Crash Test

Jul 27, 2009 at 10:59
by Joshua Pierce  

“Hindsight is always 20/20, but looking back, it’s still a bit fuzzy...” Megadeth, Sweating Bullets

“It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever.” David St. Hubbins, Spinal Tap

I was looking out from a hospital bed, 4 days after breaking my C1 vertebrae - by forcing the C2 vertebrae through it. I had what’s called a Plough fracture, an injury with an apparent 16% fatality rate, and one which more often results in neurological damage of some kind, from loss of feeling in limbs to partial or total paralysis. I was fortunate - somehow I’d broken my neck but not damaged any of the vital communication lines between the brain and the rest of the body.

Most crashes we walk away from. We pick ourselves up, find our missing shoe or whatever, and push back up and do it again so we don’t get a mental block about whatever it was that spat us out. Sometimes we have to do it half a dozen times before we get the flow. But the fact is, crashes are a regular, sometimes daily part of our sport, and learning how to prevent serious injury is a necessary part of the skill involved in riding. Most of the time we tweak an ankle at the most, maybe scrape up an arm. But after a few minutes, maybe a little longer, we’re good to go.

But where does axial loading and hyperflexion fit in? I landed on my head from about 15 feet up, and the impact twisted my head and neck in a way they were never meant to be twisted. Somehow I hit the ground before my bike did, having seriously screwed up a launch from a ladder drop, and came to an abrupt and very nasty stop.


In that hospital bed, I had to play it over and over in my mind. What was it about this crash that was so different from the (probably) hundreds of others I’ve had? I’ve plummeted off ladders, flipped wrong off lips, totally baffed step-ups, landed ridiculously short of transitions and blew off pedals countless times. But I’d never faced a really serious injury on a bike.
I’ve heard someone describe extreme riding, or any extreme sport, as controlled risk. We take obvious risks in our sport, but by controlling certain other factors, we reduce the possibility of a negative outcome. If we don’t control those factors, we’re in the hands of fate. Or pushing our luck. The way I was seeing it, in between being poked and prodded by nurses and doctors, was that this time I had done three things wrong. And by not observing these three things, I multiplied the possibility of serious injury by an exponential factor. Check it out.

One: Not enough sleep.


We’ve all ridden hard after a night of very little sleep, and this factor in itself isn’t enough. But combine it with any other variable and you’ve just increased your chance of a serious accident. It seems obvious, but it’s easy to overlook when your concentration is on riding. But without enough sleep your reaction time will be slower, guaranteed.

Two: Underestimating the stunt.


Without proper examination of the drop, I just assumed it was an easy run-in and I’d already looked at the transition. I’d seen other people hitting it, so I wasn’t concerned. In the least. What I didn’t take into account was the run-in itself, which was a skinny that was almost 45 degrees up to the ladder, and it sucked up almost every drop of momentum I had. Again, this in itself wasn’t the issue, as I’d stalled on ladders before, and just jumped down and hit it again with more speed. But if I’d paid more attention to the speed my riding buddies were hitting it at...

Three: Something new at the end of the day.


Yep, it’s that same old story - never try something new on your last run. This one is hard to resist, and I know I’ve had some stellar last runs that have left me pumped for a week. But once again, add this factor to any of the above and you get a recipe for impending doom. I combined the three together, and ended up with a 3-month sentence in a halo with 4 pins drilled into my skull. And looking at another month with a neck brace and physio after that.

So in a last-second decision to hit a ladder drop I hadn’t properly assessed yet, at the end of the day, at the end of a really epic last run, I wrote myself off for the season. Or, in other words, controlled risk was eclipsed by uncontrolled stupidity. It’s a fine line, sometimes.


The seriousness of the crash was avoidable. And if you’ve ever been in this kind of situation, I’m sure you’ve heard plenty of apparently well-meaning people tell you how risky and dangerous it is, and now that you’ve got off lucky, you’re going to stop this kind of crazy activity, right? You’re not invincible! Suddenly the outside world’s obsession with safety smacks up against the love of stretching your own limitations.

Well, once I was able to get out of that hospital bed and shuffle, painfully slowly, around the spinal unit, I discovered that most of my fellow wounded had been doing super high-risk activities like walking down a set of stairs. Or cutting down a tree. Or driving a car. The lumber cutting guy will likely never walk again - he was two weeks into a lifetime of getting used to being a paraplegic. That, to understate it completely, would suck.


I could launch into a babble of statistics to show that driving a car is way more dangerous than riding a bike - or that road cycling has thousands more fatalities and serious injuries per year than DH and freeriding put together. But the fact remains that there is a perception that our sport is way more dangerous than, say, walking down stairs. Well, fair enough. But I just received another card from family friends that says, ‘We wish you a very speedy recovery, and hope that mountain biking will be scratched from your agenda for some time...” But if I’d been in a car accident, would they say “...and I hope you don’t drive a car again for a long time..”? Or would they say to the poor bastard in the wheelchair, “...we hope you don’t work again...”?

Now that I’m more than a month into wearing this crazy carbon-fibre and aluminum contraption, I’ve obviously had a lot of time to think the whole thing over. My friends are saying, ‘man, the summer’s just going by so fast!’, but I’m like, ‘...uh, 1 month and 1 week and counting.’ And I realize there was another factor that contributed to my present state of relative immobility, maybe the most significant.

Four: Complacency.

I had been getting lax, maybe too smug, maybe even a bit bored with my riding. Over-confident but not truly progressing. I was still riding hard but not feeling it as much. Too addicted to the adrenaline of risk, and when that perception of risk wasn’t there, I wasn’t as connected to it. So something that should have been easy took me down and made sure I’m staying down long enough to pay attention. A harsh lesson but one that I’m trying to make the most of, and to share with you so maybe you don’t have to deal with the same thing.

The big message? Pay attention.

-mpathic.pinkbike.com
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73 Comments

  • + 25
 yea people like to have opinions about accidents and risk. After some drunk bastard in in a truck failed to stop at a stop sign and busted me up real good on my motorcycle the first thing the surgeon said to me after i came out of the anisthetic was " i hope you have learned your lesson" when i said "what" he said " that motorcycles are too dangerous and i should have know better than to ride one"
I don't envy your recovery. Good luck
  • + 6
 the trail of life we take is worth taking - yet there truly is a fine line -
  • + 3
 #3 is so true
  • + 8
 really good read! hope you get fit, up and running soon
  • + 3
 As i read this i have 2 broken ribs under my skin from last Sundays 4X national race.My chain broke just before the first drop so i believe theres one more factor that is sometimes called luck.Everything you write is true.I wish you A fast and painless recovery.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/3811079/#top
  • + 4
 you only live once. My dad keeps making comments about "doing silly things on my bike" after i've crashed like... a couple of times, no big deal. I don't really take big risks, and i'm not about to stop the sport i love. Props for not letting it get you down man, and i wish you a speedy recovery!
  • + 3
 i agree im getting all of this shit from my parents after breaking collarbone. i pulled a #2 i think
  • + 2
 really hope and pray for a solid recovery bro - you put in perepective what i need to be focusing on aside from the shredding - need to focus on the fact that there are certain times for certain progressions - and always playin it smooth and methodical is the major way of stayin in one piece (even though we all know shit happens ) - your writing is extremely straightforward & honest - nuts how just an easy drop & a few hindsights can just take you down without a blink - guess i did the same thing the other day but was able to walk away thank God - was tree ridin a tree ive riddin plenty of times that hips left but you gotta place yourself - i had it - but i popped late and sure enough slipped out - did a nice side plant into some brush and popped up like it never happened - sittin here today with a nasty bruised rib that crept up and now readin your story - your testament to riding and the philosophy behind it all is truly inspirational -
  • + 1
 Doing any sport is dangerous in it's own way, but if your in the zone and fully concentrated you have a much better chance of not hurting yourself. I broke my tibia and fibula at the Canadian nationals, you would think it was during a race, no it was on our day off playing chinese downhill on our last run of the day, 4 of us crashed and i got the short end of the stick, yet some how i crashed in the super g the day before going 85 k/h and walked it off as i sat in the hostpital bed i thought back and came up with the same variables, bottom line shit happens and the better you prepare yourself and the more focused you are you have a lot better chance of walking away. So for everyone out there that is missing out on there riding season, theres always next year.
  • + 3
 Bike to have fun and not to impress people.. Do It for yourself and you'll have less bad falls. I often use chicken runs when Downhilling but I still have tones of fun. And I still go fast, so I dont think that taking a road gap or like a 20 foot drop or whatever is really necessary lol
  • + 12
 You are lucky for how easy you ended up.
And we are lucky for having someone like you to remind us that we aren't invincible. Thank you so much for being such a conscientious person and writing this article rather than wallowing in self pity. You are truly strong.
You are in our thoughts and hopes.
  • + 5
 GET WELL SOON BUD!!!
ive had two bad injurys in my riding life, the first a seperated ACL from a collision with a bad driver on my ride to work,about 4months off the bike an a good 4months before i could ride back at my normal level
the second,a very badly sprained ankle.3months off the bike an another month before i can now get the wheels off the ground. i KNOW these injurys can i no way compare to what your goin through but,i will say this.my injurys an time off the bike recovering,(while all my frends are out riding!) have given me a far greater appreciation ths simple things in our biking world! like goin for a beer run,ridin to work or over to a frends house.even dare i say it goin for a XC ride through the woods an actualy stoppin to enjoy the veiw!!
i would reccomend (as soon as our injurys allow)makin the most of time off the wheels with a camera,vids or stills
all the best to ya man!!
no retreat no surrender!!!!
  • + 3
 The handlebars on my Road Bike broke in half on a 90 kph+ decent which put me in a Hospital Bed for 3 weeks. I never stopped racing but I did learn to enjoy it much more afterwards.
So get well soon and get back on that Bike but remember ... you don't have to do crazy things to enjoy it ;-)
  • + 2
 I don't like road bikes, but it is true you don't have to do crazy things as to be able to enjoy it. Every time I read a Mountain Biking tip I get pissed off. If you do this or that, you will "impress your friends". Well, I don't mean to impress my friends but my own self. You go down that road you are a posser in my eyes. Riding a bike is one of them things you can do on your own out of sheer pleasure, so I cannot understand very well where this "your-friends" thing comes into the ecuation.
  • + 2
 Solid article, it really puts things into perspective... Every time my parents come to visit they try to convince me not to ride or race any gravity events on the grounds of how dangerous it is. I emailed this article to my them, as your description of controlled risk is 2,000 times better than mine was. P.S. I'm no dentist, but it looks like you're going to need a wisdom tooth pulled pretty soon.
  • + 5
 As I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil...
  • + 2
 i can re-late to your break. Even tho it was yrs ago, through all my years i have always calculated the risk of anything I have to do, riding BMX vert/street/racing, back when a helmet wasn't nessesary. And now on to DH racing, where I NOW wear full armour, seeing there is alwways a risk, and your artical brought it all back in to focus. (I have broken C2, both collar bones, dislocated both shoulders, 5 broken ribs, dislocated hip, torn RT ACL, torn LT MCL, wrist, fingers, and jaw.) The factors you stated are so true, but we all don't read our own minds, and see the accident about to happen. It is all hind site. But remember without fear, theres always a chance of injury. Know your limits, crash and take it as a lesson. Armour maybe hot, but it may leave you too ride another day. After reading this, a Leatt is my next purchase.
I wish you a speedy recovery. And get back up on your bike when your ready.

Peace.
  • + 2
 Laure Luxton

I am not a rider but my husband is and a few month before, he fell and smashed his shoulder because of all the reasons you said : too much confidence etc...
I told him many times to be careful and not to ride when he was tired
to no avail!
But because you ride and you feel exactly what he feels, your words touched him, really.
So for him, for me and our daughter, thank you.
  • + 2
 Great read and so right. It is so hard to keep all the factors in your mind and make the correct decision when it counts. I broke both wrists one requiring 14 pins and a plate. I remember going through this same analysis and determining it was the exaustion of the ride up and inability to tell myself to slow down a bit because I was tired that caused the wreck. None of my family/doctors understood when I rode my bike to therapy while still in casts. Good luck with your recovery and stay positive.
  • + 2
 I am sorry to hear about your injury, i myself have luckily never done anything worse than tearing a few muscles in my shoulder. But I have taken the advice of some 'well-meaning people' and got myself a leatt brace this summer, i was just wondering if you were wearing a neck brace at the time and/or if you think that could have prevented your injury? I hope that you will be lucky enough and fully recover soon!
  • + 1
 that was a really good read and i do hope you have a speedy recovery and painless one

i feel some of your pain as i have dislocating knee caps and recently dislocated them off a really small drop (one that i had hit 40-50 times in the past) and as you said in #2 "Without proper examination of the drop" i have also learnt this this summer and am out for a while. friends/family may not understand y we mountain bike (i know mine don't) but don't give up this will make you a stronger better rider I'm sure of it!

hope you get better soon
  • + 1
 all the best man hope you get back on your bike soon. My mate broke his collar bone while snowboarding, combination of going for it a bit to much since it was the last run and being tired from the rest of the day, as you say its not a good combination
  • + 1
 Right on. I cut my spinal cord in 3 places 3 years ago. I twisted in a get off and cookie cut my cord with my vertebrae. I can walk and ride again now but I have permanent damage to the cord. I got real lucky. Doc's all said my core muscles saved me from being paralyzed.
  • + 1
 Great perspective and some intelligent thoughts in a sport that needs more. As a health professional at the rehab end of the spectrum I always see the worst injuries when people are as you put it complacent! The worst ski and mountain bike injuries always eem to happen at the end of the day and on often the easiest runs. To do any extreme sport one needs the connection and the focus to what they are doing in the moment.
  • + 1
 always pay attention! i was taught the same lesson when a snowboareder hit me in the terrain park after i wrecked on a jump (it was mostly his fault though) it ended up cutting my arm in half and snapped through my ski pole. i lost mobility in my hand but it could have been a lot worse! especially if i didn't have ski poles! you can always say you got off lucky when you look back at wrecks, but by paying attention you can minimize having to do that.
  • + 1
 dude, i feel for you. my 75 year old grandpa had a serious bike accident yesterday. he has a broken pelvis, collar bone, some haed injuries, and internal bleeding near his stomach. so what's the lesson here? be careful. i hope both of you guys get better soon.
  • + 1
 The two times I've been to the ER I had the same young lady for a broken hand (non-bike) and a dislocated elbow from coming off a wall ride screwy. She told me we had to stop seeing each other like that.

Riding my bike actually helped my arm get better and it is now back to normal with no other problems like can sometimes occur with a dislocated elbow such as messing up hands and shoulders along with it. Truth be told, the problem can sometimes be a solution as well.
  • + 1
 Wish you all the best pal and a speedy recovery. This brings back memories of when I did my ligaments in my leg and had to have they all reconstructed. I know its nothing in comparison to your injury but I was in hospital a long time with doubts as to weather I would be able to walk again, all that time in there gets you thinking how valuable life actually is and you learn to calculate possible risks more thoroughly in future.
  • + 1
 You put into words exactly what I think every time someone tells me I'm crazy for enjoying the more aggressive side of mountain biking. I work in a shop where I always have a mtb video going (somethin old like Roam or the original collective b/c of the family friendly soundtracks of course) and where I work the majority of my customers ride their road bikes. They look up at the TV with astonished and sometime repulsive looks. I then mention that I enjoy and partake in many of those styles of cycling and they look at me as if I'm a madman who has just decided to just off a bridge without a parachute and hope for the best. The argument that I always bring up is that when I am in the saddle choosing to do those stunts.....I am in complete control of my own outcome. I try to explain that road biking, or being anywhere in fact, where other humans are in control of machines that could kill you if not operated correctly, is in fact more dangerous. I feel more at home in a gnarly rock garden, blasting through at top speed, than many seasoned drivers that I have rode with feel when they're in traffic during rush hour.....and yet they still call me the crazy one. At least I am putting myself in a situation where my choices affect only me, unlike that drowsy driver who causes a massive pile-up, affecting countless other lives besides his own.
  • + 1
 I really want to thank everyone for the overwhelming wishes and positivity! I have been blown away by it, I could never have expected or predicted such amazing responses. I've been reminded of yet another reason why our sport is so great - the amazing community of riders! So many of your stories have really touched me as well - and for all who are dealing with injuries right now, may you also have speedy and problem-free recoveries! BTW, I've been researching the Leatt brace, and I think it was designed to prevent or seriously reduce precisely this type of injury, so for any of you hovering on your decision to go out and buy one, go for it! It will be a part of my kit when I'm back on 2 wheels. Again, thank you so much for taking the time to write your comments.
  • + 1
 sketch. i just had one of those crashes where you usually wouldnt walk away from it. it was really dumb, but i was doing this little step down in whistler, and decided at the last millisecond (litterally-my front wheel was already off) to bail. so i went off to the right. hit my face on a tree. the helmet hit my nose and mouth, which were both bleeding for some time. I wasgoing more than fast enough to break my neck, but, after sitting down for a few minutes with a concussion, i finished my run, andwent back up the chair... for a few more. was barely even sore the next day.
  • + 3
 I think you wrote a great article, this is one of the few I couldn't ignore. I hope you'll be riding once again. don't worry, life is short, so will you recovery be. Thanks.
  • + 1
 This is what I say: If I am going to die anyway (whether I ride a bike or not) I think I'd rather go to war and die as a hero instead (it is just so easy to die as a coward).
  • + 1
 I swear to God I have seen my death, yesterday I have. I've got a well defined urban like track I follow three times a day (mornings, afternoons and nights) with all the props, flydowns and the like. The thing is, there is this wallride spot in it. I usually clear it at not very high speed, but yesterday I wanted to see how I would get on with it at higher speed. Weel, I almost smashed my bike against the incoming wall, so I had to grab my brakes ke as I was doing it. I don't know how, but in the end I managed to bunny-hop back onto the pavement. After clearing it, I could see some skid marks on the wall, so I am very gratefull I am still alive. Riding good depends on your mental predisposition and attitude (thre is at list one day during the week I don't ride good just because I haven't got the right frame-set to do it), but overconstimating yourself can actually kill you.
  • + 1
 gutted man hope you get a super fast recovery though from what i get of it sounds like your a lucky guy. don't bother listening to people who say its to dangerous you don't know when life's gona go so live it as much as possible when the opertunity arises and don't just think I'll do it tomorrow as who knows what will happen tomorrow just hope you get a speedy recovery and get back on your bike
  • + 4
 just +1.

i wish you a speedy recovery and hope that MTB will NOT be scratched from your agenda
  • + 1
 "That blows, man!" Bart Simpson. I've been an ICU RN for 7+ years now. Seen this injury and others that are "Career Enders". You are right as to how lucky you are. Today I am taking care of a guy with a C7 compression from diving from standing flat, while in the water (Oooh! sounds risky to me!), and augering hard (jumped forward and landed on face). Like you said the stats don't bear out (compared to other sports like say hockey and football) for mountain biking to have the rap is does. I admit that what I do affects how I ride. RESPECT to the mountain! Take heed of mpathic's tale chill'uns. AND to sound like a guidance coucillor. Play SOBER! Save the bevies for after the ride. They have the exact same effect as that short sleep (the more you have, especially later in the day, the shorter that sleep becomes). We have a saying in my industry "alcohol + ______ = work" Meet me on the trail, not staring up at my pretty face from a Hospital bed.
  • + 1
 I would add a #3.5 : Never try the same thing over and over and over and over without taking a break. Just take a break, try some other things and come back to it later. Repetitively trying something is a recipe for disaster because you get tired and mad for failing again and again. This leads to stupid tentatives and to injuries.
  • + 1
 Just wanted to throw a few more stories out there; both my cousin and her partner are wheelchair bound after neck/ back injuries. My cousin was on a boat, slipped and fractured something (C6 ish I think). Her partner was a tree surgeon, fell and is now unable to climb trees! The message Id like to reinforce from mpathic is that it can happen to anyone doing anything. So although you should sometimes stop to assess the risk, dont sit at home feeling sorry for yourself if you didnt hit something.
Great article. Wink
  • + 1
 i wish you a speedy recovery. all of the things you said are so true, but i think it would have been good to put in that you gotta have the right protection. i would like to know if you were wearing a leatt brace? if not i hope you invest in one when your healed up and ready to rip again! get well soon
  • + 1
 Good luck with the recover man and sorry to hear about your accident, but I completely disagree with one of your points. DH IS DANGEROUS!!!! When you mention that a lot of the other spinal patients had been doing things like driving or walking, you neglect to account for the amount of people that dh and the amount of people that drive and walk. There are way less dh riders, so proportionally many more dh riders end up with serious injuries than drivers or people out for a stroll. Its admirable that you try to rationalize dh as "safe as walking," or "safer than driving," but that IS NOT TRUE!!!! YOU WILL GET HURT DH RIDING, which is fine if you can accept that, but don't fool yourself, this shit is risky and the consequences can be high.
  • + 1
 You are one lucky guy. I have worked as a physiotherapist with these types of patients occasionaly and most of them don't walk at all. Get well soon, be careful when you are back on the bike and think about some voluntary work for you and your friends visiting the wards when you are fixed. Its an amazing to hear other peoples stories and their problems. A real leveller. All the best.
  • + 1
 Healing feelings to you my friend!

I had a compound break of my tib+fib nearly 2 years ago now, and it sucked, but it made me a better rider because it made me think about what went wrong and how to minimise it happening again, and that made me progress faster without big risks.

I can't imagine the pain of your injury, and hope it gets fixed asap, but as nojzilla said, use this time.

I had the good fortune to have an amazing opportunity during my time in bed, i spent the time putting together a huge presentation with video, slideshows, website and plans, for a bike park. That bike park is now up and running and hosting NPS events.

So out of the pain and frustration came something pretty damn good. So, it may suck now, but put your mind to it and turn it to your advantage if you've got time on your hands!!

Good luck with everything, you'll be back on that bike and better than ever.
  • + 1
 I broke by C-1 vertebrae a few years back doing DH. doctors said i was really lucky to walk. it hasnt kept me from riding, despite the fact i thought it might. as you said, its a big lesson learned "never ride over your head." is what i call it.. and i take that into consideration everytime i ride. basically the same as what you said...good to hear your ok man. get better quick
  • + 1
 Great article, and from someone who actually has learnt the hard way instead of just preaching what they haven't experienced. A great read! Hope you're on the road to recovery.
  • + 1
 Yeah, that's awful. I'm yet to break any limbs yet. *knocks on wood* Sucks you're out of the game for awhile, but you'll be back. =] I couldn't have said it better myself, pay attention.
  • + 1
 Dress for the crash, not the ride......where a Leatt Brace. They have an entry level model thats cheaper than a TLD D2, well worth the price if you get to walk away or at least walk at all.
  • + 3
 damn, after reading this I think I've convinced myself enough to invest in a leatt brace forsure
  • + 1
 mind read
  • + 1
 I would love to get one and know i would wear it a lot. However the money they cost is mad. Great write up,
  • + 1
 Hope u recover ok, I done c6 and c7 compression into each other, walked about with it for 3 days before going to hospital.. had a bit of tingling down an arm for few weeks untill swelling went down.
  • + 1
 Excellent read. Thanks for your experience. Speedy recovery to you so you can go back to enjoying "controlled risk" activities!
  • + 1
 Best written words I've read on here. I don't feel so tragic about my broken hand now - but I wish you as speedy recovery as possible, and keep writing/riding - Peace!
  • + 1
 that sux ass. i recently got a leatt club and just wow! sure their expensive but just remember protecting your neck is as important as protecting your head. get well soon
  • + 1
 man! i jus cant find the words to type..ur story has touched me and others..i hope u get better soon and no wheelies in the wheelchair..lol..take it easy man
  • + 2
 maybe neck braces (LEATT) should be used like we use helmets and gloves and a wake up call for us all?
  • + 1
 Yeah man, get well soon, and your absolutly right on all points. keep shredding..
  • + 1
 good luck in your recovery, hope you make a complete recovery and start biking again
  • + 2
 well said we have all been there
  • + 1
 Very insightful advice. You will be back and riding because you sound very determined
  • + 1
 REPLYING TO THE GUY AT THE TOP, did you punch the doctor in the face? you should have
  • + 1
 get well my friend. a biker down is a brother lost. i hope you have a speedy recovery
  • + 1
 That was great josh hopefully the double shot i made you today makes things heal a little faster eh
  • + 1
 Mistake: #2
Result: 2 Broken Ribs
The Big Message: Ride Faster!!!!!
  • + 1
 really good article, hope everyone reads it and takes it to heart. hope you get well soon!
  • + 1
 wish you all the best and hope you don't write off mtb's for good!! keep your chin up.
  • + 2
 Life goes by fast -

"Andy Dufresne: Get busy living, or get busy dying."
  • + 1
 Get Well Soon man. And dont give up downhilling Big Grin
  • + 1
 That was amazing. I hope you get back riding soon
  • + 1
 hope you heal up quick bro!
  • + 1
 man that looks bad, hope your better soon.
  • - 1
 At least youshould be able to pick up some chicks with that neck brace, or at the very least look like a total bad A for a while.
  • + 1
 Best wishes from Canada

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