100% Forecast Roll-Off System - Review

Mar 19, 2017 at 5:58
by Olly Forster  
100 Forecast Goggle Review
Are we looking at another cookie cutter product from the MX world? Absolutely, but who cares if it does the job.

When it comes to keeping the crap out of your eyes and maintaining vision on wet and muddy rides, what are your options? Aside from a front fender on your bike, which you should have anyway, your options are limited to wiping your optics as and when they become compromised. Doing so will only scratch and degrade your lens, and going sans eyewear will only introduce debris to where you want it least; your eyes. Faced with this dilemma, downhill riders have taken cues from the world or motocross in the shape of roll-off systems and tear-offs. The latter, which are thin pieces of transparent plastic that can be torn off and discarded, shouldn't really be an option for mountain biking, as you're technically littering if you use them correctly.

Tear-offs have been vilified for this reason and banned from the British Downhill Series, Enduro World Series, and the Morzine, Châtel, and Les Gets bike parks. Will we see more race series and bike parks go in this direction? Let's hope so. With tear-offs ruled out, that leaves roll-off systems, and while they've been used in downhill racing to success for many years (think Danny Hart, Champéry, 2011 world championships) they've often been more hassle than they're worth for your average rider busting out laps in the rain.


100 Forecast Goggles Review
100% Forecast Roll-Off Kit Details:
• Low profile design
• 2x 45mm wide films in the box
• Self-cleaning canister
• 9-pin retention system locks the Forecast into goggles existing lens channel, creating a tight seal against the elements
• Smooth rolling drawstring for easy pulling
• Film exits closer to the lens to reduce dirt from entering the main view
• Compatible with Racecraft, Accuri, and Strata 100% goggles.
• MSRP: $59.95 USD / £49.95 GBP
www.ride100percent.com

The main issue regarding roll-off systems is that they often fail in MTB scenarios. Let me explain: moto riders, for whom these systems are primarily designed, spend an average of 20–30 minutes at a time in the saddle, while mountain bikers, barreling down a mountain (after a trip up, either in a cable car or uplift truck), spend in the region of 2-5 minutes at a time and usually repeat this over the course of a day. Because we spend a lot of time with our goggles not actually on our heads, such systems can all too easily become compromised by moisture getting behind the roll-off film itself, causing it to adhere to the lens, resulting in a jam.

Instalation and Operation

The Forecast system is effectively an all-in-one roll-off kit that slips into any 100% goggle via the 9-pin lens channel. The Forecast comes assembled with the simple task of installing one of the two roll-off films supplied into the canisters. The unique lens, which is larger than a standard 100% lens, has two horizontal rows of small raised pimples - these prevent the film from sticking to the lens when wet. While you can see these if you look hard enough, they're not visible when you're busy with the task at hand and staring at slick roots and rocks.

Mounted at either end of the lens are the canisters: one contains a tightly wound roll of clear film, which you then pull across the lens, under the visor at the top of the lens, and with the yellow adhesive strip, attach it to a post in the opposing canister, which rotates via a spring loaded cord below. Pulling the cord, in turn, pulls the film across the lens from one side to the other, and in doing so clears any moisture and debris covering the film. The last key component is the visor at the top of the lens—this shields the film from moisture or debris getting behind the film from above (like rain or roost).

100 Forecast Goggles Review
The Forecast system slips into any 100% goggle, just like slotting a lens in.
100 Forecast Goggle Review
The mud visor and lens pimples deliver the magic ingredients.
100 Forecast Goggle Review
32mm vs. 45mm—the Forecast packs a punch.

The larger than average (for 100% goggles) lens slots into the special Forecast frame which then slots into your goggles' lens channel, just like a regular lens. Traditional roll-off systems forgo an additional frame and comprise of an adapted lens which slots straight into your goggles. The larger lens used on the Forecast system represents a significant advantage as it allows for a wider 45mm roll-off film to be used. Why is this important? Traditional after-market roll-off systems have narrow 32mm (on average) films as they are confined to set lens widths—now this makes a lot of sense when your field of vision is reduced to a thin strip.

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On the Trail

Providing you follow the supplied manual, getting the Forecast ready for action only takes a few minutes, although installing it into your goggles is a pretty fiddly affair. Once in, it's steadfast and seamless in its integration into the host goggle—for this test, I used their mid-price Accuri model. With the goggles on and dropping into the trail below, the first thing I noticed was the additional 125g mounted to the front of my goggles. It also took a bit of time for my eyes to get used to the lens position, which is pushed outwards thanks to the Forecast's design as it effectively offsets the lens to the outside of the goggle frame to accommodate the larger lens.

Reaching for the pull cord with a lens covered in crap is easy and especially satisfying, providing that you remember it's on the left and not the right—guess which side a throttle is on—and it immediately zips back into place as you release it, leaving you with clear vision. It really is that simple. The Forecast's construction is solid and the whole system feels resoundingly well made. The rear portion of the canisters is clear so you can see how much film you have left—you get two rolls in the box and a pack of six will set you back $15.

100 Forecast Goggle Review
Whether you want the "moto look" or simply want to 'look' where you're going, a roll-off system makes sense if you regularly ride in wet conditions.

From days after heavy rainfall to days in the rain, the Forecast system did little to disappoint, working pull after pull and proved easy enough to break down and clean after a good day bashing through puddles. I did manage to get water between the film and lens on one occasion—this did not happen on the bike I may add, but when loading the bike onto an uplift trailer in the rain. Thanks to the lens design, it didn't jam the system but it did distort my vision. This is simple to fix provided you can find something dry, clean and absorbent (on a wet day on a mountainside—good luck!) to get in-between the film and lens. It's situations like this which trip up all roll-off systems and it just pays to be diligent with your optics when the weather is especially bad. For racing, you can see why such systems are popular as you can keep your optics relatively clean and out of the way, ready for when you drop in for that all-important run to the bottom.

So does the 100% Forecast roll-off system deliver the answer to keeping your optics clear on wet days getting the laps in? It goes some way in that it's one of the best on the market, and while it only works in their goggles, all of their goggles use the same 9-pin lens retention system. The bottom line remains the same; these are still specialist pieces of kit that will make a difference for downhill racers and bike park regulars who like to be prepared for all eventualities and take pride in their kit prep. It's relatively well priced given its specialist use and it should appeal to those of you who have been thinking of trying such a system out for the first time or have used others in the past, to much frustration.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIf you love riding in the rain and have had enough of scratching your goggle lenses, getting grit in your eyes or just hate the thought of tear-offs, a roll-off system should be on your list of things to try, and the 100% Forecast is one of the better options on the market. While it might not help you to win a race, being able to see where you're going while tearing down trails in the rain has its merits.Olly Forster








MENTIONS: @ride100percent




76 Comments

  • + 91
 I wonder if I could use old film to watch some movies on the trails with this as well..
  • + 16
 Convert pov footage of *insert your favorite pro rider here* to analog film and have virtual-real reality! Sounds like win win to me.
  • + 9
 @daweil: povgmented reality perhaps?
  • + 4
 pinkbike kids won't unterstand...
  • + 2
 Could this be the new POV for track review? Load up the old film recording of your first descent and watching again, again and again. #clearadvantage. Say bye to your Oculus VR system!
  • + 1
 Got to be video of the year Wink
  • + 61
 Good to see a nice and clear product review
  • + 9
 Ahh! I see what you did there!
  • + 11
 Wow! These Puns are visionary.
  • + 15
 I roll my eyes every time I scroll past a pun thread.
  • - 1
 These look like something I can vision myself using, seeing as how much rain we're getting this year.
  • + 2
 +1! Other than the intended pun, we did appreciate the time spent identify the yay or nay of our product.
  • + 43
 When the end of the roll comes, does it display "You have 0% of your 100%" ?
  • + 15
 And if you reach the end of your race run, but have some roll left in the canister, then you can't have given it 100%.
  • + 12
 @aoneal We should look into that. Smile
  • + 1
 Nice one!
  • + 35
 This Winter riding product brought to you on the 2nd day of Spring...
  • + 43
 Don't forget, there are plenty of places in the world where spring time means wet and sloppy conditions.
  • + 9
 You clearly have never been to the Pacific North West in Spring...
  • + 16
 @mikekazimer: Good point! I remember hearing in England, the only spring time weather change is warmer mud!
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: northern Utah. here spring is a week long period with 1 inch snow melt then again melt. after that week its 90 degrees.
  • + 7
 What is this 2nd day of Spring that you speak of?

Actually it was dryer than usual here in Ireland today... because it was snowing...
  • + 1
 You may have seasons in many parts of the USA but feel for the people like us in the UK - We may not get extremes of weather but it does rain for a large portion of the year!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: And the fact that they've been out quite a while now. Not like its a new product for them, just finally getting its review. Good write up BTW
  • + 2
 We would have to second @mikekazimer, second day of Spring means the start of the rain season before summer in a lot of places, like Pacific Northwest to say the least.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Here in Colorado we have a little something called mud season, wear all the snow mealts and it like riding in a bunch of nutella.
  • + 1
 @Boxxer1237: Utah seasons are just the same, went for a ride on a DIRT ROAD and I sunk and more mud gripped to my tires then tires gripping mud around corners.
  • + 20
 Ill wait for the bluetooth handle bar button option.
  • + 11
 Great feature to add next year, we will keep it in mind Smile
  • + 8
 How many pulls do you get with a system like this? Or any roll of system? I don't ride a lot in the rain but getting back into racing and there is always aMuddy race.
  • + 2
 To many to count
  • + 3
 Enough to do a 30minute + 2 lap motocross race while constantly being roosted by dirty great 450cc four-strokes. So for a 3.5 minute DH track or uplift day, plenty!
  • + 4
 This article made me smile, thinking about all the old spandex strava guys I see on the local FB groups who are probably cringing in anger at this invention. Never should there be anything that encourages wet weather riding on trails, lest the temperature be 80*F+ and dry for at least 3 days to ensure no tread marks will ever be present. Uptight anal suburban yuppie trail steward's worst nightmare!
  • - 1
 I'm more of an old spandex strava guy who thinks that riding with goggles is a far greater sin than riding in the wet weather.
  • + 2
 @levysac*nt: hmmmm guess you never tried it.
  • + 1
 @DHaddict82: For motocross yes, but I haven't for the MTB. I think they would look funny with my road helmet. lol
  • + 2
 You literally cannot win with people. We hand built a trail (modern flow line, 15'-20' doubles, some tech,) and that winter the local XC community lost their collective sh*t when they stumbled across us riding it in the rain (they were on an adjacent fireroad.) You can't even ride your own trails you built without somebody busting your balls about it.
  • + 2
 That looks seriously slick. But hey, the problem with tear-offs is the rider, not the system. You don't litter if you use them correctly - you litter if you choose to throw the discarded bit away instead of stashing it in a pocket.
  • + 10
 ever tried to stash a tear off in your pocket during a race run? Not that its the right thing to do but....
  • + 5
 @g-42 As @USMC said, it's quite the challenge! That's where the Forecast answer the question.
  • + 1
 "Whether you want the "moto look" or simply want to 'look' where you're going, a roll-off system makes sense if you regularly ride in wet conditions."

i really try not to be a grammar nazi but the 'look' in quotes is just unnervingly similar to how trump misuses quotes in his twitter rants. please no. again, sorry...just a touchy subject right now.
  • + 1
 Am I the only one that thinks this is kind of ridiculous? If I'm going to attach something that big to my googles it better be a full wiper system with washer fluid. Tear offs are fine if you really need them, just don't litter. It's not like I'm going to take a hand off the bars during a race run anyways.
  • + 5
 Haha so wonder which countries will use this the most.
  • + 3
 Here in Utah it rained a whole once last summer; definitely on my need to buy list!
  • + 2
 Whenever it is muddy enough to need these, people yell at me for riding lol I did love using them in Whistler though.
  • + 1
 @dbodoggle: Great to hear!
  • + 1
 Rolloffs have been developed for the last 20 years or so by Scott and Smith. Pretty certain 100% is licensing the same technology. For sure the older 32mm systems were marginal, but they still worked . The new dimpled lenses are the key as well as the small strip at the top to keep water from draining down across the lens. Once you adjust to these systems and their small added flexibility you'll wonder why you never used these before. Given the shortness and relatively small roost issues compared to riding/racing moto you will get quite a bit of mileage out of each role of film. My systems would give me 100miles of clear vision racing in nasty mud around others no problem.
  • + 3
 If this comes in remote mounted to handlebar then i'm buying
  • + 2
 Will keep in mind...
  • + 2
 Actually I think it makes sense. Maybe you could even program it to pull the film every 30 seconds or something. So if you are pro and the conditions are terrible, you can have clear vision for the duration of your run. It would be expensive, but probably still cheaper than a pair of enduro specific sunglasses...
  • + 1
 @Archimonde: clockwork mechanism in the roll-up film?
  • + 1
 @mattg95: Something simple and light. I have never ridden in conditions that could warrant something like that, but I guess there are places on this planet where this would be a lifesaver.
  • + 1
 @Archimonde @mattg95 Thanks for your input, appreciated.
  • + 3
 If it rains here, it means Trails are Closed..
  • + 8
 If it rains here, it means conditions are normal.
  • + 3
 Sounds like an opportunity to create biodegradable tear offs
  • + 7
 Good idea! Could use some rice sheets, and then eat them.
  • + 1
 In a perfect world, yes, but in reality the vision through "biodegrable green" lenses isn't as optimal as Lexan lenses.
  • + 1
 Also, they need to not stick together or start to biodegrade while they are getting rained on, on your Googles. Otherwise you'd go to pull one off and it'll be stuck to the one underneath. But someone does need to figure out the solution and make them all biodegradable soon... the amount of them you see flying round the car park at a windy motocross race is pretty bad. Forget the 5p plastic bag tax, we'll all be getting charged tear-off tax.
  • + 1
 @ride100percent: Maybe not, but I'm sure that can be addressed if it is a real problem.

We're not shooting bottle caps at 1000yds here, while not optical quality, it's probably comparable and worth it if the result is less plastic garbage.
  • + 2
 Cord. Chord. They have different meanings. Maybe stick to the same spelling for one review.
  • + 2
 Why havn't any good fenders that actually protect more then your shock arch been designed?
  • + 2
 There's some. The Topeak XC1 has a lot of coverage and works really well on my commuter, but could be used for for MTBing as well.
  • + 2
 Living in California, I haven't really had much need for fenders, but the Mudhugger FR seems like a pretty solid option. www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDKaqjY8V3A
  • + 1
 Here in NC if it's muddy enough to need these you'd want to stay home because our mud cakes like little debbie
  • + 2
 Going to see a lot of these next week at Crankworks !!!!
  • + 1
 @glenno Hopefully not... but looks like it!
  • + 2
 But then we don't get to watch Danny Hart tearing 'em off mid WC run...
  • + 1
 I'm gonna need that for Barry-Roubaix Saturday according to the forecast Frown
  • + 3
 Rain, lol.
  • + 1
 Next will be the dust mask attachment for those dry dusty tracks
  • + 1
 I 100% like the look of a printing press on your googles.
  • + 1
 Are the roll-off film cartridge recyclable?
  • + 1
 Don't think that's how you spell installation.... tut tut.
  • + 1
 Or just buy a mudhugger

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