11 Riding Glasses Ridden & Rated

Apr 23, 2020 at 14:05
by Nikki Rohan  
About This Review
It happens to all of us. You’re pinballing through a technical section of trail way too fast but feeling perfect when out of nowhere a little pebble flies up and smacks you in the eye. In an instant you’ve gone from a single track assassin to a blind man without a cane; you’re adrift and shutting it down in an effort to keep the rubber side down. After you come to a screeching halt, you immediately grab your water bottle and flush the little [insert bad word] out with what remaining water you have available. That is the moment you curse yourself for not wearing proper eye protection.

Choosing the perfect pair of performance eyewear for mountain biking is a lot like choosing a saddle: everyone has a different opinion on what works best for them and why. In shopping for "the perfect pair," the most important factors to consider are (not in any particular order) cost, performance, quality (frame and lens), protection, and fit/comfort. I like to squeeze my pennies as much as most dirtbags, and I hate to admit it, but in general, the better the performance, the higher the price tag. Yes, you can rock some 3M safety glasses for under $10 USD, but the tech invested in even the most basic "real" riding glass reviewed here, the Bliz Matrix ($85 USD) far outstrips the performance of the bargain bin 3M glasses. Think of it as buying a suspension fork that's a decade old vs one of Fox's new 38 beauties for your bike. They'll both get the job done, but which one do you really want to have on your bike?

Some things to think about: we all have different shaped faces, we all have different riding environments, and (admit it!) we all want to look rockstar fabulous. Do you have a narrow face? Do you have a wide face? Do you ride in the desert? Do you ride in the deep dark woods? Does it rain 99% of the time where you live? Will that frame color match my handlebars?!?! These are just a few of the factors to take into consideration on eyewear, and realize too, that while you will find an awesome selection of some of the highest performance riding glasses currently available in this review, some of them just might not work for you.

(Note that all the product testing and photo work for this piece was done prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. All our local mountain bike trails have been closed since Friday, April 3rd. Respect the closures. Stay home, stay healthy.)






Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
POC Aspire Clarity

• Weight: 40g
• Frame Colors: 8 different options
• Lens Colors: Transparent, Grey, Light Brown (Clarity)
• MSRP: $220 USD
pocsports.com


Born in a restaurant on a napkin with the goal of making outdoor sports safer, POC has come far. In addition to their helmets, protective pads, lids, and apparel, now you can add eyewear.

The Aspire Clarity rings in at the cash register for a hefty $220 USD. For that hard-earned money, you get a distinctly Euro look framed up with a lightweight Grilamid TR90 frame topped off with a durable polycarbonate lens from Carl Zeiss, a legend in the optics world. The frames feature hydrophilic grip rubber on the nose and temples for a secure fit. Lens construction provides ventilation to evacuate sweat vapor. Each Lens is “Ripel” treated to help keep vapor, dirt, and your grimy fingers from soiling the lens. The Aspire Clarity has been designed to match seamlessly with POC’s Tectal and Tectal Race helmets. For safety, it features a snap-in hinge designed to give way in the event of an impact to save the frame while still protecting your baby blues. The Aspire Clarity lenses are available in several activity-specific tints; each one has been designed to intensify color and contrast specific to different riding environments from deep woods to high alpine. And make no mistake: the lenses are the gold in these distinctly shaped performance specs: Carl Zeiss Visions is no joke in the optic world.

While I struggled to like the look of these frames, I was pretty impressed with the performance of the Aspire Clarity glasses. They had one of the best anti-fog performance of the group, provide ample coverage/protection, and the lens worked phenomenally well in the low light conditions with a very clear and clean perspective. While the glasses are reasonably lightweight and comfortable, I (unfortunately) also couldn't get around the fact that, particularly for my smaller face, they are big. Maybe too big. I tried every helmet I have, and even with the POC branded helmet on, the glasses pushed the helmet up off my forehead. So not the best fit for me ( big glasses and small face 101). Aside from the not so perfect fit, the lens coverage provided excellent protection from debris yet at the same time the glasses also had enough ventilation that they fogged up only under extreme efforts. Other than the fact I felt like an extra in a "Zoolander" movie, these are in excellent pair of riding optics with options to swap out lenses for a mere $80 USD.

The Aspire Clarity have all the tech you want with unique style but at a hefty price tag. I give them a solid 8 out of 10 in my book of performance eyewear.


Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
POC Aspire Clarity



Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Smith Attack MTB

• Weight: 34g
• Frame Colors: Matte Black, Jade, Red Rock, Iceberg, Moss, Mediterranean
• Lens Colors: ChromaPop™ Platinum, Black, Green Mirror, Blue Mirror, Red Mirror, Low Light Rose
• MSRP: $207 USD
smithoptics.com


The Sun Valley brand is enjoying the move to the heart of the Pacific NW, and now calls Portland, OR home. That move takes nothing away from Smith’s focus on top-notch gear for bikes. With sixteen different performance glasses available in their line, it was a tough call to pick which one to test but eventually, we settled on the Attack MTB.

The Attack MTB comes in eight different flavors, each with a low light ChromaPop™ replacement lens, lens bag/wipe, and a performance zip case. The frames feature Smith’s MAG™ technologies for easy lens swaps and are made from Grilamid TR90 for durability. They have hydrophilic, two-position adjustable nose pads for a secure fit. On the optic side, they feature a hydrophobic lens coating to protect from dirt and grime, as well as prevent vapor build-up, and make use of Smith’s ChromaPop™ technology for optimized vision. There’s also a ventilation channel in the brow for superior moisture management. It’s designed for a medium fit and offers generous coverage.

The Attack MTB looks a lot like the Attack or Attack Max models of performance glasses that have been around the past couple years with a couple minor design changes, including brow and lower lens framing features. The glasses offer a large and wide wrapped coverage area and fit well with a variety of helmet brands, including Smith, Giro and TLD. Swapping out lenses is as easy as advertised thanks to the Smith MAG™ technology: the arms just pull away from the lens for quick swaps, yet remain firmly locked in place when riding even the most bone-shaking trail. ChromaPop™ continues to impress me, offering, a clean, crisp perspective on the world, regardless of how much or how little light was available. My grimy fingers still left smudges on the lenses during swaps, but they wiped away cleanly with no residue vs. just smearing. The glasses do fog up a bit when climbing in damp humid conditions, but I didn't notice any sweat dripping down the inner lens and once I had some speed, the glasses had good airflow and cleared up pretty fast.

All in all I was pretty happy with the performance and features that the Smith Attack MTB glasses offer. I give them a solid 8.5 out of 10 and next time I have an opportunity I plan to grab the photochromic clear to grey lens for these and see how they hold up against the competition.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Smith Attack MTB




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
100% Speedcraft

• Weight: 32g
• Frame Colors: Clark, War Red, Falcon5, Genesis, Black, Lightsaber, Nuclear Citrus, Litkit, Royal
• Lens Colors: Clear, Silver Flash Mirror, HiPER Silver Mirror, HiPER Red Mirror, HiPER Blue/Red Mirror, Gold Mirror, True Gold Mirror, Blue Mirror
• MSRP: $155 USD
100percent.com


100%’s lineup of performance eyewear has a lot to choose from. Each model exhibits similar DNA, but we opted to try the Speedcraft® Soft Tact Midnight Mauve with a Purple lens for $155 USD (there are twelve different flavors of Speedcraft available ranging in price from $155 to $220 USD). In the box, you get a microfiber cleaning cloth, a hard case, and a clear replacement lens.

100% have done their homework. The polycarbonate lenses are high impact resistant, have a five base cylindrical shield lens for increased peripheral vision and side debris protection without compromising clarity. The scratch-resistant lenses are interchangeable and feature a HYDROILO lens treatment to repel water, dirt, and oil. The Grilamid TR90 frame has air scoops to manage moisture on the temples and increase ventilation around the eyes to reducing fogging. The Lenz has a filter category of three and blocks up to 88% of light transmission. The clear lens that comes with the purchase of these glasses is a category zero and transmits 93% of visible light. Last, the ultra grip rubber nose pads and temple tips are hydrophilic and provide a secure fit even if you’re sweating buckets.

Fit for me is always a bit of a struggle: I have somewhat high cheekbones but a smaller, rather flat face, so a lot of wrap or shield style optics contact my face such that when I sweat, there's no escape for that moisture which results in condensation/sweat pooled up against the inner lens (or dripping down my nose). Despite the best anti-fog lens treatments out there, unless I am moving faster than a cheetah, uphill sections almost always result in my glasses fogging up. With the Speedcraft, the glasses fit fairly comfortably and had enough curvature that there was minimal contact with my face (it was close, though; the lower lens just barely sat off my cheekbones). The design does provide good airflow through both the top and side of the glasses, and there are two slots between the lens and bottom framing for a bit more ventilation. Much like the POC Clarity shades, these have a large coverage area and probably are just a tiny bit too big for my small-ish face which means they push my helmet up off my forehead—less than ideal compatibility for me. Aside from the slightly too big for my face gripe, these are solid glasses. The lenses stayed surprisingly clean, despite my sweaty, dirty hands clumsily grasping them when I swapped lenses. The clear lenses were perfect for most of our forested trails and the dark purple lenses were perfect for the open, sunlit trails across the river. The increased peripheral vision was nice, but I noticed some drop off on clarity in the peripheral zones. Overall, good performance for the price.

A 7.5 out of 10. These glasses offer a lot of bang for your buck, and although they were a little big for my face, they are stylish, and offer excellent coverage and protection.

Bonus: this is the same frame as the one for the Speedcraft SL. The only difference is the SL has a smaller lens and uses a different nose piece. Want to change your look? For $40 to $80 bucks you can grab a SL replacement lens, and while I can’t find replacement nose pieces on their site, I’m sure they’re available.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
100% Speedcraft




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Oakley Radar EV Advanced

• Weight: 32g
• Frame Colors: Multiple options
• Lens Colors: Prizm, Prizm Polaraized, Photochromic
• MSRP: $206 USD
oakley.com


California based Oakley has come a long way since decking out Greg LeMond in a garish, day-glow look back in the day. Although perusing today’s offerings, you have to ask, was it garish, or just forward-thinking?

The Radar EV Advanced is just one of Oakley’s go-fast performance optical pieces of modern art. The aerodynamic design and taller lens shape makes this a “go-to” for cycling. It uses Oakley's "Advancer" technology, a unique nose bridge which allows one to instantly open airflow to combat fogging and overheating. Plus the Unobtainium nose and temples make sure your Radars stay in place on even the roughest trails. On the optics side, the “Prizm” lenses enhance color, contrast, and detail and are designed to meet or exceed the ANSI Z80.3 rating for optical standards and impact resistance.

At first glance, I really didn't think I would like these glasses. From a "how do I look" standpoint, the lens shape is smaller than the current trends and the Advancer nosepiece looked a little out of place. However, once I slid them on and got out on the trails, they quickly exceeded my expectations. The lens did a phenomenal job of adjusting to the varying light conditions on the trails, and I had no issues with fogging or sweat inside the lens on any of my climbs. The Radar EVs fit snugly on my face but offered enough airflow I was able to forego using the nose bridge adjuster, yet at the same time, they were also big enough to protect my eyes from any mud or grit thrown off my tires or other trail features. I was worried the lens would be too dark to ride at dusk since most of my testing was done in the evening after work, but again, Oakley did their homework and these Prizm lenses seemed to adjust better than most other photochromatic options I reviewed. I did give the advancer nose bridge a test run on a mid-ride climb: flipping the switch essentially just pushes the glasses off the brow for more airflow, and while some people might enjoy this feature, I didn't adjust well to the feel. More importantly, I found that having the top brow of the glasses framing my view was distracting. In certain climate conditions, I could see this being an amazing feature and likely I would eventually adjust, but for the conditions I tested in it seemed unnecessary.

I give these glasses an 8.5 out of 10 in my book: high-performance design and lens technology with a couple lost points in the style category.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Oakley Radar EV Advanced




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Bliz Matrix

• Weight: 34g
• Frame Colors: too many to list
• Lens Colors: see above
• MSRP: $84.95
bliz.com


Bliz is the technical sport personality of the Future Eyewear Group, a Swedish based eyewear consortium established in 1984 that makes everything from Rx eyewear to lifestyle sunglasses to goggles. Additionally, Bliz and Future Eyewear strive for as small an environmental foot print as possible in production, packaging, and shipping and is a member of BSCI (business social compliance initiative).

The Matrix is a no holds barred fast forward sport-oriented wrap-around eye glass design. It’s available in five different frame colors with eight different lens tints available. In the box, however, there’s only the case and a microfiber wipe, no spare lens. The frame is made from Grilamid TR90 for durability and features a featherweight 34gram total frame and lens weight. Nose and temples are sheathed in adjustable hydrophobic rubber for a secure, customizable fit. The lenses are easy to swap, are shatterproof polycarbonate, and are optically correct despite the curvature. They provide max UV protection and are hydrophobic as well as scratch-resistant.

For the price, these are one of the best bang for your buck options in this review. They tick all the boxes well enough to overlook any shortcomings. Out of the box, they had an awesome fit for my facial features and offered loads of style; the variety of frame and lens colors was also a plus. On the trail, they had great lens tech and quality: my vision was clear and sharp from edge to edge, and the lens tint I tested was perfect for both bright and low light conditions. Nor did I have any issues with fogging when climbing—even when it was both cool and wet out—thanks to the ample airflow from the vents. The featherweight design and comfy fit quickly let me forget about the glasses and simply focus on the ride. While the cost of replacement lenses is almost half the cost of the glasses themselves, you can purchase a spare clear, dark or rose-colored lens, and changing them out was easier than my 4th grader's common core math homework.

While I had never heard of Bliz before this review, these $85 glasses get a solid 9 out of 10 in my book. They come in multiple sizes for different shaped faces, they are affordable, stylish, and offer excellent coverage.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Bliz Matrix



Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Rudy Project Defender

• Weight: 33g
• Frame Colors: Black, White, Blue, Yellow, Pink, Red, Bronze
• Lens Colors: Multilaser Orange, Red, Blue, Ice, Smoke Black, Photochromic clear to multi-colored options
• MSRP: $210 USD
rudyprojectna.com


Arising in Northern Italy in 1985, Rudy Project is squarely focused on being a leader in sports eyewear. It now produces a huge variety of sports sunglasses, prescription glasses, goggles, and other sport accessories.

The Rudy Project Defender comes in some eleven different frame and lens combinations. As per the norm for most glasses tested here, the frames feature adjustable nose pads and temple tips for a customizable fit. The lens frame bumpers are designed to provide a soft buffer between the edge of the lens and the skin in the event of a fall but also double as a ventilation system—pretty trick. Lens swaps are designed to be quick and efficient. From a coverage standpoint, the Defender offers a full wrap, keeping dust, water, and debris away from your eyes. Last, they are Rx compatible with an insert (sold separately). In the box, you get a microfiber cloth and a hard case to protect your shades.

These glasses had one of the best fits for my face of any of the glasses tested. They didn't hug my face so tightly that sweaty climbs overpowered the vent system, but at the same time the venting wasn't so much that my eyes teared up at speed. Nor were there any gaps significant enough for trail debris to be an issue. Excellent lens technology, too: that Goldilocks fine line of being not too dark/not too light. And lens swaps were ridiculously easy but...kinda pricey. However, if you read into the technology of the lens you'll see how complicated they are, and that complexity directly adds to the cost. The Defender also played nicely with ever helmet I tried them with.

While I didn't find these to be the most stylish glasses of the review, given the fit and the performance, I'll happily dole out a solid 8.5 out of 10 and offer up that these had one of top photochromic lens designs of the bunch.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Rudy Project Defender




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Melon Optics Alleycat

• Weight: 31g
• Frame Colors: Black Matte, White Matte, Grey Matte, Neon Yellow, Paint Splat Matte, Turquoise
• Lens Colors: Amber, Violet Chrome, Red Chrome, Silver Chrome, Smoke
• Nosepiece Colors: Black, Grey, Pink, Neon, Turquoise
• MSRP: $150.00 USD
melonoptics.com


UK based Melon Optics was founded on the core principle that “quality eyewear shouldn’t break the bank”. They are dedicated to offering an exceptional, customizable product that enhances whatever adventure you choose to undertake, but have a focus on surf, snow, and two-wheel adventures.

The Alleycat is their one and only cycling glass. It’s available in six different frame colors, with a choice of five different lens hues, five different colored nose pieces, and six different colors of Melon icons. The purchase comes with a hard case box, a microfiber bag, a carrying case, and an extra low light lens.

The frames are made from everyone’s favorite material, the super-tough Grilamid TR90. They have a hydrophilic rubberized nose piece and temples for comfort and security while riding. They utilize Zeiss Optics' “Trail” glass for the lenses. They’re interchangeable, shatterproof and there is a lens tint suitable for any condition you want to ride in. These beauties are made in Italy and receive a premium anti-fog treatment that—along with the cutout ventilation slits—should keep your vision fog-free.

I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked the Melon Alleycats. The fit for my face was quite good—I had no issues with frame contact on my cheeks trapping moisture and steaming up the view and they fit with all my helmets. Plus I had good airflow due to the side vent slits to help disperse any vapor. My Melons came with the violet chrome lens tint, which I found suitable for the more open sunlit trails. I found that the Zeiss generated "Trail" optics worked like a charm, offering clarity and just the right amount of contrast, even in flat light. I also appreciated their unique, "choose your own adventure" color and style options, which offered some ability to customize not just the look but also the fit. The nosepiece is a little tight and cheap feeling and pulls off fairly easy, so people with big noses might want to do a fit test on these before they push go.

A solid 7.5 out of 10. The glasses come with a clear lens for a wicked price, they look good, feel good, and offer the full coverage and UV protection I expect all my riding glasses to provide.

Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Melon Optics Alleycat




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Ryders Roam Fyre

• Weight: 31g
• Frame Colors: Red Black, White Black, Black Grey
• Lens Colors: Rose-Purple, Yellow-Brown, Light Grey-Grey
• MSRP: $240 USD
ryderseyewear.com


Like me, Ryders is another child of the '80s. Founded in the shadow of mountain biking’s infamous North Shore, Ryders still calls North Vancouver home. Today they’re known as an offbeat but gritty brand with authentic roots and an appetite for adventure.

The Roam Fyre features a semi-rim frame that can quickly convert to a rimless road frame. Like just about every other frame in this view, the Roam Fyre is made from Grilamid TR90 material. It also features the usual hydrophilic nose pads and temple tips for—big surprise—a comfortable and secure grip no matter how sweaty you are.

The lens tech was developed in partnership with Essilor Sun Solution. They utilize VARIA photochromatic tech that darkens or lightens the lenses depending on available light, are scratch-resistant, have ‘Colourboost’ to enhance color recognition, NXT advanced impact protection, and a military-grade anti-fog coating. That may seem like a lot but it's the same options found with nearly every lens here, just different mouse traps, nothing earth-shattering

The Roam Fyre is another one of those glasses that have a unique, "out of the box" clear lens look. Again, with my face shape, when I was exerting a lot of effort I noticed sweat pooling on the lower frame and dripping down my nose due to the tight fit on my cheekbones, creating a mini sauna between the lenses and my eyes. But that's my face, not yours. From a technical performance standpoint... OMG! The transition lens technology was phenomenal. The Essilor photochromatic style lenses work great out on open slopes where they easily dial back the bright glare of sunlight when you need them to, but also (and more importantly) effortlessly lightened up when I ducked back into loam country under deeply forested canopy. And it wasn't just the lens tech—although that was exceptional. But the Fyres also had good airflow and offered fog-free vision despite the mini sauna created by my cheek/frame interface, even under heavy pedaling in fairly humid conditions. A bonus on post-spring rain rides when the air literally feels as if you can cut it with a knife.

The technology of the Ryders lens was by far one of the best. Aside from fit, these were up there with the Julbo as my favorite all-around pair deserving a solid 9 out of 10. Stylish, comfortably, excellent tech and performance. The only missing point is the steep price tag, and not purely because of my genetics.


Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Ryders Roam Fyre




Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Pit Viper 2000's

• Weight: 37g
• Frame Colors: Merika 2000, Monster Bull 2000, Killer Bees, Jet Ski, Baja Blaster, White Out, Montucky, etc...
• Lens Colors: Mirror, Clear, Smoke
• MSRP: $60.00 - $85.00
pitvipersunglasses.com


The company that prides itself on not taking itself too seriously (an understatement) was born out of necessity in 2012 when founder Chuck Mumford’s expensive, high-end sunglasses broke while ski touring. In seeking a replacement, he determined that he needed to develop something better. Something that could be “shot, sat on, shoved in pockets, run over, and mostly maintain their sun and wind bucking ability.”

Pit Vipers come in a myriad of frame and lens combos, and range in price from $69 to $99. The 2000 line features a dozen different frame/lens combos, all priced at $99. The Playmate is a bubble gum blue framed number, with a mirrored lens that goes from sky blue to yellow to orange. The lenses themselves have a blue tint and offer 100% UV protection. They transmit 17.9% of available light and are made from polycarbonate with an impact rating of ANSI Z87+. The frames feature a roomier fit vs. the original Pit Viper, with redesigned nose and temple pieces. The temples are adjustable for a semi-custom fit. In the box, you get a firm case and a limp cloth.

I really wanted to love these glasses. They speak volumes of steeze, and when you see them out on the trail you kinda just want a pair. However, in my case, I had a hard time getting a comfortable fit despite the fact that they have multiple adjustment points. I found that the brow bar pushed them off my slightly flat face a little further than I like, leaving a fairly big gap between my cheekbones and the lower lens. Despite the brow bar issues, the glasses fit snug enough that I was happy to put them through the ringer testing in a variety of weather conditions. The big gap along the bottom did offer nice airflow so I didn't have any issues with condensation pooling on the inside or the glasses fogging up, but that gap would be perfect for trail debris to potentially crash my party on a muddy or loose and dusty trail. One cool feature aside from the multiple adjustable points is that the glasses have a slight wrap around the sides that offers a little extra sun and debris protection. An important factor to note is that you can't change the lens on these so if you want multiple lens colors for different conditions, you will have to purchase multiple pairs (they do offer a couple of options with clear lenses). The pair I tested had a fairly dark tint that worked well on the open trails but not so much once in the deep, dark woods. I tend to think the 2000's would be happiest in Virgin, Utah surrounded by half-naked millennials gawking at the Red Bull Rampage insanity.

These glasses get a 6.5 out of 10 and most of those points come from style and affordability.


Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Nikki Rohan on a dawn patrol test session for Pinkbike on the Syncline Trail system near Bingen WA
Pit Viper 2000's





Julbo Fury

• Weight: 23g
• Frame Colors: Army/Black, White/Pink, White/Blue, Black/Green, Black/Red, Dark Gray/Orange
• Lens Colors: Spectron or REACTIV Performance
• MSRP: $129.95 USD
julbo.com


French-based Julbo Is the old man of this selection of optical manufacturers. They were founded in 1888, initially for making sunglasses for crystal hunters in Chamonix. From there, Julbo continued to innovate protective sunglasses for all kinds of alpine activities, from climbing to skiing to cycling.

The Julbo Fury is another wrap-around shield type of sports optic. It’s available in six different frame colors and four different tinted polycarbonate lenses (called “Spectron”) or a photochromatic polycarbonate lens (called “Reactiv”). The frames are exceptionally lightweight (25g) and are designed with venting in mind to eliminate fogging in cool, wet weather. The hingeless design features elastomer grips on the nose and temples for security and comfort (bonus, the material doesn’t grab one’s hair). The wrap-around lens is designed for perfect clarity from edge to edge. The Spectron lenses are available in C1 and C3, which offer different amounts of light transmission depending on your needs, or you can select the photochromatic lens for no lens swap hassles.

I tested the Dark Gray/ Orange Fury with the REACTIV Performance 0-3 lens. Out of the box, without knowing what Julbo sent me, I thought maybe they had mistakenly sent me their Olympic Racquetball athlete glasses... the lens looked clear and the frame above the nose bridge was not only 100% visible, but looked, well... slightly awkward. However, there is a saying that first looks can be deceiving—and why yes, these glasses deceived me. Starting with fit, the glasses have a nice tall profile but a slightly flat design such that they were just kissing my upper cheekbone. Climbing, while the glasses have some slots for airflow, I did notice a little condensation on the inside that was a result of fit, not performance. However, there was zero fogging—even with the sweat droplets accumulating on the lower frame. That nearly won me over right there. But what sealed the deal was the lens performance: the Fury optical quality was nearly the best of the group—edge to edge I had clear, razor-sharp vision. And don't let that out of the box clear lens deceive you: once you're out on the trail, the transition lens darkens or lightens as conditions shift. As a bonus, when the lens gets darker, the internal frame disappears and that racquetball championship look evaporates, leaving one with a fairly stylish appearance.

These glasses were my top pick and easily deserve a 9.5 out of 10. They hit all the points—performance, coverage, price tag, and the pretty awesome transitional lens technology—easily making them my favorite pair of the group. And to top it off, my 12-year-old son absconded with them so they must be somewhat stylish in his book.

Pre lockdown Hudson Hollatz focusing on his Social Isolation on the Zen Trail in St George UT

Julbo Fury



3M Flat Temple Safety Glasses

• Weight: 18g
• Frame Colors: Amber, Clear, Pink or Grey
• Lens Colors: Amber, Clear or Grey
• MSRP: $9 - $12 USD
amazon.com


In a nod to the budget-minded, we opted to test the typical over-the-counter, department store, Canadian Tire, Walmart, Home Depot, safety glasses—in this case, a low budget pair made by 3M. 3M (originally the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company) is a global powerhouse aimed at making products "to improve the daily lives of people around the world." Anyone reading this article would be hard-pressed to not find something made by 3M in their home. They make a ton of useful products, from adhesives to bandages to—in this case—a budget pair of amber lensed safety glasses.

These safety glasses feature 3M’s proprietary “pressure diffusion temple technology” to provide a comfortable, secure fit even with ear protection (or a helmet) on. The lenses are anti-scratch and have a Scotchgard anti-fog coating for working in wet and humid environments. The amber lenses not only block 99% of UV rays but also increase the contrast, making them ideal for working in low light and riding in the woods. As for safety, they meet ANSI Z87.1 rating for impact resistance.

These glasses fit fairly tight against my face leaving almost no gap except a small slot on the brow line and peripheral edges. While the supposed anti-fog coating is a nice thought and will likely work in most garage settings, pedaling uphill in slightly humid PNW winter weather was a no go. As is the case with lots of glasses, pedaling in humid damp sticky weather will fog up just about everything in sight regardless of the price tag or technology. For us on the fringe of Eastern Oregon (the dry side vs. the fog-shrouded western half of the state), it's fairly rare to have humid damp conditions, so it's less of an issue; but for those of you who struggle with it every day, these lenses are no better than anything else available. Despite the tight fit on my face, once moving and mostly descending, there was enough airflow that the glasses stayed clear and kept wind and debris from irritating my eyes. The low profile shape and smaller lens fit well with the various helmets I tested in and the yellow lens adds a degree of brightness to everything within sight. This might be a nice offering for a foggy dark day, but when you exit the woods into the sunshine, the squint factor is real.

These bad boys get a solid 5 out of 10. The price is right, the look is early-2000's doable, and the glasses get the job done without any bells or whistles.


3M




About the Tester:

Nikki Rohan stands 5'5" and weighs 130 lbs with a 28-inch waist, 37-inch hips, and 35-inch chest and wears a size small helmet, size large gloves, and EU-41 shoes. She resides in Hood River OR with her husband, Colin Meagher, her two kids, a dog, and a grumpy cat. Nikki has been mountain biking for close to 20 years, including a short stint competing in the pro women category in enduro races in the PNW, as well as events like the Trans BC, the Trans-Provence, the Downieville Classic, Grinduro, and the occasional CX race.



320 Comments

  • 190 17
 Why do all riding glasses look terrible.
  • 43 11
 I blame @Senditofficial and @Jerryoftheday
  • 14 16
 I've just bought some Oakley Half Jacket XL's. Look way nicer and priced at the lower end of most of these. Just as good on or off the bike so get more use out of them.
  • 23 10
 @tremeer023: I couldn't have been happier with the arrival of Jawbreakers. Second hand market got filled with Racing jackets in pristine state, costing nothing. Roadies are indeed very serious about updating their eyewear
  • 17 1
 @tremeer023: this is do true, plus you look less like a roadie.

These are all oversized and overpriced
and if 7 times out of 10 you want clear lenses if you ride all year, your paying for fancy coatings and colours that when you actually eventually use them will just scratch.

You can get clear , UV protective glasses from a bunch of brands and a set of Oakleys/Smith/Ryders etc for sunny conditions that you might be able to use off the bike too without looking like a melon, for less than these.
  • 29 0
 I just wear my prescription glasses. I can see really well then....
  • 24 2
 Its funny when the Pit Vipers look normal compared to the rest of these. They are all so big and gaudy.
  • 6 1
 I just got the Oakley Sutro and really dig the look of them. Almost goggle like and they fit real nice.
  • 26 1
 It's like on did a review just to get free glasses? most of these are a crap load of money to look like a wanker.
  • 22 2
 LOL the safety glasses I have used for 3 years look better then all of the above and I think I paid $12 for 3.
  • 6 0
 Agreed. Riding glasses have become face shields. I do not understand it.
  • 12 5
 @Shredtheduck: using these to look "less like a roadie" is a rather failed attempt at improving MTB identity. These glasses are ok on a party when everyone is already drunk and stoned, but a big miss outside of that zone.
  • 2 0
 There are other ones that look good and function really well. Look at the Ryders' lineup. Lots of good and good looking ones. The Fyre's are probably the more "out there" ones.
  • 4 0
 @Telebikes: It's a plot to see how obnoxious an advert people will tolerate on their face
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: yep the incline are awesome not too big, no upper frame for good vision and comes in different lenses and prices.
  • 4 0
 was just gonna say the same.. how can you pay $300 and look like that????
  • 3 3
 @Shredtheduck: not oversized for those of us with large / heads faces. i've tried Smiths previously and really wanted to like them, they were super nice but just too small for me. I wound up with Pit Viper Mud Slinger Double Wides and for me they provide good coverage without looking absurdly oversized.
  • 1 0
 I hear you sidelicksjn. Also, if you’re going to wear glasses with XL single lens with no partition why not wear goggles at that point.
  • 9 4
 @captainderp: At the risk of appearing rude - How Large head do you have to make these look Like normal glasses on norm... ekhem! medium sized head? Erm... would you mind... posting a selfie? Smile
  • 14 1
 Pretty sad statement about the state of fashion in the bike industry when the best looking set out of the bunch are $10 safety glasses. Not to mention the yellow tint probably works better on the trail on average than any of the other bike specific lenses reviewed...
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: All my helmets are L or XL (mostly XL). Head circumference measurement is just over 24 inches (about 61 cm). Not the hugest by any means, but large enough it can be challenging (particularly for sunglasses). I remember trying on a first gen POC DH helmet and I could barely get on the largest size (those ones were oddly proportioned though).
  • 1 0
 @trillot: This is exactly what I was thinking. They're probably safer compared to the exposed edge lenses with sharp edges as well.
  • 3 0
 @rrolly: Ive tried different riding glasses for 20years + now and nothing has been better than the Ryders Fyre. I run mine frameless as it sits better. After 5 minutes of wearing them you don't even notice you have glasses on ! I rate 10/10 Pay for what you get... eye protection is so important, I remember seeing a guy at whistler bike park with a stick in his eyes.. not good !
  • 1 0
 Spending $30 you can find a solid pair of glasses (goodr glasses). At that price point if you scratch them no biggie, they can be replaced when you want. Most people can't afford $200+ riding glasses when they're gonna get scratched by every piece of debris that flies up from your tires.
  • 1 0
 THANK you for saying that.. So Freaking bad.. Dang Shades all day!
  • 2 0
 If you buy a good pair they last for years. You definitely get what you pay for. A premium made in the USA frame is the way to go if you can afford it. I'm still using my Oakley OTTs that I bought in '98. Style never fades and they're built to last.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: Style never fades. As my kids say, "okay, boomer."
  • 1 0
 Only ones I somewhat like are Oakley Sutro
  • 5 0
 Yeah I don't get it. They are almost goggle sized. I have stupid looking sunglasses for cricket and golf, I don't need another pair. All of these glasses I'd remove as soon as I'd get off the bike, you couldn't wear any of them without looking like Cleatus going down to the firing range. I'll stick to my five year old Racing Jackets with photochromatic lenses. I ride mostly under tree cover so really just need clear lenses.
  • 2 0
 Cycling glasses is the worst genre of sunglasses.
  • 2 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: I mean, being almost goggle-sized is kinda the point. These big glasses look goofy but give you a similar FOV and level of protection to goggles without being extremely hot.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: Yeah but it comes back around, just look at those Pit Vipers! Straight outta Heavenly Valley! Bring back the Varnets with the string neck cord!
  • 2 0
 @glenno: Yep, I have to second that... those Fyre lenses and the fit of the Roam are just insane. No matter the conditions - hot and dusty and bright to wet, muggy dark fog - I totally forget I'm even wearing glasses, they just disappear, let me ride and see perfectly in all conditions.. including during the climbs, which is a substantial feat (it's hard to make them fog).
  • 1 0
 I have tried on the Pit Vipers before. I have an average size head for a male and I thought I tried on a women's or kids pair. When I asked the guy told me that they are all one size. I was surprise as another average looking guy came up and had the same issue. Seems like they need to be a bit larger.

I wear a M/L TLD helmet with plenty of space to cinch up.
  • 138 23
 Unpopular opinion: Pit Viper are garbage and they're trying way too hard. It was cheeky and funny ten years ago when Chuck sold em out of his van. Now they're just sad. Go ahead and downvote me now.
  • 19 46
flag oragy (Apr 29, 2020 at 5:14) (Below Threshold)
 Your opinion is wrong
  • 11 5
 Agree. Worst pair I’ve ever owned. They were uncomfortable to even wear around town. Worth $10, maybe.
  • 2 1
 @fjallman82: what made them uncomfortable? I know the originals were a little on the smaller side. I've been looking at them because they are ome of the more affordable options that can have an RX lens insert, and the z87+ rating gives me a spare pair of RX safety glasses.
  • 23 1
 They are meant as a joke or funny to wear. Just don't tell that to frat bros
  • 6 1
 Even though I agree, I'm glad they are where they are. I manage a retail shop in a ski town and we sell 25 pairs a month haha
  • 4 1
 Looking like your opinion is not that unpopular. I actually like mine, I’ve tried Tifosi, Smith, Ryders, and Home Depot safety glasses and sold them all (except the safety glasses, good for home repairs) for various different reasons. The Pit Vipers aesthetic looks more than a little out of place on me but I get a better fit, less fogging, the right lens color without a bunch of other spare colors I never use and better field of view for cheaper (again, except for the safety glasses). Totally agree they seem to try too hard though
  • 14 0
 @makripper: Ok, if the Pit Viper are meant to be a joke, what's POC's excuse? I can't be the only one that just cringes when I see a pair. It's like if Donald Trump owned POC and had to give his son Eric a job, so he put him in charge of the sunglasses division, thinking how bad could he screw it up.
  • 1 0
 @trillot: I'm not disagreeing with that lol
  • 2 1
 Very much agreed. I haven't worn the originals, but I got a pair of 2000's at Sea Otter last year. I had never worn any riding glasses besides a free pair of wayfarers and fake Oakleys, so I was stoked to have a pair of "real" riding glasses. The Pit Vipers are incredibly uncomfortable around the ears and no matter how short I make the arms, they always fall forward down my nose while riding. The coating on the lense started flaking off almost immediately and the frame feels like incredibly cheap plastic. I dealt with it for about a week before I went back to my free wayfarers. The Vipers are fun for daygers in Isla Vista, or when using a power tool I guess, but definitely not worth the $60 I paid. Just get some cheap $10 knock off on Amazon and It'll probably be the same quality.
  • 3 1
 Just bumped you to 100 upvotes - you're welcome. If you're not rocking an 80's mullet, you should not be wearing Pit Vipers!
  • 2 0
 yeah, but what other glasses can i slice my loaf of bread with?
  • 2 0
 But they say Pit Vipers in huge letters on the lens. These with some Muc-off gear and your the Jeff Lowe of mountain biking.
  • 1 0
 @WiscoRida: curious, what Rx Lens buster fo you use? Been looking for one
  • 1 0
 @nyles: sell it and shame em! at least they will have the ultimate style on the slope with some butt snorkeler.
  • 1 0
 @forkguardian: Howdy Joe! Been a while bby.
  • 48 0
 Tifosi. Look 'em up. Lens quality second only to Oakley. A fraction of the price of the other major players. Lots of different models, colors, and fits. Photochromic, polarized, swappable lenses, etc.
  • 16 1
 I've had two pairs of Tifosi glasses... only bought the second pair because the first got stolen. $60 and they came with a hard case, a soft case and three different lenses: dark tint, rose, and clear. Replacement lenses are dirt cheap too, so I don't really care if I scratch them ($14 to $25 depending on lens type). It's been a while since I bought them, so I was worried they might be out of business, but just checked their website and they have a ton of styles available, most expensive is around $80.
  • 11 0
 Here’s another vote for Tifosi. They’re good. Other than their big ugly logo they put on the temples and lenses.
  • 5 0
 I've had 3 pairs. Great glasses for the price. The only issue I had was that the nose piece disintegrated on the first pair.
  • 4 0
 Yeah, for mountain biking I have a hard time justifying expense past a set of Tifosi's. My buddy Conto helped that brand grow for a long time and they are still in most of the bike shops around here. Not a single set of wide framed riding glasses make anyone look cool ever, so why worry about style with riding glasses. I've got the Smith Attach MTB right now and no surprise, have scratched 2 lenses. They are uber expensive, come with an extra lens, but you can't pick which lens, so oftentimes the color frame you would want doesn't have the lens combo you need, so I had to settle. Tifosi's throw in a clear lens and a tinted lens and you can buy 2 and sometimes 3 pairs for the price of 1 pair of other brands.
  • 4 0
 I was thinking the EXACT same thing. I am on my second pair of Davos but only because I drove off with the first pair on the roof of my car. I actually went back to find them but could not. I have sat on them, had a branch impact them, there is TONS of ventilation and air movement, they are red tinted which helps with seeing stuff in dense woods. I ride in Va and WVa were humidity is ridiculous. They also do not fog or accumulate sweat anywhere. They were $50 which included a hard case, cleaning cloth, and soft pouch. To leave them off and focus one glasses that cost 3 or 4 times as much was a major oversight.
  • 5 0
 I can't up vote this comment enough. I just don't get the idea of paying hundreds for biking glasses that will inevitably get scratched, smashed or left on the side of the trail. Tifosi are great quality with plenty of styles to choose from. I even use them as my safety glasses at work.
  • 4 0
 I'm a Tifosi ambassador, and to be honest, I was on the fence about it at first. I used to think Tifosi was the bike shop budget brand. Now that I wear them every day (casually and for riding), I don't think I'd ever go back. The build quality is superb and the lenses are amazing. It's crazy that most of these glasses reviewed above are over $100 with many over $200! Go get ya some Tifosis, heck get two pairs and still have some money leftover!
  • 1 1
 @your-pal-al: Thanks so much for the Tifosi reminder! I used to wear them back in the day (90s) and totally forgot about them when I got back into riding a few years ago. Will be picking up a set.

For now, I rock the $5 safety glasses. I can't see spending a ton on something that, as was said above, will end up scratched in the best case, and usually end up lost on the trail. Most of the time I wear ambers anyway, so no need for the absolutely ridiculous looking ski glasses that have somehow crept into mountain biking. Seriously, keep your ski and roadie fashion show OUT of mountain biking please. We were better off without it...

"That is the moment you curse yourself for not wearing proper eye protection." - Who rides without it?
  • 2 0
 Riding for 25+ years with... $8 Smith & Wesson Magnums.
  • 3 0
 Tifosi Davos and Tifosi Aethon seem to be the best suited for mtb, IMO, for anyone wondering which tifosi to look at
  • 2 0
 They dropped the ball and never sent us a pair for this. We reached out multiple times. Would love to include them next time as they are reasonably priced.
  • 2 0
 Another Tifosi rider here. Not the best looking sunglasses, but they don't fog, they're photochromic and they were cheap.
  • 3 0
 Yep. Got my last Tifosi pair for $15. The style looks kinda electronica eurotrash roadie but zero fvcks given. I actually like the irony...
  • 3 0
 @MikerJ: i tried the magnums, but they kept slipping off...
  • 3 0
 @savagelake: Fortunately there are other ways to make her happy.
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan: ok but you could have bought them for like $15 with ExpertVoice.
  • 1 2
 I picked up a couple when Performance carried them and they were on sale. Good bang for the buck but the good clarity and color was never there, and they'd fog up like crazy. It was a significant difference when I went to Jawbreakers.
  • 1 0
 @savagelake: I always find them a bit tight myself
  • 2 0
 @nkrohan: dropped the ball? Or chose not to be a part of it? Can't accuse a company of doing something wrong if they willfully decided to opt out of something they didn't ask to be part of.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: no. They said they shipped them and I never received them. Typically that means someone forgot. I deal with this all the time and it happens often. I think I even sent them a reminder after they said it shipped and I didn't receive it and they said they forgot and would ship it. #notmymonkeynotmycircus
  • 3 0
 Dude I LOVE my Tifosi Davos'. Bought the first pair for like $55 on Amazon, found another pair of the same color for $35 on Chain Reaction Cycles.
  • 2 0
 +3 on Tifosi- their photochromics are great and lenses are available for reasonable $

also these one piece windshields are the 70s perm of stylation, you will see these later lol.
  • 42 0
 No beer goggles? I'm out, bye.
  • 32 1
 Why did I expect an objective comparison of lense quality? Instead I read about how they looked.
  • 7 1
 And most weren't even worn while riding. Super wierd
  • 13 2
 She also says that Portland is the "heart" of the Pacific Northwest. Really? If your heart is where your knees are at, okay.
  • 10 0
 @rrolly: Ha. Very true. Although we can drive north right into the ass crack pretty easily.
  • 3 0
 @nkrohan: There are parts of downtown Portland that fit that description pretty well. Wink (Although old Portland is so beautiful)
  • 3 0
 @rrolly: Portland qualifies as PNW, but it is hardly the heart.
  • 1 1
 It's 2020 - form over function. The vanity is real.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I agree. That's what makes these glasses so expensive after all. The first time I put on my Smith Attacks (with chromopop) I went "woah, the grass has depth". But at the same time, whether we admit it or not, the way things look plays a big part in peoples decision to buy something. I feel like that should be left to the individual buyer to decide however.
  • 26 5
 I can see clearly now the rain is gone
I can see all obstacles in my way
Gone are the dark clouds that had me blind
It's gonna be a bright (bright)…
  • 30 11
 ...sunshiny fail
  • 8 1
 Oh, yes I can make it now the pain is gone
All of the bad feelings have disappeared
Here is that rainbow I've been praying for
It's gonna be a bright (bright)...
  • 36 7
 @chyu: ...Collarbone Xray...
  • 4 0
 Omg. This song was playing inside my head when I saw the article. Scrolled down to comment page and see this.
  • 2 0
 @kilazilla: What does it mean?!?!
  • 3 0
 I go to work Like a doctor When I rock the mic You got to like The way I operate I make miracles happen Just from rappin' I'm so lyrically potent And I'm flowin' And explodin'
  • 3 1
 @TheR:
Smashing through the boundaries
Lunacy has found me
Cannot stop the battery
Pounding out aggression
Turns into obsession
Cannot kill the battery
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns:
Songs that ain't strong, brother, you're dead wrong
And got the nerve to have them Star Trek shades on
  • 2 1
 @TheR:
Yo listen up, here's the story
About a little guy that lives in a blue world
And all day and all night and everything he sees is just blue
Like him, inside and outside
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns:
To the break of dawn, beats nitro
Lyrics weak, say goodnight, yo
Star Trek shades, man cut the joke
Let's get serious and go for broke
You still got a lock on my jock like a pitbull
Sit still, before you pull it off, you soft Mr. Pitiful
Here's some mouthwash, g
Your breath smells like my jockstrap,
C-A-U-S-E, you're ridin' me
T-O-D-D?, junior Moe Dee

You down with Kool Moe Dee, Waki? And his old school battles with LL? Google a photo of Kool Moe if not.
  • 18 1
 I just use some Bolle safety glasses I got from work for free. I have had them about 4 yeas now. I think you can buy them for under £10.
  • 2 1
 +1for bolle, been using safety glasses from uvex clear and tinted for 15€ with little difference to my expensive julbo or pricier uvex glasses. Upcharge definitely not worth the marginal performance gain. Looks on the other hand.....
  • 1 1
 +1 for Bolle safety glasses. I have used Silium-model for few years they are around 20€ and you can get them clear and sunglass versions. They have very good antifog but like any other glasses it wears out in a time, when you wash them. I have also tested cheap models like in this rewiev, but every one of cheap ones i tested the antifog didn´t work
  • 1 1
 Another +1 for Bolle - found Contour or Silium models do just what I need £6-10 UK
  • 2 1
 +1 for self aggrandizement
  • 2 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 29, 2020 at 6:14) (Below Threshold)
 Another +1 for Bolle - had them before I bought my current glasses. Were great until they cracked at the frame. I think I bought them for 10€ and they lasted at least 4 years.
  • 4 1
 I like how she reviewed a cheap 3M pair. But she gave them 5/10, and didn’t really explain anything that was wrong with them. Said they fogged up, but that all glasses would do that in those conditions....
  • 3 0
 @blu3: You need to try Ryders if you want great anti-fog. It's not topical so it doesn't wear out. And they are really good for warranty as well.
  • 4 0
 @skelldify: She should have reviewed the $2.50 3M.
3M tinted work as all day safety and sun glasses.
3M blue make overcast light seem like daylight.
3M clear keep bugs and dirt out at night.
3M yellow wash the brown trails out so you can’t see rollers.
Lifetime replacement warranty available for purchase at Dixieline $2.50.
  • 14 0
 I definitely think that glasses fit into the same category as saddles and grips as they are such a personal fit and features that are pointless for you are essential for me, e.g. The Oakley advancer is amazing equipment for me (especially riding on humid days) to stop fogging as I run very hot and can guarantee I fog glasses more than talked about in the review here!
  • 3 0
 Yeah I don't know if women get less warm/sweat less during exercise or if it just people specific, but I can not wear any type of glasses while pedaling actively or uphill without fogging them completely in few minutes.
And knowing this, I certainly am not willing to spend €€€ for some glasses that don't fog on people that anyways don't have fogging issues
  • 3 1
 I got a pair of the Oakley Field jackets with the advancer and its brilliant. I use them for everything from XC skiing to road biking, and the advancer function is a game changer for me. I normally fog glasses like crazy, but pop that advancer and you're set. Plus, you can get them in perscription (which I did), which while it costs a fortune, allows you to actually see while riding!
  • 2 0
 @zede: Try Ryder's Antifog. I've said it in posts above, but living in the rainforest of BC I've never had any riding glasses come close.
  • 2 0
 Completely agree - Like saddles, I have gotten a general idea over time of which riding glasses may possibly work just by looking at them (i.e. - full frame to keep sweaty cheeks/fingers from smudging lenses, straight blade ear pieces to avoid helmet interference, etc), but it doesn't actually tell me how they fit my face without physically trying them.
  • 1 0
 Yes, which is why sunnies' reviews and comparisons are fairly worthless to me without the basic eye industry measurements: Eyesize - Bridge Width - Temple Length. MTBR just had an even more generic comparison. Most commenters here are likely male with significantly larger heads and vastly different head sizes than 5'5 130lb @nkrohan. My wife and all my female riding partners are most comfortable with vastly different apparel and sizing. I find reviews lacking this crucial data for reference just lazy. Adding two paragraphs of saying preferences vary wildly is a duh...this is where data and details make the best reviews. Look at Vital's recent Flat Pedal comparison, measuring to the millimeter concavity, surface area etc. You don't think these measurement aren't as crucial in determining what fits my head?
  • 14 1
 For all the Europeans, check Decathlon. You can get nice glasses, with similar features as the 200€ Oakleys etc, for 40€
  • 3 0
 30€ with 5 lense colors. I only use clear for rainy days, and rose for the rest. The yelllow is terribly bright, and don’t know why, but never even tried the blue ones.
If fogs on the climbs, but as I use contact lense I need the extra protection
  • 2 1
 Same here, £25 in UK and they've stood up to the abuse I've given them over the past 5 years. 4 sets of lenses which seem decent enough quality. Can't understand anyone who shells out on £200 Oakleys etc for mtb, considering glasses can be so easily damaged when riding.
  • 2 0
 Thats the main thing, who would pay those prices for tiny amount of material? Is lunacy exceeded only by the vigor with which oakley shills defend their fav brand.

I picked up three lens tifosi kit for $35, working great for me the past 4 years.
  • 2 0
 Decathlon is spending like the virus ... over 1500 stores in 49 countries !
  • 2 0
 ...and the lens quality is nowhere in the vicinity of Oakley. While compromise is possible, there are no wonders in this world.
  • 1 0
 @Maxipedia: I haven't tried Oakleys so I can't compare. However, I mostly use a clear lens, so personally I can't see how they could be much better...
  • 3 0
 @jose90: Oakley is the best. Just ask any Oakley wearer. /sarcasm

I've worn them. No different than any other quality lens really. They are just an older 'cool kids' brand that has been around for a long time and have a dedicated fan base.

As long as you aren't buying walmart specials, you should get a decent lens for not a lot of money. 3Ms are fine, tifosi, whatever. Make sure they are polarized and are optically clear and you are good to go.
  • 1 0
 @Maxipedia: I've tried Oakleys and I will admit that the lens quality is excellent. But are they worth 2 or 3 times the price of a good set of budget glasses that have decent lenses? No.
  • 4 0
 @captaingrumpy: Prices are high because of Luxottica.
  • 2 0
 @AD4M: I always ask myself when buying most things and there is an expensive alternative: Is it 2x better? 3x better? Usually the answer is no. It isn't always the case and sometimes you do have to spend for quality/feature. I don't think sunglasses fit in this bucket though.
  • 1 0
 Oakley is trash same as Ray Ban compared to something like Maui Jim, and MJ is cheaper haha. I'm using Decathlon ones for trail running, got a photochromatic ones for like 15 euro on discount and they're excellent for MTB.
  • 10 0
 A few years back I was in a pinch and bought the nicest 3M safety glasses you can get at Home Depot. Maybe $18 USD. Been using them ever since. They function as well as anything I’ve ever had from Smith, Spy, Dragon, or Oakley. No cool points, but just on cost alone they’re higher than a 5/10. And they don’t look like a prop from Back to the Future Part II. Guess I’m getting old and cranky but I cant stand most of these.
  • 5 0
 Yup, Home Depot glasses for me! No complaints!
  • 9 0
 I am the guy that choose the cheapest option but Oakley's Prizim is worth evrey $
  • 3 0
 Agreed. I rode with some various budget brands from 2006-2018. Finally, on a humid morning road ride, after the lenses fogged yet again, I was trying to pull them off while on the move and put them in my helmet. I dropped the glasses and a car crushed them. My riding buddies convinced me to finally spend some money on the Oakley Prisms. They never fog unless I'm physically not moving. They stay on my face. A quick spray of water clears off any sweat muck. If I get 5 years out of them, they've cost me $40/yr. Worth it.
  • 7 0
 Had several cheap-ish riding glasses over the years, from Decathlon crap to Rudy Projects. After those got scratched up a bit too much, I got Radar EVs with the prizm lens. I’ve been blind my whole life.

I actually don’t like taking them off after a ride because the world looks so grey all of a sudden. No fogging problems unless standing still when it’s humid, don’t slip or wobble compared to my old ones, great field of view without being ridiculously oversized like some of the tested ones here. And the lenses are super clear as well. Especially with the cheaper models you are aware that you’re looking through glasses all the time. With the oakleys you kind of forget about it.

Even landed on my face once, broke my helmet and bruised my chin, the lenses came out of it with the tiniest scratches that you can only see when holding them against the light and that aren’t visible while you wear them. And even then, the replacement lenses are „only“ 60€, the frame probably lasts a lifetime. Worth every cent.
  • 5 0
 If there's something I refuse to get cheap on, it's my sunglasses. Oakley may be expensive,but they're worth every cent,and are extremely durable. Still use M-Frames,and have no plans to change.
  • 2 0
 I’m one of those Oakley fanboys. Quality and clarity folks.

We carried Oakley in the shop I worked at. Our rep came by with one of their mannequin face/head thingys to put glasses on. It had 2 lasers for eyes. We aimed the lasers at a grid pattern on the wall a little ways away and put different pairs of glasses on it. Any and ALL Oakley’s would have the same point of aim on the grid when the glasses were placed. We would put any other brand or even prescription eye glasses on it, the aimpoint would change drastically on the grid. I think we had Tifosi at the time that we tried. The other brand we put on did not have consistency even among the same style of glasses. I remember one pair the laser beams actually crossed paths they were so off. - Your eyes have to compensate for the lack of clarity in the lenses.

We also had one of the M Frame lenses that had been shot with a shotgun at 20 feet - dents in the lens, but it it did not shatter, break, or penetrate the lens. I know there are cheaper polycarbonate lenses that will shatter and have debris go in to your eye.

Anyway, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. No I don’t have a beard, tribal tattoo, and think I’m a tactical operator. But I could be...
  • 6 0
 I wonder why don't you include a more wallet friendly options that most will appreciate. For example Rockrider XC Race glasses that most can afford. I wonder how they perform with 2x more expensive offers.
off.road.cc/content/review/glasses/rockrider-xc-race-photochromatic-sunglasses-review-4453
  • 9 4
 These prices are absolutely ridiculous. Let me get this straight...I ride 6 days per week, so if I purchased according to Pinkbike average prices on reviews, I should probably be wearing $200 glasses, a $200 helmet, $150 bibs, $120 shorts, a $80 jersey, $30 gloves, $150 shoes, and a $100 pack. Oh and I need 6 pairs of bibs, 6 shorts, and 6 tees. Plus some long-sleeves (3 at $100 each), 3 base layers ($40 each?), and a rain jacket ($200).

That's $3400 in riding clothing. The price of a full-on bike, maybe a Ripmo AF. And clothing needs to be replaced. Pinkbike reviewers need a bit of a reality check, unless there really are enough suckers in this world to spend this much on kits. Glasses get broken and lost.

$200 on glasses is pretty damn silly. Get yourself something from Tifosi, Goodr, or an Amazon knockoff of something. Reviewers, please give us more useful buying recommendations.

The most useful information in this review is in the comments. Thanks to the people who just introduced me to Tifosi.
  • 8 0
 Totally agree, but remember, content is pushed by those with money. All these companies can afford to give goggles and glasses away for reviews because of huge profit margins. They have sponsored users who tell you “bro, they’re actually really good.” Well, for free, I’m sure you’re happy with them.
It makes me sad to see what I imagine are really good people be used as such tools for industry. Products should speak for themselves.
Bring back unbiased reviews, and get rid of the thinly-veiled ads.
  • 4 0
 Hey diddle diddle The bicycle riddle-- The strangest part of the deal Just keep your accounts And add the amounts The sundries cost more than the wheel
  • 1 0
 Got my 2 Jerseys for 12€, Troy Lee pants for 34€, gloves for Like 15€.

I dont like wearing polyester Jerseys at all- I prefer wearing my old t Shirts..
  • 6 0
 Buy a washing machine and then you wouldn't need six sets of riding gear?
  • 3 0
 Riding glasses. I think it all depends on where you ride and if you follow others. I know I should wear them but for mid day riding with no insects when you are in and out of trees, its a pain. Add to that that the one time you need specs - in the rain and mud, you cant wear them because its raining and muddy and you cant see! On the road bike though.....every time. Got a stone chip fired at me once and it struck the lens.
  • 6 0
 Julbo renegade zebra. Best glasses ever and u dont have to rock a blond stash to wear em.
  • 5 1
 Hands down favorite. Replaceable literally 100 times and you'll still save money over some of these options! : P

www.kmstools.com/radians-mirage-safety-glasses-clear-133639
  • 2 2
 ...but I do get them on discount for $1.99, so maybe only 60 or 70 times for the rest of you suckers Razz
  • 4 0
 Just picked up a pair of these. Big and ridiculous looking just like the rest, multiple lenses, polarized, fits well on your face and cheap.

www.amazon.com/dp/B07PXK96D6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_I7uQEbF7CA8Q1
  • 3 0
 I’ve been riding in a pair of those cheap X-Tiger glasses from Amazon for a year, they’re great. 3 lenses and a hard case, pretty durable, and can’t beat the price. Will definitely buy another pair when I’ve beaten this pair to death.
  • 4 0
 They should have done a cheap shootout with glasses like these
  • 2 0
 @makripper: agreed
  • 2 0
 After snapping 3x Oakleys, I tried a couple budget brands like Tifosi and Native. They had that old-school rigid plastic feel like safety glasses, along with small lens and fit that just isn't comfortable. Finally I ordered the X-Tigers, shocked how great they are. The fit is ace, super flexible, no fogging. Transitional lens like Trail Prism are superior, but incrementally so. If you order from AliExpress rather than Amazon, you'll get 5x lens. With discounts I got them for ~$15usd ~ www.aliexpress.com/item/32982042718.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.57764c4dNkeaaR
  • 4 1
 Julbo has a bunch of glasses in different styles just for MTB. So you don't have to look like you out of 1980s surf documentary. www.julbo.com/en_us/sunglasses/mtb

As someone who has Julbos, also note a lot of their MTB glasses are prescription ready.
  • 4 1
 For anyone who is struggling to find good Rx riding glasses: Pit Vipers + RX insert is the best combo I've found, and you you keep all your kidneys. I was skeptical about the insert but it actually works better than having RX glasses. If you scratch or damage glasses – the insert will be fine. And Pits aren't expensive to replace. Plus you can have a clear and darker pair and just swap the insert between two.
  • 6 0
 So, no prescription options - thanks
  • 5 0
 I agree mate we need a prescription glasses shoot out, I personally will never know the joy of lobbing on any old sunnies!
  • 3 0
 planet x,co,uk web site, does prescription options start £9.99
  • 2 0
 The Pit Vipers kinda have a prescription option. But yeah, no mention of it.
  • 3 0
 @Peskycoots: That would be great. "For the second run I tried a pair of +2's and things were great. I was happy that I didn't hit any trees compared to the -8's I wore on my first."
  • 2 0
 Oakley does sport Rx lenses. They've been doing it for ages. look up the guys SportRx, they review sport eyewear pretty in depth.
  • 1 0
 @pushingbroom: just found them today after this article. I wish more offered a RX insert option vs prescription lenses. I don't want to pay for 2 sets RX lenses so I can have low light and regular sunglasses.
  • 3 0
 @WiscoRida: Wear contacts or get laser eye surgery. Problem solved. I wear contacts and was planning on getting laser eyes but then this so called virus came and closed everything. Contacts are better for sport anyways (over glasses).
  • 1 0
 @pushingbroom: contacts for astigmatism are shite and I’m a bit old for laser surgery
  • 1 0
 @Peskycoots: I suppose they could be if your eyeballs are pretty bad. I use the Air Optix for astigmatism and they seem to do the job okay. I had to start wearing glasses/contacts around 2011 so it's pretty frustrating. I'm 39 now and saving for the laser eyes... to have at least 20 years of not wearing corrective lenses is so worth it for me. Best of luck man.
  • 2 0
 Got the Ryders Roam Fyre on a deal last year (still expensive). Fourth or fifth ride, my toddler said goodnight and yanked them off my face and dropped them on the driveway. Nice scratch right in the middle of the lens. Rotted.
  • 4 0
 I'm never buying glasses with exposed lenses again, full wrap frames only! I'm not getting my face sliced open in the event of a crash!
  • 2 0
 I'm very surprised the reviewer did not touch on this. I have seen some serious facial damage done by open lenses.
  • 2 0
 I have tried so many different glasses and they all fog. End up taking them off. Clear 5 dollar 3m wrap around safety glasses do the trick on the way down. I could give a f*ck what they look like as long as I don’t tear up.
  • 2 0
 Rudy Project (best lens, best fit)
Oakley (very solid)
Smith (a step or two below)

Everything else has much lower quality lens, construction and fit.
3M and similar are good and I use them, however the lens distortion could give you an headache.
  • 3 1
 Nice review. I would like to see an optical distortion test: shine a laser through the lens and see how much that laser shifts position on the other side.

Poor quality lenses will greatly shift light as it passes through. This would be less subjective.

Also, an impact test would be nice. Search Oakley vs shotgun.

I use Oakley Sutro and Jawbreaker glasses. I mostly use the Sutro with the low-light prism lens. The Sutro dumps heat easily and the low-light prism is great in the forest.

Every now and then, Oakley does a 30%-sale. That’s when I make the purchase. I have no affiliation, just a fan boi.
  • 2 0
 Impact testing is overrated. When it's raining or super mucky we ride without glasses on anyway.
  • 2 0
 There are always gonna be people that bitch and moan about the price of glasses...which are in some cases kinda absurd. But you can ALWAYS find those Oakleys or whatever on sale online for last years colors or what not. I have a pair of Jawbreakers with Prizm and the optics are second to none and had them for 5 years. I hate riding with shit glasses now but I also never pay retail; go find them online for 30-50% off - you can find those oakley Radar's for almost 40% off right now, just not in every color. Worth it to have good glasses, and no, your $5 gas station glasses do not do the same thing.
  • 2 0
 I wish this review included more information regarding sizing. as someone with a large head/face (i typically wear XL helmets) i frequently struggle with this. I had a pair of smith's arenas previously (essentially the same size as the Attacks reviewed here) they were great glasses except they were simply too small for my face. i hesitantly switched to Pit Viper Mud Slinger Double Wides at the recommendation of a buddy (style wise they weren't my first choice). I have been super happy with them and i found the adjustability to be extremely useful to get a perfect fit.
  • 2 0
 Why does everyone act like Oakley is the definition of lens quality? I bought a pair and they were terrible. Lens scratched super easy and didn't seem to fog or deal with oils any better than $10 glasses.

Another vote for Tifosi glasses here.
  • 2 0
 Oakley, first and only stop. Not even sure why you needed to do a shootout. Oakley has about 6(or more) dedicated sport pieces that all have Prizm trail lens option. Then you have the additional lifestyle pieces with sport use that you can also get with the trail prizm lens. Also, they have their custom builds in which you can choose your own colour way (within the options given) to match your kit. Also, everything on their website is 30% off right now and free shipping. Easy, done!
  • 3 1
 Hot take: Oakleys are garbage for the price and hype. I give them big marks for clarity and color of the Prizm lenses but they're not made to last. The lenses scratch easily, the coating can bubble after a while marking the lenses unusable.
  • 2 0
 $200+ for riding glasses is ridiculous, especially with lenses that are way too dark for riding in the woods. Also, all these look like ass. I used to buy a new set of Smiths pretty much every season when they were like $80. I'm just hoping some of the MFG's are reading these comments and see that we want clear or light tint glasses for under $100, because they will get beat up and we don't care about fashion. Goodr nearly has it.
  • 2 0
 I bought a pair of ryders incline a few years ago on a whim and they've been rock solid. Pricey, but the photochrom lens quality is top notch, and they aren't too big...im not a fan of the huge lenses on the above. They have a semi frame on the bottom, which does look a little weird, but my buddy pointed out that it'll save you from bad lens cuts if you crash...never thought of that, but makes sense.

www.ryderseyewear.com/incline-fyre

they don't have a single scratch, and i'm not super nice to them...they don't fog easily...overall great shades. Again...pricey, but I only get pair of mtb glasses once every 3-5yrs if that, so I didnt mind.
  • 2 0
 Did PB pick the biggest glasses they could find?

The only ones that fit her face and don't look like goggles are the yellow 3M safety glassess ... I love those safety glasses, keep a set in my van for driving and another set in my riding pack for low light riding.

Such a shame PB didn't review glasses that people would actually wear. I'm partial to Tifosi, prices are reasonable, been riding them for twenty years, long lasting, scratch resistant, lots of choices in lens shade, lens features, and frame size.

Shout out to Tifosi!!

EDIT: Okay, so I just read this ladies bio and it lists her body dimensions. WTF?!

Apparently it's from her own bio, get that, but it's still not necessary and it comes across as sexist.

So so now let's see the same stuff posted for all the male "models": waist, chest, shoulders, biceps, etc...
  • 2 0
 It was posted for my male counterpart in the goggle review. Its a cut and paste and its not sexist since I am writing it. Although I might need to add a couple covid inches.... I would have loved to include Tifosi. I thought they were sending a pair, but they never showed up. Large lens riding glasses seems to popular right now but the oakley and Rudy project, I would not consider "large".
  • 2 0
 Glasses wishlist:

1. Stop flies flying into my mince pies at speed.
2. Not make me look like i'm a getting-to-old-for-this-now-really-but-i'll-never-give-in perma-ski-batchelor; getting steaming in the middle of the afternoon at the ski bar and believing they can pole dance in ski boots by 4pm.
3. Cheap enough that i dont get too upset when lenses get scratched or frames snap.

Whilst i'm aware from doing snowsports how much of a help top quality lenses can be in challenging light conditions in the mountains, i just don't think i need super ultra vision on the bike for most of my riding. Keep the dust and flies out. Maybe a little polarisation to help with transitioning from wooded to open areas. £30 or less.

I got a really sweet pair of spy goggles for about £30 and they serve me absolutely fine. If they can make good goggles that cheap, surely they can knock out some sunnies even cheaper?
  • 2 0
 I love my 100% Speedcrafts but I can tell you the photochromatic lens is super reluctant to darken unless it's in uninterrupted direct sunlight. All the other lenses are spot on.
  • 1 0
 yeah, I've had multiple brands with a photochromatic lens. They should just call them shade glasses. You pedal into dark, leafy, shaded woods and they aren't clear enough to see details, then you pedal back out and up the fireroad in the bright sunlight and they "sorta" darken.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: The 100% lens is pretty quick to get back to clear so I've never really had a problem with it being too dark, partially because it's slow to darken in the first place. In fact I frequently night ride in them because they become so clear in low light.
  • 3 0
 None of these are made for optics.
Would be great to see a review of glasses that can be fitted with optical lenses (like my Julbo Run).
  • 5 0
 Those look absolutely ridiculous. Go on and give your balls a tug.
  • 1 0
 To be fair....
  • 4 0
 Ha didn't we all get slammed for wearing mx goggles with enduro lids, these glasses are even bigger.
  • 1 0
 Found myself some crivit sports glasses for 50 SEK ($4.76) at Lidl. 3 different lenses included so i bought two. They actually fit quite well and sits nice at the old snout. Big plus I don't have to look like a scifi lab worker and pay top dollar for it.
  • 1 0
 I've been using native eyewear glasses for years. Lenses are great and they have a lifetime warranty. Snag a reduced pair on ebay or steep and cheap then if they break pay 30usd for brand new warranty replacement. They have a really nice low light lense that I use for all my riding. Got to the point where I have two of the same pair, one for driving and hanging out and one for riding
  • 1 0
 Tifosi Dolomites. $60 and I’ve has 2 pair over... 14 years now? I lost the first, and after about 8 years on the second some of the rubber is starting to separate from the nose piece so I’ll buy a third pair soon. Get compliments on them all the time off the bike, too.
  • 2 0
 Watch this documentary if you want to know why (sun)glasses are so expensive:
youtu.be/gDdq2rIqAlM
Oakley was the only real competitor to Luxottica and they got pushed out of the market and bought by them as well.
  • 4 3
 Common core math! F*&^ that. I have a 3rd grader who naturally does math in her head, but no one in the house can figure out the squares and circles and random lines they're trying to abstract an already abstract concept with.... Oh, and nice comparison.
  • 5 1
 Common core math is just teaching multiple methods because one method doesn't work for every student in every situation and every kid doesn't develop understanding the same way. The idea is to teach kids the relationships between numbers and concepts versus teaching memorization or single solving methods. It is like being taught calculus based physics versus algebra based physics. In algebra based physics, you are handed equations and you find the one that fits the problem you are solving. In calculus based physics, you derive the equations and it makes so much more sense. You get to those same equations a lot of the time, but you have a much stronger understanding, IMO. I know people that thought they were just "bad at math" growing up when it turns out they were just bad at memorizing.
  • 3 1
 Common core is creating deep thinkers and conceptual reasoners instead of memorizers. I get that it's not how you learned it, but different doesn't mean wrong. Coming from someone with a math degree, our kids will be far ahead of where we adults are when it comes to math reasoning because of common core. Your third grader is getting introduced to concepts that he or she wouldn't have even seen until pre-algebra traditionally. It's a very good thing.
  • 1 1
 @rickybobby18: I get the multiple styles of learning but the concepts are fundamentally flawed. If a kid doesn't understand the basic abstractions in math yet ( ie. the symbol "1" represents a quantity of one ) drawing circles to represent the symbols as a double abstraction isn't making it easier. Forcing kids to write proofs on top of that, not using standard mathematical notation but another systems of shapes and lines at age at an age when they can't even define the word proof is unreasonable. I understand all the tiger mom's out there want their kids to be preselected for whatever stem program they imagine gives them the most status, but after 10+ years, the numbers are already showing it's a failed experiment.

Additionally, the unreasonable focus on "higher level" concepts in brains that are not developed yet to that point has actually had the opposite effect. Math and reading scores are down and kids are more stressed. On top of that, we're seeing that it's actually making kids hate math, so it's unlikely to result in people having a higher level understanding than I do, unless that person was already capable in that way.
  • 1 0
 @hangdogr: I googled and it appears the few studies that have been done have shown it as a mixed bag. One shows slight improvement, one shows slightly worse. I don't know if the studies normalized for regional economic trends, opiate crisis, or anything like that.

If things truly are getting worse, what makes American kids unable to learn via the same methods used by kids in other, better performing countries? Is the problem the standard or other trends impacting modern American childhood?

My anecdote is that I'm impressed at what my 2nd grader is learning and the focus on real world applicability. I am "good at math" and I can see the groundwork for the mental math methods I've developed over the years. On a macro view, I'm a huge fan of standardization with the caveat that the standard should always be audited and further developed.
  • 3 2
 Ali baba POC knocks off , super cheap, work great
Dragon enduro, got them for $50 on sale
My favorite are POC Flow currently got them on sale a few years ago well under a $100, they fit every helmet I have and look sweet without trying to hard ( Pit Viper I'm looking at you!)

I find a lot these bigger frames don't work with my TLD A2
  • 1 0
 I have the Smith Attack glasses. Both sets of lenses broke where the mag connector thing attaches to the lens. Within 2 months. Amazing lenses and the Mag system is pretty nice, but can’t recommend. Have Tifosi’s that have held up way better for $60
  • 1 0
 I keep reading about fogging for glasses and goggles, I keep experiencing it myself with both, yet NOBODY makes a dual pane lens...why? I'm returning to MTB after a long hiatus, but wore goggles a ton playing tournament paintball for a decade. How come I got fog free goggles 18 years ago but I can't for MTB goggles? Maybe I need to find some JT proflex goggles and yank the face shield off to use those, they never fogged even in humid Texas summers.

Is there a reason dual pane lenses are not used for MTB?
  • 2 0
 Price WAS the reason, but clearly that has been eclipsed.
  • 1 0
 I used to use dual pane and it didnt really help. Check out Smiths MTB goggles, they have killer ventilation. As long as I you’re moving, the stay clear.
  • 1 0
 So few actually addressing the reason I usually ride without any eyewear: fogging. Why can’t that be the selling point, the engineering target? It’s fine when riding lifts because of the speed, but trail and enduro - it’s a foggy mess. Especially when the time I actually want eyewear is when it’s wet/raining.
I’m honestly hoping that someone will integrate a shield into a helmet like for Tri because maybe that will fog less. All these glasses are missing the fundamental point that they are unusable if you actually sweat and drop below 10 MPH.
  • 4 1
 awesome reviews, i just ordered pit vipers and bliz. i'm glad i went with the bliz over the alleycats with how you rated the two! thanks!
  • 2 0
 How about buying pretty much the same 100% glasses on amazon, called 'x tiger' with 3 lenses, one polarized, one black and one clear, in a case, with the same material frame as a 100% pair, for £20?!?!
  • 1 0
 Anyone have any luck finding large-lens glasses that fit a high nose-bridge well? My big nose always pushes large-lens glasses up onto my helmet, and I lose the lower coverage they are made for. Plus, I just want to be more enduro.
  • 2 0
 I've been riding the smith attack mtbs for more than a year now, and they're way better than any other riding glasses I've used. They also don't look like the same pair of poc glasses that every douchebag I race against has.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure many people realize this, but with glasses this massive a lot of the time they contact your helmet and you end up supporting the weight of your helmet with your nose. I didn't realize it until recently, and when I shifted my helmet back so it wasn't resting on the top of my shades my nose felt SO much better.

ALL of these glasses but the 3M (which also happens to be the only non-ridiculously-sized pair) look like they're in direct contact with the forehead part of her helmet.
  • 1 0
 Yes, I have this problem and hate it. On long bumpy descents the helmet bangs up against the top of the glasses and is not only distracting but painful. My helmets sit low on my forehead normally making most glasses unusable. Heading to the hardware store this afternoon to pick up some safety glasses...
  • 1 0
 I have a need/hate relationship with glasses and riding. I wear contact lenses and my eyes dry our or water excessively at higher speeds. I also live a a warmer climate which means that sweat always seems to drip onto the lenses making it difficult to see. I don't really want to tape a gutter to my forehead and I really don't want to stop every 200 meters to clean my lenses off. (which never seem to get clean enough after sweating on them).

For long descent days I bring goggles. This article has inspired me to try safety glasses.
  • 2 1
 I can’t believe how many people buy expensive glasses for riding. I have a pair of clear safety glasses for most Washington weather, and a tinted pair for summer rides that aren’t mostly in the trees. If I was rich I would add a pair of yellow tinted glasses for intermediate light conditions, but that would put me at over $10 total, and that’s just too much money.
  • 1 0
 Why are they all just so massive - none suit the lady modelling them cos her head is tiny compared to these Surgeons shields they call glasses these days.
I guess we all don’t get paid to wear them!
Not for me or a lot of people on this post
  • 1 0
 I hate sunglasses. Hair grease makes them fade to no definition when they up for climbing. Cant live without on downhill return when bugs are out. They just zero in on my eyes and fly right in there. Be carefull with bug spray with high deet content. Ruined some nice ones by accident that way. Stuff will strip chrome from a bumper. (Also critical item...)
  • 1 0
 Thing is, riding glasses need to be the way they are to work well. Beach sunglasses sit too low at the brow and on a bike when you’re in a riding position you’ll be looking at that frame top or over it. And the wrap is necessary to keep dust out. You’ll certainly look like douche wearing riding glasses for everyday use. But you’ll look equally douchy wearing beach glasses riding. The reviewer seems to have a similar problem to me. Helmets fit low at the front and interfere with her glasses. Always take your riding glasses with you when your buying a helmet. Only Leatt and Fox helmets seem to fit me these days. I dented a helmet last fall and I tried Sweet, POC, Smith, Giro, Bell, Troy Lee, Lazer and I don’t know what else. The Leatt shop had closed for the season too. But then I tried a Fox Drop Frame which fit with my glasses. And it was on sale. My vision isn’t great even with contacts so adding shitty glasses really bothers me. Good optics are worth it to me. I keep coming back to Oakley because of their optics. And they have enough styles that I can find something that fits although I’ve cut the ends off the arms often enough to keep them from interfering with the helmet. I’ve never lost a pair either. And the Oakleys seem less likely to scratch unlike some Smiths I’ve had.
  • 1 0
 Since I always damage / lose / forget my glasses, I'm using 10 EUR Merida sunglasses. Fits perfectly, looks great, cheap and can wear it outside biking.
I see what they trying to achieve here, mix up the biking glasses with the MX / DH googles, but come on, these looks ridiculous . Maybe the Oakley and the Rudy Project are somewhat normal, but the rest... no thanks industry.
  • 1 0
 Done with all these expensive glasses. I’ve tried so many and they all suck. Interfere with your helmet, constantly slide off your face, fog up. I switched to Good’r glasses. $25, they stay freakin put no matter the amount of sweat or how gnarly the terrain. I got a 3 for $60 deal and got a sun pair, an overcast pair, and a clear pair. After 20 years in the game (some of which in retail selling the expensive stuff) I won’t buy these (cheaply made) expensive ones. Not to mention they’re all made and owned by luxottica.
  • 1 0
 I skimmed the pics first and thought - "Man, most of these frames are some of the largest these companies offer, they look way to big for her face."

Then I skimmed the reviews - seems like they were almost all too big for her.

Why test large framed glasses on a small person? Ain't no 5'5" person going to choose most of those frames, and nobody my size is interested in what a tiny person thinks of them either.
  • 1 0
 "I was worried the lens would be too dark to ride at dusk since most of my testing was done in the evening after work"

This seems like not a great way to test sunglasses. It doesn't seem like she wore them during the day either, which I get for style, but most people want to know how sunglasses work in the sun
  • 1 0
 They all look great to me and I'm sure they'll all do a decent enough job, I've even splashed out in the past and bought some of the high end quality glasses on offer at the time. My problem is that I just keep loosing the fecking things, they just seem vanish into the ether, if aliens ever arrive on this planet I bet half will be wearing my old glasses. If any of you guys making these glasses are reading this, add a little GPS tracker to them so I can bloody well find them again. Stay safe
  • 1 0
 I can never keep a pair of glasses on for an entire ride. I'm a sweater and as soon as a drop comes off the brow and lands on the lens I'm stuck with the choice of either protecting my eyes and riding with compromised depth perception/vision or taking them off and actually be able to see the trail, they always have to come off. Until a company figures out a way to avoid this I think I'm stuck. Anyone with similar issues ever find a solution?
  • 1 0
 I would love a review like this but of prescription glasses. Unfortunately, us blind folk aren't able to benefit from the fancy glare reducing, fancy mirror finish that some of these offer. My biggest interest is getting a large frame that works with a prescription that can block out all of the wind.
  • 4 4
 Without having tried most.... anything over $150 that's not oakley, wtf am I paying for? Flat lenses and corporate salaries? Would love to find something reasonably priced that's not ugly or trash after a leaf brushes against it
  • 10 0
 Well with oakley you're definitely paying that corporate salary. Smith have always been my go-to but they're just as corporate gooney as Oakley now days.
  • 2 1
 Oakley? yeah sucking the teet I see...
  • 1 0
 Sorry highly inebriated when I wrote that. Let me rephrase.
Remember when luxottica was the expensive brand? Now everybody enters the market at similar prices just because
  • 2 0
 @captainjack07: from what I’ve read Luxottica bought up the majority of competitors (including Oakley) and is now basically a sunglass monopoly
  • 1 0
 @captainjack07: definitely right. I'm all for supporting the smaller guys but it is tough to buy something priced the same or higher when you know that Oakley, Smith and many other large brands push out really good product.
  • 1 0
 100% have been the only frames I've broken period and they didn't want a bar of it. Even cheapo 20 buck riding frames don't break like they did. Oakley just work, stupid price or not.
  • 1 0
 Make a chart comparison that labels features as well as a sections for highlighted features on why you liked each pair. This was just a bunch of long drawn out paragraphs not really telling us much of anything.
  • 1 0
 Agree. Next time I will incorporate a table. Thanks for the suggestion.
  • 3 0
 Can't say enough good things about my Julbo Furys. I always ride with glasses and these are the best ones I've ever owned.
  • 1 0
 Nope to all, I got a cheapass pair of Tifosi that I've had for 3+ years, never lost of broken, don't need to waste that much $$ on overpriced sunglasses cause they have a fancy name on them.
  • 2 0
 Note that to wear POC glasses, you have to purchase a POC helmet to go with it. No other helmet brands are compatible with POC glasses
  • 3 0
 Love my Bliz Fusions!! Affordable, lots of ventilation, plenty of colour choices, and they have a wide range of view
  • 1 0
 I own an Oakley M-Frame since the mid-90's from my ballplayer dayz and it still has its place on the trails today! I have never seen these glasses worn or endorsed by anyone for MTB-riding....
  • 1 1
 Couple years ago I won a pair of pit vipers at Wydaho Rendezvous and thought they were cheap sunglasses. I was carrless with them since they were terrible and lost them. I had no idea they go for $80. I think people are way too willing to pay a premium for cheap plastic. Tifosi is where it's at for me.
  • 3 0
 ok now repeat the article for those of us that need prescription riding glasses,,,
  • 1 0
 Next time I will incorporate this. I wear contacts so it should have been something I considered.
  • 1 0
 I would have liked to have seen a couple that have the readers built in. I can not be the only one who wants to be able to do a field repair without pulling readers out of a backpack.
  • 1 0
 I still ride with a pair of Smith Sliders, circa 1995 , in kiwi green frame with replaceable lens ( orange). Would LOVE to find the lens to buy,as they are all pretty scratched up!
  • 2 0
 When I saw the photo of the front view with the sun glaring across the POC Aspire clarity I thought it was a version for Pirates.Shiver me Timbers
  • 1 1
 Covid Crisis will cure this madness. Glasses for $200, generally a disposable item which will get scratched after first crash ... Ok, when they are fotochromatic this could make sense, but otherwise, really?
  • 2 0
 Just got a pair of photochromatics, after watching dorks wear them around for years and thinking they'd be perfect for mountain biking. Turns out they are. Def need a heavier shaded pair for midday rides, but for dusk/dawn rides they are perfect. Perfect shade no matter where the sun's sitting.
  • 3 0
 @pbfan08: I suppose that depends on where you ride. We have trees here, and the sunlight through the shade is rapidly changing. Photochromic has no time to adjust, and are actually a handicap.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: I'll take a pair of photochromatics in those conditions over a heavily shaded reflective lense any day. Photochromatics really cannot get that dark. But, sure a clear or lighter lense would be perfect but if its a heavily shaded area.
  • 1 0
 What lenses did you test on the Oakley's? You mention them adjusting to the light but the pictures appear to be the normal Prizm lenses.
  • 2 0
 Lastly, it's "Advancer" and not "Advanced" Sorry, the caffeine is kicking in.
  • 2 0
 This whole artical would've been better if it was a review of knock off glasses from ali express
  • 1 0
 i use glasses for usd. 2.5 , full transparent and available at any safety shop! Its crazy, i know, maybe i am ahaed of any Enduuroorism ha ha ha ha 200.- ha ha ha so Enduro
  • 2 3
 Using a good pair of riding glasses, such as Oakley, is worth every penny. Had an unfortunate event with face vs. tree (on Slickrock of all places) leading to a laceration over temple/cheekbone, but the lens of my Jawbones (now discontinued) did not shatter - further inspection showed a good scratch from the tree which suggests an eye injury was averted. Interchangeable lens (clear, yellow, etc.) means they are useful in all conditions.
  • 1 0
 Why does your test field say Oakley Flight Jacket and you reviewed the Radar EV? Flight Jacket would have been a way better choice in this line up
  • 2 0
 Which ones don't fog up when you're riding with a face mask? #StupidCovfefe. #ImeanStupidCovid
  • 2 1
 Why are people paying these insane prices for something you will invariably leave laying on a rock somewhere?

Free safety glasses from work for the win!!!
  • 2 0
 I liked this article. You've got an interesting spunky writing style. Hope you keep writing.
  • 2 0
 No matter what glasses I get, they still will fog, even the anti-fog ones. I have a particular sweaty face.
  • 2 0
 Ok, am I the only I’ve that feels sun glasses are just distracting and mostly foggy? I prefer bareback all the way...
  • 2 0
 Adidas Zonk Pro w photochromic lenses are the best riding glasses I've ever had.
  • 2 0
 The PoCs are super nice and have never had them fog. For women they have a smaller frame one that seems to do the trick.
  • 1 0
 I got fed up loosing or breaking at least one pair of expensive glasses per year - budget is now limited to $50. Besides, goggles.
  • 1 0
 Holy batman! 70's glasses are back! I assume all these are for women? If they're all that big, why not just put on a pair of goggles?
  • 1 0
 They are all unisex. Other than sizing, most companies do not make gender specific glasses, just color options that may be more masculine or feminine.
  • 2 0
 Oakley has the best lenses - get the prism deep water polarized - will enhance your riding
  • 2 0
 Some of the style you either have to be 25 or under to pull off, or a pro wrester.
  • 1 0
 If you run a not-extreme prescription, you can run Gatorz sunglasses. All billet construction too. They're nice, but not cheap.
  • 1 0
 I tried some Gatorz glasses which cost just about as much but are aluminum, made in the US, and can be adjusted to better fit. No regrets yet.
  • 1 0
 Looks like everybody's jumped on that big goofy retro look. It has always amazed me what people are willing to pay for a pair of sunnies.
  • 1 0
 I agree with everyone above. Toni Tifosi makes top notch glasses. Julbo for glacier glasses, Toni Tifosi for everything else.
  • 2 0
 Just buy some Oakley Sutro's and be done with it. Oakley lenses and they actually look alright.
  • 3 0
 Pit vipers rock! Beat fit ever for the senders! ????????????????????
  • 3 0
 POC always making the fucking ugliest shit i have ever seen
  • 1 0
 Pit vipers are the shit, look good, priced relatively good compared to those and adjustable , the only downfall is there cheap looking plastic arms
  • 2 0
 Ah man, I wanted know how easy all the lenses were to change....
  • 1 1
 Missing the Falcon from Naked Optics here. Pledged them on Kickstarter and they are great and not overpriced like many other shades!
  • 4 4
 I have never tried a pair of Oakley, but if they look bad on such a beautiful woman I can't imagine how they look on my already not so nice face!
  • 1 1
 Oakley's are the sickest pair of eyewear you could ever get. They have loads of options and colours, plus their tech is the best.
  • 3 1
 200 bugs !? hahahahahahahahahahahaha
  • 1 0
 Also, the index at the top of article say "Flight Jacket". I've lost all confidence in the article. Do better!
  • 1 0
 As mentioned before: none is for optical lenses. Second thing: where is Shimano?
  • 2 0
 Rudy project review mentions that an Rx insert is available.
  • 3 0
 Shimano didn't respond in time and Tifosi didn't follow through on multiple emails where they said they had sent a pair. I will make sure to get Shimano and Scott and some of the other brands in the next round up of glasses...
  • 2 0
 Oakley has been doing Rx implants for years !
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan: thanks Smile

Shimano are really strong in bang for buck category and worth showing despite that they're not flawless. I'm suprised how long my www.endurorider.pl/shimano-equinox lives Smile
  • 1 0
 Love my Rad8 MTB Glasses. Several frame style and lens options, including prescription lenses ????
  • 2 0
 I thought we grew out of face shields with the M Frame in the 90s.
  • 2 1
 Thanks for reminding me of how ugly Pit Vipers are. I wonder why Shimano Technium glasses werent reviewed? They're awesome.
  • 2 1
 I'm impressed that she knows about Canadian Tire, when she lives in Oregon!
  • 2 1
 Look up X-Tiger glasses on Amazon. $20 and it's all you need. $200 for a pair of non-prescription glasses my ass.
  • 4 1
 200 bucks glasses? GTFO
  • 2 0
 Ahoy PinkBike,

Why do we need to know what size a woman's figure is?
  • 1 0
 Its just a short bio cut and pasted from all my "reviews"... since I mainly do clothing, its important. I don't see the need to change it for each piece.
  • 2 0
 @nkrohan: Okey-dokey, makes sense to me.
  • 2 2
 If you're thinking of spending ~ $200 on sunglasses for riding your bike maybe give some money to the poor and/or homeless. You've got enough.
  • 2 1
 You and your friends sit around talking about how everyone in the world is stupid and offensive don't you?
  • 2 0
 @mtbgeartech: Which pair do you own?

Dorky $200 riding glasses make you look dorky, give the money away is all.

I don't have friends.
  • 1 0
 @Steventux: I don't own an expensive pair. I use some Tifosi that my LBS gave me.

I get it, nothing wrong with giving money away.
  • 2 0
 Where is the Pro's and Con's list all pinkbike users love to see
  • 1 0
 Ha. I just didn't have the capacity to deal with that. I blame COVID-19. After the goggle piece, I felt I'd give everyone one less thing to bitch about.
  • 1 0
 Have these been tested in proper PNW conditions? Mid December day dark in the woods pissing down rain?
  • 3 1
 I don't care what the reviews say, I'm getting Pit Vipers.
  • 2 0
 Bright sunshiny dayyyyyy
  • 5 4
 Whoever thought that half lid and goggles looked stupid...
  • 2 1
 I like my 10€ sunglasses
  • 1 0
 What the F***! Julbo Fury at 175€ in Europe Frown Frown
  • 1 0
 I found them for £65
  • 1 0
 Depends on your lens's choice. They can be found at 90€ but still, it's pretty expensive...
  • 1 0
 @downhill38: don't ever buy prescription Oakley's....
  • 1 0
 If they don't fog and fit with your helmet on, they're perfect in my book.
  • 1 0
 I'm back from reading and now I'm mad
  • 1 0
 A lot of good glasses for reasonable prices.

www.opticnerve.com
  • 2 0
 I get my glasses at ARCO
  • 1 0
 Does anyone recognize the trail she's riding?
  • 2 0
 Looks like Syncline trails on the Washington side of the Columbia not too far from Hood River.
  • 1 0
 If you’re not going full turbo on your pitties then what are you doing!
  • 1 0
 Can we agree that all of these look terrible..
  • 1 0
 200USD on cycling glasses. Never gonna happen!
  • 1 0
 I would just go to Decathlon and save myself $190
  • 2 1
 JUSSSS GONNA SEND IT ????????????????
  • 1 0
 how can i get a pink bike glasses testing gig?
  • 1 0
 old smiths FTW! once you go frameless....
  • 1 0
 You had to give Pit Viper 6.5...you couldn't even give them 6.9? C'mon...
  • 1 0
 What lens colour does the tester have on the bliz matrix?
  • 1 0
 delete
  • 2 1
 deleted
  • 2 1
 No full frame...no buy.
  • 1 0
 NM.
  • 1 0
 No Oakley Sutro?
  • 4 7
 Finally a review that includes the real winners... them pittys baby!!
  • 1 0
 When you pay $100 to get a cheap pair of sunglasses but it's ok because it had Metallica font on it
  • 2 0
 @Ajorda: sounds like someone has some oakleys stuck up their butt.
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