Orange Factory Racing Announces it Won't be Returning in 2024

Dec 17, 2023 at 0:37
by Orange Bikes  

Words: Orange Bikes

30 years of racing pedigree. A roster stacked with iconic names. Front-and-centre throughout downhill and enduro history.

Orange Mountain Bikes has racing in its DNA and Orange Factory Racing is the latest chapter in that story.


Way back in the late 80’s, our founders started Orange because they loved racing bikes. The rigid machines of the time weren’t quite right for their needs, so they made their own. Roll forward to 2023 and there’s been a whole load of evolution and innovation since those early bone-shakers, but the passion for riding bikes fast, against the clock hasn’t changed.

In 2020 we launched Orange Factory Racing - a formal name for what we’d spent 3 decades doing, supporting talent and going fast between the tapes at the top of mountain bike competition.

It was our way of bringing racing full in-house, under our own control and 100% on our terms. Run by Orange staff, partnering with brands that we trust and all to help our bikes and our riders go fast. It was run by the people that design and build the bikes with every hard-learned lesson going straight back to source to help Orange bikes evolve.

Orange Factory Racing Andy Lloyd Photo

Orange Factory Racing Andy Lloyd Photo

For year one we recruited Scotsman Joe Connell, Lachlan Blair and longstanding Orange rider Tom Wilson. The Orange Stage 6 Evo was the team’s flagship bike - showing the world that single pivot and British-made could cut it on the World Stage.

The team raced the full Enduro World Series, select Downhill World Cups and a few one-offs such as Trans Madeira and a whole heap of domestic British events.

Good times and good results followed, spreading the good word of Orange around the globe.

photo

photo

For 2021 the roster didn’t change but the tools of the trade developed.

A Factory team isn’t simply about racing. It’s also about R&D, testing prototypes and proving our bike designs are ready for the world - and the team’s greatest success for 2021 was the Orange Switch 7.

Our hard-charging, World-stage-ready superbike, the Switch 7 was made for the demands of Factory-level riders and tested, refined and developed by the team.

Orange Factory Racing Andy Lloyd Photo

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For 2023 the team wished a fond farewell to Joe and Lachlan, and welcomed Becky Cook and Christo Gallagher to the family.

The racing evolved from Enduro World Series to Enduro World Cup, but, our commitment to round-the-world racing continued. Full EDR, a whole load of British and a few other bits and bobs in between.

2023 EDR World Cup Maydena Australia Photo Kike Abelleira

Becky scored the Switch 7’s first-ever race win in the Welsh hills early in the year, and went on to a season of solid results with wins at Tweed Love and the UK’s prestigious Southern Enduro Championships and also a 3rd place at German National Enduro in Winterberg.

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Christo added more gold to the team trophy cabinet. First at the famously technical Dunkeld enduro and again at the British Downhill National at Glencoe, the South West Enduro Series Event at Minehead and Tweedlove Vallelujah race.

2023 EDR World Cup Maydena Australia Photo Kike Abelleira

And let’s not forget Tom Wilson. Gold medal at Tweedlove, gold medal at the IXS DH Cup in Winterberg, gold medal at Gisburn PMBA Enduro. Rock solid.

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But - all that good news comes with a bittersweet note.

Whilst we’re celebrating the successes of the team, we’re also drawing a line under this particular chapter of Orange’s history. Orange Factory Racing won’t return for 2024.

With so much uncertainty in the bike industry, challenges around the future of the Enduro World Cup Series and the sheer cost of running a competitive Factory-level team, we’re pressing pause.

We’ll return when the time is right. But for now, we’re ending on a high and will take a break to focus on our main goal of creating world-class bikes.

All that said, our passion for racing isn’t going anywhere and neither is Orange Bikes. We’ll continue to support a number of talented athletes around the World - look out for more news on that in the new year.

Orange Mountain Bikes would like to thank everyone that has supported Orange Factory Racing through its 3-year tenure. That includes our staff, our athletes, our partner brands, race organisers, media and our customers and fans.

The Orange Factory Racing Roster:
Riders:
Tom Wilson
Lachlan Blair
Joe Connell
Becky Cook
Christo Gallagher

Staff:
Kelvin Lawton
Alex Desmond
Dan Greenwood

Photography:
Kike Abelleira

You can learn more about Orange Mountain Bikes at https://www.orangebikes.co.uk

Photos thanks to Kike Abelleira, Andy Lloyd, John Chennels and Liam Money.

photo


Author Info:
orangebikes avatar

Member since Jun 28, 2010
29 articles

206 Comments
  • 146 6
 God alive this sport is starting to get depressing. Discovery buying the world cups, huge companies going bust, unpredictable prices, big enduro teams pulling out. What happened to our sport man
  • 157 12
 Covid happened - but the sport itself is just as fun as it always has been, the bikes are cheap right now and they ride better than ever. The industry is temporarily in the shit but give it a year or two and everyone can get back to moaning about the price of bikes again.
  • 60 0
 @justanotherusername: up -down - up -down.... business is just like biking itself
  • 10 13
 What huge company went bust?
  • 43 3
 Doesn’t help when they decide to make a complete mess of the EWS and put downhill behind a paywall.
  • 48 1
 UCI trippling the cost of entry with nothing in return for the price hike, a terrible calendar and everything behind a pay wall it's not that surprising. It's the most honest press release I've seen in regards to getting rid of your race team
  • 27 0
 @sino428: probably not that big in America but CRC/ Wiggle been in administration would be equivalent to Jenson going in the US and they own nukeproof/ Vitus and whole host of other brands
  • 29 19
 It's tough times for the industry for sure. I can say that I love MTB. However, I honestly never watch racing or follow what is happening on any race circuit. I rarely watch any bike riding videos. I would watch that BoBo guy (Funny) way before some pro-riders video. (So dull). The bikes now work great, riding is fun. Racing meh don't give a rats A$$.
And I bet there are plenty of other riders who feel the same.
  • 20 1
 @justanotherusername: is the industry “in the shit” or is it returning to pre-Covid normal and they didn’t adjust quickly enough?
  • 16 0
 @trashpander275: I know you may cop some down votes, but you are right in saying not many people care about racing. I watch downhill and the odd XC race and EWS occasionally. Only a couple of my friends watch any mountain bike racing at all.
  • 8 0
 @meathooker: It seems far worse. It looks like they made tonnes of money for a bit, but it never occurred to them that it was temporary. What also doesn't help is the uncertainty of the race coverage's future...
  • 15 1
 @justanotherusername: Hit the nail on the head. Covid happened and the bike industry became greedy. They saw demand rocket and their prices followed. It's just the way of the world. Give it time and the brands with decent business plans, good distribution networks and value for money bikes will survive. Sure, some niche players will fold, but will this fundamentally change anything for the vast majority of mountain bikers? No

As for the athletes, most of us never get to live their dream. For some, it will just have to become a hobby, but that's what it is for the majority of us.
  • 19 9
 @briain: Brexit and poor management killed Wiggle/CRC,not Covid19.
  • 12 5
 Greed.
  • 3 0
 @briain: I guess that’s fair but even though they own a few brands I see Wiggle (and their problems) as more of a retailer than a bike company. I’m not sure how much of their problems stem from the retail business vs the bike business.

Struggles of a particular retailer don’t always say much about an industry as a whole. I don’t know what went on at CRC/wiggle but I was fairly a regular shopper there even being in the US. And even during the bike boom a few years ago it seemed they were having some issues.
  • 43 4
 @vp27: @vp27: You see the term 'greed' isn't really fair unless you understand how business was changed during the covid period, some greed sure but much of it is the reality of a once in a generation change in demand.

So say you go super busy all of a sudden, sell all of your inventory and are left with zero - you re-order from your supplier / manufacturer and get a lead time 3 x as long as usual, you pre-sell the lot and get back in touch with the manufacturer for even more stock, after all what is the point of a business that cant sell, what do the staff do etc?

This time though its not 3 x the usual lead time, its 10 x the usual time and its a yeat, you order as you have no choice and then once that's sold you do it again, demand is huge, shipping costs rocket, raw material costs rocket, factory prices rise, you of course raise prices to make more profit as any sane business would do.

Then, things slow a little, some orders can be cancelled some cant, you have to take inventory you don't need, then things slow even more and you need cash to pay for all of that stuff in the warehouse and the new staff you took on to deal with demand, so the discounting begins and everyone else does the same so discounts are bigger while its still hard to sell.

Add into the mix outside investors who got involved at the peak and are now not willing to keep putting money into companies now performing waaaaay less than expected - e.g. CRC / Wiggle. HLC USA, PON group etc.

The result - staff get laid off, stock gets sold off, cancel all non-essential business activity and try to steady the ship.

Yep, some greed but a lot of the issue was caused by the way the industry supply chain works.

Normality will resume as you say with a few less business trading.
  • 8 0
 @meathooker: Brands are running 40%+ discounts across the board, the industry's in the shit. The Covid boom happened, massive amounts of money was borrowed at a personal and government level, now we all get to pay the bills and nobody wants to spend $5k+ on a new bike. Kona is running a buy one get one free sale on mountain bikes. I dread to think what their overstock must look like to be selling high end bikes off two at a time.
  • 2 1
 @justanotherusername: In the mean time, innovation will be put on hold. How many companies will be introducing new models or revamping existing models in 2024! I think racing as a hole will retract due to brands pulling out but privateers may dominate! I don’t think the popular events will go away but the worlds DH and EWS will have smaller offerings
  • 9 0
 @nozes: it's got nothing to do with Brexit and everything to do with René Benko (Mr Signa holdings) and the value of commercial and office space.
  • 2 0
 @briain: I agree seems very honest, and finally an idea of how much the increased cost. Triple the cost is nuts, no wonder no more places bid to go in to the calendar and teams dropped. It is a truly Sad moment for the sport.
  • 3 0
 @rivercitycycles: I imagine innovation isn't slowing down too much but its all going to happen behind closed doors and wont be released until late 2024 - 2025 when the market is a little better.

Who would want to reduce a new flagship product / design when everyone is selling similar things for 30-50% off?
  • 1 0
 @meathooker: I believe so. You know what happens they used to such growth that when it levels off back to normalcy they feel like its a decline. Because covid changed what normal is.
  • 6 3
 Sorry but bike racing is not soccer. I know it is bigger in Europe (especially road)but it is far from being some gigantic industry that attracts a lot of money and interest. Many of us that have ridden bikes our whole lives could care less if DH, enduro, or XC disappeared. We'd still hit the trails and have fun and make it to our day jobs.
  • 2 0
 @ajaxwalker: Yeah. I'll be honest I never watch mountain bike racing (maybe Hardline) and I don't believe any of my friends that mountain bike do either.
  • 4 5
 @foggnm: If racing dies so does innovation & sales drop even more.
  • 7 0
 The end is Gnar
  • 7 1
 @Diesel2007: Sales reverting back to pre-covid is an issue but not in itself.

Sales reverting back to pre-covid with inventory 10 times the usual amount, additional staff, additional capacity and costs etc is the real problem.

Bikes sold at 40-50% discount are being sold for cost price now, liquidating to pay bills.
  • 9 9
 @justanotherusername: so basically greed.
  • 8 3
 @TomasK: Did you read anything I wrote above or just decide to write ' it da greedies bike indisrieeeazzz!!!'
  • 11 29
flag Mtbdialed (Dec 18, 2023 at 7:41) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: covid did nothing.....tyrannical governments did this. yours, mine, and many others.
  • 18 4
 @Mtbdialed: Nick you are a moron, everything you say is ridiculous.
  • 3 0
 @sino428: ChainReaction, Wiggle, Nukeproof and Vitus are soon to be gone, Guerilla Gravity went a few months back
  • 1 0
 @sino428: Wiggle?
  • 1 0
 @rivercitycycles: I think innovation will continue. Trek just released gen 6 slash, the Commencal meta was released this year, based on typical release schedules for specialized (and the odd rumours) we can expect a new enduro and stumpy. I would expect that with all kona process models currently BOGO that they’re probably going to have a new iteration coming soon as well. New t-type drive trains are released. The industry will keep trodding onward.
And this is great news for consumers. Excellent new and used deals abound for gen 5 slash models which are phenomenal bikes, Stumpjumpers are cheap, as I mentioned process models at buy one get one. Mind you they aren’t deeply discounted like some other brands, but if you wanted a 134 trail bike you could also pick up a process x dh for those bike park days at no added cost. Or link up with a friend or WAG and get a pair of new bikes at 50% off.
  • 3 1
 @Diesel2007: I was thinking the same thing. Discounted bikes at the end of the year and everyone thinks the industry is collapsing. But wasnt this the norm pre-covid? You could always find good sales at the end of the year and for those few years where you couldnt everyone complained.

It does seem like the discounts are a bit larger this year but that's likely do to the abnormal spikes in supply and demand over the last few years, which should at some point stabilize.
  • 3 0
 You know what can solve you getting depressed over all this industry crap? Just go ride your bike.
  • 3 2
 @Shitass: I don't know how much of the Wiggle/CRC stuggles are related to retail vs the bike brands they own. One specific retailer going out of business is not to me indictive of an industry in shambles.

As for Guerilla Gravity, I'd hardly call that a "huge" company. They were a small boutique brand that went out of business. Not unusual and not itself any real indicator of how the overall industry is doing.
  • 6 4
 @justanotherusername: yes I have, but correct me if I am wrong. Without greed there wouldn't have been issues in the supply chain? Cause and effect? Everyone, particularly big players, seen the opportunity to cash in (which is understandable) and in turn created this shit storm we are in at the moment.
  • 7 1
 @TomasK: so would you have preferred the business to sell its stock, not re-order and lay off staff / potentially close when their revenue runs out?

Would you have preferred all of the people that wanted bikes during covid not to be able to buy them?

What you describe as greed is the literal purpose of a business, the greed aspect comes when it goes too far, where that line is drawn is difficult to say.

What do you do for work?
  • 7 1
 @sino428: HLC are a huge US/ Canadian distro, they just laid off a huge number of staff, closed a warehouse or two and have suspended orders and payments.

Taiwan is currently awash with inventory and down to 3 day weeks / reduced capacity due reduced trade and all of the unsold stock on the floor.

Virtually every brand is selling bikes at 30-50% off, literally cost price to get cash into the bank.

Large numbers of PO’s have been cancelled as a result of reduced demand causing issues up and down the chain and furthering cash flow pressure.

2024 will see more companies go under, the real big boys will weather it or bankrupt their smaller suppliers by not paying them - wasn’t it shimano that extended payment terms unilaterally?
  • 4 0
 Depressed about the bike industry? Go ride your bike! Usually works.
  • 7 1
 @Maxcommencemal: Brexit added import duty & customs delays for EU customers and hugely increased postage charges... I hardly order anything from the UK any more and I'm sure I'm not the only one!
  • 2 0
 @briain: Jenson doesn't even come close to the prices CRC was charging before Shimano banned them from selling to Canada. If Jenson went belly up, NBD.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: never made comment on why they went into administration but Brexit certainly didn't help. But what actually screwed them was Signa hildings(the owners) going bust
  • 1 0
 @sino428: I think with Brexit they lost competitiveness compared to the German online retailers. But everything that went on with Signa is what tanked them
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah, it's a fuzzy line. Seeing as we're both Canadian, I'd say that line is around 34.99%. Any interest charged in Canada below 35% APR is seen as acceptable for credit cards, payday loans, etc. Charge 34.99% and you are a reputable business person helping someone out by giving them credit. Charge 35.01%, however and you will be charged as a lowdown, greedy, despicable loan shark.
  • 1 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: the issue as I see it is the long supply chains. They probably ordered the frames 2 years ago and now have a warehouse full of them with no demand left. The manufacturers who make their bikes in house or at least on the same continent have much shorter supply chains and shouldn't be as affected. Also alot of brands manufacturing in Asia charge as much as companies that manufacture inhouse
  • 1 0
 @rivercitycycles: they'll have to innovate. To differentiate in a crowded market
  • 1 0
 Who even knew they were at the races. Not the results to get into the main show and I never saw any socials around each event
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: There's much material for complaints in the pricing dept still.
  • 4 1
 @justanotherusername: If you get something back from a supplier stating 10 times normal lead time you do alot of work to make sure you are actually going to want that volume at that point far into the future
  • 1 0
 @TomasK: The supply change was hugely complicated. China and actually a lot of Asia having rolling shut downs due to covid. Messed with production outputs. China banning import of recycling material(trash) doubled or tripled the cost of transit for ships(Propain started transporting by air freight as it was the same price). The Suez canel getting blocked. These things all happened in quick succession and had long lasting impacts. Nothing to do directly with greed although greed was definitely involved
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: No, I used Jenson because there biggest online retailer I'm aware of in the US market. But yeah I don't think Jenson was close in scale to CRC/ Wiggle
  • 4 0
 @njcbps: To be fair, I just bought a new Rocky Mountain Altitude for (far) less than the list price of the same 2018 model. In other news, my rent is triple what it was in 2018....
  • 2 0
 @chrismac70: what ‘work’ would that be then? It’s called take it or leave it, have something to sell or nothing, there’s no alternative to be found at such short notice and with other people willing to take your slot if you don’t.
  • 2 1
 @justanotherusername: nah its just like insurance premium increases because they could they did
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: dunno i reckon now everyone knows that those expensive bikes cost 1/3rd less if they can wait for sale time , some people will begrudge the proft margin now they have a rough idea what it is
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: i often wonder if the comments has employees or just people not involved with industry
  • 1 0
 @korev: accoding to the government whisky and shortbread will keep the UK afloat
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: they will come up with a new wheel size or add an extra cog to the cassette and all will be forgotten.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: maybe he meant chiggle, signa or something was it called
  • 1 0
 The whole bike industry of going through a rough patch. Sometimes damage is destiny. Every sport and activity goes through fluctuations. I'm sure it will come back at some future time frame.
  • 6 12
flag Mtbdialed (Dec 18, 2023 at 13:27) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: you can name call(and get it wrong multiple times in one post), but you don't add anything other than maple syrup twinged impotent rage.

sure, believe all of the gov. responses to a respritory virus that had a death rate of .1%, were just and logical....but understand you are the 1% at this point that are still sucking Justin's ween...
  • 3 0
 @Mtbdialed: from memory i think hes irish not canadian
  • 3 3
 @Mtbdialed: Your name is Nick though, ‘Conoat’ on Twitter - once director of dissolved company MTBdialled the UK, a Walter Mitty character who is a world famous barman / ‘mixologist’ if I am right?

You spoke shit before moving back to the USA and speak just as much shit now, I can’t imagine you can even remember the stories and rubbish you have told on here over the past few years.
  • 3 0
 You can see it like that or you can just think I love riding bikes and ride your bike. None of this has any effect on your enjoyment of riding your bike. Im sure none of us as 10 years old riding around the park super stoked were getting upset because a few race team we have nothing to do with shut down. We were just stoked to be on our bikes, none of this changes you loving going for a ride at all
  • 1 0
 @korev: Brexit has undoubtedly damaged any UK company that exports to the EU, but it's irrelevant to the collapse of Signa Sport (CRC/Wiggle's parent company).
  • 1 0
 @rivercitycycles: @KNOLLYBIKES is rolling out a bunch of new bike designs in 2024. Gotta say I was a bit worried about them given how they are blowing out their existing inventory at huge discounts.
  • 1 0
 @TomasK: not quite. Covid caused a peak in demand as everyone was at home not spending money on holiday etc. There was only limited, normal supply coming from factories.

Brands discovered lead times went way up as everything that had been made had sold and been re-ordered by competitors, so placed orders with very long lead times. Demand has now dropped and those orders are still coming through, leading to overstocking.

It's not necessarily greed, it was probably a sensible option at the time to place the order or go bust with nothing to sell.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: I work for company, which manufactures mountain bikes and rest assured got to experience highs and lows of Covid first hand. I assume you are in same industry?
I never said not to re-order, my point was, big brands congested factories with their over the top orders and unrealistic expectations of Covid golden era to last forever and as a result are sitting on inventory which they can't sell.
  • 2 0
 @TomasK: this is what I was getting at in my pst above. My cousin works for a high end window covering company. We live in one of the frostiest growing cities in the US. His boss projected the sales of their company would continue on the trajectory of the last 5 -6 years. He started building a multiple million dollar commercial building for the window covering company. We’ve hit a slow down and he’s freaking out. I feel like this is not an uncommon scenario
  • 1 0
 @meathooker: That's a tough one - sometimes the best estimations made with good intentions can fall apart. Hopefully he lands OK.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: this. Took the words out of my mouth.

Sad times still, I live in Halifax (UK) where these are made. If scrapping the team for a year increases the prospects of the company as a whole to survive, then tough decisions have to be made.
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: If only the current government’s callousness, stupidity and bigotry had economic value, we’d be rolling in it.
  • 68 1
 File the team away for another year.
  • 4 2
 I see what you did there, thats an upvote for you
  • 40 1
 Top drawer comment.
  • 3 1
 Turn out the lights and lock the gate.
  • 2 1
 Fold it up and give it another crack later
  • 2 0
 Either that or put it in a biscuit tin.
  • 25 0
 1x "DNA"
2x "Passion"
The Breakup Statement drinking game is taking a heavy toll on my health and productivity this year.
  • 7 0
 That's not the spirit you should be aiming for...
  • 30 5
 orange had a competitive race team?
  • 6 2
 If it wasn't for the fact that one of my friends has Phil Atwells old orange DH rig from his Dirt mag WC team days... I wouldn't have known either........
  • 10 2
 I also can't remember the race teams of Steve Peat or Greg Minaar
  • 8 0
 @browner: kids these days don't know they're born. We only had one pivot and we were grateful for it. etc etc
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: They've got a new bike on the front page Wink
  • 5 0
 If even the Pinkbike audience doesn't know Ben Cathro.
  • 1 0
 and it was a "source to help Orange bikes evolve" .
apparently...
maybe that didnt work out :-)
  • 23 1
 Orange you glad you weren’t on that race team?
  • 10 0
 Stop taking the pith!
  • 5 0
 Their riders won a bunch of one off events, but never placed in the overall standings. I guess that makes them a seedless Orange.
  • 2 1
 @woofer2609: Yeah, Orange need to win stuff like clockwork...
  • 15 1
 It is a bad time for DH & Enduro Racing. The UCI is pretty much killing the sport out of shear incompetence!
They are completely out of touch with reality!

The price hike for teams is ridiculous but the move to Discovery for race coverage will prove to be one of if not the biggest mistake the UCI has ever made!

It is rumored that Discovery is right on the verge of bankruptcy!
  • 8 1
 to be fair, the UCI has been killing the sport for the last 20 years or so.
  • 1 1
 !!! !! !
  • 4 1
 I don't think nt think it's incompetence. I think it's quite deliberate
  • 18 2
 Since you can´t comment on outside-articles... Gravel full sus ... So wrong... Smile
  • 3 0
 Have there been several articles on that dumb bike or do they keep recycling the same one?
  • 10 4
 I have always said gravel bikes were stupid, it’s just road bike companies tricking people into thinking they’re not.
It’s like CrossFit: people think that doing a 360 sideways box jump is somehow getting you more into shape.
  • 6 0
 @nickfranko: fUnCtIoNaL tRaInInG!!1!
  • 1 0
 Like yes, but what a cool machine. It does not really have a purpose but I love when people make all sorts of whacky bikes.
  • 4 1
 @nickfranko: Naaah. Gravel bikes are the most versatile bikes. If I had to limit myself to two bikes, it would be my 150mm 29er and a gravel bike. The MTB would be fine for everything from XC to DH, the gravel bike would be fine for everything from bar crawls and commuting to XC.
  • 2 0
 As a guy who doesn't like gravel bikes... They definitely aren't stupid. They make more sense for the majority of road riders. More relaxed geo, wider tires, disc brakes, lower gearing, all good things about gravel bikes. And the ability to get you off of the roads you are afraid of riding, but you're less interested in mountain biking. I have one, and an aero road bike, enduro bike, and XC bike. I wish I liked gravel, I just can't get into it.
  • 18 1
 World Cups will be much quieter without them.
  • 7 0
 I’ll be honest, sad as it is to see bike brands pulling out of racing, I’d rather they did that for a few years than closed up business forever. The industry is going to have at least a few hard and lean years coming up and they’ll need to manage their finances as best they can until they’re able to support more riders again.
  • 7 0
 It is going to be a shame not seeing Orange's bikes out there this year. I have enjoyed seeing them come down the course under some of the world's greatest riders. Hopefully they will regroup and compete again very soon!
  • 7 0
 Water bottles mounted under the downtube is just wrong in so many ways (photo 1). You're literally drinking whatever you ride through.
  • 5 0
 Here's my winge at Orange - bought 3 of their bikes in the past, between 2005-2015. They all cracked/snapped and Orange were crappy about warranty. This story in isolation is no big deal, but this is an extremely common story of previous Orange owners. And it builds up to a point where you've burned bridges with all of your audience
  • 1 0
 That is opposite to my experience - I sent my bike in for a (paid) re paint, Orange noticed an issue with the frame, so sent me a new one, in my choice of colour FoC. This is the first time I’ve heard bad experience of their warranty department.
  • 5 1
 Racing is definitely in a tough spot.

The state of the industry is entirely the industry's fault. Anyone could see from a mile away that all those sales gains were temporary.
On the bright side there are SO many more people on bikes now thanks to Covid. My local areas are booming and the sport has never been more popular but everyone bought their bike during Covid and now it will be component / accessory sales until people decide that they want a fresh rig in a few years.
  • 7 3
 It's the pricing model of this entire industry as a whole, for bikes and apparel. No carbon latte mocha bullshit is worth what you charge for it. No pair of shorts or shoes are worth what you charge for it. No bike is worth more than a car, dirtbike, or an ATV... NONE. 90% of the participants in this industry would do perfectly fine with a $300 Walmart bike on their local trails.

Mountain Bike Market was worth US$ 6.26 Bn in 2022, where'd all that money go? YOU DID THIS TO YOURSELVES!
  • 8 0
 not sure orange did this to themselves mate i now pay 120 quid for tooling plates that two years ago cost 25-30 quid the price of making stuff domestically is extortionate in this country , someone did something but i dont think recycling biscuit tins would help
  • 3 0
 I agree that the bike industry has some overpriced items, for sure, but I also feel that for $3500, you can own a pretty cool piece of machinery that will be relevant for 8-10 years, but still enjoyable for longer than that. And to say that no bike is worth more than a car? You clearly haven't seen some of the sh!tboxes I've owned!
  • 3 2
 @woofer2609: A bike is always 'worth' more than a car.
  • 1 0
 @andrewbikeguide: You clearly haven't seen some of the bikes I've owned either!
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: value is in the eye of the beholder. I'd pay good money *not* to be seen on an ATV.
  • 4 0
 The UCI and World Cup fees that are incurred by Race Teams has effectively killed off the support. All that talk about taking MTB racing, specifically Downhill as 'the Formula One' of mtb racing (and it's little brother Enduro Racing), forgot the fundamental fact that it's still bicycles that cost a few thousand dollars, and not the average price of a Porsche 911 that Formula One fans love.
  • 3 0
 "challenges around the future of the Enduro World Cup Series "

Surely the UCI has a strategic plan for the future of EDR , It wont be long until September '24 , So the teams and riders need to know what the long term future of the sport ?
  • 6 0
 THE UCI AND ITS CONSEQUENCES HAVE BEEN A DISASTER TO THE MOUNTAIN BIKING WORLD
  • 3 0
 I keep saying it but, once the season finishes, the teams, and MTB race media go into hibernation.......Not good enough - sponsors want exposure 12 months of the year. MTB is appalling at this.....compare to Road teams who are always putting out content even in the off season. The teams, and media really need to get better at publicising the sport.......
  • 4 0
 My memory is a bit fuzzy but this has the feel of the late 90’s US racing scene when Norba left and things took a crap for awhile, a long while.
  • 7 0
 NORBA didn't leave, it was taken over by USA Cycling, then they did what the UCI has done to enduro. Raise prices and provide less.
  • 4 0
 That's not what happened it was because Brian Lopes was a douche and slapped a young fan in the face
  • 5 0
 @browner: still a douche
  • 1 0
 @font style="vertical-align: inherit;">font style="vertical-align: inherit;">browner /font>/font>:


Vc tem algum registro em site disso para passar? Não fazia ideia desse acontecimento
  • 3 0
 Bad and “badder”: in 2023 the Orange US distributor was banned from mtbr, booted off PB and lost his small Michigan operations. Tough year.
  • 4 0
 Racing in its DNA! Everyone take a shot!
  • 4 0
 Does orange juice count?
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Maybe it counts, but not as much fun?
  • 2 0
 Can someone explain why the EWS transitioned to Enduro World Cup under the UCI? On the outside that seemed like a bad move…
  • 9 0
 So Chris Ball could get his $$$
  • 13 0
 Rebrand for the sake of it. Enduro has been moving the wrong direction for a couple of years. It's essentially turned into a lift assisted multi stage DH race. It should be multi day stage event with some tight transfer times to really show who the best overall skillsets
  • 1 0
 @Paco77: lmao never underestimate sporting organization greed…
  • 1 0
 @briain: hopefully they can return to the original format before the whole thing implodes.
  • 1 0
 @Bikedude666: I really hope so. The last couple of years you've seen the physically bigger stronger riders start to take more wins whereas before the smaller riders generally had better stamina so could stay faster through the days stages
  • 3 0
 @briain: Wait, are you saying that Enduro racing should have some form of endurance component?
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: they should put in the name or something
  • 2 1
 I’m sorry but I’m pretty sure this bike rips and it’s cool but as a consumer I’d never buy this bike it looks horrible and again I’m a consumer and you need money to keep things going
  • 3 1
 Correct me if i’m wrong but i’m 99% sure Lachlan Blair rides for deviate!
  • 4 0
 "For 2023 the team wished a fond farewell to Joe and Lachlan, and welcomed Becky Cook and Christo Gallagher to the family".
  • 2 0
 @Bitelio: ah, totally misread that!
  • 1 0
 @Maxy1993: No worries! I had to read it twice!
  • 7 4
 Hope to see some Orange DH rig at a world cup soon, Enduro is ended.
  • 5 12
flag naptime FL (Dec 18, 2023 at 5:11) (Below Threshold)
 29 is DEAD
  • 5 1
 Orange had a race team?
  • 2 1
 News to me.
  • 1 2
 @tbubier: What? Racing is in its DNA! Says so right up top!
  • 2 1
 Another one, where is all the move to inclusivity and bringing more people to the sport and making it more acccessible? Aah I got it, se have snow race...
  • 3 1
 I can do without racing. Put the money into R+D, it's not like we need racers to show us what breaks.
  • 2 1
 Also Sam Hill won't be racing next year according to his wife's instagram post. Sad times
  • 5 0
 Nukeproof not paying that salary I guess and his results the last two years were a bit dismal.
  • 2 1
 Is it because your frames break in 5 pieces?
  • 3 5
 15+ bikes ,20+ bikes ...people want to drive Lambos from 1.5kg China shipped carbon frames....have a nice day....All will be buy-out from big people! Small-brand wont surrvive!
  • 2 1
 I think they made a lot of money during the pandemic.
  • 5 8
 Umm what's so "uncertain " about the bike industry? People are still buying and riding bikes, as well as parts. What's actually happening is that we're in a global recession thanks to greedy companies hiking prices during covid which led to inflation while people's income has either stayed flat or decreased in contrast.
  • 4 6
 Recession? No sign of recession in the USA, and inflation went down.
  • 8 0
 @cashew: There are huge signs of uncertainty that smell in the US and Canada. Inflation did not go down; it simply grew at a lower rate Y.O.Y. Saying it went down is like saying you only gained 3 pounds in the last year, as opposed to 8 the year before, so you are therefore losing weight.
  • 3 0
 @cashew: Might not meet the technical definition of "recession" but the economic parameters in the US have certainly changed over the past few years. And the inflation rate went down but the high cost of living expenses, especially food hasn't changed, so saying that "inflation went down" is inaccurate.
  • 3 0
 @cashew: Incorrect on both
  • 4 0
 @cashew: Replying with a NY Times article that we have to pay to read, that says we're not all as broke as we think we are, is not convincing. I would love to read it, but I'm not paying for it.
  • 4 1
 @cashew: LMFAO. Next time I go get groceries, gas, bike parts, or anything at all I'll show them the article and say "Why is this so expensive? We're down in inflation according to this NYT article! I demand you lower the price!""
  • 2 1
 Their design is so dated how does the company keep returning in general
  • 3 0
 Single pivots are still relevant and have had a rebirth thanks to 1x drivetrains and better suspension, but, agreed that the look of their bikes have not changed.
  • 7 0
 Orange are a bit like Porsche. They've taken a bad idea like a single pivot and refined the living crap out of it till it works really well
  • 4 0
 @briain: Each to their own opinion, but there are plenty of well-loved single pivots on the market. My last 2 bikes have been single pivots and I'm not going back to a bike with a ton of pivots given the choice.
  • 3 0
 Telescopic forks are a "dated" and imperfect design compared to a parallel linkage, but have been so refined that we consider them acceptable to the point they are the norm. Single pivot suspension definitely has its place.
  • 2 0
 Isn't the horst link dated too by now?
  • 10 0
 I had a bit of a bike demo binge this year, gathering ideas for my next bike. I tried a number of very high end fancy bikes and common workhorses including Deviate, Santa Cruz, Pole, Trek, Specialized, Ibis, Nukeproof and many more. Every bike had it's strong points and a number of annoying small flaws that I knew would bug me. Then I tried the Orange switch 7. It was a head scratcher. It just seemed to do all the things, all of the time. Like I couldn't fault it in any situation. I don't like the looks, but they are actually pretty cool looking in the flesh. It was fast, poppy, forgiving, lively when I needed it to be, jumped and cornered well. It just kinda had no annoying quibbles and calmly responded to every input I put in to it. I kinda wanted to hate it, but left the demo day confused and wondering if I should finally buy a bike with my head instead of my heart for a change. Literally blew every fancy newfangled high pivot carbon bike out of the water. I can see why Orange has a loyal following of die hard fans. Also interestingly almost every review I can find of every Orange bike (with the exception of Pinkbike's review of their current DH rig) seems to sing their bikes praises. So if they are out of date, maybe old school is better? Dunno. Guess I might have to buy one now...
  • 3 0
 @vinay: Horts link is an old design but just like single pivots, it's been re-born with 1x drivetrain. One of the benefits of virtual pivot points is that it worked with multiple chain rings for 2x and 3x systems. But with 1x, you can design the suspension with a specific chain ring size in mind.
  • 1 1
 @AndrewFleming: Yeah, I got nothing against single pivots. I've got one bike with rear suspension, a Cannondale Prophet. This whole discussion is kinda odd especially considering some of the recent bikes from Orange have a linkage driven shock like so many praised suspension designs like the Trek ABP and much of what Commencal has done. Santa Cruz only dropped the single pivot after PON took over.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewFleming: There's a lot to be said for simplicity and ease of maintenance. But by there very nature are less refined then multi link design. Also I'm talking about a true single pivot and not a linkage drive single pivot as they have as many bearings as a multilink designs. But they rely on really good dampening in the shock and suffer brake jack worse then other designs
  • 1 0
 @vinay: has anything objectively better come along. Not sure you could say a vpp, DW or any other design is outright better. 4 is the most common design for a reason
  • 1 0
 @briain: I care less about the total number of bearings than the number of pivots between the BB and the rear drop out. That's what makes single-pivots so stiff laterally.
  • 2 0
 @CamRivers: this matches my experience. I rode one on a demo day and it just felt right. Bought one a few months later and still happy with it 5 years later.
  • 1 2
 I have a single pivot that's the best bike I ever rode the v1 druid but if it didn't have a idler and linkage it would be crap
  • 1 1
 Wouldn't it be just easier to make a list of teams which will still operate in 2024 at this point?
  • 1 0
 So they decided to shut the barn door
  • 1 0
 So there'll be no Oranges between semi's and finals then??
  • 1 0
 And now we know why
  • 9 10
 Yadda, yadda, welds, Yadda, yadda, skeleton in a filing cabinet. Too bad for the riders.
  • 3 3
 … yadda yadda, don’t let the barn door hit ya on your way out.

Dammit, sucks to see another team shutting down, but the jokes have to be made.
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