10 Men's Kits Tested - 2019 Summer Gear Guide

May 29, 2019 at 15:34
by Nikki Rohan  



Spring is a magical time of year: everything turns a stunning shade of green, trails start to have that perfect blend of tack with minimal mud, the Rainier/PBR/Modelo/Molson/etc... starts to actually taste refreshing instead of chilling your core, and you discover last season's kit in a moldy heap under the seat of your car. Most of us would probably be fine riding in a simple tech-tee and a pair of gym shorts, but a nice mountain bike specific kit can make a huge difference in allowing freedom of motion, minimizing flapping/snagging from extra materials, and keeping you cool and dry. Not to mention the extra bit of zip that looking sharp in a well-fitted kit adds.

This spring Nikki and I have gotten the chance to test some stellar new mountain biking kits from ten different brands. There are lots of new features out there including an MTB specific girdle (skip straight to POC for that!), grip shaped zipper pulls, performance "jort"-wear, and many more. What better time to ditch last year's threadbare, soggy mess and upgrade to something shiny and new for the summer?

Sizing from each brand has been all over the map: I had to size up to large on some brand's tight-fitting bunhuggers and size down to small on other brand's baggy numbers. Your best bet is to go try these kits on and buy them from your local shop, as the size charts don't always line up with the final fit. But read on for details on some of the sleek new options available this year.



About The Tester:

Pierce Martin is 5'11" tall, has a 31-inch waist, and weighs 160-lbs on a low beer week. Usually, he is right in the middle of the bell curve wearing medium for most cycling shorts, jerseys, gloves, and helmets. Pierce lives in Hood River, OR where he spends his working hours as a desk jockey in the cube farm.



O'Neal Racing


O'Neal started as a motocross brand in the 1960s and branched out into mountain bike clothing in the 1980s. O'Neal usually has a clean design to their apparel that isn't over the top or flashy. Recently they have been creating more trail inspired clothing, instead of just focusing on aggressive downhill riding.

O'Neal Stormrider Jersey and Rockstacker Shorts.

Rockstacker Shorts
• MSRP: $99.99
• Sizes: Adult 28-38 (32 tested)
• Colors: Red (tested), Blue, and Black
oneal.eu

The Rockstacker Shorts are a baggier freeride/enduro short with an motocross-inspired design. The articulated knee and rear seat stretch fabric feel excellent and eliminate unwanted bunching when bombing down the trail. The material is on the heavier side, but seems super durable. Laser cut holes on the inner thighs provide some airflow at speed. Bonus: The handlebar grip shaped zipper pulls will impress any die-hard gear nerds you might encounter on the trail.

The size 32 in these shorts were actually perfect for my 31-inch waist, and utilize Velcro waist tabs to dial in an exact fit. The inseam is on the longer side and easily covers knee pads (avoiding any unsightly gaper gaps). One thigh mounted pocket on each side easily fit snacks, keys, or a phone. These shorts are excellent for shuttle days or laps at the bike park, but wouldn't be my first choice for an all-day trail riding adventure as the fabric weight is a little heavier than I'd prefer for that kind of heavy pedal riding.


Articulated knee fits nicely over knee guards and side pockets fit a cell phone or snacks easily.

Stormrider Jersey
• MSRP: 59.99 €
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Gray/Red (tested), Blue/Teal
oneal.eu

The Stormrider Jersey is a relaunch of a former fan favorite from a few years ago. This jersey features an innovative 3/4 or full-length sleeve design where you can tuck the 3/4 length sleeves up in the jersey if you want to cool things off a bit. You can also cut off the extra-long sleeve portion if it's not suited to your style. The material is lightweight and wicking with plenty of airflow. A unique rubber hem surrounding the bottom of the jersey keeps flapping at bay, but also adds some weight.

The medium size I tested is slightly baggier than other brand's out there, which is more suited to O'Neal’s personality. For the majority of the time, I left the sleeves at full length, and the 3/4 section actually was nice in that it kept the sleeves locked in position and worked to minimize warp speed sleeve flapping. All in all, this is a solid option for those craving a clean-looking jersey with the option to go 3/4 or full sleeve.


Integrated sunglasses wipe and full length or 3/4 length sleeves. You decide!



Yeti Cycles


Yeti is well known for their race-bred designs and their stylish looking bikes and apparel. Based in Golden, Colorado, Yeti has been cranking out some excellent new apparel lately that spans the range from hard core enduro to dyed in the wool cross country. Bold, vibrant colors and clean designs make it easy to spot a Yeti fan out on the trail (myself included).

Yeti Cycles Tolland S/S Jersey and Mason Shorts.

Mason Shorts
• MSRP: $90.00
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (S tested)
• Colors: Magnet (tested), Storm, and Turquoise
yeticycles.com

The Mason shorts are Yeti's lighter weight, breathable trail shorts and feature a board short feel. They have a clean, no-frills design with a nice, baby-butt soft four-way stretch fabric that keeps things snug, yet still allows for freedom of movement.

Based on Yeti's size chart, I opted to size down to a small, and I am glad I did. The fit was totally dialed and I didn't have to loosen or tighten the elastic drawstring waistband at all. Yeti dubs these as "Trail Fit" and I guess that's what they mean for these more XC trail oriented shorts. I usually prefer a more fitted shorts for riding, and these were my favorite fit out of all in the test. Even though these shorts are slightly slimmer fitting than others, they still felt awesome on the bike without any bunching.

Nit pick: I am a fan of at least two pockets on a pair of shorts for carrying phone/wallet/keys pre and post ride and the Mason falls short in that aspect. A single pocket on the right side is all you get. C'mon Yeti, at least give poor ole righty a buddy on the left side to hang out with!


Elastic drawstring for keeping things in place and single right side pocket.

Tolland S/S Jersey
• MSRP: $60.00
• Sizes: S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Storm (tested), Spruce, Turquoise, Black
yeticycles.com

The Tolland S/S Jersey is probably the single most no-frills top in Yeti's clothing lineup, but I appreciate it for the simple fact that it performs well, is comfortable, and you don't have to strip it off when you head to the pub. The Polygiene antimicrobial odor control material is exceptionally soft and lightweight, and has kept me surprisingly sweat and stink free even on the rare 90+ Deg F days we have had this spring. Other features include DriRelease open-knit side and armpit insets that are extremely breathable and a hidden sunglasses wipe.

I tested this jersey in a size medium, and it has become my go-to piece for most days on the bike as the fit is perfect (I also might be a bit biased, gotta match the bike, c'mon!). The fabric feel is excellent, and I hardly notice I'm wearing it when riding; exactly how it should be. And the Polygiene is brilliant! I find I can usually wear this shirt for a few rides before having to wash it, so the anti-stink claims seem to be valid. It's a solid option for adventuring out in the Colorado high country in the summer heat or weekend riding missions.


Clean no-frills neckline and a gomer on a bike because we forgot to take another picture of the jersey.



100%


Similar to O'Neal, 100% started as a motocross brand that has branched out into mountain bike apparel. 100% is known for loud, bold graphics across their protection, eyewear, and apparel ranges. The 2019 Mountain Bike gear line has improved from last year with upgraded fabrics and more colors, and continues to strike a balance of racing performance and long-lasting wear.

100% Airmatic Jersey and Shorts.

Airmatic Shorts
• MSRP: $89.00
• Sizes: Adult S-XXXL (M tested)
• Colors: Navy (tested), Brick, Black, Charcoal
ride100percent.com

100%'s offering to the trail short segment is a solid design that has all the bells and whistles you would expect these days: lightweight, four-way stretch materials, thigh pockets on both sides, adjustable waist, and an articulated fit. Regarding fit, the size mediums are definitely on the roomier side, and I probably should have sized down to a small. There aren't any Velcro waist adjusters, but the unique mechanism for locking the fly in place offers several loops for getting the fit exactly right.

The Airmatic short is aptly named with the standout feature being the material itself: it's stretchy, breathable, and lightweight. Not to mention it has a touch of DWR coating to keep water from soaking through on wetter rides. Similar to the Yeti fabrics, the 100% material has a much softer feel compared to some other brands in this test, making them disappear from thought while riding. Two pockets on the left and one on the right make my inner pack-rat giddy!


Innovative short clasp and Airmatic short material keeps things cool.

Airmatic Jersey
• MSRP: $49.00
• Sizes: S-XL (M tested)
• Colors: Slate Blue (tested), Black/Flo Yellow, Black/Charcoal
ride100percent.com

Similar to the Airmatic Shorts, the Airmatic Jersey is made from an awesome heather material that feels almost like a casual t-shirt but with greater wicking and breathability (although not quite as breathable as the Yeti jersey). The styling is subdued for 100% but I really like the printed pattern on the Slate Blue I tested.

the fit in the size medium I tried was perfect with the sleeves not being too short, and the drop tail keeping things PG on steeper lines. And like the shorts, I hardly noticed I was wearing this jersey while riding. It was so comfortable that I would often find myself wearing it for long periods post ride.


Airmatic jersey material is wicking and super soft.



Zoic


Zoic got its start as a grassroots brand with a reputation for quality gear that allows you to just get on the bike and ride. As a consequence, they don't have extravagant styling or designs; instead they focus on producing high-performance gear designed to enrich the riding experience.

Zoic Cirrus Jersey and Ether One Shorts.

Ether One Shorts
• MSRP: $95.00
• Sizes: Adult S-3XL (M tested)
• Colors: Grey Micro (tested), Black, Night
zoic.com

The Ether One shorts are an evolution on Zoic's popular Ether shorts; Zoic lengthened them by an inch and switched to a much lighter material for the construction. Most Zoic shorts have a scrunchy waistband reminiscent of my first-grade swimsuit, but these have a standard flat waistband that should appeal more to the enduro crowd. These are the only shorts that I tested that have a standard no-zip pocket on either side, so if that is your thing these are the shorts for you. There are also multiple zippered thigh pockets for keeping things secured through the chundery bits.

The size mediums I tested fit brilliantly without having to snug up the velcro adjusters. Well, maybe a touch. The fabric was breathable, stretchy, and lightweight compared to some of the other more downhill inspired shorts in this review. The coverage over the knee pads was a little slim though, and I feel they could have lengthened the inseam a bit more. All in all, these are an excellent short for someone who wants lots of cargo capacity, discrete styling, and lightweight, all day riding performance.


Two nice zippered pockets and a well-fitted velcro adjustable waist.

Cirrus Jersey
• MSRP: $70.00
• Sizes: Adult S-2XL (S tested)
• Colors: Fleet (tested), Puff, Sequoia
zoic.com

Sticking with Zoic's philosophy of designing high-performance gear that enables a better ride, the Cirrus jersey is a subdued affair that shines when you're riding hard. The fabric is super lightweight and breathable and provides decent coverage with a drop tail. A nice loop at the back allows you to easily hang it after riding or washing.

The fit in the medium was on the larger side for me and I probably should have sized down to a small. Despite that, the jersey performed like a champ, and I hardly noticed I was wearing it. As a bonus, I appreciate it when companies use tagless labels that don't irritate my skin. It saves me the hassle of scissor tailoring to get rid of that itch.


The Cirrus Jersey has a clean no-nonsense design and a loop for hanging after ride or wash.



Dakine


Dakine is based in Hood River, Oregon and produces some high-quality gear that spans surf, bike, wind, and snow sports. I often see the Dakine crew riding Post Canyon after work so I know that the stuff they are producing is trail tested.

The Dakine Vectra 3/4 Sleeve Jersey (Vectra shorts not pictured).

Vectra Shorts
• MSRP: $85.00
• Sizes: Adult S-2XL (S tested)
• Colors: Sand Storm (tested), Black, and Star Gazer
dakine.com

The Vectra shorts are Dakine's do everything, all-purpose mountain bike short. The Sand Storm flavor is not too different looking than your standard khaki's. The four-way stretch fabric is subdued, yet offers high performance. I appreciate the external waist adjuster which allows you to dial in the fit with the shorts actually in the position you will wear them, instead of having to turn the waistline inside out. Bonus points for having 3 total pockets (2 on right, 1 on left).

Usually, I wear a size small in other Dakine shorts I have tried (their size mediums are usually way too baggy for me), so I chose a size small for this test. Unfortunately for me, Dakine makes the Vectra with a more fitted cut, and the size small were a bit too tight - I should have gone with the medium. Other than that, the shorts feel excellent, breathe well, and I really like the perforated rear and thigh panels which keeps things cooler (cooler than the jersey strangely enough).

STATIC IMAGERY
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Outside waist tightener and right side pockets for phone or other goodies.

Vectra 3/4 Sleeve Jersey
• MSRP: $50.00
• Sizes: Adult S-2XL (M tested)
• Colors: Slate Blue (tested), Castlerock, Electric Mint
dakine.com

The Vectra 3/4 length jersey is classic and casual with an understated style and a small front pocket that I am not sure what you would use it for. Similar to other jersey's this has four-way stretch construction, Polygiene odor control technology, and a drop rear hem.

Dakine jerseys have always fit me really well, and this size medium I tested was no exception. Lately, I have been enjoying wearing 3/4 sleeves more and more, and I find that the Vectra 3/4 is the perfect length for providing a bit of sun/branch protection without being overly constrictive. I appreciated the feel of the material and it was breathable, but I found it to be a bit too warm on hotter days. This will be my go-to fall or spring piece as the weather cools off again.


Nice 3/4 length sleeves keep the sunburn at bay and a pocket for candy?



Leatt


Leatt began as a company designing and selling neck braces in South Africa back in 2001. Since then they have expanded into offering a wide array of protection and apparel for both moto and mountain bike use. Although Leatt's core focus has been saving lives and reducing injuries, their latest apparel designs offer some excellent material choices, along with clean styling.

Leatt DBX 1.0 Jersey and Shorts.

DBX 1.0 Shorts
• MSRP: $79.99
• Sizes: Adult XS-XL (L tested)
• Colors: Ink (tested), Ruby, Black, Slate
leatt.com

When I first received these shorts in a size medium I was shocked as I tried to squeeze into them. I thought for sure I had been given children's size! After consulting with Leatt it turns out these shorts are targeted much more to the XC end of the spectrum and are supposed to be super tight fitting; not lycra tight but not that far off. I sized up to a large, which were still fairly tight, but fit better through the waist. If you want something looser, consider their DBX 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0 line of shorts (from what I can tell, a higher number means a burlier short). There's not much coverage for knee pads in these shorts, either, so expect some serious gaper gap if pads are the way you roll.

Despite the tight fit, these shorts do offer some trail worthy features and merit a closer look for riding in hotter weather or XC racing (or maybe even cyclocross). The material is awesomely stretchy and lightweight... it feels like a technical form of spandex. The huge holes on the inner thighs gave me plenty of views of my pasty white man-thighs peeking through, but also provided excellent ventilation. Again the lack of multiple pockets is an issue for me, as there is only one on the right side.


The DBX 1.0 shorts are slim, lightweight, and crazy breathable (see large thigh vents).

DBX 1.0 Jersey
• MSRP: $54.99
• Sizes: Adult XS-XL
• Colors: Ink (tested), Ruby, Black, Slate
leatt.com

Similar to the shorts, the DBX 1.0 jersey is super fitted, lightweight, and very breathable. There are large holes on the back for airflow, and the material itself feels exceptionally airy. There are also DBX 2.0-5.0 jersey options available from Leatt so there is a wide range to choose from to fine tune your material/protection preference.

The size medium I tested actually fit pretty darn well, and I was ok with the slim fit to go along with the slim fit of the shorts. Surprisingly, this is probably the loudest styling design of the kits I reviewed, but I actually like the patterns and color combos.

This jersey/short combo will be my first choice for horrifying the fashion police at Whistler. Just kidding! But it will be first off the rack for long, XC inspired adventures this summer where kneepads won't be required.


3x3 set of holes promotes airflow across your back along with the lightweight material.




Maloja


Maloja is a German brand located in the upper Bavarian Alps that produces a wide variety of clothing and performance apparel covering bike, hike, run, climb, biathlon (and even E-bike specific apparel). The Maloja style is very distinct from other brands out there and usually offers a smart blend of fashion and performance.

Maloja AlbanasM. Jersey and RemusM. Shorts.

RemüsM. Shorts
• MSRP: $169.00
• Sizes: Adult XS-XL (M tested)
• Colors: Mountain Lake (tested)
malojaclothing.com[

Bring back the denim! For those of you who still ride in your chopped off Levi's, these are the shorts for you. These shorts are Maloja's freeride offering that offer some upgrades over your standard jort: flex panels in the crotch and rear provide much better articulation, an MX style ratchet strap keeps the waist secured, and zippered pockets allow you to securely stash various items. The articulated knee cuffs easily cover knee pads, and avoids that ragged denim edge that afflicts most home-made jorts.

I tested these in size medium and they are exceptionally roomy. Not quite "does this tent make me look fat" roomy, but they had the baggiest cut of the shorts I tested, minus the O'Neals. The denim material is quite hefty, not very breathable, but is probably quite abrasion resistant. These are perfect for shuttle rides or hitting the bike park, but maybe not so great for all day peddling.


Your new favorite pair of jorts.

AlbanasM. Jersey
• MSRP: $75.99
• Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: River Multi (tested), Moonless Multi, Grey Melange Multi, Vintage White Multi
malojaclothing.com

This multi-sport jersey features Naturalon material that has the functional performance of polyester, but the soft natural touch of cotton. The jersey has a clean round neckline, nice contrasting colored sleeves, and a rounded hem at the back. Polygiene odor treatment keeps the trail stank at bay.

The size medium I tested has a relaxed fit, and is super comfy, making it versatile enough to wear both on and off the bike. The breathability wasn't quite up there as compared to other jerseys I tested, and things definitely got pretty sweaty on hotter days. The style is clean and subdued, and this would be an excellent (if somewhat pricey) shirt for just playing volleyball at the beach or lounging in your camp chair after a day on the water.


The AlbanasM. Jersey




Race Face


Race Face is a company that is mainly known for their high-quality mountain biking components, but they also produce a large range of apparel and protection. Being based in Vancouver, B.C. shows through in their design philosophy as they produce burly components and apparel meant to withstand the steep, rugged terrain of the North Shore of Vancouver.

Race Face Indy SS Jersey and Ruxton Shorts.

Ruxton Shorts
• MSRP: $169.00
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Black (tested), Loam, Dark Spruce
raceface.com

The Ruxton shorts are more in line with the offering from O'Neal: they feature heavier duty materials and have more coverage for knee pads. Perforated panels on the upper thigh are placed slightly differently than O'Neal and I actually preferred this location for keeping it cooler. The articulated rear panel felt great at any speed and didn't bunch up. The pockets on each side meet my storage fetish requirements.

The fit in the mediums I tested was pretty much spot on and I appreciated the zipper-less ratchet fly for dialing the fit in just right. These shorts weren't as baggy as the O'Neal shorts, and yet while somewhat roomy, they had a slimmer fit through the rear (which I like). These shorts are an excellent option for gravity racing/park as they articulate well, are breathable, durable, and offer good knee pad coverage.


Ruxton shorts with articulated rear and zipperless rachet fly.

Indy SS Jersey
• MSRP: $54.99
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Dark Spruce (tested), Rust Red, Black
raceface.com

Nikki isn't really a fan of the color combo on the Indy SS jersey from Race Face, but I like it! This jersey's Cool Touch Polyester fabric has much more of your standard polyester silky feel compared to the soft touch feel from other jersey's such as Dakine or Maloja, but I find that keeps me cooler on hotter days. Race Face claims a UPF 50+ rating, so that should keep you from sunburn in the coming summer months.

I tested the Indy SS in size medium, and the jersey has more of a relaxed fit than other brands in this article. I liked the clean, circular neckline and didn't really notice the jersey once I was wearing it. Cool Touch fabric is reputed to be a wicking fabric and the performance in warm weather supported that. All in all, this jersey/kit combo is a perfect choice for aggressive trail/enduro themed rides.


Indy SS Jersey.



POC
STATIC IMAGERY


Similar to Leatt, POC started as a company to make equipment designed to reduce injuries (first in skiing). In addition to the huge variety of protection items, POC has applied their scientific prowess and high tech materials to their apparel line. POC's styling is very black and white (literally) which makes it easy to spot out on the trail.

Pierce Martin getting after it in Post Canyon outside of Hood River OR
POC Resistance Enduro 3/4 Jersey Jersey and Resistance Enduro Shorts.

Resistance Enduro Shorts
• MSRP: $160.00
• Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Uranium Black (tested)
pocsports.com

The Resistance Enduro shorts from POC features Vectran material: a highly advanced fabric used on multiple space missions (including in NASA's spacesuits). It's five times stronger than steel pound for pound, making it extremely tear resistant yet very lightweight. POC found it to be perfectly suited for use in the lower legs and sides of these shorts. The pre-bent knees have slightly more material in the front for keeping knee pads covered and at the same time prevent fabric bunching behind the knee. There is a zippered thigh pocket on each side, along with a discrete card pocket on the back.

I tested the size medium shorts which were exactly what the doctor ordered, so to speak. I didn't have to touch the side velcro adjusters at all to get the fit I wanted. The Resistance Enduro Shorts are on the slimmer side with form-fitting legs, yet they still covered my knee pads without riding up. And they are so black... If you want to play Darth Vader for a day in a quality high-tech short/jersey combo take this kit for a spin!

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Resistance Enduro Shorts with zippered pockets and Vectran material with extra for kneepad coverage.

Resistance Enduro 3/4 Jersey
• MSRP: $160.00
• Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Uranium Black (tested)
pocsports.com

The Resistance Enduro 3/4 Jersey is an innovative piece of gear the likes I haven't seen before. First, there are three rear SWAT type pockets for holding small tools and snacks so you can ditch the cumbersome pack. As you start adding more weight to your rear pockets, a normal jersey will start to take on its own personality and fly all over the place at speed. The innovative girdle POC added solves that problem by keeping everything locked down like a super max prison after a riot: anything short of a box of hammers stays put no matter how aggressive the trail.

The medium size I tested is on the more fitted side of things for a jersey, but felt as if tailored for me. The long zippered neckline was exceptionally useful for ventilation control and the zipper pull was easy to grab no matter if I was zipping down for long climbs, or closing up shop for the descents. Why don't more mtb jerseys include this? The material is lightweight and breathable, but has a much tighter knit than either Zoic or Race Face. But there are mesh zones in the armpits to help with climate control, so venting's not all dependent on the zippered neck.

This is really the only jersey in this test that has much to differentiate it from the rest I reviewed. Other than slight variations in cut and sleeve length, most of what I reviewed were all pretty similar. But if your list of requirements includes some rear pockets, a girdle to keep things in place, and a zippered neckline, this jersey should be on the top of that list.

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Resistance Enduro 3/4 Jersey with girdle for keeping things in place and zippered neck.



Scott Sports
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Scott has its roots in the snow but has evolved to cover everything from road cycling to motocross. They've introduced many innovations to the sport of mountain biking and produce some quality apparel that is both well thought out and well suited to everything from racing to long days out on the trail.

Pierce Martin getting after it in Post Canyon outside of Hood River OR
Scott Trail Vertic S/SL Shirt and Trail Flow Pro Shorts

Trail Flow Pro Shorts
• MSRP: $119.95
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Dark Grey (tested), Ochre Yellow
scott-sports.com

The Trail Flow Pro Shorts have a board short inspired design with a string fly closure, perforated thigh vents, and quick drying four-way stretch material. Contrary to the jersey, the styling is casual without any frills or bold graphics. Knee pad coverage is average, and on par with most other trail oriented shorts.

I wore the size medium in these shorts and I have zero complaints with the fit. They seem right in the middle of the "semi-fitted" road without being very slim or baggy. The hidden inside velcro adjusters allowed me to get the tension on the string tie system perfect to my liking. Overall, these are a solid short that's good on the trail and don't scream bike nerd if you're wearing them at a post-ride bbq.

STATIC IMAGERY
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Trail Flow Pro Shorts with velcro adjustment tabs, boardshort string tie, and laser cut vents.

Trail Vertic S/SL Shirt
• MSRP: $59.99
• Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
• Colors: Light Grey/Dark Grey (tested), Black, Nightfall Blue/Washed Blue, Aster Blue, Black/Dark Ivy Green
scott-sports.com

The Trail Vertic S/SL shirt is Scott's race ready jersey with a quick dry four-way stretch fabric. The material for this jersey is much more similar to the Zoic and Race Face with a classic, silky polyester feel. A huge mesh back excelled at keeping things cool, even when wearing a hydration pack. One interesting feature of this jersey is the zippered stow pocket for the glasses wipe, which keeps it from getting dirt and sweat on it before you want to use it.

Similar to the Flow Pro Shorts, the size medium Vertic S/SL Shirt I tested is right in the middle of the slim/baggy spectrum and has a very light and airy feel when wearing it. The breathability and wicking are superb. This jersey is an excellent choice for racing or riding in hotter weather.

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Trail Vertic S/SL Shirt with integrated glasses wipe with its own stow pocket and airy back mesh.



Summary
I would sum up the kits that I tested in the following manner:
O'Neal: Burlier materials for shuttle or bike park days
Yeti: For all day epics up in the high country
Ride 100%: Versatile breathable enduro kit
Zoic: Understated with high performance
Dakine: Clean simple kit with Hood River style
Leatt: Super lightweight XC performance
Maloja: German freeride style featuring performance jort-wear
Race Face: Solid all-around kit
POC: Innovative jersey with a durable short
Scott: Airy kit that isn't too slim or baggy


228 Comments

  • + 168
 ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY BUCKS FOR A JERSEY. Just wanted to write that.
  • - 18
flag TransforDerek (Jun 6, 2019 at 0:16) (Below Threshold)
 I guess it could be justified for the POC one, but the Scott jersey is just basic...
  • + 28
 @TransforDerek: this could be justified for a suit...
  • + 14
 well it has a glass wipe ...
  • + 1
 @karoliusz: True, I wouldn't pay 160.- but it is radically different from the other stuff, that's what I meant
  • + 49
 I am blown away by the fact that there is still a market for those polyester jerseys. 160 bucks buys a piece of high quality merino/lyocell basic layer, which is hundreds of miles ahead of every polyester jersey in terms of comfort and environmental impact.
  • + 6
 I just looked, that price is wrong. In the UK they retail for £54.99 so around $60
  • + 7
 TEN BUCKS AT WISH.COM :-P Just wanted to write that.
  • + 4
 @Skinnyman: As much as I like merino shirts, I'm afraid the production of a merino shirt has a higher environmental impact than polyester :-(
  • + 12
 It's not just black, it's URANIUM black!
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: Wear one, next thing you learn is there is a Reaper drone hovering over you...
  • + 8
 Check out Handup Gloves shorts and shirts. Cheap AF compared to these guys.
  • + 13
 @nowherenear In a Life Cycle Assessment that accounts for use, the less frequent need to wash Merino compared to synthetics, or that one garment can replace 2, overcompensates for the minor difference in the EA of production. Add the advantages of comfort and no stink, and Merino becomes the obvious choice.
  • + 14
 @Skinnyman: So true! All these polyester jerseys need to be washed after each ride whereas you can wear a Merino a couple of times.
Regarding the environment impact I can't understand why the media like Pinkbike don't mention anything about the environment impact (type of materials, recycling, production place, etc).
We are in 2019 guys, it's time to change our habits!
  • + 22
 Not a single polyester/synthetic alternative here. There are more brands now using merino wool, bamboo fiber, etc... feature some of those.
  • + 2
 @supertack: I’d size up on the Handup shorts.
  • + 3
 @karoliusz: had some suits custom made for groomsmen at my wedding, $150 a pop w a shirt / tie too. Everyone still wears those suits to this day, they came out super nice!
  • - 1
 @granjak: well most people dont give a flying f*ck about sustainability.

I actually hate that there are nearely no companies that produce Lyocell MTB gear made in Europe...Synthetische fibres are just not nice to wear
  • + 2
 I love myself some merino but after wearing jersey and pants made from it by Mons Royale or Endura I have found one huge drawback. When it's wet you can see it. And it is not very pleasant sight riding with huge wet spots on your trousers (guess how it looks like) and completely drenched jersey.
Also it is not true the merino does not smell. Only the odour is more tolerable for the second day but after that it starts to smell like amonia(cats' p**s).
  • + 4
 @nowherenear: How did you estimate the impact of production? It might be a bit higher, but I would be interested in knowing by how much. Polyester comes from fossil fuels, it is colored using oftentimes toxic stuff that is sometimes dumped into rivers and then transporting it to consumer, in our case to Europe, also has a footprint. While we over here can buy local stuff like Keli, which is made from italian merino in Finland.

But when the entire lifespan of the garment is taken into account, lyocell/merino/bamboo fibers are on a different planet, primarily because polyester sheds microplastic when washed, that is now present even in bottled water.
  • + 2
 @lp130i: > Also it is not true the merino does not smell. Only the odour is more tolerable for the second day but after that it starts to smell like amonia(cats' p**s).

Are you sure you used garments made of 100% merino? I saw some stuff being marketed as "merino" even though it was 80% polyester and only 20% merino. I only had a smell piece once - 70% merino and 30% silk. My stuff does not smell after literally weeks of not washing and just letting it dry.
  • + 1
 @Skinnyman: Couldn't agree more!
  • + 2
 @nowherenear: Even if that's true on the production side (not sure I buy that, but let's just stipulate that for now) - after two years of wear, the polyester stinks to high heaven no matter how much weird detergent you throw at it. Eventually, it ends up in the landfill - where it will pretty much stay for a very long time. The merino won't get all stinky - I've got merino layers that have seen a lot of use and are still going strong (and stink free) after four years. And when you finally do have to toss it, it's less of a burden in the landfill (as the wool parts will eventually decompose).
  • + 6
 @granjak: Said the guy who rides a carbon frame,drinks bottle water,upgrades his phone every year,etc,etc.
  • + 2
 To be fair, I did mess up the price for the Scott jersey.
  • + 4
 @g-42: Patagonia is making garments from recycled polyester; you may wish to donate your old stinky polyester items to them.
  • + 2
 @DJ-24: you're right, I work on it Wink
I predict that in the coming years we'll see more and more bicycle companies making frames by using recycled materials. And it's going to be a massive marketing argument!
  • + 2
 @meagerdude: much of Giro's garment line is now recycled polyester as well
  • + 2
 @granjak: I agree. We will try to do better next time. We did discuss materials and DWR /PFOAS in the Fall 2017 Gear guide - but digging into each companies production takes more time than we really have budgeted to pull off these monthly reviews.
  • + 1
 @granjak: Just so you know,my comment wasn't aimed at you specifically and I mean no offence.There is much work to be done when it comes to the environment.
  • + 1
 That why I only Buy TREE Top quality for way less ! the only pair of bike short that last me more then 100 ride!
en.treesmountainapparel.com
  • + 1
 @Skinnyman: I read some articles about the environmental impact of wool production a couple of monts ago - they mainly focused on the fact that sheep have to poo, which contaminates the water, and so on. Based on that I wrote my above statement which is - I have to admit it - probably not correct.

I found this study which concludes that the energy that goes into merino production is smaller than the energy needed for polyester and the likes. However, I'm not an expert in that field.
citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.553.6556&rep=rep1&type=pdf
  • + 1
 @stewspooner: You're correct, my statement was more focused on the impacts of wool production, such as sheep contaminating the water systems and so on. I'm not an expert, but I believe that you can keep a merino shirt for a longer time and that it needs to be washed less frequently. On the plus side, there are no nano-plastic-particles that go into the water system when it's washed.
  • + 1
 @nowherenear: Thanks for the link — that was an interesting read! I'd be interested in learning what they meant by "sheep have to poo, which contaminates the water", since sheep do not eat meat and I'd expect their poo to not be an issue. Then, as said, merino is not the only alternative, since there's also lyocell/tencel, which is basically wood fibers and the footprint is even smaller, while garment prices are lower.
  • + 3
 @DJ-24: THIS!!!!
we drive for hours to reach the trailhead on huge trucks running on fuel, we ride carbon bikes and use stuff that are made on the other side of the world and shipped here.....but then we feel more conscious because we wear a merino shirt made with a bit of wool.
come on guys.....wake up....that's marketing BS as well.

If we really want to do something for our planet, all we can do is get to extinction....and we are on the right way.
  • + 1
 @alexmarengo: > If we really want to do something for our planet, all we can do is get to extinction

This is a false narrative, since the planet does not give a schnitzel, it will be just fine no matter what humanity does. We have to do something for ourselves. At the moment we don't need to have everyone living perfectly sustainably, but at least partially sustainably, let it be even a stupid merino jersey, since one has to start somewhere.

> come on guys.....wake up....that's marketing BS as well.

What exactly is marketing BS? The amount of energy, water, chemicals is measurable in numbers. Numbers can be compared. Forget about sustainability — lyocell and merino are just way more comfortable.

> we drive for hours to reach the trailhead on huge trucks running on fuel, we ride carbon bikes and use stuff that are made on the other side of the world and shipped here

There are a lot of people that buy local, second-hand, commute by bike etc. I really don't understand what your message is.
  • + 2
 @alexmarengo: I get your point, but everybody can make a difference. I personally don't have a car, I pedal everywhere or take the train.

Especially when it comes to bikes (and clothing), it's possible to buy a lot of bikeparts which are made in europe. You can even build a whole bike thats made in Europe. Start with a frame with pinion gearbox (Nicolai, or some nice custrom steel frame), add an italian EXT shock, a German Intend fork, Renthal alloy cockpit, Trickstuff brakes, Mavic wheels, Selle Italia Saddle, Vecnum Dropperpost, Hutchinson tires and so on.. Of course these parts need resources as well, but at least they're made by someone who lives near you and maybe in a country with good laws protecting the environment.
  • + 1
 @Skinnyman: I think what he's saying is that there are bigger places to start than cycling apparel.
  • + 2
 @DJ-24: Like what place for example? Shall I not buy sustainable clothing because I driver a car? Should I not drive less because I fly on planes? Should I not fly less because I build a house? Where do you start then? Microplastic pollution is a relatively "big place", because that shit gets into our bodies. This is a ridiculous piece of logic to me because we are dealing with a problem of scale — even a tiny change in consumer behavior has a tremendous impact because there are so many millions of consumers.
  • + 2
 They missing the only brand worth having and that is MONS ROYALE. Seriously they are the only tops I need and wear when riding now. So good. Merino is the only way to go IMHO.
  • + 94
 Enough of the bull$&@ ????????pinkbike I'm 205 (built like a brick shithouse) and sweat like rat ???? in the nyc subway on a 110degree day send me those kits and I’ll test them.. enough of these guys 120 lbs 31” waist are these women with beards PM me for my mailing address if I could write a review it would be cool
  • + 5
 ^^ This!!
  • + 16
 You would probably have a 31" waist if you cut down on the beers and pies!
  • + 39
 I'd read that review if you typed it like that comment.
Btw 160lbs is pretty standard for a mid sized athletic male. Perhaps you should lose some weight if you don't want to be the one out of four Americans dying from heart disease.³

³cdc.gov
  • + 1
 you and I both brother!
  • + 22
 @colincolin: 160lbs is light for 5'11" and a 31" waist is considered small. if buddy is 200lbs and fit, your point is claptrap. the absolute leanest I can be is just under 200lbs (at about 5% body fat) and I guarantee I'm fitter than the average rider here when I'm sitting at 220lbs. sometimes fitness isnt a f*cking weight ya goofs. ever occur to you that the USA has all types of people, including pro athletes? or did you have to throw in a dig at America. which is a pretty "thrown from a glass house" kinda thing considering half of your countries genes disapeared last century and Germany doesn't do much on the world stage athletically.....
  • + 7
 @atrokz: Got any pics of you at 91kg and 5% body fat? Sounds impressive!
  • + 3
 @jaame: I do. but the neked ones aren't online. easy to do when your thighs are big and carry most of the mass. haha.
  • + 11
 How about a guy who's 6'1" and weighs 140 lbs with a 28 inch waist - I want to know if there's a pair of shorts that will stay up on my non-existent ass!
  • + 6
 @Lokirides: youre the splitting image of my best friend! He did a ton of squats one year and got a lil booty. haha.

im not trying to shame anyone just saying light weight doesnt mean fit. heavy weight doesnt mean strong. and that the USA has it all. its the most diverse place on the planet when it comes to people.
  • - 2
 I think we've established that humans come in different shapes and sizes. And still: 5'11ish and 160 libras are average. kthxbye
  • + 7
 @colincolin: I didnt know libras were average. they tend to be a bit judgy. dont get me started on Scorpios!
  • + 2
 about the sweating-cut down on your alcohol and sugar consumption. seriously, profuse perspiration is a symptom. you'll thank me later...
  • - 1
 @atrokz: holy smokes he throws a little shade at America about overweight people (which is pretty well documented, not to say the person he threw it at is, or that it was funny even), and you go all out race bs on him, with genes disappearing and some bs about athletes on World level (ever heard of biathlon/nordic skiing? Your claim is stupid and wrong on so many levels)... Plz do some meditation and think about proportionality.
  • + 19
 Build the wall!!!

Sorry, what are we talking about?
  • + 5
 @jts-nemo: cool story bro. you took a tounge in cheek jab and made it more than it is.

does proportionality allow you do DL over 400lbs? I dont think you even know what that means in this context. Well documented? like the hundreds of world records and titles and championships Americans hold?

have a good day, sir. today is the 75th anniversary of DDay. find a Canadian or American to thank and maybe expand your ignorant myopic.
  • + 1
 @flipoffthemonkeys: thats damn true. after a night out the ride is a damn sweaty one!
  • + 7
 @atrokz: yeah, today is least of all days that no French or German should be taking a dig at anybody. After today, we can get back to the insulting.
  • + 1
 On the other end, I'm 190 cm and 78 kg (that's 6'2" / 172 lb for you 'muricans) and have yet to find find shorts that that do not expose the Enduro Gap that are not a 3/4 length variant.
  • - 7
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 6, 2019 at 8:12) (Below Threshold)
 @jason475: taking credit for what your countrymen did in 1944 (@atrokz forgot about English among other nations) as a reply to someone generalizing “Americans” is kind of funny. But expected.

@atrokz I pulled 395 on 1rep max when I was 170lbs/15% body fat (5ft11) and have seen a 25yr old mdrfkr with less muscle who pulled that on 3 sets of 5...
  • + 4
 @jts-nemo: USA isn't even in the top 15 for overweight people by country. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_body_mass_index
  • + 4
 @atrokz: ..Yep with ya, I've got a 6 pack at 220lbs.
  • + 3
 @jaame: don't be a idiot. Their is muscular people in this world. I'm similar, so are many people I ride with
  • - 1
 @chasintrails: yeah but they are few enough to not grasp it initially. And vast majority of folks with 200lbs under 6ft with 5% fat are on juice. Why would anyone in their right mind get under 10% with so much mass when such weight cut is effectively compromising strength and muscle growth. That means you need spend so much time on hypertrophy that Your chances on how “good” you are on a mountain bike are Slim (pun intended). So much muscle also means that your FTP and explosivity (due to predominant resistance regime) is way worse than one of a skinny dude who's naked photo screams “muscle atrophy” like in the case of this fella. I must nonetheless say that most people are around 20-25% fat which makes this fella unqualified. Mike Levy or Brian Park would be better models Big Grin so muscular or not, majority of people do not look like the model here. If anyone was to complain though, it is these skinny folks who need long fit to very slim body section
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: agree. at around 5% it was pretty painful and I left a lot of strength on the table. i learned my lesson from that year and ate a lot better and got stronger. just saying it was extremely hard to get to under 200lbs and i was waaaay too lean. there's pics in my album that shows me at a fitter healthier weight and I still had veins popping out. its been years and now that Im closer to 40 I am now happy if I'm at 20%.
  • + 9
 @atrokz: MY CAMARADERIE FOR CANADA JUST GREW TWO-FOLD.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 6, 2019 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 @atrokz: I have been on -500kcal per day cut for the last 2 months and I am so fkng tired. Today is a cheat as fuk day but there are still 5lbs to go (ca 15%-17% fat now, vertical line is finally back) and the very thought of gobbling protein shake not to lose too much muscle is making me want to vomit. The battling thoughts of what to eat when, being on rather strict 15-9 TRE scheme 12-12 on a cheat day, doing sprints and cold baths to keep metabolism, up it is freaking tiring and annoying. I actually got quite easy to trigger lately hahaha. And I never got under 12% even though I tried damn hard.
  • + 1
 That is what fit athletes look like. All the top pros are built like that.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: it's easier to do in your 20s but even then Im sure it damaged me in some way and it was a miserable existance while I tried it. haha. never again.
  • + 1
 I demand to see hunter1031's article. Come on, PB, do us proud.
  • + 1
 Agree, my athletic 14 year old son weighs the same as these girls with beards..
  • + 1
 @Apex06: @hunter1031 @pinhead907 We are working on a shorts review for later this summer based on different body types. Send me ideas on what you want to see.
  • + 1
 Do you think these companies want to make products for the majority of the market or for big humans that live in NJ and spend their time on city subways? I see from your comments that your size really bugs you, why not purchase some items and form opinions on your own? There could be a whole market for the casual male XL cyclist that you could spearhead.
  • + 5
 My biggest issue with riding shorts is finding some that are not to tight in the thighs.. I have to size up and end up with shorts to big around the waist. I’m probably not the norm though, I’ve got running back legs. I just like bitching on pink bike, it’s therapeutic.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: hey we established last week that science, biology, physiology, and kinematics don't apply to biking. Get your analysis out of here.
  • + 1
 @Apex06: hahahahha
  • + 1
 @Lokirides: You and I have the same body size/type. I can find shorts to fit my waist size but can't find ones with a long enough inseam to not have a gumby gap between my knee pads and the hem on the shorts.
  • - 1
 @chasintrails: I'm not being an idiot. 90% of caucasian fully grown men, when in shape, would have a 30-34 waist. Bigger than 34 and you're out of shape, unless you're way over six foot.

The problem I have with cycling jerseys is that they are a shit fit. Always square cut. Too baggy at the right length, or too short at the right tightness. Lucky for me my wife's friend does clothing alterations so I get all my shirts fitted to my model build. When they fit right, and you've got an awesome bod with a 31" waist and unreal V-taper like I have, not to mention grapefruit delts, any shirt looks great.
  • + 0
 @jaame: Having a "model build" must be tough to find clothing, but imagine having a body like a Greek God. I can't find clothing to fit for the life of me.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: I feel your pain!
  • + 30
 Thank buggery that MTB clothing is refreshed every year. Gotta love those massive discounts on last year's gear.
  • + 2
 Just picked up a Fox 40 factory for $1200...2020 just released same shop $1800 looool
  • + 24
 1..Yeti bike owners must wear Yeti clothing and $300 Oakley Blade sunglasses. It's in the Bible.
2... The Yeti Retro Members Only jacket in turquoise is sweet, but you have to be a member to get one.
  • + 23
 It's just shirts and shorts at the end of day. Nothing realy to be reviewed here. And I'd say ugly and expensive shirts and shorts in fact.
  • + 3
 thank you
  • + 1
 Anyone who actually buys these kits should just flush money down the toilet instead...if you really want a light, breathable shirt with no pockets on it, wear your favourite team's soccer jersey, it'll cost just as much and be just as good. Alternatively, spend $10 on a T at Decathlon, MEC, REI, or whatever your equivalent is.

Or, yknow, buy a road cycling jersey for wayyyyyy cheaper than any of these and actually have storage on your body.

For shorts, just wear whatever light cargo shorts you can find...did some shorts in this test seriously come with one pocket? Really? If you need a chammy, buy some road liners or bibs and wear them under. God I hate the MTB industry sometimes.
  • + 2
 @mnorris122: on the shorts bit, cargo shorts generally get trashed here. Rocky trails with thorny vegetation at trails edge is pretty common, not to mention when things get overgrown in late spring. I bought a single pair of Zoic Ether shorts roughly 4 years go. They've been through hell, all I've done is minor sewing around a zipper and to sew the Velcro adjustors into a fixed position as the list their stick after a couple hundred washes. Perfect shorts if you would rather not wear a pack and want to keep phone, wallet, keys, multitool and some snacks on your body instead of strapped onto the bike (I have a hardtail and a full suspension trail bike so the stuff I ride with stays in the truck and not on the bike).
  • + 1
 @yzedf: K that's great! But what the heck is Zoic? Are they a North American thing? Because I've been MTBing for over ten years and have never heard of that brand.
  • + 1
 @colincolin: 25 years old American company I think? A lot of stuff they sell is available in basic black, not as in your face as most of the wannabe moto brands, so you might’ve seen them before but it didn’t stand out.
  • + 19
 Please can you measure the inseam of these shorts. I'm afraid the relative term of 'long' becomes rather meaningless. For medium sized shorts I've seen this range from less than 12", to more than 14". Some of the ones above that are described as long, definitely don't look long in the photos.
  • + 5
 yes please. inseam and outseam for all the shorts.
  • + 4
 This...those of us with long legs could use the inseam stats please - cheers (Dakine 8-track wearer)
  • + 3
 @LuvAZ: And whether the shorts include a liner. I'm assuming the answer is "no" for all the shorts tested, but it makes a big difference to the "value proposition", as the marketers like to say.
  • + 12
 Or you could just go to Decathlon and get a pair of riding shorts for £20. Had mine for 4 years now, worn every second weekend and they are still perfect. Some crazy prices for the shorts in the article and I bet they don't even come with inner's - which IMO are more import than the actual shorts.
  • + 3
 Or you could have had stuff from decathlon, and despise it because of :
-zipper breaking after 3 use
-weak fabric tearing at the first Bush encounter
-weird shape/cut
-uncomfortable fabric
(For shorts)

-"10000mm dwr Coated water proof jacket " leaking after 5 uses
-ultra fragile fabric considering the weight of the jacket
(For jacket)

-Headlamp switch button not working anymore after 5 night rides
("You're the first client to ever have this problem" website said otherwise (20+ occurrence)

So maybe decathlon quality has changed since 2010-2014, but the bad experiences I have had with their products was enough so that I never try again.
  • + 4
 @zede:
- helping to deprive your countrymen of jobs in the name of a nice quarterly statement for the shareholders
  • + 2
 @jaame: I don't think it's different for most of these brands. Whether Decathlon or these brands, everything's designed in the "home" country and produced by cheap labour oversea.
Decathlon just gets the cheapest prices possible while the other brands have marketing and sponsoring to pay for, they also probably increase the price to make their products artificially top tier (160$ a jersey... you've got to pay those 3-4000€/month swedish salaries).
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: yeah you're right. I've got a bit of a downer on made in China that's all. Everything in decathlon is made in China and shite quality.
  • + 3
 @zede: I tore (ok, stretched) some fabric during my first bush encounter.
  • + 1
 @zede: for sure you need to be careful about what you buy from Decathlon. I agree some stuff is rubbish but some are also pretty decent - for the price and comparable to more expensive stuff. I bought some MTB shoes from them about 7 years ago and they were shocking - they got returned. Maybe I have just got lucky with my shorts!
  • + 1
 @BMG: yeah these things felt like they hadn't been tested properly, if at all.
On the other hand, there is this big 60L backpack, very comfortable and solid, the only thing I've bought there and I'm really happy with it. I use it regularly to travel and it's perfect. Ive even pedaled over 300m elevation with the backpack loaded with 15kg of gears clothes and food, and I just got sore shoulders from it and it disappeared within the night.
It's like it's the only product that was designed and tested correctly
  • + 1
 @zede: The 3.90€ light windjacket are the best 3.90€ I've ever spent. It folds on itself and fits in a pocket, and protects from a chill wind. Of course if you wear it for too long you start to sweat inside, but for 3.90€, I always carry it if there's wind or rain.
  • + 15
 Maloja on my ass??
never ever!!
  • + 5
 Mountain biking's equivalent to „Camp David“ clothing. Make that logo bigger!
  • + 6
 I really enjoy their jerseys, but anytime I see someone with that writing on their butt cheeks it reminds me of a tramp stamp. Not how I want to look on the trail.
  • + 2
 Took me too long to find this comment. My first thought was, "So we're all just going to ignore the shorts with Maloja" all over the ass? Glad someone else is with me here.
  • + 11
 Why do mountain bike shorts have such weird closures? Why not just a bit of elastic in the waist band and then a zipper and button and belt loops like every freaking other pair of pants/shorts in the world. I mean keeping your pants up is a pretty solved problem and none of the "solutions" these companies come up with seem to be able to handle my 2 to 3 inch waist size changes that happen over the year. Clothes that fit at the start of the season in spring are falling off my ass by mid summer and I can't just throw a belt on?
  • + 13
 Can we get a review on last year's clothing and where I can buy it at 60% off?
  • + 8
 As a general rule of thumb you don’t ever ride with people that were ‘kits’ - especially if it matches their bike. Their either a jerry or a fast pro but either way they won’t be fun to ride with
  • + 1
 It’s like wearing a Ruroc helmet on the slopes. Red flags gallore.
  • + 4
 I'm neither. I just buy stuff on clearance in my size. Sometimes it matches. Usually it doesn't.
  • + 7
 too expensive, too ugly, too much advertisement... gonna save the money for some good food and some good training and ride my bike that people wearing these eat my dust on the trails
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 6, 2019 at 7:23) (Below Threshold)
 What if you have so much cash you don’t need to save money for good food... also vegan food isn’t that expensive
  • + 1
 Except for dudes who have some good training AND expensive kit. The two aren't mutually exclusive.
  • + 5
 I wish PinkBike would write one of these up for the guys who have to wear athletic-cut jeans. This guy looks like every gear model on every website. I read "5'11" tall, has a 31-inch waist, and weighs 160-lbs" and didn't bother reading the remainder of the article because I knew none of the information would apply to me at all.
  • + 5
 i'm glad my days of buying full matching Fox riding kit is behind me.

These days I go for mid level bib shorts, mid level shorts (still from fox) and then a regular old fruit of the loom t-shirt. I don't then get upset if I fall and rip them.

Although it is nice to see some fairly subtle designs. Some riders looks like they are straight out of an 80's ski catalogue with bright colours and crazy shapes.

Not that it matters of course, as long as everyone is riding, smiling and having fun... wear what you will!
  • + 2
 I'm with you. The last few years, the Fox kit has been way overrated. Still like their gloves, though.
  • + 7
 With this gear you need to ride fast so people don't notice how ugly it is.
  • + 8
 No fox???
  • + 1
 Speaking of Fox, they already have the "innovative short clasp" that 100% put on their shorts.

Anyway, I buy my ride specific shirts and shorts on clearance. 1, 2, 5, 10 year old clothing tech works perfectly fine in 2019.
  • + 2
 It would be great to include specs like fabric content and inseam/outseam lengths to help with buying decisions.

Maybe they’re all polyester but if someone came out with something that wasn’t, I’d be interested.

Also, mtb kits are just so ugly. What’s the deal? I know Kitsbow makes some decent looking stuff. Where are they?
  • + 2
 In the era of online ordering, why are we still using s,m,l etc., for size references on shorts. No one makes their clothes the same size. Can we start using waist sizes and inseams. Yea, I know, there are reference charts, but Wouldn't it be easier to reduce the hassle of returning a short marked XL that shows up w/ a 32" waist or legs so long they could be pants?
  • + 0
 If the world went to actual waist sizing on clothing people would be shocked. Vanity sizing has taken over and people don't want to admit that they're fat. 34" waist pants are typically 36 - 38" in true sizing. Women's clothing is even worse.
  • + 2
 Nothing about Fair-Trade certified sewing, sustainable business practices, recycled materials, or 1% for the planet. Just keep driving that consumeristic model with wasteful "outdoor" industry bullshit and lack of eco responsibility. Lame.
  • + 3
 Seems like you could've worked artisanal in there
  • + 2
 MTB kit is expensive. I never pay retail for my MTB clothes. I usually just wait until they go on clearance online, or use 'pro-deals' to buy new gear.

I really like Pearl Izumi's lineup. My style is monochromatic like PI's color palette. Their Elevate shorts are the highest quality MTB shorts I've ever used. And I have a lot from different brands from clearance sales. Their jerseys are also really nice. As are their chamois, which I use almost exclusively now. Their QC is impeccable. The best part is their lifetime warranty on any and all clothes and shoes. Who the hell does a lifetime warranty on clothes and shoes that is going to be crashed and slid through dirt and asphalt?!?! A company who knows that their gear is built to last.
  • + 0
 Too bad Shimano bought them....
  • + 0
 @yzedf: Shimano has owned them for over a decade. What's your point?
  • + 1
 @Almazing: when you try to do a warranty on shoes, they just send whatever random similar model they have, whether it's in your size or not. They sent me a 46 of a redesigned shoe that was a roomier fit, too bad my shoes were 45 of the older snugger style. Handed to me by the rep, who wouldn't look me in the eye he was so embarrassed. I'd been buying their stuff forever (well, since the 90's).
  • + 4
 Bracing for the "HUNDREDANDSIXTY BUCKS FOR A PAIR OF SHORTS??? I get mine at CostCo for $5!" comments
  • + 4
 Well done to POC for sticking a zipper on the neck. I won't buy a riding top without one.
  • + 1
 Yeti ride clothing is the best I've ever tried! I've ridden every day and done quite a few races in the same kit since 2017, it doesn't smell, shows no signs of wear, has not stretched or faded, is completely comfortable, well made and is one of the few bike related purchases that proved to be good value in the long term!
  • - 1
 I would buy Yeti clothing only if I was to take a 1998 hardtail with bar ends to sandbag group rides with Volvo engineers


*expecting a couple of friends sending me angry PMs... Big Grin
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: I was thinking more along the lines of, I would wear yeti clothing if it didn't have yeti on it. I mean, if you have a BMW, you don't wear BMW clothing. You just don't. It doesn't matter how good it is.
  • + 9
 Do you also wear other turquoise colored things and post pictures in the Yeti FB group with your matchy-matchy kit and matchy matchy bike?

I swear 50% of the posts in the Yeti FB group is people posting turquoise colored clothes and accessories asking for opinions. And the other 50% is the same colored turquoise bike I've seen thousands of times.
  • + 1
 @jaame: I've seen people in BMW clothing. True story.
  • - 2
 @jaame: Yeah, wearing “factory” SWAG is a slippery slope. But wearing BMW clothing would not be adequate to Yeti. BMW is like Specialized. And I am more than fine with that. What makes me cringe though is folks walking around with stuff from Merida or Canyon. That’s some quite failed “I do MTB” signaling. Nobody wears a Kia hat. What amuses me though is folks in quasi counterfeit swag. Like people in S-Works Tshirts that you can tell were not released by Specialized. There’s a lot of that in MTb meccas like Garda or on Marathon races. Not to mention Monster Energy sticker on a moped or a pickup truck in Europe. GoPro sticker on a 5yr old BMW M3. Yes it’s a nice car, but you can tell dude bought it second hand and attempts at signaling his drifting creed. I got the One up Tshirt Less work More Ride and went to work in it once. I was put into my place rather quickly.
  • + 1
 That's why you just don't wear factory swag. Ever. Imagine buying Yeti's entire wardrobe for years to match your sweet ass bike. Then one day, you decide to switch to another brand. Oh the horror. Your new bike doesn't match the color or name of your wardrobe. Time to buy an entire new line of MTB clothes to match your new bike. That gets expensive you know.
  • + 2
 Yeti enduro gloves were the biggest POS I ever had. I ripped 3 pairs all on the first ride that I used them. I guess to give them credit they did keep giving me new pairs but after 3 I just wanted my money back.
  • + 1
 I kind of feel the same about home brand components. I would never buy a set of bontrager wheels aftermarket, or a Santa Cruz handlebar. I don't care how good they are. I think that's one thing that YT has got right. They put name brand finishing kit on their bikes. Ok it's gone down a bit since the bos/DT Swiss days, but at least you still get a renthal cockpit, fox dropper and stuff.
The exception is the Specialized body geometry stuff. I've got their saddle and insoles. That said, if I could get some other make of saddle in the Power Arc shape, I would. And those insoles are really light compared to the competition. About 200g a pair lighter than the Aline insoles I have. They are about 450g a pair. I had to put them in my golf shoes after I weighed them!
  • + 1
 OMG, the price on some of this kit. Dickies shorts FTW. I can go down and the shorts barely register a scrape. Those nice synthetic things will be toast. And the Dickies will last through a season of riding and casual wear. And in basic black. What more does anyone need?
  • + 1
 Does anyone have any good suggestions for warm weather riding pants for talk people? I prefer pants for some rides due to ticks/poison ivy, esp. when I'm likely to stop and do a bit of trailwork.

The Fox Flexair is the closest I've found but I'm worried that it's 31.75 in inseam would end up midcalf mid ride.
  • + 1
 I've been trying out Fox Flexair pants this spring due to poison oak super bloom in California. They pedal well, and actually feel cooler than some of my shorts due to the light stretchy material. I wear 32" jeans and the medium Flexair pant stops just above the ball of my ankle.
  • + 1
 @andeh23: Thanks! That's what I figured. I'm a 34 inseam so I suspect that they'd stop a bit higher than I'd like for tick prevention purposes (though with midlength socks, they'd probably be fine for poison plant protection).
  • + 4
 Dakine is my fav. Simple clean design, always grey and usually dark green are in the line up....good fit, good price.
  • + 1
 on a cycle you "pedal" or are "pedalling".
going house to house selling small items you peddle or are peddling.

Come on guys, you are supposed to be literary enough get get this item correct about the sport you are supposed to be expert on.
  • + 3
 Please review a $15 thrift store kit.
Lets see how my cutoff jeans and pearl dnaps compare
  • + 1
 I wish these tests were more dynamic. In the northeast we get all conditions - wicked rain, very cold, very hot, snow, wind; you name it. I'd like to hear from riding areas that cover the gambit.
  • + 3
 The fall gear guide typically includes more durable and weather specific riding kits and material information. This time of year, it wouldn’t work for us due to our fairly temperate climate.
  • + 4
 Whats wrong with using a belt? Just asking for a friend
  • + 1
 For the UK readers, how about telling us how it does in the wet??
Also, with a couple of guys above,

how about measurements rather than sizing, one brands "L" is another's "M".
  • + 2
 The answer is C: just get Endura instead.
  • + 2
 The "no belt option" is a knockout-criteria for me when selecting pants. These velcro-solutions work for a few months, then the pant renders itself useless...
  • + 2
 With California's poison oak season the way it is, I'll be sticking to pants and long sleeves thanks
  • + 1
 Every pair of poc shorts I’ve had the zippers failed. But that being said, they sent me a new pair to replace them two different times.
  • + 2
 This is what you should look like, a mountain biker, all shinny and technical. Specific riding shoes will complete the look.
  • + 1
 Will I also get money if I write something about those famous Tineli Jerseys?

So, how about the jerseys from famous Tineli?

P. S. @tineli: pm me for my bank account number
  • + 2
 Check out Voler. Made in USA (jerseys at least). My 3 jerseys have held up for years.
  • + 1
 $160 for a pair of shorts?! Just hit up Aliexpress - MTB shorts start around $10 a pair if you want to save some beer tokens. I haven't shredded a pair yet.
  • + 5
 Mtb shorts are worth spending the money on, I ride in a cotton t shirt, couldnt care less about that but a decent pair of shorts make a difference.
  • + 1
 Cheap shorts in HK summer last don't last long before sweat rots them away.
  • + 3
 @zyoungson: you're probably right but are they 16 times as good?
  • + 1
 @colincolin: What do you call good? Mine haven't split, ripped or faded after 18 months and all the zips still work. They're unlined and have done all I want them to do. Cheers ;-)
  • + 1
 surprised no Club Ride, it's really all I buy now. As a ski/bike shop manager I can wear it to work then ride after work without changing anything really.
  • + 2
 It’s included in the women’s review this go around. We will try to get their stuff into a men’s review when we can.
  • + 2
 In your fervour to review the most significantly overpriced kit, you appear to have forgotten Endura.
  • + 2
 Well if you are going to review over expensive gear at least review some 7 Mesh stuff, good guys and good stuff.
  • + 1
 When is the kneepad test article coming? In almost every shot there is a different kneepad being worn so I would assume that is next?
  • + 2
 I did like the last tests more where i could see which short is the best etc.!
  • + 2
 Having owned POC shorts in black I can say without doubt that they stay black for ONE WASH !
  • + 1
 This would be a much more interesting article if it had actual affordable gear you can find at Walmart or Target or TJ Maxx or whatever.
  • + 1
 "...while somewhat roomy, they had a slimmer fit through the rear (which I like)"

Come on guys, you're doing this on purpose right? Wink
  • + 2
 T-shirt and cut off Dickies. Done.
  • + 2
 Where the Rasta kits at ?
  • + 2
 I just wear kit all the time now, so I'm ready to rock.
  • + 2
 I just wanna be as lean as the dude modeling the outfits.
  • + 2
 Damn...

Mountain bike "fashion" = fugley
  • + 1
 Men's Zoic and POC kits look so poor, cheap even, compared to the women's version.
  • + 1
 Just got some of those Zoic Ether One shorts, really nice and a big improvement over the regular Ether (previous favorite).
  • + 1
 Check out Patagonia. Super high quality. Price is reasonable. No stupid logos. I’ll never wear anything else again.
  • + 2
 We reviewed both a men's and women's Patagonia kit for the Summer 2018 gear guide. Excellent products.
  • + 1
 @nkrohan: Agreed. Material is really soft and both the tops and shorts are thoughtfully made. I bought the bibs this year as well and have been very impressed.
  • + 1
 What is this?! There is missing a sign for dentists and lawyers only! A bunch of pijamas for a price of a suit! #endurogap
  • + 1
 Why don't they just compare all 10 of these kits to Troy Lee Designs' clothing? That's the benchmark to me.
  • + 1
 They make the best shorts for sure.
  • + 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: Have you tried the newest version of Skyline jerseys???
  • + 1
 @unrooted: no, the last skyline jersey I had was maybe a 2017
  • + 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: is i the mesh-y material? I like that jersey, but the new material feels 1000% nicer, I've been able to find them for $33 US on Ebay.
  • + 1
 With that riding style, it doesn't matter what you wear you're gonna look shit
  • + 1
 where is TLD? Really weird omission? Is there some bad vibes between Troy Lee and Pinkbike!
  • + 2
 People really ride with their phones in the pockets?
  • + 2
 Was just thinking I can't stand stuff in the side pockets. Give me two regular person pockets deep enough and were good. Also all the Fox leftovers just went on sale at Cambria. $50 for shorts with 2 pockets and a chamois liner. Mine last fine for a season or two.
  • + 1
 Do you guys test how well stains wash out? I have some shirts where the stains just don't wash out Frown
  • + 1
 We do pay attention to durability after washing but stains not so much. Getting stains out is more a personal thing and takes into considering how you are washing the clothing, what detergent, what temperature and what stain removers, etc... I let my husband do all the laundry so I definitely don't have a good answer.
  • + 1
 I was wondering if Fox or TLD made the best kit. Guess I'll still wonder...
  • + 2
 Fox??? I've owned a lot of fox gear, most of it fell apart quickly, including moto gear.

For me jerseys and baggy shorts: Troy Lee
Gloves: Troy Lee and Alpinestars
Spandex shorts: Yeti or Pearl Izumi Elite
  • + 1
 @unrooted: I always go with Royal. Thin, light, stylish, nearly indestructible and usually on sale.
  • + 2
 That metal clasp can suddenly become a part of you in an event of a crash!
  • + 2
 Now I'm really curious what e-MTB specific clothing is?
  • + 1
 MTB clothing is more expensive than designer clothing. I'm going to start riding in a designer suit. It is cheaper. lol.
  • + 2
 Ridiculous pricing I wonder just how many of these get sold at RRP
  • + 1
 I wear a full face with full body spandex suit.
  • + 2
 No TLD. No care.
  • + 1
 How about reviewing Walmart & Target brands that sell for around $20!
  • + 1
 I guess blue is the color to be seen in this year, huh?
  • + 1
 I'll wait for the end of season sales...pfft
  • + 1
 Norrona makes really nice riding kit as well
  • + 1
 Should have reviewed some DHARCO kit. Would be the most popular here.
  • + 0
 Summer kits? Pfft! I'm just into buying new waterproof shorts and socks here...
  • + 2
 what a waste of time
  • + 1
 Best Jersey - fox flexair Best pants - Poc resistance Dont even argue.
  • + 1
 And im here, buying my stuff on aliexpress
  • + 1
 I would love to hear your take on the new Patagonia MTB kits!
  • + 1
 Still waiting on a @nf-design review!!
  • + 1
 You guys need to check out the Chromag gear. Real nice .
  • + 1
 Airmatic shorts look cool. All else...Meh.
  • + 2
 Never buy in-season.
  • + 1
 No LV kit?shame
  • + 1
 5.11 and 31 waist ?
  • + 0
 im gonna stick to my jean cut offs and Hawaiian shirts
  • + 2
 **Aloha shirt**
  • - 1
 How about the jersey's from famous Tineli?
  • + 2
 I see what you did there.
  • - 2
 How about these famous Tineli garments? None of them?
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