Now Over: Norco Ask Us Anything - DH Geometry and Suspension Kinematics

Apr 7, 2015 at 10:55
by Norco Bicycles  
Norco AUA


For this edition of Ask Us Anything, Norco...

Norco's evolution from 'that Canadian company' to becoming a real player in the high-end bike market is a feel-good story that was fuelled not just by dedication and hard work, but also a desire to design some truly impressive bikes. Comparing those early VPS machines to their just debuted Aurum Carbon, a bike that looks as if it could go up against anything on the market, is evidence of that journey, and while having their headquarters located within spitting distance of the fabled North Shore mountains certainly hasn't hurt, it'd be selling Norco very short to think of them as 'shore-specific. In fact, Bryn Atkinson and Jill Kintner have been racing all over the world aboard their Norcos, and the freshly signed Sam Blenkinsop is looking to use his Aurum Carbon to move up from a ninth overall world ranking in 2014.

Norco has put a lot of effort into the Aurum Carbon's A.R.T. suspension and Gravity Tune geometry, and the story goes much deeper than just a new carbon fiber frame that sheds weight. The bike's rear - center length changes between sizes in an effort to maintain proper weight distribution regardless of how tall you happen to be, and it's also one of the few carbon downhill bikes that sports different length head tubes, a tactic Norco employed after the polling of Aurum owners revealed that many were using headset spacers to fine tune their cockpit. You can learn all about the new Aurum here, and then ask your questions in the comment section below.

Want to know more about Norco's approach to geometry and 27.5'' wheels on downhill bikes, their A.R.T. suspension, or what the future may hold? Owen Pemberton, Senior Design Engineer; P.J. Hunton, Engineering Manager; Jim Jamieson, Product Manager, are here to answer those questions.

Norco
Gravity Tune.
Aurum
Advanced Ride Technology (A.R.T.)


The Panel

Norco
  Owen Pemberton, Senior Design Engineer; P.J. Hunton, Engineering Manager; Jim Jamieson, Product Manager, are here to answer your questions..

P.J.
Name: P.J. Hunton
Title: Engineering Manager
Years @ Norco: 6.2
Hometown: Bralorne, B.C.
Favourite Norco: Range Carbon
Favourite Terrain: Chilcotins, Pacific Northwest
Riding Style: Fast & Smooth

OWEN
Name: Owen Pemberton
Title: Senior Design Engineer
Years @ Norco: 5
Hometown: Coventry, UK
Favourite Norco: The ones that don’t exist yet
Favourite Terrain: The rootier and rockier the better
Riding Style: Loose… between crashes

JJ
Name: Jim “JJ” Jamieson
Title: Senior Product Manager
Years @ Norco: 25
Hometown: White Rock, B.C.
Favourite Norco: Sight
Favourite Terrain: Trails with good flow and jumps
Riding Style: Airtime and style before speed



How ‘Ask Us Anything' Works:

Starting at 10:00 AM PST/6:00 PM BST on Thursday, April 9 you can type your questions into the comment box following this article and The Norco Bicycles team will answer them. Sometimes your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, as Norco Bicycles will be busy responding to the flood of questions. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines:

Keep your questions relative. While this is an 'Ask Us Anything' session, the concentration is on Norco's 650b DH technology. Questions related to this are encouraged, but still feel free to ask whatever pressing queries you may have.

Stay focused. Try to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later.

• Try to keep your questions to about 100 words.

Ask Us Anything is a service to PB readers who are seeking helpful information, not a forum to broadcast opinions or grievances. If you do have a negative issue that you want to ask about, no worries, just keep your complaints relevant and in the context of a question so that it can be addressed in a productive manner.

Use propping to acknowledge good - or not so good - questions. Bump them up or down to where they belong.


Mark your calendars - the conversation starts at 10:00 AM Pacific Time / 6:00 PM British Time on Thursday, April 9.

Other time zones:
• 1:00 PM EST (New York)
• 6:00 PM BST (London)
• 7:00 PM CET (Paris)
• 8:00 PM SAST (Cape Town)
• 3:00 AM AEST April 10 (Sydney, Aus)
• 5:00 AM NZST April 10 (Auckland, NZ)


www.norco.com

Must Read This Week

353 Comments

  • 73 16
 I have 12 000$ but i dont know what to do with it, so should i buy the new norco DH carbon with enve groupset or a brand new yamaha R6 super bike with full yoshimura exhaust for the same price ?
  • 14 9
 Go for the norco!!!
  • 31 3
 12000 ? Give it To me no worries
  • 9 12
 buy an Enduro bike and an MX dirt bike an be happy you will be happier than riding your nice YamR6 on roads full of cars producing fumes
  • 9 8
 R6. Because it has a greater cargo capacity and can go both up and downhills.
  • 43 2
 $12,000 sex doll? Ya, $12,000 sex doll.
  • 7 2
 Not sure if that is a question or a statement about the cost of bikes...
  • 38 4
 Buy a lot of cocaine
  • 25 3
 a LOT of cocaine
  • 6 1
 Buy the R6 if you want resale value the Norco if you want fun.
  • 16 0
 I think that, as consumers, we need to realise the MTB brands are in competition with one another, and that unless the frame design is truely awful (which is extremely rare unless you read Protour's comments) no one could really pick the difference once the shock and fork are tuned to their riding style. I reckon any pro would still win under the right conditions on a Trek or a Canyon or a YT etc with the shocks tuned to his/her riding style.
Until we widely accept that the bikes are mostly going to be awesome and hence why there are very few negative reviews, nothing is going to change price wise. Once more people realise, they'll just buy the cheapest option unless they want to look different (one would think you'd be judged on you riding more than your kit) and the industry might condense and become more like the Moto industry. Sure there is a minor market for those who want to look different but It almost baffles me that there are at least 10 brands making bikes which perform so similarly yet price the bikes like they aren't in competition. You can go on and on about volume, but with a low spec but decent dual suspension bike (reasonable brakes and suspension) costing 3k minimum, good luck growing the sport beyond the fanatical outdoorsy types. The average person scoffs at 500 for an around town commuter because it's a simple machine, let alone 3k to ride decent MTB trails moderately comfortably and safely.
  • 4 1
 @camcoz69 its called a hooker Wink
  • 67 8
 Would you rather shred the Whistler Bike Park or the Sea to Sky Highway? Could you show up with the R6 at a Superbike Grand Prix and be competitive? I doubt it. You could certainly show up at a UCI World Cup DH race with the Aurum and win. Well, probably not you, but Sam could! Go Blenki!
  • 3 27
flag R-P-S (Apr 9, 2015 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 Lol, says a rider on a competing team could win a World Cup race on their new flagship DH bike and then gives his own rider a sympathy shout-out! "Damn I wish we had Sam riding our new bike, but don't worry Blenki, I'm sure you'll have some half decent results too!"
  • 6 1
 @PJHunton-NorcoBicycles I would definitely ride the bike park Smile but im also pretty sure that #1 world cup rider could probably win with the 5k$ bike.
  • 11 1
 You can't hit dirt merchant on a street bike. And if you don't want the top model Aurum we do have a model at $5030 with the same frame. /jj.
  • 2 0
 @PJHunton-NorcoBicycles sorry but i dont understand the difference of price of 3205$ between the 2 top aurum bikes, the only difference in the spec are the 2 enve rim, hubs are the same... complete enve wheel set is like 2700$
  • 3 0
 @R-P-S Just scroll down to where it lists their riders......

www.norco.com/15aurum?
  • 20 1
 Lol, I'm an idiot. Oh how I wish there was a delete button.
  • 5 1
 The Aurum with ENVE wheels was a limited release of a small number of bike. The Enve rims and DT 240 hubs are the only up specs, we use the 340 hubs on the DT wheel model. The price difference may also be slightly due to the Can $ vs US$ today.
  • 4 2
 Sorry, but an R6 is not even a superbike. It's a supersport bike. You need to step up to a Yamaha R1 for superbikes, and those run $16500...
  • 4 1
 @norcobicycles you can hit dert merchant ... but you will probably also hit the dirt
  • 1 0
 More like eat the dirt.
  • 1 0
 Good point norco. @hardyk point is top of the line aurum is almost identical to what the dh pros ride. Factory r6 is not even close in any way to grand prix bikes. Never thought of it that way ☺️
  • 1 0
 @paulclarke 12 000 is still way too much for what you get, the point of comparing stock r6 to track r6 is also stupid since there is much more components on a motor bike than on a dh... and also you dont have to worry about power on a dh bike... the spec is not so different compared to the 7k models exept for rims... its a huge difference of money just to get a 'limited' edition color of the frame with enve rims. you wont go faster with the 12k bike than on the 7k one. This is bs.
  • 1 0
 the rims and custom paint etc, that not what I was talking about. And comparing superbikes to GP bikes is not stupid. Same as comparing top of the line Aurum to DH world cup Aurum, its all relative, if you understand that. All I was saying is that PJ put it in a way I had never thought of before. People say its so much for a top of the line DH and you can get a R6 or another 600cc for the same price. It is not pointless comparing the two dh bikes to the motorbikes. It is all relative.
  • 56 2
 In a sector of the industry where bikes are getting longer and front triangle (reach) is increasing significantly (and for the better as I'm sure anyone will agree who has a longer bike than they previously ran) how come you've gone completely backwards with the new Norco, the largest offering only 432mm reach? at least 20mm shorter than most other top end DH bikes.
  • 7 1
 @TEAM-ROBOT wee need you hear for this
  • 5 0
 also wondering this, new bike looks amazing, just a little short on front center length.
  • 1 11
flag bmaclean (Apr 8, 2015 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 i have 07 r6 ! get r6 you won't be disappointed and its more justifiable lol
  • 4 2
 i totally agree with fatality here- when i saw the pic of the bike, i immediately thought of a late 90's DH bike- you know the deal...short cockpit, slightly steep head angles with these massive forks that make the front end look extremely "upright" for lack of a better word.
seems like a very short reach for a like meant for WC speed- but then im sure the geometry was arrived at thru much feedback and testing. i would be very interested to hear about what lead to the current sizing of the frame!
  • 10 0
 I can’t really make much comment on what other people are doing but when I look at the current crop of DH bikes there are a couple of bikes that are longer than ours (size for size) but also a good amount that are shorter. What I can explain is what we did with the sizing of the new bike compared to the old bike. Basically we kept it very similar, almost the same. But, that can’t be right the reach on the old large was 447.6mm and the new large is 432.6, that’s 15mm shorter surely? Those numbers may suggest a shorter bike but they do not take into account the stack measurements. When comparing reach numbers we should always also look at the stack numbers.

Take a look at this image www.pinkbike.com/photo/12102111 which shows a graphical overlay of the old bike and the new.
  • 7 0
 When designing the geometry for the new bike we polled a cross section of current Aurum riders to get their view on the fit of the bike, we were extremely interested in how they were setting up their cockpit. What we found was that all riders were running some headset or stem spacers (or a combination of both) to get to their desired bar height. Because the old Aurum employed a single head tube length of 110mm we found that larger riders were needing to run a minimum of 35-40mm of spacers to get to their comfortable bar height (some riders a lot more). It is more efficient to put this height into the frame rather than spacers as it puts less stress on the headset bearings and the fork steerer/stanchions. We found that the combination of bigger wheel, longer fork and a 120mm head tube length would put the reach/stack point right in the same zone as the minimum people were running on the old bike.

Rider feedback has been unanimous that this position is spot on, we are not forcing anyone to run a bar height higher than they want, but also riders are not needing to use an excessive amount of spacers either. Due to some geo tweaks to get the weight balance a little more dialed with the bigger wheels and the move to a larger offset fork, again because of the larger wheels, the new bike has a longer wheelbase, and therefore some increase in stability at speed over the old bike. Yet it still ‘fits’ the rider nearly identically.
  • 2 0
 Owen, Thanks for the answer, but I am still a bit confused. Can you please clarify? 432.6 is in fact 15mm shorter reach than 447.6, how does the stack effect that exactly? It seems to me that changing the stack number has no effect on the reach of a bike what so ever.
  • 5 0
 No photo on that link. But I am slightly colorblind. ..
  • 14 0
 parallaxid, I think what he meant was that the vast majority of people were running spacers on their old aurums, which obviously set's the bars back a little but thereby effectively reducing the reach... and because it's done with spacers, it never shows up on any geometry charts. With the new Aurum, they've built that stack height in, so people don't have to run spacers. The end result is a reach that is pretty similar, except because it's built into the frame now, the reach actually shows up in the geometry chart.
  • 1 2
 hmm no ... owen is talking about the most important number in DH-frame sizing -> downtube length ... the headtube moves back and up. The downtube length stays quite the same.

when you take a look at the reach numbers you always have to take the stack into your considerations.
  • 4 0
 @brussell beat me to it, that is exactly what I was trying to say. Our riders where adamant that they didn't want us to significantly change the 'fit' of the bike.
  • 3 0
 A medium 2015 giant reign has a reach of 444mm
  • 1 4
 this really makes it clear as day for anyone confused so i'll post it again www.pinkbike.com/photo/12102111
  • 1 0
 How do you take into account the sack. If two bikes have the same reach and one's stack is 1 cm taller how much bigger of a bike is it?
  • 49 1
 How limiting is patenting and the guarding of intellectual property when you try to design a suspension platform? Do you guys feel that patents stop innovation since frame designers can't use other people's designs when trying to improve? Have you guys ever wanted to try and do something with a new frame and have been stopped by other companies? Would like to hear your opinions on this, it seems to be something that isn't really discussed as much as other topics when regarding frame design.
  • 3 1
 Can I just add: How did you guys get to Norco? Since it's a fairly small industry I'm curious about how you guys individually got to the positions, as in jobs, where you are today. Cheers Smile
  • 2 0
 I'm interested in this too, with so many suspension designs already taken. Is there a process to license a suspension design, and how to you know if your design won't infringe on someone else's patent?
  • 10 0
 Not very limiting for us. We have done kinematic evaluations of many different suspension systems and we always come back to the Horst link design for a number of good reasons: adaptable to any intended use, we can get any suspension characteristics we want (axlepath, anti-squat, leverage curve, …), active suspension while braking and a stiff frame structure. I don’t think it’s really limiting innovation because each brand is spending the time to optimize their own system. By sticking with Horst Link, we haven’t been shut down by other companies.
  • 2 1
 @PJHunton-NorcoBicycles Wasn't the Horst Link patented by Specialized here in the colonies up until very shortly? Did that affect Norco?
  • 2 5
 I feel there is a lot of stagnation in the industry. Companies like Yeti have created two new suspension designs in a few years while everybody else is working off old retired patents. Why hasn't Norco made something new rather than optimize an old Horst Link system?
  • 1 2
 @DrLyonsMTB would you use something you know that doesnt fit your demands ?... due to the simelarities with the single pivot or vpp design yetis designs both have pretty high brake squat and both feel pretty harsh suspensionwise, wich is not ideal for a dh bike
  • 14 0
 @hamncheez Specialized did not patent the Horst link suspension system. A motorcycle designer named Horst Leitner did. Specialized then bought the rights to use the technology. It only affected us with the bikes we sold in the US, where we had to pay a royalty. The patent expired in 2013.
  • 1 0
 AMP Research - Horst Leitner

My company Bombproof here in the UK bought several "kits" from him (same as used on the Mongoose Amplifier) before we quickly realized the limitations of the Macpherson Strut, and moved to a swinglink design but still using the horst pivot
  • 2 0
 I've met horst L. a few times at the resort at pelican hill (newps) where he likes to drink.
Kinda just smiles and seemed pretty soft spoken and very pleasant.
  • 39 2
 Could you rename it Severe Hucking Advanced Ride Technology (S.H.A.R.T. for short)? Thanks!
  • 36 3
 How important do you think axle path is? being as most frames have little to no rearward travel at all, and with fork compression happening to shorten the wheelbase by almost two inches at full travel, do you think stability can become an issue without rearward travel on the back end?
  • 11 1
 ^this.
And if your rear wheel goes over an obstacle wouldn't a rearward axle path help minimize deceleration?
  • 15 1
 Canfield Brothers figured this out years ago. Test ride a Jedi and you'll see how well it actually works.
  • 5 0
 There are negatives to a heavy rearward axle path too.
Ever try getting one off the ground without a jump?
  • 2 1
 Yes I have. I have a k9ine which hops and wheelies perfectly and gets off the ground without a ramp just fine. it also keeps great speed through really rough stuff due to the rearward travel. my question was wether or not the guys at Norco felt it was important....
  • 19 0
 Axlepath determines how your suspension will react to square edge bumps, pedaling forces and braking forces, so it is extremely important. In regards to matching the rear wheel path with the front, that would result in too much chain growth & anti-squat, making the bike extremely stiff under pedaling forces. There is not a single bike on the market where the front and rear axle paths are parallel. Stability is also related to where your center of mass is located relative to the wheels. If the wheelpaths were parallel, your weight bias would end up horribly forward near full travel leading to instability.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the reply!
  • 10 5
 @PJHunton-NorcoBicycles "There is not a single bike on the market where the front and rear axle paths are parallel." what about a full rigid? Razz
  • 42 0
 @groghunter I didn't realize that two points could be parallel. Maybe I missed that day in skool.
  • 5 0
 ^ Haha I went to that day!! 3 points and it's a party, or a plane. Not quite locked down block party until you tackle the 6 DOF
  • 3 2
 Hey, they move, just not in relation to the rest of the frame. XD
  • 35 3
 I've owned a carbon Range since last September and have mostly been really impressed with it. You guys did a really good job creating a light, stiff, and responsive long travel trail bike. One nagging trait which is probably going to lead me to replace it is the low, forward horst link setup that gives the frame an incredible amount of anti-squat. Any stand up mashing extends the rear end kind of excessively. This is fine on gravel roads because it increases rear wheel traction. But this trait also drives the rear wheel into terrain irregularities and causes the bike to hang up, to the point where it almost stops in some cases since the wheel is fighting the terrain. I've owned a variety of horst link bikes over the last 15 years and know this was a design choice, not something necessarily inherent in the horst system. It's like a 2002 Giant NRS's little brother. Why was this done and are there any plans for future models to tone down the amount of downward wheel force/antisquat? Thanks for fielding the questions!
  • 4 0
 Great point. Huge % anti-squat at beginning of travel.
  • 3 1
 Kidwoo do you know how much anti-squat the carbon Range has at normal sag? I'm on a carbon Range and haven't experienced the bike hanging up like you're describing, but maybe it's because I'm running a different chain ring size or shock setup. That said I've run chain ring sizes from 22 to 38 teeth and can't say I've noticed the bike hanging up when mashing on the pedals. Interesting question none the less and looking forward to a response.
  • 2 0
 It certainly varies with chainring size (I've been running a 32/11sp setup) but if you believe that linkage program it's upwards of 160% depending on rear cog. I don't take those numbers as gospel or anything but I didn't even look at them until after I'd ridden the bike for a while. I imagine it would be lower/less pronounced with a bigger front ring. It's not particular to this frame, almost any time you see a low, forward horst link like these there will be some of that. Next time you're out find an extended steep and bumpy section that you pretty much need to be standing to motor up. You'll feel it when your back wheel hits a ledge/root under a hard downward pedal stroke. If not.....no worries. You can definitely watch the rear shock extend just pedaling up a road and looking down. But I've had some specialized bikes in the past with the same behavior. You'll notice in a Vital review it gets mentioned (at least the rise part) and they touch on it in the recent bike magazine bible test video. I'm far from the only one who's picked up on it. It's really the only gripe I have with the frame in terms of ride quality. And like I said, sometimes it's a benefit on smoother steep stuff with crappy traction.
  • 19 0
 Great question and you are not alone with this astute observation. Why is the anti-squat high? It is a bi-product of a fairly rearward axlepath, which was designed intentionally to deal with square edge bumps very efficiently. This was an important goal for the Range (and Sight), to allow the bike to carry lots of speed through rough terrain. The compromise being high anti-squat. We prioritized bump absorption over stand up pedal mashing efficiency. It is possible to reduce the anti-squat but you can’t do this without reducing the rearwardness of the axlepath. This would reduce the square edge bump compliance. Is this something you would want in a future version of the Range?
  • 14 2
 Honestly.......yes. I think you guys could keep some of the square edge compliance trade-off minimized by going with a slightly longer chainstay that would open up the arc angle a bit. I think the range is a beast descending (in a good way) but the inefficiencies on rough climbs kind of wear you out after a few hours. It makes for kind of a stop and go ride expending more energy than some other designs. For me, at least Wink

Thanks a bunch for fielding the questions! You guys are making some awesome bikes these days.
  • 3 0
 I have a sight and while I feel pedals beyond great I am thinking of trying an 34t Oval chaining to get closer to "ideal" 100% antisquat. This would give you less antisquat (36t) during the high power part of standing up and mashing. Anyone tried this/Any thoughts?
  • 1 1
 Want less anti squat? Use a larger front chain ring like a 36t.
  • 1 0
 I'd like to but I'm using a 34t now and already feel like I don't have a low enough when I want to rest during climbs even with the 42 in the back. I'm thinking 34t oval would give me similar effort level with less antisquat.
  • 19 2
 curious why you made the new aurum with 142 spacing instead of boost 148? it seems like if you are getting away from 150/157 on a DH bike, the wider spoke flanges of a boost 148 setup vs. 142 would of been more ideal? maybe you wanted to avoid all the PB hate? Wink
  • 11 12
 Norco's just being smart. A narrower rear actually handles better. The specialized WC team Demo 8's uses 135mm spacing.
  • 6 0
 @fatenduro if you think that is the case, would be interesting to hear WHY that is from Norco
  • 6 1
 please explain how the width between the stays affects handling? Geo is not affected, suspension is not affected, contact points are not affected? The only thing affected is the stiffness. Are you telling me that less stiff is better which is the opposite of what we have been told by bike companies for years. Spec did it because they could make it stiff enough without the extra width and so they could save weight.
  • 2 0
 @fatenduro do you have any evidence at all to back up that statement?
  • 14 8
 You guys can feel the difference in stiffness between a 135mm wheel and a 150mm wheel...... Do you understand how absurd that statement is? How do you tell the difference from tire flex when you're running sub 30psi? Get over it, you guys will never be able to ride hard enough to necessitate 150mm rear ends, especially if Gwin and Brosnan are running 135mm rear ends. Freaking hell. Who started this "stiffness" bs in the first place? Regardless, drop that word from your vocabulary, now.
  • 4 0
 The reason is because specialized. Sometimes it's because Brosnan. But usually its because specialized.
  • 10 0
 During the development of the new Aurum boost 148 didn’t exist (or at least we were not aware of it). We chose to go with 142 spacing over 157 because of the benefits it offers with an improved chainline for dedicated 7 speed drivetrains, extra heel clearance and extra clearance for the rear derailleur. Our rider’s feedback has been that with modern wheel technology stiffness and strength is not an issue.
  • 22 0
 Boost 148 would not offer as perfect a chainline as 142, and the extra clearance would be less, but personally I could live with that if it means we only have one rear hub width for all MTB’s in the future! If the whole industry moved towards using Boost 148 for every MTB discipline how would PB feel about it?
  • 4 0
 When and if i need a new frame, i will go to whomever runs 150, ive invested too much money to switch to 148. so as long as you guys offer a aluminum version @ 150, i'll stay with norco.
  • 11 0
 Owen, you could come up with Roost 149 instead! Imagine the increased stiffness and massive advantages in shit talking at the local trail head over Boost 148! Endless! Partner with Shimano for the hubs. win win.
  • 4 0
 or just produce and sell 1mm shims for way too much money to fit 150.
  • 2 0
 Here's the reason 135mm handles better, at least for DH racing. Imagine a really wide rear axle. Like a boost 600 or something. So wide it's practically an equilateral triangle when you look at it from behind. The tire is at the pointy bottom of the triangle. The axle in the flat triangle top. If the tire hits a rock on the side, that force will do 2 things to the triangle. First it will push the base of the triangle or axle to the side, and second it will cause the triangle to rotate or twist the axle. As the axle gets wider, more and more of that sideways force from the rock will be lateral, and less and less will be rotational. It will feel stiffer, because hitting a rock sideways will push the bike sideways. Now imagine the narrowest axle possible, like 1mm. From the axle down to the wheel it's practically a straight line. If the tire hits a rock sideways most of the force at the axle will be rotational, and very little lateral. As far as racing goes, at least the specialized racers prefer to have their bike tilt when hitting rocks sideways as opposed to being pushed sideways and off their line.
  • 2 0
 @Owen-NorcoBicycles Please just make every mountain bike you sell have a single rear hub width. Please stop this incremental improvement BS by collaborating and communicating with other companies!
  • 16 2
 what software do you guys use for modeling the kinematics?
  • 6 1
 Most likely solidworks in the mtb industry
  • 93 2
 Mostly crayons and play-dough.
  • 7 0
 "Solidworks is like engineering with a crayon"...famous words from a co-engineer in the company we work at. ha.
  • 2 0
 I don't have much experience with solid works, but when I did use it I hated it. I much preferred inventor to solid works. Am I just being obtuse?
  • 18 5
 Hi, im 17 and my dad left me, do you know where he is ... ? please
  • 12 2
 On new Range A versions you have used mechanical shaping for tubes instead of hydro forming. How this affects strength of the frame compared to other methods?
  • 7 0
 A mechanically formed tube will have the same strength as a hydroformed tube of the exact same shape. However, some shapes aren’t attainable with mechanical forming, such as sharp edges of a tube profile. Most bike frames these days are mechanically formed.
  • 1 0
 The same. It's using force to mechanically manipulate a material.
  • 9 0
 What do you have to say to the doubters of the 650b wheelsize? It seems like that is the direction downhill is headed in. Are there any applications (for downhill) where you see 26in being superior?
  • 18 2
 To the doubters, have you ridden a 650b wheeled bike? We think the benefits are pretty clear, as do our friends on the World Cup DH circuit. The only DH application where 26" wheels could be superior is for an extra small size, where we would want the rear center length to be even shorter than our current small and the bar height lower than the small.
  • 1 0
 Thank you for the response.
  • 10 2
 Hi guys. I've applied for the advertised Bicycle Design Engineer job with Norco. I'm hoping you can help get my application past the HR department. I'm a Mechanical Engineer, with a Master's degree. I've wrote my undergraduate thesis on the mathematics of bicycle design, and use Solidworks daily in my current position. Thanks
  • 18 1
 Bro do you Strava?
  • 62 1
 Just follow me on Strava and I'll see if you're qualified.
  • 3 0
 PJ with the right answer.
  • 19 8
 Are you going to come up with any new standard?
  • 7 0
 Hey guys, slightly off topic. We've had 3 Norco FourTwenties on order for about 10 years now and our rep keeps saying they're right around the corner. What gives?

Seriously though, no questions really just keep up the good work.
  • 9 0
 Stoked you remember that bike. I was hoping when I worked on that frame and spec that riders would use a chromoly full suspension bike with a rotor and pegs to grind boxes and do BMX style tricks in the bone yard in Whistler. Maybe that will still come in the future and the bike is actually 20 years ahead of it's time. I think we still have one of the original 420 frames here hanging up here../jj.
  • 1 0
 I actually screw around at the local skate park. On a 2008 norco shore one Razz . That is until the trails are dry.
  • 10 1
 The picture for this makes it look like Owen Pemberton is the new seat for the Aurum. He looks pretty unhappy with this.
  • 38 0
 I'm English.. I'm always unhappy.
  • 6 0
 Hello!
I have been looking at new DH sleds for a little bit, and have taken note that you get A LOT of bike for a great price with the Aurum 6.2. No one else, other than YT really can offer an equivalent build kit for $3,000 but Norco is not factory direct. How is it that Norco can offer that when most others can't even come close? Also thanks for your support of the Bachelor Bike Park!!
  • 10 1
 It is our goal to not only offer premium price point models but also bikes that riders can afford. The Aurum 6.2 is a good example trying to get a solid bike for park rentals and riders on a budget. /jj
  • 7 2
 The new aurum has a 142x12mm rear axle. What was the reasoning behind this decision and were there any extra design decisions made to stiffen up the rear end -or- is there any reason why you think a less stiff rear end might be beneficial.
  • 9 0
 We chose to go with 142 spacing over 157 because of the benefits it offers with an improved chainline for dedicated 7 speed drivetrains, extra heel clearance and extra clearance for the rear derailleur. Our rider’s feedback has been that with modern wheel technology stiffness and strength is not an issue.
  • 18 8
 Do you guys even lift?
  • 5 0
 When a bike is designed, it's often with the assumption that a certain chainring size is used (for anti squat, as an example). How do you deal with 1x drivetrains? What chainring size do you count on being the "right" size to design around?
  • 7 1
 1X drivetrains have actually made this easier because there's only one chainring to consider, instead of two or three. We design the kinematics around the chainring size which we feel is the most appropriate for the intended use. If you go up or down a size or two, your bike will still ride awesome.
  • 6 1
 Im a 4th year engineering student that has always wanted to try out the bike industry. How did you guys get to your positions? Any recomendations? Also, how do you guys take athlete input and work it into the design of a rear suspension linkage for example. Is there a lot of computer modelling and analysis that goes into how it will work or is it more so the use of many prototypes and tweaking geomentry physically to find the desired feel?
  • 7 0
 We all got to where we are by firstly being avid riders who are stoked on bike technology and design. Ride lots of different styles of bikes, stay in tune with modern bicycle technology and learn to use Solidworks really well. Athlete input is a key part of our product development process. With athletes competing in all the different disciplines, we are fortunate to be able to gather this feedback and incorporate it into the next generation of frames. The Aurum frame geometry is a prime example of how this athlete feedback system works. We use a combination of computer modeling and prototypes to develop our frames but at the end of the day, it's the ride feel that drives our decisions.
  • 4 1
 3rd year engineering student here, how important are marks?
  • 5 0
 @trailblitz If you need to ask, you've already been screened out. :-)
  • 1 0
 go Kyle!
  • 8 1
 Can you make an even bigger bike, xl maybe? New carbon one is very nice but the L is still a touch too small.
  • 7 0
 We are testing an XL size now so you may see one coming in the future. Your feedback and other taller riders who comment can help to make our decision.
  • 1 0
 What size rider (height and weight rider spec per size for Engineering spec) is modeled for a Large is there a sizing chart available for the new build?
  • 5 0
 When will 2015 frames (higher end models at least) actually be in stock for bike shops? We're 4 months into 2015 and last time our shop called we were told frames won't be in stock for another month or so
  • 5 1
 This could be due to shipping hold ups. The west coast ports were on strike which caused a HUGE delay, some shipments being 3-4 months late
  • 1 0
 And the carbon frame recall from 2014 is possible also a reason . But i got my Noroc Range C 7.3 Smile last week.
  • 6 0
 We were hit with some delays due to the shipping strike affecting Canada and the US. Frames are shipping now and have been for the last few months and we have in some cases shipped some by expensive air shipment. Look forward to these arriving at your local Norco dealers soon
  • 2 0
 We got some of ours up here! Not far to go for us though.
  • 1 0
 We had Carbon Aurums arrive in my shop today! They look amazing!
  • 1 0
 It would be nice if we could get Norco's here in Texas. San Antonio to be exact!
  • 8 0
 Is my 2007 Atomik frame actually indestructible?
  • 1 0
 and the 2002 model
  • 8 0
 Can I get a discount frame If I never say "kona" again?
  • 4 0
 With technological advancements moving bicycle performance forward at an incredible rate.
Will there ever be a point where those advancements lead to more durability, longevity, and lower maintenance?
As opposed to just making bikes more fragile?
The new breed of trail bikes can be ridden like downhill bikes.
And I haven't seen many bikes survive a season without breaking when ridden like this.
I don't want a 25lb bike if it means I have to replace shit all the time.
What are your thoughts on performance vs durability in the industry and at norco currently?
  • 3 0
 Durability is something that we put a lot of emphasis on in our designs and we have made big improvements in this over the last few years, and will continue to focus on. I think the industry will always chase performance however, some of which is based on bike weight - so bikes will continue to get lighter. The durability of our bikes will not change because our machine testing standards are only getting tougher. This is due to the fact, as you point out, that bikes are becoming more and more capable as frame geometry, suspension components, tires, etc... get better.
  • 7 0
 Is Pat Mulrooney really the best rider working at Norco? I heard it from a reliable source (P.M.).
  • 14 0
 Not by a long shot. He is definitely the best product tester for kids bikes though.
  • 6 0
 Only thing i don't like about my "old" aurum 2013 are the bearings, did you improved the bearing life in some way?
  • 4 0
 We did alter the hardware design on the new Aurum to improve bearing life, we also put an emphasis on making the bike simpler to service once the time does come that the pivots need some love. Reliability and serviceability is a very important part of our designs and we are always looking at ways to make improvements.
  • 1 0
 so typically speaking how long should pivot bearings last.i know, i know, riding type, conditions etc..., but in general?

Thx
Brian
  • 2 0
 Hey Brian, this is a difficult question to answer as it really does depend so much on the conditions/type of riding/how well the bike is looked after etc. Changing bearings once a year seems reasonable to me. But if you're riding the bike park regularly then maybe a mid season freshen up would be in order.
  • 1 0
 last year i serviced my bearings but couldn't get out the main bearing which goes through the upper link and the frame..now i tried it with my friends help...he couldnt do it either...he is a mechanical engineer and took it to work. they found out that this bearing was glued into the frame. that was very disappointing for me and i asked myself how should i ever had that idea. i mean if i didn't have my frineds help i could have not finished my bike for the season...that was a bummer for me. new bearing forutnately fit withoud any play. hope it holds up.
  • 3 0
 There appears to be a consensus that a rearwards axle path is good as it allows you to keep momentum while the wheel moves away from the obstacle. A slack headangle as well as a high (virtual) pivot for the rearwheel help there. It just seems to me though that it shifts the rider weight forwards relative to the wheelbase, which doesn't seem as ideal. This seems to be covered by longer and longer bikes. Wouldn't a forwards rear wheel axle path be a good alternative here, like one that rotates around the bottom bracket similar to those dirt jump bikes with rear suspension?
  • 6 0
 I think your first sentence basically answers your own question. The benefits you get from a rearward axlepath in regards to bump absorbtion and maintaining momentum, not to mention pedaling efficiency, far outweigh the effect of your weight shifting slightly forward relative to the wheelbase.
  • 2 0
 Ok, clear. Thank you for your response Smile .
  • 3 0
 The 2013 Range was shown the demo video with a DHX air. My 2014 Range 7.1 has a CTD evo stock. Of all the shocks on the market which shock is likely to work best on this frame? A list of 3 shocks would be great. I am considering removing the spacer from my CTD evo, for a more linear feel.
  • 3 0
 In no particular order the Cane Creek DB Air, RockShox Monarch Plus and Fox Float X are all great shocks and suited well to the Range.
  • 3 0
 Why do you use Pressfit instead of normal threaded BB´s ? As far as I know ist much easier to work with threaded ones. And could you always incorporate a frame colored only in mixtures of black and white in your lineup.... of every model, or at least as a frame ?
  • 11 8
 The original Aurum felt like an old school DH sled compared to the latest top end DH rigs. Simple and effective yes but not necessarily evolved. What does the latest Aurum have to offer against something like the V10?
  • 18 9
 In what way is the V10 more "evolved" than the Aurum?
  • 5 20
flag JMBMTB (Apr 8, 2015 at 13:32) (Below Threshold)
 the V10 rides better.
  • 4 1
 Maybe because the horst link isn't exactly new .
  • 1 0
 my opinion on the v10 is overpriced and rides awkwardly... the norco can only be better haha
  • 2 0
 ok fair enough i can't really say what i said considering that i haven't ridden the norco aha and to be honest it's a nice looking bike, just as good looking as the V10 is being honest however i can't say i'm sure about the build quality, i think the V10 is better in terms of build quality but i'm sure it rides well enough
  • 2 0
 Hi guys,

When you've been designing that Aurum, with the chainstays size which is different depending on the frame size, how did you manage to keep the same suspension performance ? (I believe that the main pivot momentum is different an so on...) or did you work with this difference to adapt the suspension performance to the different sizes?

Cheers !!
Ben
  • 3 0
 Hey Ben,

To achieve the different rear-centre (chainstay) lengths of our Gravity Tune geometry we move the position of the bottom bracket within the front triangle structure. We do this because, if we were to alter the length of the rear triangle members it would have a significant effect on the suspension performance between sizes. By only moving the BB position it allows us to achieve our desired geometry goals while keeping suspension performance consistent across sizes.
  • 3 1
 Talking about the Aurum, Do you know that S size riders need lower stack geometry (590mm)? This is harder to achieve with 27.5 wheels, but can be executed perfectly with 26 inch wheels, but since smaller size riders LOVES 26 inch wheels, Why not make S size Aurum with 26 inch wheel?
I hate I cant ride an aurum
  • 4 0
 I personally ride a small Aurum and when we first started to develop the Aurum MKII around 650B wheels it was a fear of mine that we would maybe not be able to realize a comfortable bar position for shorter riders on the small with the larger wheels. Therefore we did consider 26" wheels for the small. However, during ride evaluation testing we found that we could achieve the correct fit with the 650B wheels, as long as we could produce a 100mm head tube length. It was a challenge to get the required strength out of such a short head tube but we managed to achieve it.
  • 2 0
 Owen how tall are you?
  • 2 0
 Chris @Mandell 5'6"ish last time I checked..
  • 1 0
 Can lower stack be achieved in some other ways? like slightly raise the bb or by using semi-integrated headset... etc
a TR500 has a 122mm headtube but only 591mm stack, carbon glory 595mm stack. and yeah it is possible to use flat bars and negative rise stems, I'm already using them, still not enough, would really hope for a stack around 590 or below, I'm 5'5"
  • 2 0
 To whoever; I'm sure you're where you are partly due to your passion in bikes and engineering. I share this same passion, hence why I'm currently working towards an ME degree at my university. My question is, what part of the design/prototype/testing/manuf. process gets you excited and really makes you feel that sense of achievement when working towards/finishing a project like this one?

Thanks.
  • 5 0
 I love being in the zone in front of my CAD screen, but that real sense of achievement comes with the first test ride!
  • 9 0
 We certainly did get here by being passionate about riding bikes. That is what drives our innovation and product development process.
My favorite part of the process is twofold:
Getting to ride a brand new prototype for the first time is immensely satisfying and it's my favorite part of the job. It makes all of the product development and design review meetings and the hundreds of hours of design time all worth it.
Secondly, I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing people I don't know riding Norco bikes. Knowing that folks have gone out and spent their hard earned money on a bike which we have designed and brought to market is a great feeling.
  • 2 0
 I appreciate you guys' answers. It's only reinforced my pursuit for a similar career path. Thanks again!
  • 2 0
 I own a '14 range c, 1x11, d.air at 35 %...
1. What is recommended sag? Seated or standing?
2. Does norco believe boost will help the wear caused by torque while in 42 cog?
3. Has norco come up w/replacements for cable plugs that pop out, crack/split etc
Other than a lot of pedal strikes (175 sixc), lov the bike!
  • 2 0
 1. 30-35% sag, seated with seat at mid height.
2. If you are talking about the drivetrain wear caused by the chainline in the 42T cog, then no. Both the rear wheel and chainline are moving outboard by 3mm with Boost.
3. These parts should all be in stock. Speak to your local dealer.
  • 1 0
 Thanks..per #3 was actually lookn for new (not same but new) style so they function properly. But ditchn em, and puln cable out-wrap electric tape and stuff cable back-works.
But there are other plugs out there...lapieer (spell) for ex.
  • 2 0
 To Owen, or PJ

Just curios on what schooling you did to get the engineering titles you received. What did it take to land your job? I am starting mech engineering degree in the next few months and I find bike mechanics, geometry's and frame layouts very interesting. Thanks.!
  • 4 0
 It took a Mechanical Engineering degree and almost twenty years of riding bikes to land my job here when I started, six years ago. I also had a keen interest in bike technology and design, I am very mechanically inclined and know how to use Solidworks. Something else that I think helped was the fact that I designed an automatic suspension lockout system for mountain bikes for my fourth year design project at university which showed how keen I was do do bicycle engineering.
  • 1 0
 Thankyou very much
  • 2 0
 Hello Norco, I am a grade 12 student hoping to get into the bike industry some day (really anything related to mtb). Any tips on forging a path into a company like yours, like an internship or similar? What would you look for in a prospective intern regarding pre-reqs? Cheers and many thanks. -Bodhin
  • 10 1
 Ride bikes, be stoked on bike technology, know how to wrench on bikes, study engineering and/or industrial design, learn Solidworks. Knowing how to give great foot massages would also be an asset.
  • 1 0
 I got offered by shimano in the R&D, knowing about bikes is indeed an advantage, but not everything, be creative *lightbulb*, and i think becoming a good rider so you can test products is important, shred hard Razz
  • 2 0
 I have general question about fork lengths on old aurum.
Manuals from fork manufacturers says that we should set up dual crown fork to some exact height (or +/- milimeters). Why many stock setups are far different from recommended and use longer crown to axle length by dropping stanchions little bit? ( aurum 6.1 2014 for example). Can You guys can give me some hint how to find the sweet spot for aurum 6.1 and Fox 40 set up?
Thanks!
  • 4 3
 Norco has drawn lots of positive press for the Range and Sight that when released in 2012 were not only the first 650b trail bikes, but also an incredibly good value. The Carbon models have continued this success, but it begs the question, what about Shinobi replacement? The Fluid appears to be a lower end bike. What about B+? Is Norco putting all its egg one Killer-B basket?
  • 2 0
 Re the Shinobi, look for something new coming in the future from Norco.
As far as the B+ wheel size, we have been doing some testing and having fun riding this new rim/tire size. Too soon to comment more on this. What is the feedback from you guys and gals out there on the B + wheel size. Is there interest in a Norco B+ bike.
One thing we do see is that with future designs riders want options so a bike that fits 29” wheels may also fit with 650B + depending on when and where you ride.
/jj
  • 1 0
 I'm loving the idea of the 650b+ size, I've tried it briefly on a 160mm enduro bike. I think the added confidence on rough terrain (both uphill and downhill) is much more valuable than the slight increase in rolling resistance for the average rider. I can imagine 29er XC bikes with an optional 650b+ package for some extra fun being released in the next year or 2!
  • 1 0
 They key is "real" clearances for the B+ tires of the future. Many current 29ers can't fit anything more than the WTB 2.8. Why will I pay for a new frame when a used one will do the trick? If I'm buying a new frame I want to be able to fit a 275x3.25" tire with clearance to spare. Likewise, the ability for the 29er to fit a "true" 29x2.5 tire is crucial as well. Oh, and none of this 100mm BB crap, that defeats the purpose.
  • 2 1
 Any plans on bringing electronics in the suspension game, for production or prototype bikes, similar way as what Lapierre has done with their e:i system..?

Or planning to stick with conventional suspension design (and leave possible electronic options for suspension companies)..?
  • 2 0
 Understanding that designing for a longer product life comes with a weight penalty, how does Norco decide on the appropriate design life, for the Aurum for example, for the purpose of engineering calculations?
  • 3 1
 How does the Sight compare to the Range in terms of durability to take a big hit Maybe give rating out of 10 to show how it matches up Also how would a Sight handle a larger fork such as a 150 or 160mm
  • 4 0
 The Range has a more durable parts spec, rims, forks, tires etc. as well as the frame has been tested to a higher standard and the geometry is different. We would rate them quite close in terms of durability. With regards to forks the Sight frame has been tested with a 150mm fork and Range 170mm. We don't recommend longer forks. Geometry will change slightly, slacker HA and slightly higher BB. /jj
  • 1 0
 Hey guys, great to see you getting a feature on AMA. I have a Norco sight 2, 2013 which I love to bits BUT I always wonder how much punishment is is designed to take? I know it was released and reviewed predominately as a trail rig and skinny bugger reviewers always remark on how well it went back downhill again but would you have confidence in a 6ft5 15 stone lad taking it to dedicated DH uplifts in Wales? Breaking £1000+ worth of bike would make me vomit.
  • 1 0
 A well educated and wise guy once said that every design is a matter of compromise. Can you be more specific on that. I like the concept of a longer rear as the front goes longer in sizing. The linkage has higher virtual pivot which should produce more rearward axle path , smoother action for square edge hits, presumably better for pedaling. How that affects handling when pushed hard down inside a bermed corner? Whats the main benefit of the design and which riders will benefit more from it?
  • 1 0
 I like the fact that Gravity Tune reflects different size of riders and offers proper frame geometry for all the riders of any height. Correct me if I’m wrong but based on my (very limited) experience there’s the same stiffness of the spring (in fork and also rear shock) for different frame sizes (based on comparison of Aurum A 6.2. 2013 Medium vs. Large). Do you plan to reflect higher average weight of taller bikers riding larger frame sizes in stiffer springs in the future (btw not sure what other brands do)? Thanks for answer and also for great bikes (I ride Rance C 7.1, Aurum 6.2 and Judan Belt and I love them all)!
  • 4 0
 For all of the coil spring forks and the rear shocks we spec in our full suspension bikes we have specific spring weights for each size for example SM sizes have the Boxxer soft, Med size uses the Boxxer Med spring and LG size the Firm spring. For rear shock we jump up in 50lb increments for each size. /jj.
  • 2 1
 I have a 650b Range. The linkage is pretty aggressively progressive (2.8 to 2.2) and spec'd with n xfusion O2. Why did you design such a progressive linkage for a bike mostly fitted with an air shock? I finally put a ccdb coil on it soften the ride, but now it weighs 35lbs. Thinking of going to a process 153 for the flatter curve and longer reach....
  • 6 0
 The progressive leverage curve is designed intentionally to provide a supple, sensitive suspension feel at the beginning of the stroke, yet resist bottoming at the end. The Range comes spec'd with high volume shocks, all of which are tuned for this leverage curve, and all of which allow you to get full travel.
Why did you feel the need to go to a coil? Were you not getting full travel? What % sag do you run? We recommend 30-35% for the Range.
If your Range weighs 35lbs now, it probably weighed 34lbs with the O2...
  • 1 0
 Hi its time to change the bearings on my 2013 range killer b, the chainstay ones are shot but the others feel fine. How do they come out, I can't find any exploded diagrams online or the Norco site. Googling -I just found bearing and pivots are included in the limited lifetime warranty, correct? Shall I just take it in to Evans the UK dealers. Great bike by the way, thanks
  • 2 0
 Thanks for riding so much and so hard and enjoying the bike! That's what we like to hear.
The main pivot bearings in the chainstays need to be pressed outwards, using proper bearing press tools.
The bearings are covered under the One Year Limited Warranty www.norco.com/warranty so depending on when you bought the bike from Evans, they may or may not replace the bearings for free. No harm in taking it in for assessment though.
  • 4 0
 Is it hard to stay humble when you know that you make the best bikes on the market but can't admit it?
  • 2 1
 The bike is cool and love how the sizing works with your frames. The only problem is I can't get one down here in AZ anymore. I tried to order a bike, paid for the bike, and the local shop said the rep wouldn't sell any bikes to us. I called Norco to ask why I couldn't buy a bike. Come to find out, the local rep Drew, wouldn't sell any bikes to the local shop because he had a personal grudge against the shop owner. A couple hours later Drew called me basically saying I needed to shut my mouth and the local shop, which is the only Norco dealer within nearly 300 miles at the time, was a shit hole and he wasn't going to deal with the owner. So I sent an e-mail to Norco customer service asking why I couldn't get the bike I paid for, and received a phone call from some sales manager at Norco basically calling me a P.O.S. because Drew said I called and complained on behalf of the bike shop. I was a customer; I had owned nothing but Norco's for 6 maybe 7 years. How can anyone justify treating a customer like dirt when they are trying to buy your products?
  • 1 0
 Hey guys, im 6ft 3inch tall and am concerned with the comments about the shorter then avg front triangle (reach) on the new aurum.. I currentlly run a medium 2010 rocky mtn flatline pro, which is obviously to small, so i am used to short reach, however the small frame is why im looking to replace it and i love the idea of an aurum providing it fits well... What would you say about a guy my size on an aurum? And how likely is it my local shop (who deals with norco) will be able to get me a demo to try out? I ask this because as I wrote this comment they called me up with bad news saying getting me an aurum isnt going to be as easy as we once thought.

Thx!
  • 1 0
 A large Aurum should be a good fit for you. New Aurums are being delivered now to shop and distributors now. As far as demo bikes, it will depend on where you live and the shop. Hopefully you can get a chance to test one. /jj.
  • 1 0
 Evidentlly the shop i deal with did not order any floor models so they would only be ordering one for me. They tell me im looking at a fairly long wait, as norco is waiting for a new shipment to be distributed. I know you arent in sales but do you know how long a wait i may be looking at (I live on vancouver island)???

Ps thx for the response!
  • 1 0
 Sry for the out of topic questions but i am using my Norco shinobi for enduro and friends advise me to go 650B or 26" 140-160mm travel but i feel better with my 29er. Isnt the frame capable for enduro since i ve changed stock wheels to flow ex/hope pro evo 2 combo and added a dropper post.Is it a good idea to invest to 150mm 29" pike or sell the bike for a proper enduro one?
Thanks in advance Joseph.
  • 1 0
 We have not tested the Shinobi with longer forks so we don't recommend a 150mm Pike. Shinobi is a great bike and if you like the big wheels, keep rolling the Shinobi. /jj.
  • 1 0
 Do you guys get free reign to design your frames however you see fit, or are you given a set of guidelines with ball park figures for the likes of frame weight and certain handling characteristics?

Also have you ever considered developing a gearbox dh bike? Weight is an issue but the possibility for a low weight gearbox is there.
  • 1 0
 We are selfish and design our frames to ride the way that our product development team, including team riders, wants them to ride. We define our own guidelines at the outset of a project and then design accordingly. We have considered it. If a low weight, reliable, efficient, serviceable, cost effective gearbox suddenly became available we would give it serious consideration. Current bicycle gearboxes have too many gears for downhill bikes, so there would need to be a specific DH box. There are certainly advantages to gearbox transmissions on bicycles, but also disadvantages. Currently we feel the disadvantages are winning.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the reply. It's good to know that there are bikes being designed by real riders who know what we need in a bike. There may be a gearbox that ticks those boxes, it won't be tomorrow but I've been working away to find a solution to the current gearbox problems and one day it will hopefully be a reality.
  • 1 0
 My '09 Shore is still going strong, but I wouldn't mind getting a new 7" travel frame from Norco. Do you have any plans to release something like the Shore/Truax in the near future ?

Also, does Norco have some kind of crash replacement policy/ trade-in program for old frames ?

Thanks!
  • 2 0
 We do get the odd request for a Truax/Shore replacement but if you have ridden the Range with 650B wheels it is a super capable bike that most guys we know have switched to. For a while there were no 650B long travel forks available as well and with trails getting faster with more flow the need for a 7" bike was slowing down.

As far as a crash replacement, we do have this and you can contact your local Norco dealer to get the details. /jj.
  • 1 0
 I'm totally looking forward to test a new Range! Thanks for your answers.
  • 1 0
 to what stress do you design your bikes? for example in structural engineering the design is based on the most exigent combination of loads. Where this loads are modelled constant on the surface. This doesn't sound like a very good idea for bikes... how do you do it?
  • 1 0
 I have noticed that if I put my handlebar higher, it is easier to pull front, but if handlebar is lower feeling of riding is so different. Is there any positive and negative aspects in this thing ? May I cut my steering tube and lower handlebar as low as possible ? Now I have 4 cm of spacers between headset and stem.
  • 1 0
 Hi guys, do you collaborate with any industrial designers on the aesthetics/graphics of your bikes? I'm currently on the media side of the bike industry but I'm looking for a position that is design-focused but less on the engineering side (although I do have Solidworks experience).

cheers!
  • 1 0
 Do you guys use a custom hub on the back to keep wheels stiffness in a 12x142 package? I have seen talk of a custom hub for 7spd but all the photos just show the XO1 which uses the standard XD cassette body and would not allow the drive side flange to move to improve wheel stiffness.
  • 2 0
 Comparing with other frames... they have 430mm(demo), 425mm(commencal) and 440mm V-10... What is the REAL chainstay for a Medium Aurum? using the same method of measuring that others use......
Thanks
Keep up the good work!
  • 2 1
 Hello,

Was there an engineering reason for switching to RS Boxxers for the mid level Aurum vs. last year's Dorado? I have tried both and have always been amazed by the performance of the Dorado and was a little disappointed that you dropped them.
  • 1 0
 I missed this whole thread; but all I want to say is: I'm planning on buying a Norco as my next bike. Maybe a Range; however I wish Norco has a contact email on their website. Ibis is great that way. Providing easy way to contact (I have a Ripley today, but want to add a Norco to my quiver).
  • 1 0
 I was wondering about the possibility of putting a Boxxer on my Range C for bike park days. I saw that Adam Graves put a Fox 40 on his SB6C and thought it might be a cool idea for DH days since I just sold my Aurum. What do you think? Obviously it will change head angles and bottom bracket height, but would it really mess it up ride-wise?
  • 9 9
 Copypasta?

"Starting at 10:00 AM PST/6:00 PM BST on Thursday, April 9 you can type your questions into the comment box following this article and The WTB team will answer them. Sometimes your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, as WTB will be busy responding to the flood of questions. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines"
  • 1 0
 Lol..I'm guessing your put at the end of the line for jumpn the gun.
  • 2 0
 when designing the leverage ratio for a bike like the aurum, what guides your decision process? How do you decide on the best leverage rate?
  • 2 0
 The leverage rate curve of the Aurum was designed to offer a very predictable ride. Of course the rate change gives a progressive feel, supple off the top, resists bottom out etc, but it is the linear way in which the rate changes from start to finish that gives the bike its Aurum ride feel. This is important as it allows the rider to weight and maneuver the bike in a predictable fashion no matter the terrain or where they are in the bikes travel.
  • 2 1
 Can I put a monarch plus on an alloy sight frame. It looks like there is plenty of space but I'm still not sure as the website says it can't. Yet the alloy frame and carbon are quite different. It's a 2015 frame.
  • 2 0
 No, it will not fit in a Sight. The piggy back reservoir can hit the downtube at full compression.
  • 1 0
 I have a carbon sight with a monarch rebound and lockout. Ive been thinking about upgrading, Aside from the cane creek what shock do you guys think works best with the frame ? For aggressive trail/ enduro riding Thanks
  • 1 0
 The Cane Creek DB Inline is a great option and doesn't need a specific factory tune. Any other shock, to get the best performance, will need our recommended tune. That being said if your Monarch does not have Debonair then an upgrade to a Debonair model Monarch would be a great investment. Also the new Fox DPS Evol shocks work really well on the Sight C. Once you decide which option you think will work for you give us a shout and we can provide you with the tune information.
  • 4 0
 do you hit any sick jumps?
  • 4 0
 I know jj does
  • 2 0
 Hey Boys ! What is the real collar of the bike ? XD looking like yellow on pinkbike, green on other website.. its a cameleon bike I think. Wink
  • 4 0
 The colour is a matte neon yellow /jj
  • 1 1
 If I show up at the factory can I buy a C7.3 or at least preorder one? Seems LTP West doesn't have any to distribute and the season is about to start!!! Actually can I come to the factory and build my own bike? There's a little marketing Give-A-Way .... "Win a chance to build/customize your own bike at the factory." Hmmm that's got to be worth access to a C7.3 at cost no?
  • 1 0
 Why are many of the carbon bikes a matt finish? I find this finish looks old quickly and is more difficult to keep clean compared to the gloss. I've used 3M frame saver in the past but this would look weird on a matt finish.
  • 1 0
 Matte finish paints have been in style recently. As well it may help to give the frame a "carbon" look and recognized as being new or different from aluminum. I understand regarding cleaning. Maybe a 3M semi matte sticker could work? /jj.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the reply... off to google 3M semi matte.... Keep up the great work. Love the bikes.
  • 1 0
 A question about the cable routing of the 'old' aurum. why did you put the cables above the rocker arm? What was the advantage of that? and why did you change it now for the aurum 2015?
  • 1 0
 The original Aurum had the cables on the top for the shortest cable length to the rear of the bike. Although this made sense for the original frame the new bike did not lend itself well to this routing with the design changes to the frame as well the chainstay and downtube routing helps with cable rub./jj
  • 1 0
 thanks for your answer. cable rub is an annoying issue with the 'old' aurum. I saw a picture of a prototype of the old aurum where the derailleur cable was in the chainstay, so I asked myself why you got away from that.
  • 1 0
 Hi guys,

How do you guys feel about the concept of forward geometry?

Kona, Transition, Santa Cruz have adopted variations of this design concept; where do you sit on the idea of massive reaches coupled with sub 40mm stems?
  • 2 0
 Don't you have to pay specialized for using their FSR system. Because I know on some norco frames that used the ART system there was a little specialized logo on the bike.
  • 13 10
 Did someone very fat sit on that bike and cause it to bend in the middle?
  • 3 0
 When will the new bike be available to mere mortals like myself?
  • 2 0
 Aurum carbon bikes are shipping now or already in some stores. You should be able to get one soon.
  • 2 0
 Now that LTP is the official partner of Bosch in Canada, how long until we see a Bosch powered Norco?
  • 1 0
 LTP as a distribution company has signed on with Bosch as a service center in Canada but we would treat this separate from Norco. With regards to Norco, we have a wide range of all styles of bikes including a BionX equipped Bigfoot fat bike in our line up for 2015. Like most bicycle brands in the world we see a lot happening in Europe with electric bikes and are interested to get a better understanding with regards to use and application. /jj.
  • 2 0
 Now that LTP is the official partner of Bosch in Canada, how long until we see a Bosch powered Norco?
  • 1 0
 Are you guys going to be supporting the Burke Bike Park again with your bikes this year? If yes will they be the ones shown above???
  • 2 0
 Not sure, that is a question for our sales guys or the bike park. Hopefully they order the new carbon Aurum.
  • 1 0
 OK. Yea would be sick definiteley. New bike looks mint!
  • 2 0
 What the steps in designing a frame like the Aurum? Do you just start with the suspension design and work from there?
  • 1 0
 We start with the geometry and then look to configure the suspension layout to give the desired performance within the geometry envolope. Handling characteristics and suspension performance need to be right to produce a good bike. From there we look to make the most efficient frame structure possible.
  • 1 0
 How can I apply to make an intership with you guys?, I am an industrial designer from México and I´m very interested in working with norco bikes
  • 1 0
 Norco Bikes, have never been the most technologically advanced or the lightest weight. However, are some of the most fun/best riding bikes out. What's your take on this?
  • 1 0
 Thanks! We are all about the ride! We won't employ any 'technology' into our designs unless it offers a significant benefit to the rider!
  • 1 0
 Hey Norco Guys,

Does the fluid 24 have the ability to put on 26" wheels?
www.norco.com/bikes/youth/24-multi-speed/fluid-24/fluid-24
Thanks
  • 3 0
 No. That's what the Fluid 6 is for.
  • 1 0
 I'm graduating in may with my mechanical engineering degree in may, and I love bicycles. Could you guys hook me up with a job or interview?
  • 1 0
 In may with a degree in may.... Great haha no we Dont want to give you a job!
  • 1 0
 As the Norco bike factory, are you looking for some others engineers in the team ? which type of ingeneer ? (civil? industrial? commercial? ) Thanks !!
  • 1 0
 If you could have one of the original froriders(Richie Schley, Wade Simmons, Brett Tippie) ride the new carbon Aurum. Who would it be?
  • 6 0
 We don't need those guys.. we have Jim Jamieson!
  • 1 0
 Hi Norco guys! I have been riding with 2013 and 2014 alu Aurum. I was wondering if there is an upcoming aluminuum version of the new 27.5 geo for 2016?
  • 1 0
 You may see this in the future. /jj.
  • 1 1
 Hell yeah! Can I pre-order direct from you? Wink
  • 1 0
 I am a tall rider (6.72 ft.) who would love to ride a tall bike. Is the the Norco Aurum a suitable ride and will there be a demo tour in german bike parks?
  • 5 2
 Thanks to everyone for joining - we're out for a ride!
  • 6 4
 Jim Jamieson are you shaun whites long lost cousin?
  • 6 3
 where's Abi?
  • 1 0
 Do you utilize any diagnostics to analyze suspension kinematics on the trail?
  • 1 0
 Do you have plans to make the rear end (chain stays and seat stays) out of carbon?
  • 1 0
 No plans at this time./jj
  • 1 0
 How come you dont distribute top model ranges in new zealand? The best one we can buy here is the second tier.
  • 2 0
 It is tough for our distributors around the world to carry our complete line of bikes. It is up to the distributor to decide which models they carry. If you feel that in your country you don’t have the model you are looking for maybe you can reach out to them to see if they can carry a wider range. /jj
  • 1 1
 I don't why Pinkbike needs to get Norco in for Q&A, looks like all the questions have already been answered by the punters (says somewhat sarcastically)
  • 2 0
 Any plans to make a hardtail with similar geometry to the sight?
  • 5 1
 We have had some interest in a trail hardtail so you may see something coming in the future. Are there more riders out there interested?
  • 1 0
 I will say I just built up a 29er trail hardtail, & it's a blast. But I built it up for 27.5+ wheels, so I'm probably not the interest you're looking for. Wink
  • 1 0
 I'd love a Killer B aggressive trail hardtail. Have to get mine from the old country or pay 3x the price for Chromag
  • 2 0
 Trail/AM hardtails need to hit N America and Norco needs to lead the charge!
  • 2 0
 Where did you come up with the name aurum
  • 1 0
 might have something to do with a "gold medal". a WC gold medal.
  • 1 0
 Yeh a gold medal for blenki
  • 1 0
 Can i fit a 150mm pike on my 2013 norco shinobi or the extra 10mil of travel are too much for the frame integrity?
  • 1 0
 The Shinobi has not been tested with a 150mm fork. We don't recommend it. /jj.
  • 1 0
 best ways to save weight on the new Sight c7.2? i.e. what to replace with more expensive pimpness>?
  • 1 0
 A carbon bar, set your bike up tubeless, maybe carbon crank or carbon rims if you have a large budget. /jj.
  • 2 0
 are you keeping the old design in alloy as the budget option?
  • 1 0
 For 2015 we are offering two price points of the current 26" wheel Aurum. Keep your eye out for new information coming soon on our 2016 line up /jj.
  • 1 0
 please keep the V3, by far one of the best looking dh bikes on the market!!
  • 1 0
 not on topic at all, but will you guys ever get back into the slopestyle frame game?
  • 1 0
 We do have the Rampage hardtail frames and bikes but at this time no plans to add another full suspension model. Maybe in the future.
  • 1 0
 OK, so which Norco bike would you recommend racing at Sea Otter? The Aurum or the Range?
  • 1 0
 Go with the Range.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for a carbon Sight to arrive in Ontario any indications of arrival time?
  • 1 0
 We apologize for the delay. We have landed quite a few of these bikes recently so ask your shop to contact their Norco sales rep and get the exact arrival date.
  • 1 0
 Are there any plans for a full sus Revolver in the future? I thought I saw a prototype under Haley Hunter Smith
  • 2 0
 Having athletes test prototypes is a key part of the development process. No word as to what bikes athletes from different disciplines are testing at the moment though.
  • 1 0
 No questions guys; I just want to say how much I love my Shinobi. Thanks for making such kick-ass bikes!
  • 1 2
 Any plans on making a 26inch specific aurum? I know 650B are the future bla bla bla but I think a lot of people would like a good ol' 26" dh bike.

Geez I'm calling 26 inch old.
  • 1 0
 I have a 2007 Norco Fluid 3.0 What is the stock rear shock length and can i get a replacement shock that is longer?
  • 10 9
 How many Quebexicans work for Norco?
  • 1 1
 Is there any specific reason as to why the top tube on your dh bike curves up like that?
  • 2 1
 Any girls, or just you three?
  • 3 2
 Yep! Lots of girls at Norco.
  • 1 0
 Is that you Kallyn?

There are lots and they are all a pleasure to deal with.
  • 2 1
 Awwwe thanks CraigSmile
  • 1 0
 Girls are cool. So are your bikes Smile
  • 2 1
 How long is a norco dh frame ment to last
  • 1 0
 Do you think you will ever start producing 29" DH bikes?
  • 3 0
 With the amount of travel and the large wheels it would be tough to make a bike that would fit anyone but a really tall rider. As well it would be challenging at this time with the availability of parts such as forks, rims and tires. /jj
  • 1 0
 Cool thanks Smile
  • 1 0
 What are y'alls dream bike, and build out?
  • 1 0
 whats the dif between a.r.t.and v.p.s?
  • 2 0
 Why no XL size?
  • 3 0
 We are testing an XL now, if we hear lots of comments with requests you may see it in the line up in the future /jj.
  • 1 0
 I see people asking for it all the time... Haha
  • 1 0
 Are you going to allow Bryn to ride his motocross bike?
  • 1 0
 Norco executives will have grown more skin by tomorrow.
  • 1 1
 Hey guys,

Apparently there are still people out there who like 26er…are these folks crazy?
  • 1 0
 How do I go about getting a bike internship for engineering?
  • 1 1
 Any plans on ever updating your suspension design to something a bit more new school?
  • 1 0
 Owen,
Are you a full fledged Canadian yet?
  • 1 0
 hey Norco why re all your new DH frames so small?
  • 1 0
 How about a carbon truax? Thanks !
  • 6 8
 I have a year left of college majoring in mechanical engineering, interested in kinematics and solidworks design, will you give me an internship?
  • 4 0
 why neg props seriously... Smile you should try to contact them more seriously by letter or mail
  • 1 2
 Do you miss the old VPS Team DH design and who came up with such an ugly looking frame?
  • 2 4
 26" , Semper Fi ! Smile
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