever brakes" right now. I heard that even by the occasion of Boost.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns:
Well,
What’s keeping you!? (industrial design pseudo perspective, rough-sketch style or something more realistic?)
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: Do you ride mountainbikes at 180- 20+mph on smooth surfaces?
  • + 1
 @uncajohn: I'm too stupid to understand what you mean
  • + 3
 @SlodownU: Is that because the requirements of Moto GP bikes and World Superbikes are nothing at all like the requirements of a mountain bike. They also don't run knobbly tyres.
  • + 1
 @Darknut:
Yep.
Someone has to inform that kid that humanity has suffered the “dark ages” and their various reincarnations…
Killing ideas just to look cool. How sad…
  • - 2
 @uncajohn: oh really? Dark Ages? Where was the guy whining at killing ideas when they came up with this: "hey, how about we call women witches and burn them for us to feel better?" A dude went like: "that is the fkng dumbest idea ever!" And then another one went: "don't knock it until you tried it". And yet another went, I'm cold, that will make me feel warm. "What about the screaming in agony?, bringing all that wood that could be used for cooking?" - "you are a hater man, humanity won't get anywhere if we're going to kill all ideas just like that". "Oh no the moon eats sun again! Quickly! Burn Rosanne!"

Or: Let's attack Roman Empire! Yea we get straight to Rome! - How will we find it? - all roads lead to R... - shut the fk up, that's how we always did it you fashion nazi! We'll get Elephants, through Alps!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
Hey kiddo.
Don’t lose it now… YOU ARE THE HATER! Every time PB covers something that’s out of the mainstream aesthetics, you post the same message:
Kill it with fire!
Just like the dark ages (the medieval times, as I mentioned before). You are going to “kill” all that does not comply with your norm. With that I mean that YOUR NAZI FASHION ideas seem to “energize” every time you see something interesting, a new design or a new idea.
And watch you manners kiddo. When you write “kill it with fire” you DO EVOKE bad memories. I assume that you know by now who was burning people at the stake (yep, the church), or books (yep, the Nazis). So, now that you know (finally) I expect from you, more… educated posts.
As for your manners, go and talk like that to your Mother… kiddo.
  • + 3
 @uncajohn: take it easy snowflake. What bad memories do you have?
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns:
History. Just read some and you will see that "we" are repeating the same shit (burn it with fire)... even in the small scale of bike design...
  • + 3
 @uncajohn: oh Jesus...
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns:
YES!
For the love of "him", so many people got burned at the stake...
  • - 1
 Yes they probably had similar sense of humor as you. Ever seen a video where two blokes try to kill a spider? It is relevant to this discussion and fkng hilarious
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
It takes at least 2 to have a discussion....
  • + 2
 @SlodownU: Well, kinda- Superbike is based on factory production bikes, so that's a chicken-vs-egg there. MotoGP won't even allow winglets much less a telelever front suspension, so it's not like teams can use it but don't. Michael Czysz had incredible ideas that were proven but could never get any of them accepted.
  • + 2
 @SlodownU: Google Britten V1000 and learn about how well a linkage fork can work on a circuit racing bike. Not saying it's a great idea for mountain bikes but your argument is flawed
  • + 1
 I think this bike would feel amazing
  • + 1
 Mr Krabs wants his bike back!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I await your Instagrm sketch showing just that! Loved your split steerer one the other day.
  • + 0
 @pimpin-gimp: that will be 1250 pounds Sir instagram.com/p/BYg531ZhTav
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: cheque is in the mail dude.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: please do... Big Grin
  • + 11
 All that trouble to offer something that's not stanchions and bushings and then link it to a rear shock that is a stanchion with bushings????
  • + 1
 Exactly my thought.
  • + 9
 Because it is not side loaded like a telescopic fork, therefore the bushes work better.
  • + 1
 @velobike: Exactly! The difference is night and day between a shock with perfectly aligned loads and a fork that's trying to slide while subjected to bending loads.
  • + 3
 @velobike: also 2-3 times the mech advantage against the friction, but the reduced side loads are probably more significant
  • + 13
 Finally. A bike I can fit my water bottle on. .... Wait a minute!
  • + 2
 My exact thoughts!
  • + 2
 Could always mount it on the underside of the downtube... Wink
  • + 12
 I think it's pretty cool!
  • + 1
 They need to sign a pro rider to bring it on the EWS or any other world class event. As long as they stay in the shadow, everyone will still be like oh this is too ugly and this is shit

C"mon !!
  • + 7
 Madder than a box of frogs! I will never be in the market for this bike (just imagine on the cost replacing the bearings on linkages) but I'm glad it's been made, we need woofing mad
  • + 12
 I know right, might cost you $100 every couple of years!!!!

If that really was your first thought, you can't afford this bike anyway, stick to a hardtail.
  • + 4
 ...yea, replacing bearings is not hard.
  • - 1
 @deadmeat25: That's just parts, and that's for cheap parts. A decent 6802 2rs (small bearing for skateboards) is going to set you back $15/pc. I counted 16 bearings. So that's actually $240 in parts. Who knows what the labor costs would be, but it wouldn't be cheap, at least $100 at a decent shop.
  • + 4
 @allballz:

1. Wrong, there are no more than 8 bearings in the fork which is all were talking about, the cost of replacing the bearings in the frame is what it is, you'd have to pay that anyway, you're just trying to make it sound worse by adding it together.

2. Cost, all you've done there is find the highest price you can on the internet to again hike up this cost to make your point and prove how clever you are. Even if you used Enduro Max type bearings (the most expensive), you can get them for almost half what you've quoted, but given the extra friction caused by the seals and careless design of these bearings they may not be the best choice in this application anyway, but of course you'd know that already wouldn't you smarty pants.

3. Labour costs, if you can't replace a bearing, you are retarded, and should be charged double for everything in life because you are a liability to the whole of society, and should give back what you will inadvertently take out by being f*cking stupid, bit like insurance costs, you pay more because you are more likely to f*ck up.

Go ahead and talk some more shit mate i love it.
  • + 3
 @allballz: If you buy them in packs of ten, those bearings are about $2 each.

So that's about $32 rather than $240.
  • + 2
 Was supposed to be cageless not careless, how careless.
  • + 4
 I bet if that fork was the norm as the telescopic fork now is, and someone introduced the telescopic fork as a new invention, everyone on PB would be willing to nuke the idea, because it just looks plain ugly. I still think that look ugly though.
  • + 6
 Finally some foreword thinking innovation that I can get behind, a technical marvel and masterfully executed work of boundless beauty.
  • + 6
 all i want to see now is how the heck does suspension work.. PINKBIKE PLIZZZZZ
  • + 2
 Get one of those full compression videos on the go!!!
  • + 15
 Added now Smile
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: With the way the calliper rotates around the disk when the front suspension compresses, do you get brake jack when you brake, like with rear suspension?
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: +1000 for adding that video
  • + 4
 @joshdodd: It looks like you get brake squat, as the caliper gets pulled forwards by the disc when you brake and that action will pull the forks shorter. It looks like a double wishbone design (aka four bar) with the pivot point being projected quite a long way in front of the front wheel, a fair distance off the ground, and moving up and back as it goes through the travel.

I wouldn't be surprised if this is loads stiffer than a telescopic fork - having just one connection to the frame via the headtube and a load of sliding bushings makes forks very bendy. We just don't know any better because we never ride anything else.
  • - 1
 The front wheel has a parabolic rearward curve. It starts out more vertical, and then quickly moves up and back towards the rider. It will have good small bump compliance and then a small ramp in wheel rate as the air shock compresses, it looks like it is setup to be pretty linear as there is a falling rate on the front rocker arm. You can picture it, if you know any basic engineering about Instant Centers. You just draw two lines from parallel with the linkages. Where the lines meet is the instant center, it changes position as the suspension cycles. This front linkage on this bike has an IC that starts out a couple feet in front and moves closer to the rider as the suspension compresses. This should give it a nice rearward arc to the wheel path. You would need a computer to map it exactly, but 'rearward wheel path' is really all you need to know. It will absorb bumps a bit better than a typical telescopic because of the IC migration, but it probably won't be a huge difference, because most DH bikes are pretty raked out these days.
  • + 3
 Pretty cool. Hopefully they do a demo so we can get a ride report.

But wait, should this be posted on Pinkbike in the USA?

I can't help it. I'm still upset we were left out of the ebike discussion and the content wasn't posted in the USA.

It's a sad state of affairs here in our country when journalists feel they might offend their audience by reporting the news.
  • + 3
 Wait, what now? There's pinkbike content that Americans aren't seeing?
  • + 4
 @wpplayer18: mah freedom
  • + 1
 Yes. There's been a week of ebike reporting on Pinkbike in Europe. But not in the USA. If you live in the USA, its too intense for you to handle. You might turn into a vegetable. There is concern among some media outlets and other editorial content contributors that Mountain Bike Culture is being appropriated by Ebike Culture as a result of a cycling industry conspiracy to dupe consumers into believing that ebikes might actually be fun to ride and any further discussion or information distribution about ebikes by popular websites will lead to loss of access to trails for mountain bikers. Additionally, any media outlet that further distributes this information is at risk of public shaming by the very vocal anti ebike horn blowers. I am glad that there are people who can help me make the right choices about what is OK to read on a website, particularly in the very dangerous area of information about bicycles and bicycles with electric motors on them. Pinkbike admin, please fire up the PinkEbike USA site stat so we can be privy to this dangerous information!
  • + 2
 I thought the problem with linkage forks was that the front wheel tends to follow a rearward axle path early in the travel, moving the front wheel towards your centre of gravity (effectively dynamically steepening your head angle when you most need your bike to be slack).

Granted, I didn't notice that tendency in the video, but it would be a good thing to the manufacturer to address directly before they can hope for widespread adoption.
  • + 4
 Hi @toooldtodieyoung,

A linkage fork can move the front wheel however the designer chooses. The problem with many has been the *choice* to move the wheel rearward, for exactly the reason you describe.

As the Scurra goes through its travel, the head angle becomes steeper, front-centre becomes shorter, and trail decreases (though mechanical trail does increase). My analysis isn't accurate enough to comment on how these properties compare to a telescoping fork.

Our choice with the Structure was to be more aggressive with the dynamic geometry, making the head angle become slacker, maintaining front-centre length, and substantially increasing trail and mechanical trail through the travel. I can't say in absolute terms that one design is better than the other; naturally, I prefer the Structure (if I didn't, I would've redesigned it!), but I suspect the Scurra will take almost zero adaptation, while the Structure takes a few minutes to get used to, which will appeal to some.

The bottom line is that we commend Scurra for taking a bold step in the effort to improve on the fundamental design of the bicycle and increasing awareness of front linkage designs. The market is certainly big enough for both of us and we wish them well!
  • + 2
 @Structure-Ryan: awesome reply, thanks Ryan! As you can tell, I follow what I can, but I am not an engineer so I thought the linkage fork idea was proven to be fundamentally flawed. Happy to be corrected.
  • - 4
flag allballz (Sep 1, 2017 at 5:18) (Below Threshold)
 @Structure-Ryan: You designed this bike but you have no understanding of wheel paths and linkage kinematics? How the hell did you get funding? Typical Euro shit, I don't know how you guys get capital. Pathetic. I only wish we could get funding in America for my designs (but our bike industry sucks, maybe I should move to Europe?) but I guess we have to be a bit tougher than you guys, who seem to get every stupid idea produced, no matter what. *cough* Lauf Fork *cough* Brake Force One *cough* Every Formula Product *cough*

If you want an innovative product, check out my profile for my IAS suspension. I designed it 15 years ago. Nobody in America gives a shit, because everybody is trying to get rich off an useless iphone app so I can't get any investors. But this is legitimate F1 technology that could revolutionize the bike industry.

Let me tell you how your bike works: The front wheel has a parabolic rearward curve. It starts out more vertical, and then quickly moves up and back towards the rider. It will have good small bump compliance and then a small ramp in wheel rate as the air shock compresses, it looks like it is setup to be pretty linear as there is a falling rate on the front rocker arm.

You can picture it, if you know any basic engineering about Instant Centers. You just draw two lines from parallel with the linkages. Where the lines meet is the instant center, it changes position as the suspension cycles.

This front linkage on this bike has an IC that starts out a couple feet in front and moves closer to the rider as the suspension compresses. This should give it a nice rearward arc to the wheel path. You would need a computer to map it exactly, but 'rearward wheel path' is really all you need to know. It will absorb bumps a bit better than a typical telescopic because of the IC migration, but it probably won't be a huge difference, because most DH bikes are pretty raked out these days.
  • + 5
 @allballz: looks like @Structure-Ryan was kind enough to jump in on behalf of a different company. Structure also makes a bike with a linkage fork, but not this one.
  • + 6
 Still less ugly than a polygon collosus
  • + 4
 I think the bush argument is there, but having the bikes wheelbase increase during compression is a solid case for linkage forks.
  • + 2
 I'm not so sure on that. If stiction is the issue, the next logical step would be bearings for the legs and gaitors to keep it all clean. Can you imagine how lively our forks would be for small bump compliance?
  • + 2
 @Poulsbojohnny: cannondale lefty Smile
  • + 1
 @baggyferret: Hm. How about a conventional two leg fork and bearings? Smile
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny: Why add more weight etc? Boeing jets use lefties so they must be good Smile I've been using them for well over 10 yrs, they're great!
  • - 1
 The wheelbase changes is so negligible it's completely useless to the average rider, maybe if you're an absolute pro and you corner at 50mph, you will get some benefit. You get, at most a couple inches increase in your wheelbase. When the average wheelbase is around 45", you get, at most a 5% increase in the WB.

That advantage is just way overblown, it's not worth the weight penalty anyway, which is going to make the bike nose heavy and plow INTO obstacles instead of OVER them.
  • + 3
 @allballz: So first you say this fork has a parabolic rearward curve, then you suggest, and i quote - "You get, at most a couple inches increase in your wheelbase". Please explain to those of us that didn't get an engineering degree from the university of bullshit and f*ckwittery how this is physically possible.
  • + 2
 Just because something is the standard, doesn't mean it's the best. Bikes and motorcycles use forks because they are economical and they work pretty good. Some high end motorcycle manufacturers have been using alternative front suspension layouts since the early 80's that eliminate suspension dive, and keep much more consistent fraction and small bump compliance under braking. We as mountain bikers complain about standards changes that make little difference in performs, and complain about new things that are the norm that could be way better. Just saying.
  • - 2
 And, how much do our bikes weigh? If you add 5 lbs to a motorcycle it's not a big deal. If you do that to a MTB it's a really big deal. That's the problem with linkage forks for MTB. You have to know what you're doing.

It's also so heavy you're forced to use air shocks, which totally compromise stiction and small bump compliance, the TWO MAIN BENEFITS THIS SUSPENSION IS SUPPOSED TO HAVE.

Totally idiotic. And if you 'fixed' it by adding two coil shocks, you would add ANOTHER 5 lbs to the bike. Now, you have a bike that is AT LEAST 10 lbs heavier than the coil sprung competition. 10/30 = 33.3% which is a huge weight penalty. It's basically THE WORST ENDURO BIKE EVER MADE...the bike could only ever be used for DH, and that's it. It basically has NO MARKET.

Back to the drawing board.
  • + 4
 I'm interested to know how much the complete bike weighs? It may not be, but it looks heavy in construction.
  • + 5
 Dunno what I think about it but I still wanna try riding it!
  • + 3
 It's ok for the rear end to be a linkage layout. But from end? Nope. Foolish. I bet this rides better than a regular fork
  • + 4
 Came here for the ignorant, narrow minded, moronic, repetitive and entirely predictable comments. Wasn't disappointed.
  • + 3
 excellent, the wheel tucks behind and reduces the wheel base during compression. Come on guys......
  • + 1
 Yup. Give it a high pivot and an idler pulley. I mean they clearly don't care about being conventional up front, so why be conventional in the rear?
  • + 2
 Hey Pinkbike!!! Do not try to test it by any means, then maybe we have to eat our hate words because of a food front suspension...and things may change...horror!!!!
  • + 1
 reminds me a bit of porn -those two rods pumping so close to each other -or the best southpark episode of alltimes - go mintberrycrunsh
  • + 1
 Watch how the position of the brake caliper moves relative to the Rotor during compression... will front brake jack become a thing?
  • + 3
 I suggest a name change to praying mantis
  • + 2
 Actually @richardcunningham maybe has something to say about that...
  • + 2
 Am I the only one who thinks the designers of this bike were influenced by a Pablo Picasso painting?
  • + 3
 I'd want those carbon mag wheels with it though.
  • + 2
 The front brake caliper looks like it might tear off if you go too hard on it.
  • + 2
 "Scurra" in Italy means "fart"
  • + 2
 Cool want to give it a try.........
  • + 0
 I want to favourite one of these photos so I can look back on it and laugh in a few years time, but at the same time... I don't want to pollute my favourites stream!
  • + 2
 It doesn't have a motor,so it's all good.
  • + 0
 Not sure if anyone has mentioned it yet but the bushings they claim to have gotten rid of are still in the shock controlling the front end, they just aren't in the "fork" ...
  • + 0
 Is this compliant with the tele-2000 fork standard or have these geniuses introduced yet another new cam-driven multilink telescoping fork standard I need to worry about?
  • + 0
 This thing is badass!!! 170mm up front 200mm on tap in the back enduro bike, hell yeah! I even like how it looks, that said, I would never buy one 26 or die
  • + 1
 please don't say "scurra" or "scorra" in italy.... (unless you just did one)
  • + 2
 I want to ride this so bad.
  • + 1
 I think this fork looks fricken sweet in motion, but that whole crown area is f*cking rank...
  • + 2
 Throw a motor and a gear box on that thing and I'm sold!!
  • + 2
 no more footjams on Enduro bikes..
  • + 4
 linkage jams?
  • + 2
 Bearing manufactures hit the jackpot
  • + 1
 To share my opinion, I would like to quote Sam Hill when asked about clips

...

"Nah..."
  • + 3
 i want to ride it...
  • + 2
 Front of bike - 2033 Rear of bike - 2003
  • + 2
 This should be fun to read in a bit
  • + 2
 Yo dawg I heard you like pivots, so I put some pivots on your pivots.
  • + 2
 As is, nope. But if they made a ***Lefty*** version....YAASSS.
  • + 1
 Minnar's V10 inspired at Val Di Sole!
  • - 1
 Anybody notice that the front brake caliper is mounted on the front of the fork? Wouldn't that cause issues given that the rotation of the rotor will try to rip it off?
  • + 1
 Are they sure that head tube area is strong enough?
  • + 2
 The head tubes I have seen snap always seem to happen when the force pushes the fork forward and tears the head tube off the bike. The big linkage attached to the down tube looks to be the perfect way to increase strength to prevent this happening. As mentioned above, I would love to chuck a leg over something like this just to try it, but not with that price tag. Telescoping forks are well proven and not overly complex or expensive to produce.
  • + 1
 The dream bike...for bearing company
  • + 1
 MY EYES. DE GOGGLES DO NOTHING.
  • + 1
 Front brake is in a bad location, one rock strike and done.
  • + 4
 So are your balls, chinballs...
  • - 2
 I know, I'd be really concerned about the brake hose too. It's just going to get hooked in a stick on trail and get torn off. There's a lot to be said to tucking calipers behind the stanchions. This design is completely compromised, but it figures it wasn't even DESIGNED BY AN ENGINEER. They don't even know what kinematics are. Pathetic. More overpriced, under-engineered EURO CRAP. Buyer Beware!
  • + 1
 What aboot the little electronic adjuster on the rear shock?
  • + 1
 that front brake mount position is really idiotic
  • + 1
 Looks like something which is coming out of Inspector Gadgets hat!
  • + 1
 Who mounted these brake levers?
  • + 2
 i like it
  • + 1
 Interesting concept, nice idea... awful look.
  • + 0
 29" in front and 27.5" in the back. Add bar ends and a battery and call it the e-Antichrist.
  • + 0
 Yeah, that looks way more intuitive than just using a suspension fork.
  • + 1
 Bar Spins? ????
  • + 0
 I'm no tech geek but it looks very heavy.
  • + 1
 My eyes!
  • - 1
 Too much weight. Too many parts. Too much complexity. Too much ugly. Too much NOPE.
  • + 1
 Just Nope
  • + 1
 Holy Frankenfuk
  • + 1
 Take my money!!!
  • + 1
 Definitely ENDURO!
  • - 2
 Yup!! I don't even know how to comment on these one soooo.... like that bike, I'm going to just move along slowly.. Good Day.
  • + 0
 Id rather S##T in my hand and clap than ride one of these things!
  • + 0
 That comment made my day Smile
  • + 1
 Where's electric motor?
  • - 1
 This bike is perfect for a "KILL ME" meme .
  • - 1
 That's an expensive nutcracker.
  • - 2
 at the end of the day the shock producing all the suspension is still telescopic!
  • - 1
 ithink that looks so ugly! traditional forks look 1000 times better
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