Ridden & Rated: 11 of the Best New Men's Riding Pants

Dec 27, 2020 at 16:29
by Nikki Rohan  


The heavy, MX inspired pajama pants of the mountain biking past have given way to fitted, light-weight, breathable pants that have all the mobility and performance of thermal lycra tights, but offer the more robust performance of purpose built mountain bike apparel. Below you'll find eleven pair of mountain bike specific pants ranging from pedigreed downhill race pants to pants designed specifically for cool weather pedal missions to a pair of pants that'll keep you warm and dry when Mother Nature throws everything at you.

Before you go on to learn about pants, I have to give a shoutout to the team at Outbound Lighting. I am a carpenter by day; in order to review everything in this round up in a timely manner, I turned into a mountain biker by night. This task quickly showcased the weaknesses of my old lights. But just a few emails later and to my surprise and excitement, Outbound pitched in with their brand new Evo Downhill light package, which basically turned night into day. Thanks Outbound for helping make this test happen!







About the Tester:

Jameson Florence is a professional fun haver who spends most of his free hours exploring the PNW on two wheels, building trail, or racing events like the Trans-Cascadia. He stands 5'9" and weighs 160 lbs, with a 31 inch waist, 42-inch chest and wears a size M/L helmet, size large gloves, and EU 42.5 shoes. He typically is a size medium and US 9.5 shoe. He resides in Fall City, Washington with his wife Holly, their dog Zangi, and soon to be child.





Table of Contents
Dakine Thrillium
Ride NF DP3
Fox Flexair
Giro Havoc
Ion Shelter Softshell Pants
IXS Trigger
Leatt MTB 4.0
Patagonia Dirtroamer Storm
POC Rhythm Resistance Pants
Troy Lee Designs 2021 Skyline
100% R-Core X
Top Picks



Dakine Thrillium

Dakine Thrillium

Dakine touts these pants as "Gravity tested and enduro proven" and the test team of sponsored riders includes names like Carson Storch, Yoann Barelli, and Casey Brown, among others. These pants are constructed with a four way stretch Schoeller fabric that is ventilated and has a "eco DWR" coating on it. The Thrillium have a zippered fly with a button at the top and a built in belt system with a fastex buckle for a secure, tailored fit.There are three pockets: two angled hand pockets with zippered closure on each side of the waist and a zippered stash pocket on the left thigh.

Dakine Thrillium Pants
• Closure type: Fastex buckle with cinch
• Colors: Black
• Size: S-XXL (M Tested)
• MSRP: $160 USD
• Weight: 530 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 28.75"
Dakine.com


Fit: The Dakine Thrillium Pant had the snuggest fit of all the "mediums" and size 32's in this round up. If you're on the upper edge of that size you may want to bump up a size. The pants have room for knee pads when dry, but once the fabric gets soaked, it tended to bind on my kneepads. The lower legs are on the roomier side as compared to many of the other offerings reviewed here, which made them nice and comfy when pedaling vs. feeling like I'd pulled on a pair of tights. Overall they fit me pretty well, considering I measure as a 31" waist, although I'd like just a little more room or stretch across the lap in the waist.

Testing: These pants are burly! When picking through the pile of pants for testing, these ones stood out in a sea of nylon as the pant I would choose to crash in if I knew I was going to eat it. I wore them in conditions ranging from around 35º F / 2ºC to a little over 50ºF / 8ºC, and some pissing rain. In the wet, I found the DWR on these pants to be rather ineffective, but the comparatively thick Schoeller material keeps water at bay for a while. Once they do wet out, though, these pants become boat anchors. That said, they did keep me warm for my ride even after they soaked through. On the warmer test day these pants remained comfortable for the entire ride, which was surprising; I thought I'd be roasting some chestnuts but they breathe exceptionally well. The Thrillium's don't have a ton of venting so I'll chalk that up to the Schoeller fabric. I was initially concerned that the rather large-seeming waist buckle would cause a pressure point under my hip pack strap, but it's big enough that it distributed the pressure evenly vs. creating any discomfort.

Dakine Thrillium Pants.

Pros
+ Warm
+ Durable
+ Super secure waist buckle
Cons
- Heavy
- Fit runs on the small side
- Limited water resistance





NF DP3



NF designs and sews all their products in North Vancouver, BC. The team is focused on "building the best rider experience possible, on and off the bike, through high-quality, long lasting, performance products locally made (and remade) to exceed our consumers expectations". They sent us their flagship piece of kit, the DP3 pant, for this review. These are sewn from a DWR coated fabric with a touch of spandex, which adds just enough stretch for easy movements. The DP3s have three zippered pockets, one which holds a smartphone better than any other pair of pants in this test, but no waist closure of any kind—no zipper, buckle, latch, velcro, nothing...just a huge elastic waistband. We'll get to that later.

NF DP3 Pant
• Closure type: Huge Elastic Band
• Colors: Black/Charcoal(tested), Cement/Charcoal, Midnight Navy/Cool Grey, Black MONO, Cement MONO, Midnight Navy MONO
• Sizes: XS - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $171 USD ($218 CAD)
• Weight: 381grams (actual)
• Inseam: 29"
RideNF.com/


Fit: I tested the NF pants in a medium. The most interesting feature which immediately stands out when you pull these pants on is that other than a "super band waist band", there's nothing to secure the DP3 in place. That's right: they're basically built like your favorite, perfectly-fitting sweatpants. In this age of buckles, belts, and velcro, this was initially a little disconcerting, but they fit just right: not too tight, not too loose. More importantly, they stayed put exactly where I wanted them during every ride I tested them. There are two small waist pockets—one on each hip. These are really too small to be hand pockets, but are perfect for keys, snacks, or a gel or three. There's also a third pocket on the side of the right thigh in exactly the perfect spot (and size) to stow a smartphone in, even when enclosed in a slightly bulky case. In fact, a phone can disappear in here so completely that I kept having a mini freakout thinking that I had lost my phone. There is also a nice articulated cut to the knees which provides decent room for knee pads. Other than these features, this pair of pants have a simplistic design to them that shines through.

Testing: The DP3s ended up getting ridden on "warmer" days due to the fact that (surprisingly enough in December) it quit raining and got oddly warm (50º F / 10ºC) while testing. In these conditions the DP3s were surprisingly comfortable and breathed well enough that I avoided the dreaded clammy chamois. They saw some puddle splashes (which were easily fended off by the DWR), but these pants never got into real rain, so the jury is still out on how well they'll perform in torrential conditions. My kneepads didn't bind in the pants, nor did I have any issues with the waist or ankle cuff shifting while riding. Overall, they were quite comfortable and performed well in the conditions I tested them in, making these one of my top picks for comfort—both on and off the bike.

Details of the NF DP3 Pant

Pros
+ So comfy that you feel like you're wearing your pajamas
+ Phone carry is unmatched
+ Fabric breathes well
Cons
- Graphics are pretty loud
- Definitely gotta take off the hip pack when nature calls
- The two hand pockets are too small for hands





Fox Flexair Pant



The Fox Flexair Pants are designed as a "super light" mountain bike trail riding pant that "climbs as well at it descends". In essence, the designers at Fox took the proven design of their DH race pants design and evolved it, creating an everyday trail pant crafted from their light weight, four-way stretch TruMotion fabric. The Flexairs are coated with a DWR finish to repel light rain, and come equipped with two zippered pockets.


Fox Flexpair Pant
• Closure type: Ratchet
• Colors: Black
• Sizes: Waist 28-28 in 2" increments. (Tested 32")
• MSRP: $140 USD
• Weight: 292 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 30.5 in
foxracing.com/


Fit: I tested the Flexair in a size 32. I typically need to wear a belt with size 32 jeans, but this pant fits just right with the waist closure toggled a hair past its middle setting; there is no other waist adjustment feature on this pant other than this ratchet, which I find keeps the fiddling to a minimum. Speaking of closure, this pant is unique in that it only has this ratchet closure. There's no fly zipper, either, just a flap that the ratchet folds closed, which nicely eliminates the potential for a "forgot to zip up your fly" situation. The lower leg is tapered to avoid snags, and while I personally found it to be tighter than I would like, that's a nit pick. The inseam is spot on and the overall cut of this pant was ideal for me.


Testing:. These pants got out on both a rather warm ride (61ºF / 16ºC) and saturated trail, as well as a cooler, rain-soaked day (45ºF / 7ºC). I was rather warm on the first ride, but not overly so. The TruDri tech Fox uses for wicking and breathing works well, as I was comfortable, despite the fact the Flexair doesn't have tons of venting. On the colder, wetter ride they performed equally well, keeping me warm and—for the most part—dry. The DWR finish beads water better than most in the test; and puddle splashing and light rain were easily fended off. But it's still just a DWR; if you're riding in pouring rain or super wet conditions, you're eventually going to get wet. Overall, this is one of my favorite picks for an all around, cooler conditions pant—so long as one is not riding in sustained heavy weather. For that I'd rather be testing Fox's Ranger 3L pant.

Details of the Fox Flexair Pants.

Pros
+ Breathes well
+ Stretchy and fits over kneepads well
Cons
- Phone storage in the pockets is a bit clunky
- Lack of fly closure occasionally can lead to open fly syndrome






Giro Havoc



The Giro Havoc pant is pointed at the rider who plans to race and ride in cold temps and variable conditions. This relaxed fit pant is built from the same Bluesign approved 4-way stretch "durablend" fabric as Giro's Havoc shorts. It has a DWR coating to help keep you dry, strategically placed laser cut venting behind the knees, a gusseted crotch, three pockets, and external waist tab adjusters.


Giro Havoc Pant
• Closure type: Two Buttons with velcro and a zipper
• Colors: Black
• Sizes: 30-40 in 2" increments (tested 32)
• MSRP: $170 USD
• Weight: 296 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 31.5
Giro.com/


Fit: I tested this pant in a size 32, which was pretty spot on: not too snug anywhere, and maybe a hair baggy feeling in the thigh, but otherwise good. Knee pad room is on point and the waist adjusters, though nothing new, work for tailoring the fit to each individual's taste. It's worth noting that the Havoc Pant also has belt loops, so if you need extra "pantsing" security from your derelict friends or the rear wheel of your 29er in the steeps, Giro has your back. The Havoc Pants have an open hand pocket on either side of the waist with a third, zippered pocket on the right thigh. This thigh pocket works OK for phone storage, but I found that once stowed a phone sits awkwardly in it, and that the pocket tends to turn inside out when I retrieved it. The gusseted crotch allows for full singletrack ninja moves without fear of blowing a seam, and the taper at the cuff prevents unhappy chain/cuff interactions.


Testing: This pant got abused on a warm (60ºF / 15ºC) and incredibly sloppy wet night ride as well as a crisp, clear day (45ºF / 7ºC) where I buried myself trying to keep pace with a lightning quick, twenty-five year old shredder. On the night ride, I found the pants to be super well vented. In fact, I'll go so far as to say that although this pant is designed for cool to cold weather, it breathes well enough that it's not a bad choice for warmer weather riding either. In fact, the venting is so good that on the colder ride I could feel a distinct temperature gradient between my shins and my calves from the cold air coming in the back. There is a downside to this awesome breathability: water accessibility. The vent holes pretty much feed puddle splashes and spray from the rear wheel right into the pants. Yes, they are DWR coated, but you're not staying very dry in these if it's soggy on the trails. Comfort wise, this pant is pretty damn good, though, and ideal for pedaling in crisp to cold conditions. Just not in the wet.

Details of the Giro Havoc Pant.

Pros
+ Very well ventilated
+ Extremely quiet material, even when wearing kneepads
+ Great for all around mountain biking
Cons
- External side adjuster doesn't play well with hip pack strap
- Phone pocket is meh
- DWR wets out quickly







Ion Shelter Softshell Pants



With the Ion Shelter Pant, the designers have placed four-way stretch material where you need it, and much more durable materials on the seat, inner leg, and hem to help thwart the earth's attempts at making you bleed. They also triple stitch all the high stress seams and then coat the pants with a DWR to shed light rain, muck, and splashes. There are two zippered pockets on either side of the waist, with an internal neoprene pouch in the right hand pocket that's meant to secure your phone. This pant uses external velcro waist adjusters on either side to tighten the waist up, zippered and gusseted ankle openings, and a zippered thigh vent backed with mesh on each leg to blow off some steam.



Ion Softshell Pants Shelter
• Closure type: Snap button with velcro and zippered fly
• Colors: Black (tested), Root Brown, Laguna Green
• Sizes: S - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $160 USD (tax included)
• Weight: 417grams (actual)
• Inseam: 29"
Ion.com/


Fit: The Ion pants fit, but the cut was a bit awkward for me. The leg length was good, and the overall fit was okay; but I found that even with the waist cinched down all the way, the pants didn't stay up well . I should note that I don't have a whole lotta junk in the trunk, so this problem has cropped up before; it just depends on the pant. Also the cut of the fabric around the knee area causes the excess fabric to bunch above the kneepads, which felt funny, but didn't inhibit pedaling. For comparison's sake, I did try on the size small, and while the waist fit was better, they were too tight on my legs. One nice feature of the Shelter Pant is the lower leg zipper, which allows you to pull the pants on over shoes or to put on kneepads after you've put on your pants—something I've come to really like as I sometimes forget to grab knee pads before putting on my pants.

Testing: These pants saw some of the coldest conditions of any pant in the test, but never really had to deal with wet weather. Even though it was quite cold, I feel like these soft shell pants do a good job of regulating heat. There's no perforated venting, nor any of the mesh panels found with some of the other pants. Instead, Ion opted for good ol' zippered vents with mesh to keep debris out. This style of venting just plain works: you get too hot, open the zipper; you get too cold, close the zipper. Until...you get it snagged on the mesh in the center of the vent. It was frustrating enough that if I were to buy these I'd consider cutting that mesh out. A phone in a case (iPhone 11 Pro with a mous case) will fit into the neoprene phone sleeve—barely; but a phone with no case fits in like butter. This is definitely a good, all around, cooler weather riding pant, despite my issues with the vents and the fit of the waist for the simple reason that it's got a lot of functional features and is on the burlier side for long lasting durability.


Details of the Ion Shelter Softshell Pants.


Pros
+Adjustable vents
+ Abrasion resistant materials
+ Lower leg zipper
Cons
- Mesh in adjustable vents snags on zipper
- Phone sleeve is tight on phone's with cases






IXS Trigger



iXS designed this pant for gravity. Specifically to go race both enduro and downhill at the highest levels. In a nod to sustainability, they build this pant with 100% Post consumer recycled PET packaging; i.e. your pants are made out of recycled water bottles. This fabric is yarn dyed to resist fading and retain soft, next to skin characteristics. There's a large mesh panel behind the knee that stretches from lower thigh to upper calf to help blow off heat. Last, there are a couple of zippered pockets on either side of the waist that are angled for easy access.


iXS Trigger Pants
• Closure type: Two large snaps with Velcro and a zipper that comes to the top of waistband
• Colors: Black-Graphite (tested), Marine-Lime
• Sizes: XXS - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $150 USD
• Weight: 397 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 28.5"
IXS.com/


Fit: I tested this pant in a medium. While it is the correct size based on iXS' charts, this pant just does not fit me. The waist is pretty generous, but when snugged all the way down with the two internal adjusters, while it "fits", it still feels oddly loose. Additionally, the waist of the pant sits too low: when pulled up to my waist, it induced unsightly man toe. And while I freely admit to having no butt, there's no way I could do enough squats to fill these pants out—there's far too much extra room in the seat for that. The internal waist adjusters work well, and although I find they are always more work to get adjusted than their external cousins, I find that once "set" they stay put better than the external ones. The lower legs of these pants are snug, too, but in a good way: they hug a kneepad and the calves tightly for a more aerodynamic, performance-oriented fit than any other offering in this test.

Testing: I'm admittedly not a downhiller, or more properly said I don't shuttle DH trails and it's rare that I visit a bike park (not that any are open near me in November/December), so these pants never got to perform in their intended venue. But I do pedal my bike up to the tops of what many would consider DH trails, and for that these pants pedal pretty well. Once pointed downhill, though, they're certainly in their element! The snug fit of the lower legs leaves no excess fabric to get snag on anything, while the ample venting makes this pair the absolute coldest pant in the test. Waist fit aside, these are a pant that's comfortable to trail ride in, and these are a confidence inspiring performer when gravity takes over. But based on the fantastic venting, these are more ideally suited for cool to warm weather riding vs. the heart of winter.

Details of the IXS Trigger Race Pant.

Pros
+ Well ventilated
+ Eco friendly
+ Fitted cut for going fast
Cons
- Short low waist
- Pockets are too tight to be very useful







Leatt MTB 4.0



Leatt says these pants are not just MX pants on a diet, but are "Dedicated for BMX, Downhill, and Trail". As such, they're built out of a lightweight, ventilated four-way stretch material with some heavier 500D laminated panels in key spots. There are three YKK zippered pockets: one at the base of the spine, and one on either hip. It features pre-curved knees that are also cut to fit knee guards. A silicon gripper strip runs along the back of the inner waist to help prevent slippage, there's a fair bit of laser cut venting on the inner thighs, and the waist is secured with an MX style ratchet, like the Fox Flexair Pant. There's a DWR for light duty water repellency.


Leatt MTB 4.0
• Closure type: Ratchet buckle with zippered fly
• Colors: Black, Onyx (tested), Sand
• Sizes: S - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $130 USD
• Weight: 401 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 30.75
Leatt.com/


Fit: The Leatt pants are touted to be some of the most comfortable mountain bike riding pants available. I love marketing hype as much as the next person, but to their credit, they really do a decent job of backing this claim up: the fabric is light, has a nice, next to skin feel, the transition to 500D fabric in high wear areas is seamless (no hot spots when pedaling), and the waist has a "soft touch" liner. The fabric may be light, but It seems durable enough to withstand a crash or three. The cut of the waist is just a bit lower than I'd like; I always felt like I wanted to pull them up a bit, but I couldn't do that without giving myself a wedgie. The ratchet closure is quick, easy, and won't pop open unexpectedly. Leatt left the perfect amount of room for knee pads in the pre-curved knees, and the tapered lower leg is snug without feeling constricting.

Testing: Leatt somehow made a pant that breathes remarkably well yet somehow still retains a nice level of heat. I always felt on the comfortable side of warm while pedaling uphill, yet never felt too sweaty. The laser cut venting in the pants definitely does its job, but the material itself also breathes quite well. Other than the low rider waist not being ideal for me, the pants really disappear when riding. They just quietly do their job of keeping the outside world off you while you submerge yourself in riding. The DWR fends off some weather for sure, and the cuff keeps water out of your winter shoes; but once the rain gauge starts collecting in earnest, forget about staying dry. In those kinds of conditions with only a DWR to keep the weather at bay, you're only good for an hour or so of playing in the mud. Leatt set out to make a good "all around" mountain bike riding pant and did a great job.

Details of the Leatt MTB 4.0 pant.

Pros
+ Breathes very well
+ Waist adjuster is quick and low profile
+ Maintains warmth
Cons
- Low waist
- Phone barely fits in hip pockets







Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storm Pant



The Dirt Roamer Storm Pants are Patagonia's lightweight, packable and waterproof MTB-specific riding pants. They feature a fully waterproof, 3-layer H2No fabric (3-layer, 3.5-oz 40-denier 100% recycled nylon stretch plain weave with a soft polyester knit backer and a DWR finish) with abrasion-resistant nylon material at the knees, seat and crotch, two zippered thigh pockets, zippered leg openings, an adjustable waistband, and are Fair Trade Certified sewn. The H2No fabric may not be the household name of Gore-Tex, but is independently recognized as waterproof, windproof, breathable, and highly packable. A good comparison of Patagonia's H2No vs Gore-Tex can be found here. Full disclosure: I am a sometime tester for Patagonia (along with a few other bike industry companies, FSA and Magura among them). This is not a sponsorship. I do not get paid. I just get to abuse their gear vs. purchasing my own and ruining it. As a field tester, I have been in these pants since their inception. Due to this, I was initially hesitant to review these for fear of cries of bias, but as they are the only truly waterproof mtb specific pant in this round up, I've opted to include them.


Patagonia Dirtroamer Storm Pant
• Closure type: Single snap with a zippered fly
• Colors: Black, Crater Blue (tested)
• Sizes: XS - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $270 USD
• Weight: 310 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 30"
Patagonia


Fit: I tested the Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storm Pants in medium. The fit of this pant is close to perfect; I could maybe use a little less room in the waistband, but it's nothing the waist cinch doesn't take care of. The waist sits where it should, and there's a slightly raised back to keep rear wheel debris out of your liner shorts. The lower legs each have a zippered opening that allows you to both take the pants on and off over your shoes as well as put on/remove your kneepads without having to take off your pants. The pockets are roomy enough for a smart phone, and biased to shift cargo away from the front of your thighs. The leg cuff is snug to keep water and crud out, but not so snug as to impair movement. There are no vents or laser cut holes for ventilation; the pants instead rely on the breathability of the H2No fabric. Tailoring the fit relies on Patagonia's OppoSet waist adjuster that can be operated with one hand and doesn't interfere with hip pack straps.

Testing: I've had a lot of miles in various pairs of these pants. They've been in every weather condition imaginable, from a few "What was I thinking?!?" hot sunny days to riding my bike when skiing would likely have been a wiser choice They breathe well enough that I wasn't completely dying in warm weather use (although there are definitely more breathable pants reviewed in this article), and are waterproof enough that big dumb rides in miserable weather are doable. And while they may be light weight, I'll attest to crashing in them quite hard, and more than once (along with a lot of trail building work with a powered brush cutter): to date I've had no rips, tears, or holes from those episodes (and if you do, Patagonia's forever guarantee will get you back up and running without a fuss). This burly construction and top shelf performance also make these the most expensive pant in this round up, unfortunately. But if you're consistently headed out for type two fun in epic conditions, look no further. However, if you just want a pant that will take the chill off cool, damp fall days there are a number of more affordable options in this round up.

Details of the Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storm Pant.

Pros
+ Waterproof
+ Burly, yet light weight
+ Simple waist adjuster
Cons
- Comparatively hefty price tag
- Not the most breathable vs. other pants in this review







POC Rhythm Resistance Pants



POC constructs these lightweight trail pants out of a four-way stretch blend of Cordura with ripstop fabric reinforcing around the knees for added durability. The pants have an eco friendly non-fluorinated DWR treatment, a pair of zippered hand pockets with a third tiny little pocket on the back of the waist for a credit card (it literally just fits a credit card or hotel card key). The waist closes with a zippered fly and a pair of snap buttons with no adjustment, relying instead on a large, elastic waist band to keep them in place. It's engineered with room for knee pads and a looser fit at the ankle for freedom of movement on the pedals.


POC Rhythm Resistance
• Closure type: Two snap buttons and a zipper
• Colors: Uranium Black
• Sizes: XS - XXL (tested M)
• MSRP: $200.00 USD
• Weight: 332 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 31.25
POC.com/


Fit: I tested the Rhythm Resistance Pant in size M, and even with the use of the big, elastic band in the waist (a trend I've noticed in a few of these trail riding mtb pants), the pant initially seemed slightly loose fitting in this crucial area. However, a cycle in the washer/dryer fixed that up enough that they mostly stayed put while riding; I still found they would slip down upon occasion, but at most I'd only have to hike my pants up maybe once or twice a ride. POC designed this pant to fit with their VPD kneepads, but for consistency in this round up I opted to use my slightly less bulky ION pads across the board, which fit with room to spare. I have no doubt the VPDs would also fit just fine. This pant also has an elastic band at the cuff which makes it particularly easy to pull on over shoes, while at the same time helping to keep out water and trail debris. Leg length was good. While I'm generally a fan of mechanical devices for waist retention duties, I have noticed that some types of buckles or velcro tabs do not play nicely with a hip pack strap. However the "super band waist band" approach of the Rhythm Resistance pants worked well with my hip pack.

Testing: These pants very much sit in the sweet spot in terms of heat retention: they're consistently not too hot, but not too cold. Consequently, when it was cooler than 50ºF / 10ºC or so, I tended to grab these over any of the vented pants. On the pedals they're quite comfortable: they have a nice light feel to them and don't hamper movement at all, even with knee guards on. Nor did I get any hot spots on seated climbs thanks to the seamless gusset in the crotch. Mountain biking in winter tends to involve a crash or two, and while I never ate it in these pants, the rip stop panel from mid thigh to just below the knee provides added confidence in the durability of the pant. POC nailed it with the pocket placement on these pants, too, and while there's no dedicated phone pocket per se, either waist pocket will securely gobble up a smart phone with room to spare. The DWR treated fabric is adequate for puddles and light rain, but it's no substitute for a true water proof fabric. These are ideal pants for drier, chilly conditions riding.

Details of the POC Rhythm Resistance Pant.

Pros
+ Waist can accommodate a wide range of size
+ Abrasion resistant materials in key spots
Cons
- Waist doesn't stay put
- The fabric is noisy while pedaling







Troy Lee Designs 2021 Skyline



This soon to be released (February 2021) Skyline Pant from TLD is a relaxed fit pant crafted from a 95% Coolmax Polyester/5% Lycra blend of Bluesign certified fabric. It's got a velcro reinforced single snap waist closure with external velcro waist adjusters to customize the fit, and silicon gripper inside the waist band to keep the pants securely in place. There's laser cut venting behind the articulated knees, which are designed to allow the use of minimal protection.The back panel below the waist—a TLD signature—is a two-way stretch mesh panel for extra breathability.


Troy Lee Designs Skyline Pant
• Closure type: Ratchet
• Colors: Solid Black, Camo Green (tested)
• Sizes: 30 - 38 (tested 32)
• MSRP: $109 USD
• Weight: 336 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 29.25"
troyleedesigns.com/


Fit: I tested the Skyline Pants in a 32, and I have to say, it's one of the largest "32's" of the test—I was forced to bottom out the two external cinches to keep them on my waist. However, I have a 31" waist, so if you're between sizes, maybe size down (or try before you buy). The stretch fabric gives the body of the pant an almost baggy feel when it actuality it has a nice, semi-fitted cut. The waist has a breathable panel of vertical stretch material across the back yoke and there's a large silicone "SKYLINE" logo'd grip on the inside of the waist. Leg length is on par, kneepad fit is excellent, and the lower cuff sits nicely at the ankle.

Testing: Troy Lee Designs did quite a good job of making a super comfortable trail riding pant with the Skylines. The stretchy material and the relaxed cut around the lap gives a rider plenty of freedom to pedal and move the bike around without any fear of hanging up anywhere. These may not be as vented as many other pants reviewed here, but they do a great job of heat management, even on sunny, but still cool days. The well-placed pockets are mesh on the inside, so in theory you could open them to help vent excess heat; however, since I had valuable things in said pockets, I never tested this. These pants were one of the last to show up, so no heavy rain testing, but the limited puddle splashing they saw beaded right off. Overall, these are a nice performing pant for shoulder season or even cold, dry days.

Details of the Troy Lee Designs Skyline Pant.

Pros
+ Great heat management
+ Very comfortable cut
Cons
- Waist runs large






100% R-Core X



100% R-Core X are made from a DWR coated polyester/spandex four-way stretch woven fabric. The most unique feature of these pants is the waist closure/cinch: it utilizes a simple, single BOA system for waist retention duties.There are no other zippers, buttons or velcro adjusters for the waist; just the BOA dial, which takes care of everything from fastening to security and to literally "dial in" the fit. The interior of the waist band has printed silicone for some extra grip, and there are laser cut holes on the inside of the inseam and behind the knees for ventilation. The R-Core X also have two zippered pockets with a small internal "stabilization pocket" inside the right one to keep a multitool from bouncing around.


100% R-Core X
• Closure type: BOA
• Colors: Light Blue/Black (tested), Navy/White, Foam/Black, Black/Cyan, Black
• Sizes: 28 - 38 (tested 32)
• MSRP: $149 USD
• Weight: 411 grams (actual)
• Inseam: 29.75"
100percent.com/


Fit:The four-way stretch fabric that most of this pant is made out of gives it the ability to be cut slim, yet still fit well without any tight spots. While these pants are more fitted around the knee than some of the others in this review, I'd say they have just the right level of "snugness" to accommodate most of the knee pads I would wear (the Ion pads I tested with fit like a champ). This helps keep pads in place without restricting my movement on or off the bike. The BOA system for the waist closure is very quick, is super easy to use, and adjustments can be made one handed; but since the fly is nothing more than gusseted fabric, the fit over the hips as you pull them on can occasion a bit of a struggle. Leg length is good, but the cuffs are quite snug—I could just barely pull them down over the neoprene uppers of my winter shoes. The pockets are generously sized, and will readily swallow up your phone, keys, a tool, etc.

Testing: As described, this pant is intended to be a DH pant for cooler weather and it shows—it's definitely on the warmer side, even with the laser cut venting. Consequently, if you're going for a pedal with some climbing, expect to get a bit toasty in these. Enough so that I'd recommend saving them for shuttle days or rides below 45-degrees F. And while I had some reservations about the BOA closure creating a pressure point under my hip pack buckle, that turned out to be a non-issue. The DWR coating does a fine job of beading off splashes, mud, and light rain; but don't expect too much more from it; at the end of the day it's still just a DWR, not a waterproof layer. 100% has crafted a great pant in my book. These are exactly what I'd grab for cool weather shuttle laps or all day ate/early season play in the park.

Details of the 100% R-Core X Pant.

Pros
+ BOA system is quick and easy to get perfect
+ Lots of color choices other than all black
Cons
- A bit warm for pedal missions
- Waist and leg cuffs are snug when putting on/taking off pants







TOP PICKS





445 Comments

  • 239 6
 Englishman here. Why on Earth would you ride in just pants? Trousers seems like a better idea
  • 70 29
 Even better, just wear shorts all year round. My legs never get cold even in -6 Deg. It's my fingers and toes that feel it.
  • 17 1
 @Vulhelm: , agree 100%, fingers, toes and nose are the worse in cold weather. I sweat a lot and hate to be overdressed, can’t imagine to climb all morning with trousers on.
  • 96 2
 @Vulhelm: For 25 years biking I thought that, then I got a decent pair of riding trousers and will never look back. You may not feel your legs getting too cold, but by wrapping them up warm you in turn keep your feet warmer as well as they are supplied with toasty warm blood. Doesn't always work, but I certainly get cold feet less than I used to.
  • 20 1
 @Vulhelm: Isn't this the point tho.? Your blood gets cold/veins constrict so by the time it gets to your feet it can't keep your toes warm, wearing pants/trousers should counteract this?
  • 41 1
 @TerryBlato: With pants you dont get so much slop on your body and can easily change clothes after ride to get in the car clean.
  • 9 10
 @Vulhelm: Do you ride with cleats? I do and I realised that those amongst my riding buddies using cleats get cold feet while those riding flats don't. Most probably the metal of the cleats that makes your feet cold?.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: agree, I love my riding trousers (Endura Spray II). Zip vents mean they work in a surprisingly wide range of temperatures and it's such a luxury not having your calves sprayed with freezing water through winter. I only wear shorts once it's above about 14 or 15 deg C.
  • 5 0
 I could not read that without internally replacing the word pant with y fronts.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: agree... I actually feel like I can get away with a little lighter top when I'm wearing pants too.
  • 3 0
 @Vulhelm: I would like to have a hot/humid weather pants if possible. Getting zinged by thorns 2-3 inches long and leeches and caterpillars that sting is not fun sometimes.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: , do you use knee pads underneath? You almost sold me, maybe I should try it and see for myself. Problem is, I can remove an extra shirt if I m sweaty, but how do I remove pants in mid ride??
  • 6 0
 @Pyres: Yup, if the ride needs it (kneeds it?). Never had a problem. I've got a few pairs of trousers I use, from waterproof Endura for those wet or sub zero days (windproof as well you see), paired with a pair of fox thermal 3/4 undershorts, or full thermal bib tights if its really cold to lightweight Fox trousers. Not once have I found the trousers cause me to over heat, it's always having too many top layers on (and I'm the kind of person who always runs hot). If you are worried, just get trousers with ventilation zips. The other huge advantage of waterproof trousers, it that when trippled up with my Northwave Winter boots (SPD) and a pair of Seal Skins water proof socks I never get wet feet no matter how wet the riding (as long as the trouser ankle cuff go over the top of the boots, and I don't step in a shin deep puddle/stream) so that really helps with warmth. That's why I wish more companies would make high top flat pedal shoes that are completely waterproof, as you really don't have to get wet and cold feet at all (which some people haven't discovered yet). As I said before, I used to be firmly in the 'Shorts all year' category, but now It's definitely 'Trousers all winter every time' - just choose the right ones for the conditions.
  • 9 0
 @Riggbeck: only on pinkbike can you find an argument that resembles a mom chastising their kid for not dressing warm enough.
  • 32 1
 American here. What on earth is the difference between pants and trousers?
  • 11 0
 @LifeIsGouda: trousers and trousers, pants are what holds your wedding tackle underneath
  • 3 3
 @Theguyfromthealps: thats definitely a thing. The metal will conduct the cold right to the bottom of your foot.
  • 8 0
 @LifeIsGouda: my Scottish friend says pants are underwear and trousers are pants
  • 3 1
 @Theguyfromthealps: this has been my experience. I may go back to flats in the winter as my feet stay warmer without the cleat.
  • 2 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: It depends on the shoes. A proper pair of winter boots with a decent thermal membrane is the way ahead.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: I have a pair on the Shimano winter boots. The cold still radiates through the cleat. I've added an aftermarket sole that helped but it's still not as warm as I ever was riding flats through the winter.
  • 6 0
 Also an Englishman. I like trousers because I don’t have to spend ages scraping the mud off my shins and leave a muddy trail from my porch to the shower
  • 4 0
 @Theguyfromthealps: the metal is a heat sink, draws heat away as opposed to transferring cold.
BTW, love to see a review of 7Mesh Thunderpant, can't be hard to grab a pair from down the street in Squam, @pinkbike! Of course they're probably sold out...
  • 6 0
 And then you go to Decathlon, hiking section, pay 30€ (here in Portugal), and you get full black breathable confy and cheap pants.
Are they the most resistent thing in the world? No. Are they wortht the prize? yes.
  • 1 0
 @i-am-lp:

This is #1 benefit to me. I hate sliding my knee pads down over wet muddy shins
  • 3 2
 I always ride in shorts. Just wear wool long Johns under them when it is cold. No sense in buying these 100 dollar pants. I could be missing something but I don’t see any benefit of pants over long Johns and shorts.
  • 7 0
 @iantmcg: knee pads over long john suck
  • 2 0
 @Pyres: One leg at a time.
  • 2 0
 @Gilmarques: why go to the hiking section? They sell two designs of mtb trousers like tested for about £30. Of course they have sold out and wont fit anyone in Britain because Decathlon only fits tiny waisted skinny thighed people....but they are there!
  • 2 0
 @iantmcg: I just switched from tights under shorts to some proper Endura riding pants. Very happy so far. They are warmer and keep my shins drier which also helps to stay warm. It’s also great to keep all of the mud on the outside , away from skin and knee pads. Just take the pants off at n the basement in front of the laundry machine and then I can make it walk through the house to the shower without spreading mud everywhere.
  • 1 0
 @Pyres:

Last year I bought Giro ones, they are very light. No problem with normal enduro kneepads. You wont even notice you are wearing them. They breath well and they just overall feel comfy for me.

I find myself wearing them more often than I thought I would.

I used to ride shorts all year round also....ah well maybe its the age Wink
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: I wear them under. My pads are just the fly racing ones that aren’t bulky
  • 1 1
 @mashrv1: Dude, why you gotta wrap that stuff up tight, it's like your girlfriend needs a gift; a small gift more than likely Wink

Let the jewels be free!
  • 2 0
 Britches where i come from.
  • 2 0
 I guess I won't bring up knickers, then.
  • 2 0
 @LifeIsGouda: Apparently to our UK brethren Pants are what we Americans call underpants (underwear for elementary school kids) and Trousers are what we call Pants. Sometimes I just wear Dungarees but I can't show my gainz unless I'm wearing shorts, which in my case are actually Shants cuz I like em long. And socks high.
  • 2 0
 Poison oak bro
  • 1 15
flag kebai (Jan 5, 2021 at 22:36) (Below Threshold)
 @LifeIsGouda:
Good that you ask. This is an international forum.
Pants, trousers? Same criteria as wings bonnets and boots for cars.
France, Germany and other cultures have localized terms for garments car parts, and food and drink.
Your English is the Americanized version of the foundation of your language.
You speak English, not American, if you follow what conservative policies offer. Spain France and England are much, much older than America , maybe you should be speaking Mexican instead of...?
The rest of the population of this planet recognizes this.
I guess your education has been localized also.
What is your interpretation of the origin of Gouda cheese? Is it similar to Freedom Fries?
Arrogance is not an asset.
  • 2 0
 @Vulhelm: The only correct response is Crikey.
  • 9 0
 @kevbai: You were doing great until you mentioned 'speaking Mexican'. There is no Mexican language. Your comment disintegrated into self-cancelled oblivion after that.
  • 3 0
 @Vulhelm: Our fall/winter days can be as cold as 10° - 15° F + wind chill. Shorts ain't gonna cut it for that. Plus, warmer legs are less injury prone legs
  • 6 0
 @kevbai: Arrogance? Come on, really? Because I don't know the difference between pants and trousers in Great Britain? I get that there are different meaning for words in different regions, that's why I asked the question.
  • 2 0
 @LifeIsGouda: Pants go on the inside unless you're Superman!
  • 1 0
 @novajimmer: Like the virus that it is, US English will vanquish the quaint ways of the Queen's English soon enough. Until rappers call US pants Trousers, it's hopeless.......R.I.P. to a real one. Trousers, see you on the other side with Dungarees.
  • 1 0
 @Vulhelm: if your toes get cold, try pants. I won't tell you about blood circulation and all that biology involved. Just put on some pants and you will be astonished. A bit like with fingers and long armsleeves (no shit)
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: In the Pacific Northwest, where the writer is from, it is wet... a lot. I see it as an outer shell for rain and/or wet trail conditions. Soaked wool socks or thermal pants under shorts are miserable. A water proof-ish light barrier over everything is very comfortable and keeps your knee pads clean too.
  • 1 0
 @DCBDH: I remember my days in SoCal... poison oak and stinging nettles all the time. I now get the contend with thorny blackberry vines in WA State, Long pants for protection!
  • 1 0
 @CyclingThe425: I am in the PNW. I usually ride between rain storms though. On the west side of the mountains it gets pretty greasy and it is not real great for a lot of the trails to ride in the rain
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh:
'Seems as though you did not understand the joke, (the joke), the joke.
I will explain:
If all of the Americas (North, South, and Central) had been held as Spanish territories then with your view of language there would be Mexicans speaking Mexican instead of...(the joke), and Americans today would speak American, not English.

Hopefully, that clears things up.
  • 2 0
 @LifeIsGouda: Sorry. You didn't deserve that. I lost my mind there.
  • 116 0
 I get there is loads of 'revolutionary technology' in these purpose made MTB pants. But, WTF why do they have to cost $150USD or in Canada two hundred bloody dollars? Why do only the wealthy get to enjoy warms legs and dry asses?
  • 24 2
 I agree. I just get a pair of long socks, cut the toe out, and pull them up to my thighs. Works like a charm
  • 15 1
 Nukeproof blackline trail pants on chainreaction, reasonably priced and great.
  • 31 34
 Just wear shorts and man the F¥€$ up!
By the time you got socks, knee pads and shorts on, its only your shin and calf exposed, and once this is caked in mud its not even that!
  • 3 0
 @zombiejack33: Try the compression-sock style for runners. They normally run knee-high.

Have a few pairs myself - i think i had an allergy to something on the trails that was causing a reaction on my legs. The compression socks (Nike, relatively cheap) went up to my knees so i had full coverage with shorts (and moreso with kneepads too).

Don't need to cut them up either.
  • 1 0
 I got a pair of Alpinestars reduced from 150 to 70 on Wiggle a few months ago
  • 12 1
 While I am one of the first to criticize the cost of stuff in the cycling world, those FOX flexair's have been the best product I have bought. Lighter and more comfortable than most shorts, provide good protection from mud spray, look brand new after thousands of km.
  • 6 0
 No doubt. Material: fancy plastic. Main ingredient: greed.
  • 47 0
 I want pants louder than my hubs and a phone pocket big enough for my ipad.
  • 3 0
 Decathlon now do 2 different pairs of riding trousers (one “normal” one for colder conditions). Apparently they do a fine job and definitely won’t set you back $200
  • 3 0
 @jason114: and they are always not available
  • 2 1
 None of those pants are worth the money because fancy function textiles are not suitable for mtb use. I guess cold weather mtb pants are ridden in heavy mud. And either the breathability (mud clogs the pores) or the waterproofness (if you wash it) will go away quickly.
  • 4 1
 Go to Decathlon to get cheap nice waterproof pants they are $40-50 and pretty good.
  • 2 0
 @jason114: All options are out of stock mate
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Base price of 150 average these reviews?
Or, I just thought of this, maybe some cheaper options exist, and... PB WHY WONT YOU REVIEW THEM?!?!?! Y’all making TLD look like pauper pants, The Least Dinero... budget. Eek
Smile
  • 7 0
 be a denim destroyer then. easy.
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: Came here to say this. Sadly they're popular and out of stock for this very reason. However Robyn Furtado of Bikeradar put the 'Decathlon MH500 walking trousers' in her gear of the year picks so there's another potential option for just £20
  • 7 1
 @Richt2000: I don't wear trousers to stay warm just to stop everything else getting covered in sh1t, it's much easier to clean trousers than clean mud off pads/socks/legs/car seat/car floor/hall way/bathroom floor/shower etc.
  • 2 0
 @justanothermatt:
Yea fair play, my point was if you don’t like the price there are alternatives ;-)
  • 3 0
 Agreed. Surprisingly the Troy Lee are the cheapest
  • 12 3
 If they could mass produce 10 million pairs and sell them at Wal Mart because millions of people were buying and wearing them I'm sure they'd be $20. But they are specialty products for a specialty market. Is what it is.
  • 2 0
 @zombiejack33: Dude, you are from Canada! You can get hockey socks and garters at the corner store, right?
  • 3 0
 www.chainreactioncycles.com/nukeproof-blackline-trail-pants/rp-prod188278

Amazing trousers, good price (relatively speaking) but out of stock
  • 1 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: Best name I have seen for a while! hahaha
  • 3 0
 If you take the time, you can find alternatives that work great for riding pants, even if not marketed as such.
Hiking / climbing / commuting pants will work as long as they are not cotton at all, and the cut - esp. at the lower leg - is tapered enough. Sierra and SteepandCheap have all sorts of closeouts that would be candidates.
  • 1 0
 @SJP: ya eh! Throw on the o’l socks n let’r rip!
  • 1 0
 I don't get it either. BMX and motocross pants are similar construction and are half the price. But can't use either because they use a much thicker material.
  • 1 0
 These cost more than my first bike !
  • 2 0
 @jason114: $110 and sold out.. lol
  • 5 0
 @y0eddy: Hard to believe that anything on CRC's website could be out of stock.
  • 3 0
 Pro tip - Old Navy stretch tech pants are $40, fit great and are awesome for biking.
  • 4 1
 Because quality items cost $$! My $200 Roach pants (from 2002) are still in awesome shape. Sometimes it’s worth it to drop the cash!
  • 2 3
 Work harder. Give it a shot. @Shred-BC
  • 3 10
flag tacklingdummy (Jan 5, 2021 at 11:29) (Below Threshold)
 @freeinpg: I'd rather get new stuff every year (more variety) and have it be cheaper. New styles and new products keep it more interesting.
  • 1 0
 @jwdenver: link? I had a look and could only find dress pants.
  • 10 1
 @tacklingdummy: not really environmental though 1 good quality product that last 2 decades or 20 crappy products. My patagonia and arcteryx gear are still going strong 20 years later and style in "style"
  • 1 0
 @zombiejack33: That's both clever and hilarious.
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: You make a good point here, but 40's and wet, pants might be nice at that point. 50's and up shorts all the way.
  • 1 0
 the Rock Bro's stuff on amazon is not too shabby at 50% of the price.
  • 1 1
 @dv8416: I'm inclined to agree. Less black would be nice though and more than one color.
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: Seeing how the product articles on PB are always the most popular. Most PBers buy new stuff regularly. Used to work in a surf/snowboard/skate shop. I have a lot of expensive brands and still have some of that stuff now. There are comparable stuff that can last and are not crappy.
  • 3 1
 For that price you can get a full wardrope at costco for riding. All 4 seasons + 24 pairs of synthetic socks. Now they wont put you on the cover of the PB article but you can get some really decent materials for next to nothing. I go for the shorts over leggings as you can wear out the cheap shorts and pick the material/thickness on your legs to match your ride weather. Get to the car tear off the short and drive home.
  • 1 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: How has this comment not been upvoted to the stars?
  • 1 0
 @pink505: I have a Costco setup that I use all the time. Kirkland Woven jogger/pants are great riding pants. Softshell material with harder outershell that is water resistant and has a little stretch. Also, the Voyager hooded shell jacket is good. Costco doesn't have either anymore, but you can find a few on Ebay.
  • 81 0
 A request to all brands:

Please make trousers/pants available with different leg length options.

As an example, Fox size large waist (34") has a measly 80cm (31.5in) inseam, which is mental! The XXXL 40" waist still only has an 83cm inseam...

Thanks!
  • 16 0
 Right!!! I never buy mtb pants because of that. I’m a 34 inch waist and need a 35 inch inseam. All the pants on the market makes me look like I’m wearing capri pants
  • 11 0
 Yep, I am slim 6ft 2, and it is very hard to get "pants" trousers that are long enough in a medium waist size. Large usually is too baggy with a massive arse on them, and medium are usually the right proportions, but way too short in the leg. In this day and age it seems really lazy of the MTB clothing manufacturers not to offer different lengths like you can get with every day pants/trousers.
  • 3 0
 Well I would also love if they would make larger diameter for the legs. I need a size S for my waist but the legs are to short and to small in diameter. Some freaking brands like GORE, legwarmers I need 3XXL for my thighs. Because of that every freaking trousers slides down and I get my back sprayed because the gap between the jacked is to small. Also most Jackets for MTB pretend to be normal hiking jackets with their short ass flap...
  • 10 0
 I have never found trousers pants that fit tall slim guys, always end up buying hiking trousers, how hard is it to put an extra two inches of material at the bottom ?
Maybe sell ' trouser extenders ', could have some velcro on the ankle and a strip of material with velcro on that you can just stick on the bottom ?
  • 7 0
 I'm the opposite, larger waist, shorter legs. I always end up with the knee section halfway down my calf. Would be nice if they could do long, short and regular lengths
  • 10 0
 THIS! Longer inseams! More variety!
  • 5 1
 Granted I’m a bit of a beanpole (30”ish waist 37”ish inseam) but... got shorts, for the right length I got stuck with a 36” waist and enormous butt, cinched it all the way and still have to wear pants underneath for a good fit... so got pants with a slim waist, and the legs are inches too short. lol oh well. Function(ish) over form. Just gotta hope nobody references Sir Mix-a-Lot
  • 48 0
 It's taken the mtb industry 40 years to make bikes long enough for us tall people, so I wouldn't hold your breath.
  • 3 0
 @bigkev123: #commentgold
  • 4 0
 What will it take for the manufacturers to heed our calls? As a fellow tall mountain biker I think it is time we start making our own trousers with different leg length options.
  • 21 0
 Thanks @pinkbike for the pant review where you give the testers helmet size but not their inseam.
  • 4 0
 Fat people get really angry when clothes don't fit them and will let you know about it. Trust me, I used to work in ski retail. Whereas tall skinny people just find alternatives or deal with clothes that don't quite fit right. Brands know this and pander to it.

6ft4/80kg here. If I ever find biking pants that fit me well I might get some, otherwise shorts are fine to about 0 degrees C and any colder than that means it's ski season.

Ion makes a "long" version in a lot of their shorts by the way. But their Shelter pant is like an exaggerated version of a bad fit if you're tall and skinny.
  • 1 0
 @oregontradesman: Check out the Pearl Izumi pants then. I hate them because the inseam is so long I look like I'm wearing MC Hammer pants. The ION's I have are perfect length for me.
  • 1 0
 I bought some endura waterproof overtrousers in Sept ready for winter. They were the only trousers that had an extra flap of fabric that extends the leg by 2 inches which was a major selling point for me. They also had zipped pockets which is good for gels and multitools. At 6'4 I still have to weigh up whether to have saturated socks or a wet arse crack, particualrly because they appear to have a rubberised inner coating which sticks to my leggings, causing the pant legs to ride up. I hoped that buying an MTB specific coat would alleviate this, which it does, but not enough. Us tall and slim guys still can't win- temped to get a dirtlej onesie for next winter...welsh autumns and winters are slopfests at best!
  • 4 0
 Scrolled right down to the sizing chart and laughed at the inseams around 30in long or shorter.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: That is exactly what I done, scrolled for inseam numbers, if they offered one in 33-34",was of good quality and it was not 150 buck plus I would be super interested, been riding for over 20 years and still rely on hiking trousers.
  • 3 0
 My TLD sprint pants inseam makes me sound like Carrie Underwood when talking.
  • 9 0
 "You have a 34" inseam? That means you must have a 40" waist."
Seemingly the mindset of nearly every MTB apparel producer out there.

These are a great option, they're available in short, regular or long leg. Added bonus is you don't need a second mortgage to buy them either.
www.regatta.com/men-s-x-pro-prolite-stretch-multi-pocket-trousers-black
I've been riding in them this winter and they're the best fitting riding trousers I've ever owned.
  • 2 0
 @azdog: can't pull those Sprint pants up or you'll split the team up. I think its designed for those of us that like the beer a little too much and have more dad bod than racer bod.
  • 1 0
 Yes!!, I’m only a 28” waste but have a near 33” leg( yep I’m a lanky teen at the moment)
  • 3 0
 @teamdoa: try being 6 feet six inches. Suuuuuucks.
  • 4 0
 Couldn’t stress that enough. There’s plenty of demand, how difficult or more expensive is it to add extra few inches on larger size trousers. Medium Long, Large Long, XL Long etc. Bike manufacturers acknowledged that there’s a need for larger bikes, how hard is it to design longer trousers. I am 6’3” with stupidly long legs, not much luck in getting trousers that wouldn’t look like 3/4ers.
  • 2 0
 Gore pants seem from all the reviews I’ve read on retailer sites seem to be exceptionally long.
No personal experience, just did research recently.
  • 2 0
 My new Endura pants where surprisingly long enough for my legs. I usually go with a 34 waist and 36 inseam jeans.
  • 2 0
 @azdog: lol Yep I’ve got a Sprint... nice pants... but I wear my shorts over for modesty and I’m quite skinny... and they’re rated a 32” waist.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy Can you put out a PSA to pant manufacturers since they don’t read the Pinkbike comments? The first company to make pants that fit people over 6’ tall is going to make a lot of money.
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: You must do some serious legs workouts if your thighs are disproportionate to your waist.
You're so right about MTB jackets, but that extra flap does make all the difference. It's looks stupid as hell while hiking, but it's awesome while riding unless you like to moon your fellow rider and feel a light breeze on your low back and bottom.
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: Zip-on extensions perhaps? Adjustable hems? There's got a be an inexpensive way to adjust the length of pants. Surely it would be less expensive to give all pants like a 6 inch adjustable hem than to have 6 different lengths of pants to pick from across six or so waist sizes. And no just rolling up the hem for the short people is not an acceptable option.
  • 3 0
 @SuperHighBeam: Too dangerous. What if a newbie accidentally zips his extensions onto his tire?
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: The IXS are for you
  • 2 0
 This! So much this!

MTB-gear sizing is really ridiculous for tall people. With jeans I wear a 33-34W 36L and in my ~20years of biking I've never seen mtb pants that come even close to fitting. There are a lot of hiking companies putting out separate tall and short sizes, but in the world of MTB this seems to be an alien concept.

Even more ridiculous that pants (and arms on jackets for that matter) hardly get any longer on bigger sizes, but everything becomes comically wide on XL+
  • 1 0
 Long legs = Endura.

I have the MT500 II Waterproof Trousers and also just got the MT500 Burner Pant II both in size small. I've just gone and measured the inseam of the Burners and it's 32" dead. I have a 32"/33" waist and wear a 33" inseam jean normally and those Burners fit me perfectly.

I've been wearing the Burners all winter and they've been perfect for me; stretch where you'd want, don't catch, good size pockets, adjustable. Very much recommended.
  • 3 0
 @Woody25: not being rude but in what world is a 32in inseam a long leg?
  • 2 0
 @therevfryslim: I totally agree, but judging by the number of those trousers that have an inseam of less than 30 inches it seems that it's in this world! To be fair, I should of said 'Slightly longer legs = Endura", but a 32" inseam is at least a bit better than 28.5" (IXS I'm looking at you...)

At least I no longer look like I've had a growth spurt at 40+ years old and grown out of my downhill pants...!
  • 3 0
 @Woody25: to be fair I hadn't looked at the inseam lengths in the table so now I see your point. But for me where I wear jeans with a 36inch leg, the 32 is just silly, especially as the trousers have to be pulled right up in order to save the arse crack.

the perils of being tall eh!
  • 1 0
 The solution exists: Cube Edge Baggy pants from that Cube MTB brand.

I am 1,96m and 112 KG (6'5" and 245) and the XXL fit perfectly, the XXXL are too wide and maybe even a tad too long for me. Tight ankles, wide knees, light fabric, comfy fit ... and they can stand a lot of abuse at a reasonable price (99.- Euro here)

Only downside is a very limited choice of colors: midnight-blue or beige-grey - no orange, no light-blue, nothing flashy.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I have a 35" inseam and have the gore rain pants... they are still too short for me. Performance is awesome though... except my feet get soaked because the water drains off into my shoes!
  • 2 0
 Look at 7mesh. Pricey, but they have a built in system to taylor the leg length so you can buy a waist size that is correct.
  • 1 0
 @Woody25: I'm not sure I would say a 33" inseam is really all that long. This mostly the 34"+ long crowd that is complaining about options.
  • 1 0
 @oblongsquare: Aye-yai-yai $300, but you're right about the ability to tailor leg length...might be worth the added coin. Looks like a viable alternative to Endura. Looks like these 7 mesh pants have 3" of inseam length adjustment for most riders, especially the tall lanky ones this likely means a starting inseam of 35" or 36"...not bad. Unknown what the inseam is on the MT500. Anyone know? @Woody25 seems to suggest it's a mere 32"
  • 1 0
 @oblongsquare: They look really good, can't live that price though, but will now hunt for some on discoutn some where, thanks for the reccommend.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: As per my post above, the inseam on the Burner is 32" on a size *small* (measured from the crotch seam to the end of the leg). The inseam may get longer on larger sizes, you'd need to check that with Endura.
  • 37 3
 Sadly, as with any cycling "pants"/trouser review, the tester way off anything close to representing my body shape. The tester "stands 5'9" and weighs 160 lbs, with a 31 inch waist", which is probably as close to fitting the size guide as I've ever seen. So no wonder leg length was "good" in basically every case.

I'm 6'2", with a 30" waist and a 34" inside leg. Don't think I've seen a set of trousers that are even close to being long enough unless I'm ordering a 38" waist...

What are my other tall and thin brethren using? Shorts?
  • 4 0
 6’3” with 33x34 pant size here and shorts all the way. Not keen on pants that only reach mid calf...
  • 16 1
 I'd get some 38" and have them tailored. or get some 30" and sew on little frilly collars at the bottom to cover your dainty ankles
  • 7 0
 6’3.5” here, 30” waist, 37” inseam, wholeheartedly agree!
  • 5 0
 is he a 31" waist... thats stretching it a bit I think!!!
  • 6 0
 I purchased a pair of the NF pants a couple of months ago. I am 193 cm with an inseam of 89 cm. They are not bad. Good for up to a PNW shower but not a rain. Still shorter than I would prefer, but loads better than anything else I have tried. That being said, 7mesh has their Thunder Pant with an option to cut the cuff that I would love to try.
  • 1 0
 @Peskycoots: Im more or less the same dimensions as you (6'4" with 33x34 trousers size)

Ive found the Troylees work pretty well, I bought the 34"s and wear them on my hips with the Velcro waistband pulled all the way in. Dont suffer from ankle swinger syndrome, enough pocket space for iphone and car keys, relatively cool in the summer and warm/dry enough in the winter when you are warmed up.
  • 3 0
 I recently took a punt on some trousers from 'RevolutionRace' - a scandi business I believe. Anyway, they have fitted me really well, and have a decent long leg length for me (I'm 6ft, but with long legs and short body!). They're supposed to be hiking trousers, but the pockets, stretchy material etc all work really well as a riding trouser. My only gripe is that they're not at all waterproof, but that might just be the model I purchased as they have a range. Anyway, I'd really recommend them for anyone with longer legs like me, the adjustable cinched cuff is good to stop any snagging, and the fit was bang on for me. Also not crazy expensive, think mine set me back 70-80 quid.

Edit: I bought the 'Nordwand' Zip-Off's, and having just had a look there are some more waterproof options on their site as well. I bought Medium size, and have a 32/33" waist
  • 2 1
 @gary-prime: as a skinny almost 2m guy I find the idea of 7mesh really interesting, but for US$300/CA$400 you may buy some 'normal' fitting pants and go to the nex tailor (or granny or whoever) with some neoprene and get it way cheaper and with the same look (a bit like the folks of ABBA).
  • 2 0
 @DirtboxTom:
Yes man they must be excellent trousers, mostly for outdoors activities, Joe Robinet wears them, they are similar to Fjullraven!
  • 4 0
 This. With a 31" waist and 37" inseam, even going for clown pants still results in flood pants.

Do you realize how stupid clown flood pants look?
  • 4 0
 Same problem, I have 32''/36'' and never found fitting trousers. Currently I'm using running tights plus waterproof shorts.
  • 2 0
 6'3" with 30x35, I feel your pain my friend. I've settled on shorts, knee pads, and some hefty socks which keeps me feeling pretty ok most of the time. My knee pads are pretty long and stretchy so they manage to cover the majority of my leg, plus it's a bit more incentive to wear them which is always good.
  • 1 0
 I have a buddy with your issue. He pretty much just wears the pants as capris. And we all give him shit for it. Smile
  • 2 0
 I’m 6’2”, 30” waist, 34” inseam...friend gave me some loosriders pants (32” waist), and with the ratchet waistband, they fit awesome. Little bulky, but the he fit is good!!
  • 1 0
 Call em Capri pants and wear purty socks?
  • 2 0
 @samfr1000 I was really surprised when I googled "average height for men uk" (and US) and got 5' 9" as the answer. I guess manufacturers are going by that, rather than looking at the distribution curve and seeing how much money they're leaving on the table.

PS, as per my comments above, I'm 6'1" with a 1 inch shorter inseam and a similar build. The size small Endura trousers fit me well and have a lot of adjustment in the waist, they'd easily cinch to a 30" waist without making you look like a carrot.
  • 1 0
 @Woody25: looks like there might be options for me after all.

Thank you all. It's nice to know I'm not the only skinny tall mountain biker struggling.
  • 2 0
 @samfr1000: My local spot is full of gangly teens, all of whom look like they've grown out of their trousers, I don't understand how manufacturers are missing this!
  • 1 0
 @Woody25: gangly teens are not a lucrative market. Perhaps they will become a desirable demographic as they age and develop careers/make money, but at that point they’re less likely to be gangly. Not sure if investing in them at an early age will pay brand loyalty dividends later (doubtful re: apparel).
  • 2 0
 @erikkellison: I'm definitely one of those former gangly teens. I'm now considerably older than that, have progressed a career and have not grown out of the gangly bit.

So maybe the companies are late to the party like @Woody25 suggested.
  • 27 0
 and STILL no one makes any sensibly prices MTB trousers for anyone over 6 foot, it wouldn't take much to even sew a 3" elasticated sweat pants style cuff onto the base of any of these for taller riders would it as even a token effort from manufacturers. if I'm paying well over $100/£100 for an item of kit I expect it to fit.
No wonder you chose a 5 foot 9 tester!!
Plenty of road brands sell shorts/ tights in a longer leg length for taller riders, would be great to see some mtb brands step up and cater for the 50% of people above the average height on the bell curve.
  • 8 0
 Buy hiking pants. They work great and look better.

My riding pants are Eddie Bauer. $20 from Costco.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: I ride in the winter in a pair of berghaus stretch fit mountaineering trousers. Which i've sewn the top end of some arm warmers into the hem of for a tighter/longer cuff.
They're decent and probably a damn sight better than most of the mtb fashion brand race pants for trail riding, but id love to see something with a waterproof arse/lower leg for the inevitable uk winter/summer puddle splashes like some of the endura offerings have but in a decent length.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Those seem fairly baggy - do they not get caught in the crank?
  • 15 0
 The Specialized Demo pants are incredible if anyone is considering. Better than my Fox Defend in every way.
  • 4 0
 the demos are awesome! wear mine all year around. so comfy
  • 2 0
 @funkzander: I can understand why you do! I want to wear mine when not riding! Feel and look great! Lol
  • 2 0
 Love my demo pants. So darn comfy and functional both on and off the bike. I’ve even started running in them for cooler weather. I tried a bunch of the pants on listed above but as soon as tried on the demo pants I knew I was home. Plus after lots of rides in them they still are in great shape. Too bad they were not included this test as I think they would come out on top.
  • 1 0
 Can confirm Specialized Demo pants are great. They make me feel sexy, tbh. Basically Lulu Lemon for sick dudes that shred.
  • 11 1
 I’m 6’2” with 34” inseam and Travis got some NF pants for me that fit perfectly. I tried them on in-store and he told me to size down to M and offered to sew them if I wanted the waist elastic tighter etc. Great product made entirely downtown Vancouver!
  • 2 0
 Does nf have a store front or are they sold in bike stores? Would like to get some but want to try them on before I buy
  • 3 0
 @Erku: Check their website - they are on Industrial Way in East Van. Covid means you probably need to call to make an appt for a try-on.
  • 3 0
 @Erku: They used to have a display with sizes and a changing room to try things on. Give them a call and if he has anything made Travis was very welcoming and friendly last year. Our problem is that they sell out of everything as fast as they get fabric delivered and sewn so the people who just buy it (I think they are the best to ride in) end up with all the goods.
  • 1 0
 NF happened to have my size in stock for some grey pants - ordered Sunday, arrived today. Now I'm stoked for my next ride.
  • 11 2
 Would be great to make the environmental impact information as standard too — e.g. "Gear Guide: 7 of the Best New Cold Weather Riding Kits for Men" from Dec 2019. Patagonia and iXS are mentioned here and assume the rest aren't making any attempt to lessen their impact?
  • 4 0
 The article says the Giro are Bluesign certified, which is an environmental certification. I agree that it would be great to make environmental impact a standard part of these reviews.
  • 3 0
 Thanks. We will try to include that information where pertinent. It might be best that we link every article to a list of brands and their environmental impact information so we don't have to re-write it every time.
  • 4 0
 The fact that Ride NF designs and sews their clothing in house in East Van says to me they are making an impact in that regard. And we get the opportunity to buy good local goods. $200CAD is pricy for some, but having a look around the local shops, there really isn't much out there that is much cheaper. But there are options (7mesh for $400!!) that are more expensive, that ARE NOT produced locally.
  • 1 0
 @ukr77: That's one reason I bought a pair of the DP3 (and DP2's previously). When you look at the cost chart in the article, they're pretty competitive with — what I assume — are all off-shore sewn gear.

@BrambleLee I totally skimmed over that. Poked around and their site has an impact page: www.giro.com/news/ride-recycled.html which is welcome. Patagonia gets lifetime repairs too, so that softens their initial cost.
  • 1 0
 @ukr77: expensive but last three times longer than the $150/pair ones. And full-on made locally. No shipping/emissions and all that junk.
  • 10 0
 Biggest Pants I've ever seen. Would hate to see what the Trousers actually looked like!!
  • 5 2
 Lol. Oh you Brits and your funny terms for common objects. Underwear covers and American/Canadian arse and Pants cover the legs and underwear. No one this side of the pond uses the term Trousers.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: shove it in the boot of your Carrera
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: Haha. It's like a car bonnet is a hood. A hood here is something to stop your hair getting wet. A car boot Is a trunk, normally a trunk is something an elephant has. Etc lol.
  • 1 0
 Don't get me started on fanny packs.
  • 1 0
 @commental: Haha, I do love to pack a fanny!
  • 3 0
 @MattP76: bonnet = old lady hat. Boot = robust footwear. Yet somehow I still manage understand Top Gear?!
  • 7 0
 I used to ride shorts all year round then changed to trousers in the winter. Here in Scotland it’s the best way. Why are there no endura reviews here? I have the single track and the mtb500 burner pants (both around £80) and they are fantastic. Sizing is decent as well. I can’t get other brands to fit right. No idea how fox etc decide on their sizing as it’s not for your average mountain biker!
  • 4 0
 agree on the Endura trousers, light, waterproof and affordable..
  • 1 0
 Yep Endura trousers are the bomb for UK winter riding. I've got the MT500 Spray trousers and use them for about 6 months of the year. They're 6 years old now and still going strong. These are reviewed in the women's article by the way and I'm assuming they're basically the same apart from the cut.
  • 2 0
 The Endura review is in the women's piece.
  • 1 0
 100% agree on the Endura Burners...they are awesome.
  • 1 0
 I use endura for pretty much everything (just bought a madison 3 layer coat as the endura offering just couldn't match up to quality for price) and agree, it's bomb proof kit. I have 2 pairs of hummvee shorts that I've had for 15 years, still going strong.
  • 9 0
 Lol, this dudes bulge in most of these pictures.
  • 1 0
 31 inch waist ????
  • 1 0
 Needs to tighten that waist up lol
  • 2 0
 Thinking of an Aerosmith song
  • 1 0
 Made it difficult to look through these photos. Just wear some underwear to tighten up the package for the photos.
  • 2 0
 @stage-a: His bulge is what makes him walk this way, although I'm guessing you're thinking of a different one.
  • 5 0
 Funny to compare these real life pictures of the Fox Flexair compared to the official ones from Fox. You think you'll look like Loic BRUNI and when you received them you looks like 2 (very expensive) garbage bags. Since then, I bought a Nukeprook and they are so much better than Fox. No doubt.
  • 1 0
 I suspect the trousers worn by the DH pros are custom made
  • 1 0
 @korev: they are custom fitted.

If you are buying pants sized "s,m,l,xl" you should expect to take them to a tailor and get them fitted. Drop the $15 and get your $500 race kit to fit right.
  • 6 1
 The prices on these items are ridiculous, the materials will only last one big crash, putting a phone pocket on the thigh isnt wise as its generally the first bit of the body to hit the ground in at least half of all crashes. Bike industry you get a C Minus because of cost, durability and practicality.
  • 3 1
 $109-150 ain’t crazy imo. I think hood mtb shorts should be no more than $50-$65 and pants about double that.

I bought the Dakine Thrillium on sale for $136 & really love it down to 25 deg. F. Fits great. I have had issue with the fit of Fox and TLD pants before- too damn short in waist to crotch, def. giving me man-toe.
  • 8 0
 Love riding in proper DH pants in the PNW. Looks like the photos are from Goose Chase!
  • 3 0
 I had the same thoughts. Im certain thats goose chase! This is the first winter i really stick to riding as opposed to switching to ski season and as a result have been hitting tokul up a ton and i had no idea how fun it was in the deep winter months. If anything its better in the winter than in the summer lol.
  • 2 0
 @Deanosuar: I think that's the consensus. I actually skip tokul in the dry summer months, too many river bed rocks and way too dry.
  • 1 0
 This is definitely Goose Chase. I broke my scapula on this section exactly one month ago today, and I recognize those ruts and stump at the top.
  • 1 0
 I knew that was Tokul! Goose Chase is a super fun trail. I've seen this guy on the trails around here. His bike is very distinct.
  • 6 1
 I will be buying the Ride NF pants at some point but more often these days i'm running long johns and shorts from riding, running and xc skiing. With pants at some point or another you're gonna get wet and it's usually from your own sweat. Anyone can hack rain or snow while staying active for an hour or two.
  • 5 1
 Huge +1 for the NF pants. Stand behind their product, meticulously designed and built and made in Canada.
  • 1 0
 @steflund: Yeah exactly this, I bought a couple small brand handcrafted products from the US as xmas presents and never will again. The quality is great but after US exchange/customs fees/shipping and taxes it is just not worth it. I'm looking at you Kitsbow...
  • 5 0
 You can also just buy hiking pants. Or golf pants. Anything stretchy works, and you won’t look like a dingus at the bar/campfire afterwards.

Eddie Bauer. Prana. Patagonia. Lululemon. Costco. Target. Old Navy. All places you can get hiking/golf pants for as low as $20. Poly/spandex or nylon/spandex fabric mix is all you need.
  • 4 1
 No go for me. Tried it with Eddie Bauer hiking pants. Lack of tapered leg is 100% deal breaker, flopping around all loose when pedaling and getting caught in drivetrain etc.
  • 4 0
 @Nwilkes: I've done this on both my mtb specific and general purpose riding pants: install snaps at the leg holes. Allows you to cinch them so you don't flop around and open em' up to get your feet through. Works great - cheap and takes about 15min once you know how to install.
  • 2 0
 @CarlMega: killer idea! I'm always game for frugal functionality. Do you ride with knee pads under them too? I found the extra room for knee pads on my Specialized pants make them much more comfortable and easier to pedal in. Lastly, do the butt pockets on your hiking pants cause hot spots on your ass? I struggled to find ones with minimal stitching and seams.
  • 2 0
 @Nwilkes: Thanks. So I've done it on 2 pairs - Kuhl Klash & a pair of club ride mtb pants. This is winter riding gear for me so no knee pads. Seams on those pants are not issues. FWIW - the small size snaps work great - larger ones tend to rattle.
  • 1 0
 @CarlMega: I don't quite get how you do that, could you explain in a bit more detail? Sounds like a good idea to achieve a tight cuff
  • 2 0
 @Kickaxe: I'll try. Basically you are making it so you can cinch the pant leg at the cuff. So you'd have the female of the snap about 2-3'' away from the male end. When you snap them together your cuff is 2-3'' smaller and thus doesn't flap around. Note: the part that connect/snap together are facing out.

If you are unfamilar, sewing snap kits don't need to be sewn in... they can press thru the fabric. Very easy to install once you know how - tho those kits that have the little tool included are helpful.

If you get stuck, DM me here and I'll get you a picture and you'll grok it 100% instantly.
  • 1 0
 @CarlMega: Hi, perfect, thanks! That both parts are outside is the part I hadn’t understood yet, but now it clicked. Thanks a lot for your explanation! Smile
  • 4 0
 Nice review, good detail, just a shame there's only 1 actually waterproof pair here. I'm only gonna switch to...ahem.."pants" when I want to spend 2 hours+ in the slop. DWR is pretty pointless in those situations.

PS latest thinking in green circles is that recycling plastic bottles into fabric is dumb - you're taking a food grade, mono material, you're turning it into lots of tiny strands, which are then mixed with dyes etc. And then every time you wash them, you release 1000s of microplastics into the water cycle.

FYI
  • 2 2
 Ride NF offers the BERZERKER V2 pant which is more or less the same but waterproof.
  • 2 0
 That’s why I use a septic field. It goes into my lawn which has turned itself into fake grass. Win/win!
  • 4 0
 Bet its essentially impossible to find any of these other than a size 28 or 40. For some reason every company seems to make riding pants 3 at a time and they all sell out in a week and they never come back in stock. Thats not just a covid thing, thats an every year thing. You'd figure they could look at sales and go..."we should probably make some more".
  • 9 1
 No endura?
  • 1 0
 Because they gone one step smarter and make a complete suit?
  • 2 1
 @number-6: *onsie
  • 4 0
 Got the Endura MT500 burner pant this year, bloody marvelous and 80 squid - no brainer looking at these
  • 1 0
 @number-6: Dunno if that is smarter because I had some suits and all of them are to hot and dont fit my back.
  • 3 0
 See the women's review for Endura.
  • 1 0
 @tomo12377: me too, awesome mtb pants
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: didn’t see any women’s review of endura pant in that post
  • 1 0
 Gore bike wear is also very good. Their windstopper pants are excellent.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: +1 for Endura. I have their Singletrack pants.
  • 1 0
 @dagzin: this is positive I’ve just ordered a pair
  • 2 0
 @Ooofff: I love em they not baggy like your from the stone roses and they not tight like your from the ramones, they stretch in all the right places, don’t fall down. And can still put knee pads under
  • 1 0
 Its in the women's piece.
  • 1 0
 Their Singletrack pants are phenomenal. No stupidly large and flashy branding, warm and weather resistant, and they do not cost insane money. $270 for a pair of pants? What the hell
  • 1 0
 @dagzin: sound brilliant I ripped 2 pairs of fox defend Kevlar across the bum and have got a refund and saw the endures had a reinforced seat panel
  • 1 0
 @number-6: I tried one on and it felt like someone was giving me a wedgie, I guess my torso is too long...
  • 2 0
 I'm on the Endura train; the size small have a 32" inseam that fits my 32" waist and 33" leg perfectly.
  • 2 0
 Endura just sounds like an Alabama red neck trying to say "Enduro"
  • 3 0
 Anyone got recommendations for pants or shorts that fit bigger thighs? I’m no body builder by any means but I try not to skip leg day, so both pants or shorts tend to be either too wide at the hips or too tight at the legs.
  • 1 0
 Same issue here, nothing fits. Bought the tsg pants a size too large and brought them to a tailor. Same issue with knee pads, only the Alpine Stars fit me.
Anybody having some recommendation?
  • 1 0
 I find my Fox Flexair pants have roomy thighs but the Defend pants do not. And if you are between sizes, I'd suggest going up a size. I usually wear 32 waist jeans but wear 34 for Fox pants and shorts. If I could only have one pair, I would choose Flexair. More versatile, super light, room for pads and strong thighs, and very comfortable all around. But FYI the Flexair shorts are less roomy around the thighs. Totally different fit.
  • 2 0
 specialized demo pants work well for me, I have the 34 waist model and have 26in thighs
  • 1 0
 Agreed. XC racer here. MTB shorts and pants should fit 'athletes' bodies, not the average body. We have smaller waists and bigger butts, thighs and calves. I have taken to buying shorts and doubling-over the waistband and sewing it. And velcro tabs that cinch the waist in are still not enough. The fit for the waist is important so that your duds don't hang too low and snag on the seat, and that only ever happens mid-body-English when you need it not to snag.
  • 6 0
 Try Handup pants, $50, and they look like regular pants. My wife and I both have a pair and wear them on and off the bike.
  • 4 0
 Was going to comment about the AT pants, Combo that with a baselayer and you're all set.
  • 5 0
 You can get Handup pants, wind breaker, jersey, and gloves for the price of 1 pare of these pants. I've never understood why most MTB pants are so expensive, even when compared to ski/snowboard pants. I couldn't justify the price tag until I found the HandUps.
  • 4 0
 Second the Handup pants. They are perfect trail pants and every day wear. It felt like I had discovered buried treasure when I copped these for $50. $170 for a pair of mtb pants is highway robbery... but if you got the $$ go for it...
  • 1 0
 I’m going to throw in I picked up some stretchy pants from Marshall’s today for under 20 bucks. Perry Ellis dress pants which look exactly like the HandUps.
  • 3 0
 I'll take a cheap pair of stretchy tights, yoga pants, or long underwear under my riding shorts and kneepads every day of the week. I can layer with a second pair if it's below freezing or pouring rain. And then I'll throw them in the laundry and not worry about any fancy DWR or anything else. Or leg warmers. The Roadies already figured this out guys. and warn under your enduro-bro shorts and pads, they're better.
  • 3 0
 I purchased the NF berzerker last year. I liked them so much I bought the DP3 this year. Yes you have to preorder and / or provide email for product notification. Also, buy them the moment they are available as they sell out quickly. If you know, you know. Made in Canada, by a small independant company. Excellent fit for my frame and the most comfortable wasit of any short / pant I have ever purchased. Price is fair given the scale of the manufacturing process that results in the impecable fit and finish. Still cheaper than 7 mesh and all their stuff is made off shore. $.02.
  • 3 0
 The quality of all the NF products are second to none. The DP3 is their regular pant, the Berzerker is the cold weather rain pant. The biggest problem usually is getting your hands on them as they sell out regularly. Plus they are designed and made in Vancouver, a place that knows a thing or two about rain. By local if you can.
  • 3 0
 the flexairs are very good and light for chilly days.. not super waterproof as stated.. people would miss a lot if they dont get TLD sprint and a few endura options, which are very good...
  • 5 0
 Was hoping the specialized pants would be here. No surprise the Fox did well. Got me interested in a couple options. Thanks.
  • 3 0
 I have tried a few.. My Demo pants are the ones I always reach for given the choice.
  • 2 0
 My new Spesh Demo Pro pants are amazing. Highly recommend and $30 or so cheaper than most
  • 1 0
 If I had to venture a guess it's because there's nothing "New" about the Demo pants.
I don't think they've changed them substantially in several years.
Different colors and logo sizes/locations is about all I've seen.
And Yes, they're great riding pants.
  • 1 0
 They were all out of stock in the size we needed. We tried to include them.
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan: Did you try the "Find Nearby" Button?

A lot of times you can find an LBS with on-line shopping that has things that the main Specialized website says they're out of. Just pick your size, hit the button and put in your Zip Code.
  • 2 0
 Leatt pants wear through very quickly, as in after maybe 8-10 rides they're already fraying.

In the UK, you can pick up mtb trousers from decathlon for £40 and they're as good as anything unless you start spending mega money
  • 9 0
 Surely the main advantage of Leatt pants is that you look like a power ranger?
  • 1 0
 Decathlon is the best!
  • 1 0
 Thanks for mentioning that. I bought a Leatt jersey that lasted maybe 4 rides before they started fraying. It's unbelievable how they can get away with making such garbage.
  • 4 1
 Article should have been called "ridden and rated: ways to carry your phone while riding". How many times does this guy stop trailside to check Instagram and TikTok? Leave it in the car… or don't, I don't care.
  • 1 0
 I don't know about you, but I always bring my phone for two essential reasons: safety and Trailforks. Maybe I should see what this TikTok is and make a clip about it... ;-)
  • 4 0
 Specialized demo pro pant. I am not at all a fan of Specialized, but these pants are the awesome. Just the best long pants I've ever had.
  • 2 0
 Been running these for a few months now.. www.target.com/p/men-39-s-golf-pants-all-in-motion-8482-navy-32x30/-/A-77287284

Could get 3 pairs in different colors for the price of one of these minus the tld...these also fit over full size knee pads and can also be worn before or after the riding as casuals. Not to knock the actual riding pants but geez hefty price for logos all over...
  • 1 0
 www.walmart.com/ip/Wrangler-Men-s-Outdoor-Zip-Cargo-Pant/524034067
awesome pants, can usually get in store for less than $25
  • 1 0
 @slimjimtim: are these stretchy? Do they come in tapered fit? You have me interested
  • 2 0
 Might not be on top of the pile of lust-worthy mtb gear, but- Uniqlo Dry-Ex Ultra Joggers and Active Pants are pretty damn amazing pants to mountain bike in, esp. w/ the cost at $40 USD.

Their activewear t-shirts are great jerseys too for $20.
  • 2 0
 Pearl Izumi AmFib pants, with zip off lowers. Great from high 20's F to mid 50's and then pull the legs off when it gets too hot. Wouldn't like to ride in them when it gets really warm though, they are heavy duty too, taken a good beating so far! Pearl's end of year sale saved $70 and they have been great for a typical wet PA winter to date.
  • 4 0
 PB: review some non-MTB pants (trousers) that are $75 and tell us which ones work best for MTB. That would be a popular article !!
  • 2 0
 686 everywhere pant
  • 1 0
 Yes please! Maybe that will open up some options for under $150 and that you can actually buy!
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: I've been wearing the 686 Everywhere and Anything pants on rides since the temps started dropping. They do pretty well! I don't ever feel like I'm overheating or muggy riding in 50-70deg temps. Another pants I really like and comfortably wore in 80-85deg dry heat was the Kuhl Deceptr. The best part about all these pants were the deep and normal zippered pockets to carry keys and phone. I hate those weird reverse angled ones on MTB shorts, especially off the bike.
  • 2 0
 Race Face Ruxtons and the new Fox defends are the best things that I’ve added to my kit in at least ten years of riding on the BC coast. Warm,dry, clean pads and ass when I’m done. I won’t pull out my shorts again till late spring.
  • 4 2
 Troy Lee Designs once again show that they are the master of ugly design. You would expect them to go wrong just one time, and accidentally make something that doesn’t look horrendous. But no, they know the secrets behind making something ugly.
  • 2 0
 I think some of these bike clothing companies are trying to re-invent mountain bike clothing and thinking that every single rider will wear clipless pedal shoes with these pants. The thought of wearing platform shoes with these pants ... I can't see the image matching up. The other problem is the materials used and how they are designed makes them look like the British word "trousers" - the stuff you wear in bed! The XC ski industry has been around for so long and their clothing are made for active movements in cold weather. These companies that make bike clothing should've learned from existing active sports industry and fine tune the knee and the calf areas for abrasion resistance rather than to re-invent a pair of "trousers" and charging ridiculous money that no one wants to pay for ridiculous looking fashion.
  • 2 0
 Found some really loud and ugly (IMO) Fly Racing mtb pants on Jenson for like $45 back in the fall. They're hella ugly which is probably why they actually had a 32 in stock on clearance. About $5 for synthetic RIT dye and an evening boiling the pants, you'd never know about all the neon logos and crap. I've found that I prefer riding in pants unless it's ridiculously hot out.
  • 1 0
 Got the same ones for Christmas, under 50 and they seem super tough. Warm enough so far (25F), they fit well, and the loud colors help find them in the laundry bin Smile
  • 1 0
 @chacou How did they turn out after dyeing? Are they just straight black now and look decent? I'd like to buy them and do them same.
  • 2 0
 @LaXcarp: Here's a photo, www.pinkbike.com/photo/19989114 they are far from all black now, but they are so much better than they were in my opinion. I haven't washed them with detergent, but just rinse them out in the shower and then hang/drip dry when needed, since I'm wary of the dye bleeding or fading more.
I started with these www.jensonusa.com/Fly-Racing-Kinetic-Noiz-Pants-2019 and then picked up a bottle of RIT synthetic fiber dye in "graphite" www.joann.com/rit-7-fl.-oz-dyemore-synthetic-fiber-dye/zprd_14669410a.html?dwvar_zprd__14669410a_variationAttribute=14669493&quantity=1, at the end of the day it all cost just over $50 w/ shipping, taxes, etc.
Follow the instructions on the RIT dye and to get them darker you soak them in the hot water/dye longer. I only did about 30-45 minutes, so I could've gone longer and gotten them darker, probably could just leave them in the water overnight as it cooled, since you do have to basically boil them (my kids thought it was hilarious that I was boiling my pants). I might pick up another bottle and run them through the process again to get them darker but they're so much better now than when they were new and extremely obnoxious and loud.
  • 1 0
 @chacou: Thanks for the detailed response. I'm gonna snag a pair and give it a shot. I like the look of yours
  • 2 0
 I've got the Giro pants—the cut is good, and they're mostly comfy though the waist does tend to sag out over the course of a day on the bike, and as the article notes, the phone pocket sucks. It's a really bad design.

I also picked up a pair of the NF DP3, and they're mind-blowingly good. They fit perfect, breathe great, are comfy as could be.

Those Patagonia pants didn't hold up for Cam MacRae over at NSMB. He blew out a butt seam, says the patterning could use some work.
  • 2 0
 I think the Patagonia pants are my favorite piece of cool weather gear. On longer all day misery big dumb rides or short crap weather shuttles. Plus they are packable so you can always bring them if it looks like snow up high. I'm 6'2 205lbs and wear a large with POC kneepads. About the best fitting thing I own. I live in a place with 4 season riding and these are just a good investment.
  • 2 0
 I love my Club Ride Gold Rush and Fat Jack pants. Comfortable, durable, and they don't make me look like I'm a wanna-be DH racer. I've ridden in the rain and snow in these. The Gold Rush pants have a nice casual look to them too... and only $100.
  • 2 0
 @nkrohan Perhaps it would be helpful to the industry to compile some surveys about preferred features and size ranges for various types of clothing. Pinkbikers seem to be plenty willing to complete MTB related surveys. About some that not brand oriented but rather feature oriented. Then we'll learn what people actually care about. Same likely holds true for bicycle components.
  • 1 0
 Not going to lie: I would love to have some of these and might spring for some in the future. That being said: with the popularity of lukulemon active pants, lots of large manufacturers have started imitating them for a fraction of the cost. We picked up a serviceable pair at H&M for like 25 bucks recently that my kid wears. And if he crashes and rips a hole in them (which does happen with even expensive “well-constructed” brands) we aren’t out a bundle.
  • 1 0
 Yes! Target and Old Navy have pants now that are just like Lulu ABC.
  • 1 0
 Flexair > all the above. Lightest in class with one of the lowest price points. I’ve worn them in 5°F, rain, snow, mud etc. they don’t move they don’t rip, they break the wind they’re sort of water resistant, pockets large enough for whatever. Can’t be beat in the price range, not an opinion.
  • 1 0
 Went through the song and dance of comparing "mtb pants" last year. Ended up going to a local outlet (Underarmor) and bought a pair of synthetic joggers for $15 dollars. No fancy tech, but they're my favorite riding pants hands down, and with an elastic waste they fit far better than any of these options (I'm 6'1" with a 30" waste...).

Save your money.
  • 1 0
 My 2018 Endura trousers are still going strong but the DWR is as good as useless in the wet and slop of the UK (9 months of the year), and they were made here for here! I don't hold up much hope for any other DWR graced trousers here, but this article was well timed considering 2020 has left my Endura's feeling a little snug! Those TLD Skylines look pretty good, not to mention the cheapest of the lot and the if the waist runs big then that's perfect for 2021 me haha
  • 2 0
 now if only some of these pants were available. ive been trying to get myself pants mainly fox or rideNF for a few months now from my LBS and online sources and none have been available in my size for over 3 months
  • 1 0
 Look at registering on their site to be notified of stock availability.
  • 1 0
 When I registered for the email notification when they were out of stock, the wait was about a week and a half.
  • 1 0
 "The Giro Havoc pant is pointed at the rider who plans to race and ride in cold temps and variable conditions." And is full of holes Big Grin

So hard to find a decent mtb pants that fits bigger rider with knee pads, are durable, has belt loops. Those ratchet, velcro, stickkers and all are no good for waist adjust I WANT BELT.
  • 1 0
 So the only 100% waterproof pant is the Patagonias at $270 USD - And they don't breathe?
I think for that I'll stick to $50 goretex rainpants I can throw on over my shorts, but it's kind of a bummer there isn't a better solution than that.
  • 2 0
 Try endura mt500 waterproof.
  • 2 0
 I've got a pair of the Patagonia pants and find they breathe really well to be fair. Plus they hold up in the nasty UK winter taking on everything from rain to snow. Pricey, but been worth it for me so far!
  • 2 0
 @awb3: That's good to hear - If they hold up to a UK winter I'd trust them for Kamloops! Maybe I'll have to check them out after all.. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 Yeah, $50 goretex will do the job, but $220 will buy you a lot of self-righteousness.
  • 1 0
 Fly Kinetic Bike ('21), 34, inseam approximately 32", 82 cm, weight approximately 540 g (though I wouldn't bet the farm on this scale's accuracy). Fit is yoga pant slim. Moto pant seat and thigh panels, stretchy everywhere else. $110 USD
  • 1 0
 Great review. thank you! I think my fox flexair pants might have been the envy of last year's transcascadia. I love riding in pants and last year's weather was so brutal for this SoCal, fair-weathered wimp. see you at TC in sept. keep those well-written reviews coming
  • 1 0
 @Vulhelm I believe Bill Burr does a segment of stand up comedy on that... I recommend checking it out.

Also, am I the only one that avoids riding with tools/valuables in my pockets? Riding in the wet/snow = inevitable wreck at some point. I don't need a massive contusion from a multi tool in my pocket or buying a new phone from landing on it.
  • 1 0
 My waist size is somewhere between M and L, but my inseam would be between XL and XXL. So basically I'm a freaking asparagus... Anyway, this does always yield the problem that there is basically no pair of pants that fit me. Does anyone have any recommendation?!
  • 1 0
 Nice to see MTB tax added to clothing, yet i can go to primark and get a pair of trousers for £15. Seriously, anything over £100 for trousers and your seriously getting ripped off. My riding shorts cost me £30 and it's not exactly much more material to make them into trousers.
  • 1 0
 MTB specific pants ? ??? LOL .???????????? i ride in shorts when it's hot and a pair of old causal chino pants with cuffs when it's cool.
For fk sake people stop being so gullible . put on any thing that is comfortable and RIDE.
  • 1 0
 Once they start stocking again Decathlon have winter and summer mountain biking trousers for 35-45 bob which don't look half bad. Quality wise they're no fucking doubt on par with the shite Fox are putting out for 4x the price!
  • 1 0
 I'm tall and have a pair of the 7Mesh Thunder Pants, so I'll pipe up...

6'4" / 235 lbs and I wear a 34 x 36" pant, but I'm probably closer to a 35" inseam. These pants work well, but the fit is messed up.

According to their size chart, I should be a L waist, but I had to go to an XL in order to fit my quads. (Which are bigger than normal, but not THAT big.) As a result, I have to cinch the waist in as far as possible, and I look like I'm wearing a full diaper when I'm not on the bike. Waist adjustments and pulling the pants up - because there are no belt loops - is pretty common during a ride. I'm thinking about going to a tailor and having them add belt loops...

I'd love a waterproof pant that didn't necessitate compromises!!!!
  • 2 0
 Should have added Dharco's gravity pants to this lineup. They're super comfy, and some of the best customer service I've found.
  • 2 0
 Finally...the grouptest I've been waiting for...just a few days too late - I ordered a pair of Royal Race Pants a few days ago! Hoping they're good!?!
  • 2 0
 The Royal Race pants are amazing, strange they aren't on this group test. I was wearing them early september and not too warm, yet keep alot of water out on the minging days. Super comfy and nice big pockets for todays massive phones and room for a cereal bar and multitool. - there you go, a review!
  • 3 1
 I have the ENEFF (NF) DP3, the NF are the single most comfortable and best constructed bike pants i've ever put on my body. I don't care they don't have a zipper fly.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I saw a con saying you need to remove the waist pack, but the pants are so comfortable and stretchy, you could easily pull them down leaving the pack on and resume riding right after. I would lounge in these pants.
  • 3 0
 Spandex, if it' good enough for 90% of overweight women it can't be wrong...
  • 2 0
 I have tried a few different pants and NF is hands down the best. Pricey you bet but you get what you pay for. Fit is spot on, breathes well and comfortable.
  • 2 0
 Question, are any of these pants actually in stock? Riding pants maybe the only thing harder to find than bike/parts right now.
  • 1 0
 I don't see how any of these fancy pants are better than the old shorts with thermal leg warmers option. But I guess the mtb industry has to reinvent the wheel and still has people averted to skin tight clothing.
  • 2 0
 None of these pants are tight enough. I need everyone to see my quad definition so that I can flex on them at the trail head.
  • 4 1
 Why is there no picture for the Troy Lee pants? Would be good to see what they look like...
Oh wait there camouflage my bad.
  • 2 0
 "Hand pockets are too small for hands". What kind of con is this? Im sure the pockets werent designed with hand storage in mind
  • 1 0
 Pocket pool obstruction...
  • 2 0
 Almost NONE of these are in stock and some don't even show to ever have existed on the website. What's the point of articles like this? Can't buy until winter of 21.
  • 2 0
 I rarely feel the need to ride in pants, but in the heart of winter here in AR I use some Adidas soccer/training pants. They work pretty beautifully and we're less than $40.
  • 1 0
 My pair of Fox Ranger pants just showed up (after 3 months!) and I love them. All the mud goes on the pant instead of on you and your kneepads. Much better than shorts for wet conditions.
  • 1 0
 The pants I find me using the most are the ones I have from Puls Wear! Also a bit cheaper than the others and you can customise them the way you wantSmile
  • 4 0
 i love pants
  • 3 0
 Good to know because we'd rather not be subjected to you in lycra or kilts. :-)
  • 3 0
 Shoulda thrown a set of Op Shop denim jeans in for a comparison....
  • 1 0
 The nukeproof enduro pant is great. Subtle (nukeproof in shock subtle branding) stylish and comfy as hell.
And also not scandalously priced.
  • 2 0
 The question is, are they available anywhere? Trousers are soldout everywhere
  • 2 0
 they reviewed products that don't even exist anymore. thanks for that
  • 1 0
 We still have some in stock!
  • 4 1
 More first world problems on pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 I bought the 45€ decathlon rockrider AM pants! Great value for the money, light, elastic material at the knee zone and great fit.
  • 1 0
 I was looking at these too.
Are they sturdy enough for harder riding?
I don't want to buy new pants every time I crash
  • 2 0
 @bashhard: I only used them last weekend so I can't tell much about durability. The material around the knee area is elastic and seems to be stronger then the rest of the pants. This should be enough to prevent damage.
  • 3 1
 No Specialized? Don't like admitting but their pants are easily top of the pile.
  • 7 1
 NF DP3 are superior in fit and quality.
  • 3 1
 @Simann: While I have not tried many other pants other than moto style, the NF pants that I have are amazing.
  • 5 1
 @Grundlepunch: Agreed NF is amazing. I have tried a few others and not going back.
  • 3 1
 Another vote for NF DP3 pants. The NF elastic waist band makes them the most comfortable pants and shorts I’ve worn.
  • 2 0
 @Simann: interesting! I'll try a pair thanks for tipping me off.
  • 3 0
 Swear all of these are built for twigs.
  • 2 0
 Can we get some lower cost pants included in these reviews, to see how they compare with the top brands?
  • 3 0
 Is a pair of riding pants under $100 too much to ask???
  • 3 0
 Same old shorts, but with leg warmers. versatile, low cost...
  • 1 0
 Can someone please point me in a direction for a company that makes riding gear for taller riders? I have a 36 inseam... does any one atleast make a 34?
  • 1 0
 My buddy is a bit over 6 foot and wears the FOX pants. Depends on your waste size how hard it is to find a longer inseam.
  • 2 0
 @onemanarmy: I'm 6'5 and all legs. Most companies don't make different inseams sizes just change waist. thats the easy part. the pants end up ending in the middle of my shins.
  • 1 0
 I love my job, but I would be willing to test stuff for normal 5'10" 200 pounders. It feels like the average PB consumer is about 2 PB reviewers in size.
  • 3 1
 Riding pants are the best. I don't wear shorts anymore. Even in summer. But not sure why they are so pricey.
  • 3 0
 Thanks for all the information Jameson. Well written article.
  • 1 0
 Funny how few of these are actually available. Dakine doesn't even list theirs on their site anymore, and most of the others have been out of stock for months. Oh well....
  • 2 0
 We are out of stock on most bike items right now, but will have the Thrillium pants and everything else on the site this April.
  • 1 0
 @dakine: awesome! Well I guess I can look forward to getting some for next winter.
  • 2 0
 just so you know, I noticed a typo in the fox flexair - "Sizes: Waist 28-28 in 2" increments. (Tested 32")"
  • 4 0
 Jeans
  • 1 0
 @J-Gordon
Denim Destroyer
  • 3 0
 Looking for: "Does the bum-mud-stain wash out test"
  • 1 0
 cant up vote this enough.
  • 1 1
 All of these pants scream . Look at me I'm a mountain biker. No wonder I use hiking pants. Same features as these with out looking like a freak vising the pub after a ride. Great that PB is presenting plenty of options.
  • 2 0
 Prana zoggers for $50 on ebay... merino wool tights underneath when it’s really cold. works for me.
  • 1 0
 No love for the Specialized Demo pant? Its a great trail pant and really ticks a lot of the boxes that the tester liked here!
  • 1 0
 I gotta wonder...... if the DNR had let us name the trail “MINOR THREAT” would all the Dakine stuff have a bad ass punk inspired graphic????
  • 3 0
 AlpineStar..
  • 2 1
 For the Scottish cold and wet I have been absolutely loving my Endura MTR. No more soaking wet arse after 15 mins.
  • 2 1
 No 7Mesh Tunderpant? Yeah they're hella expensive but my god do they work! I've pretty much lived in mine since I got them!
  • 2 1
 id have to sell my house for a pair of them so I too would live in them if I owned them
  • 2 0
 I love mine, too. Aside from the sound its barely even noticeable that you're wearing pants, in a good way...
  • 1 0
 I suggest to add another line on the characteristics list of all the reviews: made in...
  • 2 0
 Then you can expect local production, if you live in Vietnam!
  • 1 0
 @Clem-mk: Exactly! It's a tricky question and se should have that information to make purchaising decisions
  • 2 0
 Still, except for IXS, none of those companies make pants for tall people.
  • 1 0
 IXS are a superior brand in quality, fit and their brand ethos. Shame they are not US based or they'd be far more recognized.
  • 1 1
 do we need to know the weight of pants? Soon I will have to deduct my morning dump from my breakfast...in order to calculate my riding weight
  • 4 0
 It’s useful information. It helps you determine quite a bit about a pant.
  • 1 0
 the price is just too high. Lot of cheapier solutions. 240 USD for riding pants ...
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the review Jameson!
  • 2 0
 Just go to Walmart and buy the 25 $ Levi 'all weather pants"
  • 2 0
 Any options for the non-millionaire minority among the riders?
  • 2 0
 Missed out the best, nukeproof blackline trailpants
  • 3 0
 what abour pearl izumi?
  • 2 0
 We reviewed their new pants the women's piece. Had to spread out the brands to cover a wider variety.
  • 1 0
 Curious about those as well
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: i own a pair and they are great fitting. the ankles are cuffed so they stop right about the ankle. tons of pocket room, i end up having to carry my friends stuff on rides due to them having very little room
  • 1 5
flag fullendurbro (Jan 5, 2021 at 11:23) (Below Threshold)
 Pearl is for road riders. Yuck.
  • 3 0
 @fullendurbro: not completely ther MTB pants are perfect!
  • 2 2
 @Luca-Ernst: Nope. As an endurbro I can only wear Fox, Troy Lee, or 100%. Anything else is for dudes who are way slower than me.
  • 1 0
 They all look baggy. Fox especially have that horse jockey fit. Guessing most racers get tailored
  • 1 0
 Don't know if they change something in their sizing but my 32 ranger pants from past year is baggy ass and I close fully the buckle, so I bought a defender size 30 recently and it's skinny fitting for ass and nuts, I put 2 clicks on the buckle and down a lit bit the zipper... I need a 31 fox!
  • 1 0
 Endura singletrack is absolutely hard to beat on quality! Mine still going strong after 7 winters in UK.
  • 2 0
 No Levi’s or Wranglers? These aren’t for people hucking it big.
  • 1 0
 The least you could have done was to include some pictures of the ACTUAL pants for the TLD pants. Jeez.
  • 3 0
 No ENDURA Pants?
  • 1 0
 I only ride in Hoch Swartzwald Super Mega Hosen . made from ground up Tannenbaum . Only 467€ . free delivery .
Buy now before the tax goes back up to 19%.
  • 1 0
 Thrillium... I just want to wear them for the awesome name, Thrillium, Thrillium. Ya, that's right, got my Thrilliums on.
  • 2 4
 Ok so here's my assessment...

Lumped together as all together too boring to be of any interest: Dakine, NF, Fox, Giro, and POC

Ion- this is an awesome choice, but only in "green" which honestly its blue
IXS- good, but graphics are too loud
Leatt- too aggressive and equipped with worthless pockets. Good only for maybe a DH racer.
Patagonia- lacks good pocket utility, and way to expensive (living up to its pseudonym PataGucci)
TLD- nice design but hideous colors. Show me a solid other than black and I'd be interested. Or black with some subtle colored accents.
100%- These are awesome pants, but the graphic branding is a bit loud and by golly what a stupid brand name.

Best of the bunch is a toss up between ION and 100%

None of them have a long enough inseam though for most over 5'10" or so. I usually wear 34" inseam at 6'2".
  • 2 0
 200 usd for pants. I might as well ride without pants
  • 2 0
 Goose Chase, great trail ????
  • 1 0
 Those Fox pants are garbage. They shred (literally) if you look at them funny. Can't trust a review that isn't honest.
  • 1 0
 You mean to tell me these pants are better than the $20 Eddie Bauer Tech pants I can get from Costco for $25?
  • 1 0
 there's a sucker born every minute .
  • 2 0
 James, great write up, love the photos! Keep on shredding!!!! Ed
  • 1 0
 Thanks Ed!
  • 1 0
 What no generic tracky b's?
  • 1 0
 Noisy material while pedaling. Wow.
  • 2 0
 If your bike creaks it drives you crazy I’m sure, wouldn’t want to listen to my fat thighs chaffing the whole ride reminding me of my undesirable physique.
  • 1 0
 That's the world we live in unfortunately
  • 1 0
 Good review for me: 160, 31” waist. Smile Many thanks for the review.
  • 1 1
 aaaaaargh! they're TROUSERS! (sorry, had to vent that, just ignore me and move on).
  • 1 0
 This article is just pants.
Rolleyes
  • 1 0
 Yeah but are any of these in stock anywhere? I can’t find any
  • 1 0
 Most common pant on the shore is Raceface.
  • 1 0
 not anymore... NF seems to be the dominant pant now.
  • 2 0
 Madison Zenith
  • 2 1
 Is that a mushroom in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?
  • 1 0
 What's the advice for my 32in waist and 37in length? Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Probably a 31 36 or a 30 36. So im usually a 31 or 32 in jeans and for my mtb pants i went down to a 3O. they are not as thick, there for the need for smaller pants. for paints, i would get a length a little shorter because on mountain pants, they are usually a little more cuffed on the bottom. therefore, if you get them the same size as your length they will be a little baggy down at the ankles and floppy around the leg. You don't want your pedals getting caught on a 150$ pair pf pants. Hope that helps
  • 1 0
 @Luca-Ernst: My point is these brands don't offer 36 length so what's the next best option for wet weather pants?
  • 1 0
 @Billjohn6: fox should have them. i just looked
  • 1 0
 @Luca-Ernst: The size 32 waist are rated for people 5'8'' - 5/10''... I am 6'4''. Not sure what you are referring to for a good Fox pants fit.
  • 1 0
 im saying the lengths arent in intervals depending on height. its not like W31 l32, W32 L33, they have long lengths for smaller widths. plus i just put out a size 32 because u said u were looking for 32 waist
  • 1 0
 Struggling with this as he has no legs in the second last one
  • 1 0
 Nice test and stuff but where were the Troy Lee pants?
  • 1 0
 Absent, just like they are from the TLD website. Shorts only under Men’s Bike.
  • 1 0
 Are there any good options out there for tall dudes? 6'3 here
  • 1 0
 look into fox. and hight doesntdetermine pant length. its the measurment of the waist down. if i was 6"3 i could have a long upper body, short legs, or a short upper body, long leges. hope that helps
  • 2 0
 I am 6'3" with a 34" waist and the size L Thrillium pants fit me well
  • 1 0
 So many comments about Jameson's chestnuts...!
  • 1 0
 Convertible/zip off riding pants anyone?
  • 1 0
 No Arc'teryx pants for the Yeti crowd?
  • 1 0
 Useless test. The test rider needs to be at least 6' with 34" inseam.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, i thought this was a Mens pants group test?
  • 1 0
 Yeah it's really hard to tell if the tester has a favorite...
  • 1 0
 any aussies here repping Reckless race concepts? how do they go?
  • 1 1
 The comments here, surpassed Sam's "trolley" !
  • 1 1
 Edit : +2 from me !
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