First Ride: Orbea's 2020 Occam Trail Bike is Light, Fast & Fun

Jun 12, 2019 at 6:38
by Ralf Hauser  


With Orbea’s Rallon situated as their enduro race machine and the Oiz taking on modern XC tracks like a champ, it came time to update their trail bike, the Occam. Previously, Orbea offered the Occam TR, a 29er with 130mm of rear wheel travel and a focus on rollover and pedaling efficiency, and the Occam AM, a 27.5”-wheeler with 20mm more travel including higher maneuverability. However, the engineers also learned that many people only chose the 27.5” Occam over the 29” wheels only because of its extra travel, and not its wheel size.

After two years of playing around with various aluminum prototypes to evaluate geometry, kinematics and stiffness, as well as putting it through the wringer in their own testing facility, Orbea is launching a revamped single version of the Occam for 2020, combining the best of both worlds with 29” wheels, 140mm of travel in the rear paired with either a 140 or 150mm fork, and updated geometry.
Occam M10 Details

• Intended use: trail
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• Carbon frame
• 66° head angle
• 440mm chainstays
• Frame weight ( w/ shock): 2,720 grams
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: S-XL
• Lifetime frame warranty
• Price: $3,999 - $7,999 USD
• Colors: sky blue/orange, mouse grey/metallic graphite, custom
www.orbea.com

Running a factory in Mallabia, Basque Country for their high-end models and one in Portugal, Orbea has their research & development departments as well as quality control, testing, painting and bike building facilities located in-house, allowing them to closely focus on most steps of their production process. This also gives them the ability to offer an elaborate custom-paint program for many of their models, for no extra cost, but more to that later.



Frame Details

A complete redesign, the Occam features Orbea’s high-end monocoque OMR (Orbea Monocoque Race) carbon technology, blending high modulus fibers and high strength fibers for an optimized weight to strength ratio and bringing the frame weight down to only 2,300 grams for a size medium without shock, according to Orbea. Orbea’s carbon and aluminum frames feature a lifetime warranty, if not abused.

Orbea's designers reduced weight and simplified the entire construction compared to previous models by implementing a tool-free bearing replacement system. The axle simply holds the rear end together and it is easy to remove the Enduro MAX bearings or to swap the derailleur hanger. It's a nice feature that makes it possible to quickly replace a hanger out in the wild, assuming you're carrying a spare.

The shock link is mounted to a massive axle in a similar way to the splined connection of a crank arm. According to Orbea’s findings, they were able to tune stiffness in a specific way, which would not have been possible with carbon. A special tool, which also acts as a sag meter, is required to fix or loosen the bolted connection.

The asymmetric structure with an additional stay between the shock link and down tube strengthens a high-stress area and neutralizes suspension forces to the frame. There is still room for a water bottle, which was made possible by pushing the water bottle mounts off center by 10mm. Orbea chose the bottle to be accessed via the left-hand side so you can use your right hand to modulate speed with the rear brake if necessary (that is, unless you run your brakes the other way around).

The extra strut reduces the impact on high-stress areas.
You can still fit a water bottle, which is accessed from the left-hand side.

Hidden inside are Enduro MAX bearings.
The shock link connects to a splined axle, similar to a crank arm connection.

Suspension dynamics have also been altered compared to its predecessor. With the old setup, Orbea noticed that stiction could end up between ten to 20 percent higher at low pressures with a lower leverage ratio. In order to achieve higher sensitivity, the leverage ratio was changed from starting at 2.66 : 1 moving towards 2.85 throughout the travel, to a starting point of 3.14 : 1 heading towards 2.4 on the Occam 2020.

Also, anti-squat was increased by 7% to better match a cassette with 50 or 51 teeth, with anti-rise shifting to a significantly lower percentage, trying to minimize brake influence on the suspension.


Orbea has picked the Fox DPX2 model as a match for the new Occam and spent a considerable amount of time testing with Fox on various compression and rebound solutions. The DPX2 will be equipped with a 0.2 cubic inch volume spacer inside and will be shipped with an extra 0.4" spacer if you want a higher progression. You can remove all volume spacers from the 210 x 50mm metric rear shock, effectively giving you three setup options to play with. Of course, bigger spacers are also available aftermarket.

Completing the feature list is a threaded bottom bracket, frame protector at the lower part of the down tube, an almost full-wrap chainstay protector with raised ribs for keeping the noise from chain-slap down, full internal cable routing, PM180 rear brake mounts, and durable Enduro LLU MAX bearings.

Apart from the flagship carbon frames, the new Occam is also available in an aluminum version. Thanks to the combination of hydro alloy and polished welds, the aluminum version looks remarkably similar to its carbon counterpart. A nice side-effect of the expensive high polished treatment is a claimed better fatigue life of the frames.


The rear linkage rotates around the axle.
PM180 standard for the rear brake.

A built-in chainguide keeps the chain in check.
Raised ribs on the chainstay protector for noise reduction.



Geometry

Four sizes (S, M, L, XL) are intended to cover body sizes between 150-160cm (S) all the way up to 180-198cm (XL).

Compared to the previous Occam, the head angle for the spec with 140mm fork changed from 67.5 to 66-degrees, while the seat angle jumped from 74 to 77-degrees of steep goodness. On a size M frame, reach grew from 431 to 450mm, with a lower standover height moving from 743mm down to 736 mm. To center the rider a bit more, chainstays grew to 440mm, instead of 435mm.

Running the bike with the optional 150mm travel fork slackens the head and seat angle by half a degree. Orbea is using the shorter 44mm offset on the 29er fork. With a shorter seat tube throughout all frame sizes, all models now come equipped with a 150mm dropper post, with the option to upgrade to a 170mm version.



Specifications

Four carbon models are available. The Occam M30 (with an SLX/XT mix) and M30 Eagle (with NX Eagle group) start at $3,999 (€3,799), the M10 with full XT 12-speed and Fox 34 Factory goes for $5,499 (€4,999) and the Occam M-LTD featuring full XTR, carbon wheels and a Fox 36 Factory costs $7,999 (€7,599). The M-LTD supposedly comes to a complete weight of only 26 pounds (11.8 kg) without pedals.

While those are pretty competitive prices, the aluminum versions will get you into the game starting at $2,599 (€2,299) for the H30, with Marzocchi’s Z2 and dropper post. The H20 with Fox 34 and an SLX/XT-mix or H20 Eagle with SRAM’s 12-speed NX group both come in at $2,999 (€2,799). The top model with full XT group comes to $3,499 (€ 3,299).


The aluminum version with polished welds could easily be mistaken for the carbon model.
Pick and choose the color combo you really want.


MyO

There are two stock color options each for the carbon and aluminum models to choose from. One of those versions for the carbon model (next to a mouse-grey one) is an homage to the era of the light blue and orange Gulf Porsche 917, which is to die for.

However, all models are also available for customization with the MyO program. That includes a custom paint job with a choice of 22 primary and 22 secondary frame colors as well as mixing it up with decal and detail colors with optional custom text for no extra cost.


On top of that, there are options or upgrades available for certain components like tires, wheels, saddles, seatposts, stems, brakes or even shock and fork. For instance, if you wanted to upgrade from a Fox FIT4 34 to a 36 with GRIP2 damping system and 10mm of extra travel, the final price would go up by $185 (€149).

Orbea works with a dealer network in the US and most European countries, as well as importers throughout the rest of the European countries, South America, Asia and Oceania. You can buy your Orbea bike either online or at one of the dealers for the same price, with the option to click and collect, making your own design and choosing your components and then selecting the nearest dealer to pick up the bike. However, in some countries, buying online is still not an option and you have to find a dealer to purchase the bike directly through them.





Two days of riding is not enough to write a full review about a bike, but the time I spent aboard on the Occam exploring the Spanish backcountry did allow me to get a solid first impression of the Occam’s qualities. And there are quite a few I can point out immediately.

Starting with geometry, the new Occam is a prime example of the new breed of bikes sporting numbers that only a few years ago would have made your head spin. The Occam’s steep 77-degree seat angle allows me - or even pushes me - to basically run a size larger frame than usual. If I want to stick to a short 35mm stem length, that I’m used to running, the shortened horizontal top tube length would put me into an overly cramped position while seated, due to the shorter top tube length. But the added stability delivers confidence and nothing beats the pedaling efficiency of a really steep seat tube angle. Without too much fuss, I was still able to lift the front end over rolling drop-offs or rock ledges.

Our M10 test bikes, with the latest edition of Shimano’s XT drivetrain and brakes, were set up with the longer travel fork option, the 150mm Fox 36 with GRIP2 damping. While we had the option of swapping to the lower-travel Fox 34 version on the second day, only one in our group opted for it. The bike simply felt too well balanced, the half degree slacker head tube angle didn’t hurt when gunning down rock slabs or when letting the big wheels pick up speed on the trail and the slightly slacker 76.5-degree seat angle didn’t hurt the Occam’s pedaling prowess much.

As a matter of fact, the new Occam is a fantastic climber. Even when grinding up long and silly steep sections the front end stay solidly planted, with the rear wheel digging into the ground formidably. Also, while I am usually slightly annoyed by the slower acceleration of 29ers compared to 27.5” wheels, the forward drive of the Occam was impressive. I still can’t point my finger to if the bike design itself was the biggest factor, the choice of wheels, fast rolling Maxxis Rekon rear tire, or most likely the combination of it all, but I truly enjoyed this 29er setup without any gripes.

The new Occam is a highly capable climber.


I started out with the stock 0.2" volume spacer in the rear shock and opted for the bigger version after a few runs for some added progression in order to keep the shock from bottoming out on hard landings after jumps or medium-sized drops. Overall, that setting created a very balanced feel in most situations, and the more time I spent in the saddle, the more dialed the suspension seemed to feel, even remaining composed in rougher rock garden sections. Of course, you could occasionally bring the suspension to its 140mm-travel limits, but it was interesting to see how far you could push the mid-travel bike even in enduro-esque situations. Also, thanks to the low bottom bracket and stack height, the Occam sliced through turns with a mission.

Surprisingly enough, running the low-speed compression setting on the DPX2 shock fully open also seemed to affect the high-speed hit absorption in a positive way, avoiding spiking, but I’d have to spend a lot more time on the bike to substantiate that observation.

Grabbing the water bottle from the left side turned out less of a problem than I first thought might be the case. Orbea is building its own dropper posts and first impressions showed a smooth, stiction-free and solid function. On a personal note, you just gotta love the custom color options. A designer’s dream, to run the craziest or most subtle color schemes you can think of and adding a unique touch to your ride.


Throwing around with that much praise makes me question my objectivity, but I really can’t think of anything that really bugged me on the new Occam. If I had to dig deep, I didn’t enjoy the saddle and surprisingly hated the Race Face grips on long rides, but those are minor gripes. What remains is the fact that I think I fell a bit in love with a mid-travel 29er, something that I would never in my life have thought I’d one day say.







211 Comments

  • + 264
 Assymetric frame design for the sake of the water bottle. No company has treated Pinkbike comment board so seriously before. We must respect that “Slowclap”
  • + 22
 But it didn't appease the right handed bottle grabbers. I'm one of them, so this frame is a no-go for me. (Not that I was in the market for one anyway).
  • + 285
 @drpheta: like in other instances in life, sometimes you gotta switch it up and use yer left hand.
  • + 63
 @drpheta: I give my bottle the left handed stranger all the time. Try it you’ll love it.
  • + 12
 @drpheta: I ride right brake rear, I reach for my bottle with my right hand, but it wouldn't be an issue if I had to reach for it with my left. It's a hardly difficult thing to do.
  • + 16
 @rocky-mtn-gman: I had to log in just to give your comment props.
  • + 1
 @rocky-mtn-gman: hahaha that comment rocks
  • + 31
 @drpheta: FFS, it's simple, just ride the bike backwards.
  • + 5
 @drpheta: They need a lefty and righty version very much like asymmetrical surfboards come in regular or goofy
  • + 5
 move my comments directly to "below threshold
  • + 2
 at first glance I expected a built in water bottle cage on that extra offset stay
  • + 6
 Assymetric this, assymetric that... what's next, assymetric drivetrain?
  • + 2
 @faul: assymetric down and top tubes. Four water bottles!
  • + 24
 @sevensixtwo: former righty stroker here. Then the mouse and internet came along. Old habits die HARD.
  • + 6
 In 12 years of mountain biking I never ever grabbed the bottle with my left hand!! :rofl:
  • + 4
 @Staktup: Try getting used to not being able to use both hands. . . one to push the forest aside the other to twist the little guy between my thumb and the index and middle finger.
  • + 4
 Am I the only one who never uses a water bottle?
  • + 4
 Right hand bottle grabber here.

Have a Lezyne left side bottle cage mounted on the seat tube of my road bike; which makes it a right hand grab job.

Well thought out bike. Kudos to Orbea for a well thought out bike and “custom” build selector. This is what Santa Cruz should’ve become
  • + 3
 @mkul7r4: Enough of you antivaccers who are proud of not watching a single episode of GOT!
  • + 3
 @rocky-mtn-gman: What if you need both hands ?
  • + 1
 @drpheta: Now my bottle will be upside down if I flip over my side-entry cage to the other side.
  • + 4
 @unrooted: Lady rider in da house?
  • + 2
 @mkul7r4: Am I the only one who never w##ks?
  • + 13
 @Matt115lamb: Works, or wanks? No one here ever works...
  • + 3
 @Staktup: Back home in Croatia we have a right wing politician who claims that he had never in whole his life "misused his body". He became a superstar :rofl:
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns The Pink creature has spoken: today you get 200 upvotes, tomorrow you get 200 downvotes. Who knows what happens the day after? Only the Pink Jabba the Hutt will decide your online fate. Prepare your skin for thickness or preening...
  • + 4
 @kiwikonadude: nobody can hurt me more than I can hurt myself...
  • + 0
 @drpheta: #rightiesdontmatta
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: self harm reduction
  • + 166
 Here comes the new XT/SLX saving us from NX at comparable price points, woohoo!
  • + 21
 this is big!
  • + 5
 At this point RockShox is the only thing keeping sram somewhat respectable
  • + 9
 @cuban-b: I think Truvativ stuff is quite decent.
  • + 1
 Is it the older 7000/8000 or new 12speed stuff?
  • + 4
 @motard5: Occam H30 (the cheapest build) is still 12 speed with SLX rear mech.
  • + 43
 Absolutely. I’ve wanted to buy a new reasonably-priced MTB for about a year now, and NX Eagle on everything in my price range has been a huge turn off.

I know that bikes are getting more expensive by the year, (thanks to unfavourable exchange rates, international trade disputes, inflation, etc etc) but with today’s technology and manufacturing capabilities, it is not acceptable to spend $2000 on a bike and receive a 610g cassette. If that is a choice I have to make, my choice is not to buy. My old hardtail will last me another year. The fact that these boat anchor group-sets have been making it onto $4000+ bikes is a laughable travesty.

It’s time to remember what NX was, and continues to be: A janky, cut-cost groupset with shifting and quality barely approaching 10spd Deore. Hopefully the new 12spd SLX will banish it back to the $1500 bikes it was designed for.
  • + 20
 @alreadyupsidedown: Deore might be heavy but it's absolutely bombproof. Can't say the same thing about NX.
  • + 3
 @alreadyupsidedown: Completely agree. I have been confused and surprised by the general acceptance of SRAM using their OEM marketshare on new higher-end MTBs, along with the allure of 12 speed to pull a bait-and-switch and this year give you the super budget NX group for the same price as last year's bike that came with GX. Is 12-speed really that attractive that people are willing to take a huge step down in quality? Why not just run an 11-speed setup that's lighter and more reliable for the same cost? People have different preferences of course, but to me it seemed like a huge poke in the eye.

I suspect if instead bikes that last year came with SLX started shipping with Deore, there would be more outrage and slander.

If prices are going up fine, but don't try to tell me that the same group that comes on a $1000 bike belongs on a $5k bike.
  • + 4
 @Climbtech:
I think there are 3 main reasons they've been able to get away with it.

1: The marketing surrounding Eagle is genius. That sexy name just gets people. They see ‘Eagle’ ‘12 speed’ and the big black cassette on the back and don’t bother to read the fine print.

2: SRAM’s current product hierarchy naming system is a lot more confusing. I could keep track of it in the X7, X9, X01 days, but honestly now I can’t even tell you if XX1 is above X01 without a google search. SX sounds like it should be nicer than GX, but it’s the cheapest. Your average Joe probably has no idea. Either way, Shimano’s MTB product names have been pretty consistent since the 80’s, it’s like Camry and Corolla at this point.

3: They all look the same. That gloss black on everything, (alloy plastic or steel) with maybe a small patch of lines/texture and a different coloured logo leaves the consumer with no real visual indication of quality. Rockshox forks have been like this for a while too, so in a bike store all the bikes pretty much look identical. No doubt SRAM likes it this way.
Shimano on the other hand, makes a lot more effort to visually differentiate their products with their various levels of black/grey/silver/ shiny or flat, painted or polished.
  • + 67
 What sorcery is this?

Occam M30 carbon with XT/SLX 12-speed $3999
Then you can add a Factory DPX2 and a Factory Fox 36 GRIP2 for $434?

I guess Shimano is finally here to save us from overpriced sram garbage.
  • + 9
 This. Perfect spec.
  • + 2
 I run sram now and cant disagree with this. Good move is good.
  • + 39
 Holy shit dat aluminum frame
  • + 17
 what sorcery is this
  • + 9
 Looks as good as, or even better, than the carbon one - really beautiful lines!
  • + 6
 what if we don't want people to think we are riding carbon bikes???
  • + 16
 @unrooted: I'd suggest you take a nice long ride on whatever-material-looking bike you have, crack a beer when you're done and let the fear of some rando's possible mistaken opinion on your frame fade into a soothing blend of hoppy suds and sweet endorphins.
  • + 3
 Reminds me of the old school Cannondales
  • + 4
 The aluminum option is the main thing that's got me lusting over this bike.
  • + 25
 "The Occam M30 (with an SLX/XT mix) and M30 Eagle (with NX Eagle group) start at $3,999 (€3,799)"

That's... not bad!
  • + 21
 This is my perfect bike. Specs, geometry, looks, it's all perfect. Bravo Orbea
  • + 3
 + the price a really good- looks Like a perfect bike
  • + 2
 Gah! I just bought a Rallon!
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: Exactly the same here, it's arriving today in fact! Are you going to keep hold of it or try and sell it for the Occam?

I like the look of the Occam a lot but it's not out until sept/oct so maybe i'll ride the rallon until then and try and switch. But in reality these bikes are pretty similar, with very close geo - the rallon is just a bit more burly. I'm happy to hear at least that the Rallon isn't getting a new frame this year and I'm actually happy I got it before it moved to 170mm.
  • + 1
 @MonteRosa: I'm going to keep mine for sure. I'll probably try to balance it out by adding a hardtail to the mix next year. Plus, why not have the Rallon ween it's so dang capable? I mean sure you could drop a few lb on this new bike for something that pedals a touch better, but the Rallon already pedals so crazy well... Unless you want to do xc races, in which case none of these bikes make sense haha.
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: Cool, thanks for the confidence. I think it's more my envy of having something brand new than thinking this bike will be so much different, because the Rallon is a year or two old now. How have you found the bike so far?

The only thing different would be slightly less weight and a steeper STA which would be nice but I wonder if I would notice THAT much of a difference. When I demoed the rallon it pedalled so well, can't wait to test mine out. But then the rallon is more burly which is nice Wink
  • + 1
 @MonteRosa: I slid my saddle fully forward on the rails to simulate a steeper sta, but backed it off. It doesn't need it. I think sta is going to settle in the 76 range across the industry.
sure the bike is a touch portly, but if I'm going to loose weight, I'd rather it come off me (and if you're anything like me, there's definitely some room to cut haha) and leave a stronger frame for those oh sh*t moments.
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: Ah that's cool to hear, yeah I think the industry is just finding the new norms for STA and HTA. 76 sounds about right and when the rallon came out it was steep!

I don't think the weight is a huge issue (depending on spec). The bike is no heavier than my mates SB130. It's around 13.5kg in m team spec? Realistically if you have another litre of water in your backpack it's another 1kg in total weight. General fitness is WAY more important than bike weight (for most people anyway).

I think the asymmetric arm on the rallon is also nicer than the occam Smile
  • + 17
 One thing to note: You can upgrade the top end aluminum build (starting at $3499) from a Fox Float DPS Performance 3-Position Evol to a Fox DPX2 Factory 3-Position Adjust Evol Kashima for $249 and the fork from a Fox 34 Float Performance 140 3-Position to the Fox 36 Float Factory 150 Grip2 RC2 Kashima for $189.

Those seem like pretty darn solid upgrades and would leave you with just enough room to upgrade the tires to Minions and keep it just under $4000. You can do the same for the lower end carbon build (obviously adding $500 to the overall price).
  • + 3
 Weirdly the Minions are a 49 dollar upgrade on the carbon bike and a 19 dollar upgrade on the aluminum.
  • + 11
 @MarcusBrody: gotta pay the chump tax.
  • + 2
 I wish more companies offered component upgrades/customization like this. I find it highly appealing. Sure, some shops are good about it too, but some act like it's a huge pain and give you a hard time. I think it would make a lot of bikes more appealing if you weren't tied to their factory spec, which quite frankly puts me off of complete builds on a lot of brands. There is clearly a market for aluminum bikes with top-end suspension for example, but it's very difficult to find as a complete build.
  • + 15
 Not sure why anyone would pick the M30 NX build over the M30 SLX/XT at the same price. It's like Orbea doesn't want any of those NX builds to sell. Or maybe it's a way to shame SRAM.
  • + 5
 Give them credit though, they put Shimano brakes on all of the builds, whether the drivetrain is Shamano or SRAM. Between that, a healthy overlap in spec options between alumninum and CF, and putting "performance" level suspension on as many of the builds as they could, Orbea might have put out the best lineup of spec levels I've ever seen on a single bike model.
  • + 2
 I think its a smart move to be covered in case Shimano can't supply them with enough drivetrains.

Demand for XT/SLX will be massive across the globe and after what happened with XTR there are some doubts if Shimano can ramp up production quickly enough.
  • + 16
 Another good bike, that ships with tokens. That's what I like to hear.
  • + 3
 Gain shock tokens, lose beer tokens.
  • + 14
 Dave Weagle must be pivoting around his axle in his lab.
  • + 3
 The question is, have they bought the design from Weagle or from Trek?
  • + 2
 @vinay: well we know who Trek stole it from ????
  • + 7
 @rh00p: I don't know. The official story was that Dave Weagle came to Trek to discuss his design to find out that they were already working on something similar. So they decided to go their own way. I get that. After all, it isn't all that different to a floating brake we already saw on bikes from Kona and Santa Cruz among others. Just less adjustable (on a floating brake like D.O.P.E. you could shift the link along the seattube to get different brake feedback on the suspension) and now with ABP they also have the shock driven by that linkage. But from the brake point of view (which is what it is all about after all) it is just a floating brake caliper. So sometimes different companies come up with a similar idea. Syntace and Schwalbe also developed ProCore independently. Then found out they were working on the same thing and then decided to continue together.
  • + 8
 With regards to the patents being discussed, neither Trek nor Weagle were claiming to own the concept of a concentric axle pivot. The concept of a concentric axle pivot is actually super old and not able to be patented. The differences between Trek's ABP and Split Pivot were all related to the shock mounting, shock technology, leverage ratios, and pivot ratios.
  • + 8
 "Also, anti-squat was decreased by 7% to better match a cassette with 50 or 51 teeth, with" Am I missing something here? The chart shows higher a.s. for the 2020 model.

I do like the a.s. and leverage charts. Reviews are moving in the right direction!
  • + 4
 The same for the leverage ratios...
  • + 7
 @JohanG, you're right, that should have said "increased" - it's been updated.
  • + 4
 I don't know what happened. Maybe I had a stroke or something. Will fix that. Sorry.
  • + 10
 I believe color coding on leverage ratio chart is still mislabeled.

"starting point of 3.14 : 1 heading towards 2.4 on the Occam 2020". this plot is grey on the chart, referring to 2019 according to the legend.
  • + 2
 @Planetx888: Yep, that's what I think too. New LR is the white line which is the oppo of the other 2 charts.
  • + 2
 @Planetx888: Agreed.
  • + 1
 @jb-scz: On the LR chart there's actually no legend as what is what. And from Endurotribe.com (in french) it looks like the right grey curve is for the new Occam, so the text described here is correct regarding LR. Just the chart colors are inverted compared to the AS curve. Weird but seems to make sense in the end.
  • + 1
 @nr22: Speaking of anti-squat efficiency, what are your impressions here?
  • + 11
 not 27.5 bikes on their AM or enduro bikes...thanks from the short people community ..
  • + 11
 That chain guide looks like it’s just along for the ride.
  • + 7
 Holy shoot that aluminum bike looks nice. Why are we putting up with manufactures putting sloppy welds and ugly colors on aluminum frames again?
  • + 6
 I think Orbea nailed it on this one.

Modern geo, well specced, individual component upgrades at a reasonable price, custom paint, bottle cage, what more can a Pinkbike reader ask for?!?!
  • + 5
 and a threaded bb!
  • + 8
 Are the colors reversed on the leverage ratio graph?
  • + 6
 Maybe the words are reversed? (mind-blown)
  • + 2
 @rnm410: hmm, looks like they’re both reversed now that pinkbike “fixed” it...
  • + 6
 Geometry is now in the database for comparison purposes...
geometrygeeks.bike/bike/orbea-occam-2020
  • + 2
 Right on! Love GeometryGeeks.com. Use it all the time. Thanks
  • + 3
 @MelvieD: You're welcome Smile
  • + 2
 @geometrygeeksbob excellent site, thanks!
  • + 5
 I wish every brand allowed you to customize the colors like this. Having only 1-2 color options on most bikes these days seems unnecessary.
  • + 3
 The frame weight (presumably medium) is listed as 2720 grams with rear shock - what does that translate into for a complete build weight as tested?
Any other current bikes with similar geo/travel specs?
  • + 2
 Not sure on total weight - maybe in the 28 lbs range. Ripmo is 2776g w/ shock for reference.
  • + 2
 Frame weight is exactly the same as a stumpy a stumpy is about 30 lbs for a high end build.
  • + 5
 Alloy frame looks better than the carbon one ! Orbea need to make a retrofit chainstay protector like this for the rallon !
  • + 2
 One of the first thing I noticed on the new bike and now I really want it for my Rallon!
  • + 2
 A 28T in the front fixes the acceleration problem on any 29er and you really don't lose much in your high gear. Top speed is a subtle difference in a faster cadence, i'd encourage all 29er riders to just try a 28T up front.
  • + 1
 Keep in mind that this is effectively a single pivot bike. These are pretty sensitive to changes in the size of the front ring.
  • + 2
 The information about the previous model is incorrect @nr22 . It has 120mm of rear wheel travel on the 2016-2019 model pared with first a 120mm Fox 32 and then a 130mm Fox 34 on the TR 29 version.
  • + 4
 When a last gen Stumpjumper and a current gen Rip 9 meet in the woods....
  • + 3
 Barry White?
  • + 4
 So would that suspension set up play well with coil?
  • + 4
 Only $500 difference between carbon and aluminum nearly equipped the same.
  • + 1
 Just curious, does the Low BB may become a concern?
336mm with 35mm drop. It may be good for cornering but for pedaling on rough terrain, we may get a lot of pedal strike.

Even the Rallon have 345mm BB height.
  • + 1
 so the occam gets a 210/50 shock, but you can easily un-spacer the shock to 210/55mm which would increase the rear travel to 154mm.. looks like a nice enduro bike with 160mm 36‘s then
  • + 1
 Assuming that doesn't give you rub issues.
  • + 2
 the old occam waa a good all rounder very light and fun to ride but found its limit on the real rough stuff. Warranty is spot on with Orbea and they are a decent price too
  • + 0
 I saved my money up and bought
an Orbea Rallon M-team, costing £6000.

It was my dream bike but after less than a year it CRACKED (straight 2 inch crack on the downtube). Orbea have been utterly dismissive and left me completely unsupported… the ‘Lifetime warranty’ is worthless AVOID.

This is despite the support of my local Orbea bike shop who expected the frame to be replaced under warranty… choose carefully people.
  • + 9
 Interesting. Any further details- how / when did it crack, Orbea’s exact response, etc?
  • + 6
 Yeah, as a brand new Rallon owner I'd like to hear more...
  • + 2
 @ratedgg13: have a feeling this same dude is posting this all over the place, if its the one ive seen pictures of its obvious crash/impact damage. just someone that thinks if they cry and whine on the interwebs they can get their own way.
  • + 1
 @b45her: yup this guy posts this everywhere. Copy paste repeat.
  • + 1
 I saw a cracket Rallon rear triangle but it was damaged by a branch, many frames would have suffered the same fate, and its replacement has been flawless for a year.
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian: Orbea's response is that as there are stone chips in the BB area, and that this is somehow evidence that (30cm away) the damage must be caused by an impact. This is despite the fact that the damage lies underneath the downtube protector, which itself is free of any marks. I bought the bike through online shop Tredz - it's taken 4 months to find this out....

I've been riding bikes for 15 years... Orbea straight up have refused warranty on a genuine issue and not provided explaination. I'm now having to approach trading standards in line with the consumer goods act ... hasslle but I have no other choice. Various other customers have since contacted me explaining they've had similar experiences.

It's a shame because I loved the bike, but Orbea have let me and others down in a big way.
  • + 0
 @b45her

The crack is perfectly straight, runs perfectly down the centre line of the down tube... my local Orbea Dealer inspected the bike and confirmed the damage isn't consistent with an impact.

I can't state this is a common problem for all Rallons (although others have had similar cracks in a different place), but I can say that Orbea's 'lifetime warranty' is worthless.
  • + 2
 @marvintheandroid: its the most perfect example of an impact split i have ever seen, and from what the pictures show its underneath the rubber frame guard, why would someone remove a glued on rubber guard unless there was some reason to?
for example after a big impact.
every single warranty i have personally dealt with has been sorted without issue or question other that the one which was actual crash damage, where a crash replacement part was offered for very very little money.
You smacked it on something suck it up and pay for a crash replacement.
  • + 0
 Eff. Top Tube is short, which he mentioned, compared to other bikes which are more like 602mm in a medium. If you up-size to the Large, seat tube increases to (457mm), high compared to something like a Ripmo where the seat tube is 420mm on a large, allowing short (legged) riders to upsize for comfort and stability. This was Orbea's problem imho with the previous OCCAM AM and they still haven't addressed it. I thought this update would put me back on Orbeas, almost Orbea, almost.
  • + 6
 But what I’ve noticed with bikes like the ripmo is that while it has a low seat tube that also translates in to a short seat tube which creates issues for tall end riders too. With every design someone seems left out is suppose.
  • + 0
 yes but the ripmo seat tube is almost too short. i'm 5'10" and think a seat tube of 450ish millimeters is ideal. if you're 5'9" or larger you should be able to handle the large size seat tube on this bike just fine, and their size guide suggests people in this height range should indeed get the large.
  • + 3
 Ibis has too short seat tubes now. My father is 181 cm tall with inseam of 89 cm, so L bikes are good for him, but he won't fit on the new Ripley, because the seat tube is too short! And he is on the lower end for L bike too! That is ridiculous.
  • + 1
 @TheJD:
That's because your Dad has freakishly long legs...
It has nothing to do with overall height.
I'm on the other side of the spectrum and I'd love to have a 420 mm seat tube on a L frame.
Not sure it's worth a new bike, for now at least...
  • + 3
 @TheJD: what length of dropper are we talking about? Why not upsize to 185 mm or even OneUps 210?
  • + 1
 @Crossmaxx: The default 150, but I looked at longer travel dropper and the 170s and 180s are the same total length as 150s! One model is actually shorter with 170 travel than with 150 travel.
  • + 2
 @TheJD: they make these things called long seatposts....
  • + 4
 That is in my opinion the best looking 29" trail bike on the market.
  • + 1
 and with custom colors, and sane pricing; it definitely has me thinking
  • + 2
 @kjjohnson: Unfortunately it seems only the LTD and M10 can do their MyO thing -.-. Maybe they're going to add the others later.

I am definitely interested in the aluminum one with GX eagle or XT 12 speed at 2999/3499USD
  • + 1
 @Ryan2949: I saw that as well, commented before I went to the website, I did have a good time yesterday playing with the custom builder, though. I guess the good news is that I do really like the blue and orange stock colourway.
  • + 1
 Righty-tighty & lefty-loosey. But if your frame is bottle blocking you...in the case of this one....it's lefty-tighty & lefty- loosey!
  • + 1
 So with this going to 140 rear are they going to redo the rallon or keep it at 150 or bump it up to 160 to complete with some of the other enduro bikes coming out lately
  • + 5
 there is a 170mm rear link kit on the way.
  • + 1
 @b45her: What's the source on that?
  • + 3
 @cofo11: Orbea, its already on thomas lapiyeries bike.
  • + 1
 @b45her: You sure that it's not the new Rallon that's coming out this year? Reason I'm so curious is if I could bump my Rallon to 170mm the Occam would make sense where I don't think it does now.

I have it from a good source that the new bike was supposed to have more travel and be more progressive out back while being a bit longer in the reach department as well.
  • + 2
 @cofo11: www.ambmag.com.au/feature/bike-check-thomas-lapeyries-orbea-rallon-523129

take a look at the linkage its the 170 kit thats going to be an option soon.
  • + 2
 @b45her: Ah I see it now, looking at the Turquoise Rallon on his Instagram page the link has a curve to it. The white one is more linear and has higher attachment point to the seat stay. Any word on what that does for leverage ratios and if a new shock is needed?
  • + 2
 @cofo11: same shock, no info on leverage curves though, rallon is identical for 2020, 170 will be an option and available to buy and retrofit.
  • + 2
 @b45her: Awesome, thanks! Now my concern is will my 11-6 play nice or not. Considering he's running coil I have to think they added a little more progressiveness to it.
  • + 1
 so the occam gets a 210/50 shock, but you can easily un-spacer the shock to 210/55mm which would increase the rear travel to 154mm.. looks like a nice enduro bile with 160mm 36‘s
  • + 1
 @MTBert: i have an H10 with all the upgrades thrown at it on order,my plan is to change the forks to 160mm.
whats involved with removing the stroke length spacer on the dpx2?
a 160 front 154 rear occam would be a monster.
  • + 2
 Please tell me the rear axle size on their website is a typo and 12x187mm is not a thing.
  • + 2
 Full length of axle. Rear hub is 148mm
  • + 1
 its the bolt through ength not the spacing, dont panic.
  • + 3
 Looks like an awesome bike.
  • + 3
 Orbea makes a high quality bike. top notch finish.
  • + 1
 ¡Vaya maquinón!, tengo una Rallon y es excelente, así que me encantaría probar esta.

Con esas cifras, no me importaría que fuese mi bici de trail.
  • + 2
 so what height is the reviewer and what size was the bike? can't believe this kind of info is left out of a review
.
  • + 2
 Rider is 168 cm or about 5'6". The bike was a size M. It's only a first ride article though, not a full review, where you'd normally find that info.
  • + 2
 Why no aluminum in the U.S.? Just cracked a very expensive carbon frame, would love more aluminum options....
  • + 1
 Orbea US site shows availability of the aluminum one, just now the least expensive model. Starts at $3k
www.orbea.com/us-en/bicycles/mountain/occam/cat/occam-h20-eagle
  • + 1
 @Dnik You sure your cracked frame isn't repairable?
  • + 1
 Another bummer from Orbea for 27.5 fans. If the rallon had a 27.5 option it’d be my current bike with out question. Still a Beautiful and nicely done bike
  • + 2
 @Colson217: So now the PB firing line is also following the industry push for all 29ers all the time and you get downvoted for requesting a 27.5?? Yikes, tough crowd.
  • + 1
 "€2,299 (not available in the US) for the H30" Ya sure? Website indicates otherwise... I'm able to see the bike and add to my cart. (and boy am I tempted to purchase!)
  • + 1
 They just sent me a note that my info sheet was incorrect in that regard. The bike is available in the US. We'll update that info.
  • + 1
 Alloy version looks sweet . These guys are biased against right handers. It's a conspiracy
  • + 1
 The model years are flipped on the leverage ratio graph. 2020 is white and 2019 is yellow.
  • + 1
 Geometry almost identical to the Ripmo. Good move by the Spaniards because everyone absolutely loves the Ripmo.
  • + 1
 As a happy Ripmo owner I’d agree about the good design, but you do have to credit Orbea for using that geometry a good 6-10 months ahead of the Ripmo with the Rallon.
  • + 2
 Funny...not even one comment from Spain...wonder why that is ..????
  • + 0
 They don´t understand english?
  • + 2
 Because we remember what a pile of garbage orbeas were when were kids... Born and raised in Spain.
  • + 0
 @Robertoregency: Feasable
  • + 1
 OK SOUTHPAW ALLERT right handers..... move along,,,, nothing too see here and it's in creamsickle
  • + 0
 Asking if it’s guided internal routing on Pinkbike reviews is getting boring. Can I route the rear brake hose on the right side of the headtube?
  • + 1
 Good looking bike though...ok...I’m done....good night
  • + 1
 Looks like specialized linkage.........
  • + 1
 Mid travel 29er???? Seems like yesterday 120 was mid travel.
  • + 1
 2020 models launched in Jun of 2019...this industry is going mad.
  • + 2
 It's been this way at least since the late 90's.
  • + 1
 Trekcialized suspension tech
  • + 1
 OCCAM M30 with 120mm rear travel? Why?
  • + 1
 The M30 has 140mm rear travel.
  • + 1
 @opignonlibre: now I know,but on Orbea page is 120mm....
  • + 1
 Can the rear end the filed off to fit 150mm hubs?
  • + 1
 A bike made for left handers .... gracias
  • + 1
 This is probably my next bike.
  • + 1
 Love the custom paint options!
  • + 1
 Always find that Mercedes F1 livery colours very pleasing.
  • + 1
 How does it compare to the Specialized Stumpjumper?
  • + 1
 from my experience with orbeas. cheaper better finish better spec.
  • + 2
 I want. This bike.
  • + 2
 Alu looks better!
  • + 1
 Left hand water bottle. I'm out!
  • + 1
 I have a like new 2018 M10 Tr for sale for $4200.
  • + 1
 Sick bike!
  • + 0
 Looks like if the old and new stumpjumper had a portuguese baby....
  • + 0
 Wow that is beautiful Drool
  • - 1
 Friday fails will be full of UK Orbea riders going over the bars
  • + 8
 When last did you reach for a bottle while feathering a brake?
  • + 1
 So rider or the bike? Rider.
  • - 3
 still prefer my nukeproof mega though...personal preference that's all
  • + 11
 O ----- Here's a cookie for you
  • - 3
 Honestly the only thing that would prevent one of these being my next bike is the Fox parts..
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