Bold, EXT Suspension and Commencal - Riva Del Garda Bike Festival 2016

May 1, 2016 at 4:44
by Paul Aston  
Riva del Garda


Bold Cycles Linkin LT

Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Bold have added a longer travel frame to their existing 130mm travel Linkin that was released last year. At 154mm travel, it joins the growing crop of longer travel 29ers. To supplement the extra travel, the head angle has been reduced to 67º for more aggressive riding and the bottom bracket is only 4mm higher (-30mm drop) than the 130mm bike to keep things low and stable, while the chainstays stay the same at 437mm. New gloss colourways add some spice to the previous raw carbon finishes, the shock has been upgraded and there's now a provision for a stealth dropper which couldn't squeeze past the internal shock on the first edition.

Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

The new 414 shock from DT Swiss has a much higher volume than previously specced damper which should work better with the longer travel frame, along with an improved damping tune that should help improve the small bump sensitivity.

Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Bold work closely with DT Swiss being based a few kilometers from one another. This is the first time we have seen their new and nifty quick release lever that can be removed for a flush finish and doubles as a 5mm or T25 Torx wrench.

Bold - Bike Festival Riva del Garda



EXT Suspension


EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

EXT Suspension has a heavy motorsport heritage in Italy, but the last three years has seen their focus turn to bike shocks. Two coil models are available and there is an air shock project in the works. The ARMA downhill shock and the Storia enduro shock are both made from a mixture of 7075 T6 alloy and titanium, use a 29mm main piston and a CVSS 'Compression Valve Spool System.' Both shocks cost a whopping €725 but are custom tuned to bike, riding style, weight and wheel size, along with including two lightweight Super Alloy Springs.

EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

The Storia enduro shock has external high and low-speed compression adjustment, rebound adjust and a two position lockout lever. It is also claimed to be the lightest coil shock for enduro riding; a 200x57mm unit weighs in at 620 grams with spring.

EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

The Arma shock is the brand's downhill offering and the first shock to offer an externally adjustable hydraulic bottom out circuit alongside high and low-speed compression and rebound adjustment. A 241x76mm stroke unit weighs 690 grams with spring.

EXT - Bike Festival Riva del Garda



Commencal Meta AM CRMO


Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Commencal have introduced this new cromoly framed hardtail for 2016. Aggressive angles paired with interesting tube profiles and structure to keep things smooth at the back, absorb vibrations and keep the maintenance:stoke ratio low. The bike in question is currently discounted on their direct sale web shop at €2499, instead of the €2799 MSRP.

Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

The chainstays and seat stays are profiled with large flat oval sections to allow more flex. The seat stay isn't welded to the seat tube as we would expect, instead bypassing it and is welded to the top tube.

Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda
Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda

The AM CRMO's prime numbers include a 65º head angle, 420mm chainstay and a -45mm bottom bracket drop. Judging by the geo chart, numbers are on the shorter side with a medium frame having a 391mm reach and an 1130mm wheelbase. There are four sizes to choose from and they are all currently in stock,

Commencal - Bike Festival Riva del Garda



120 Comments

  • + 41
 That hardtail looks wicked. I'd love to try one to see if the stays really make a difference. I don't have any huge issues with my current hardtail, but if things were a little softer out the back I wouldn't be sad about it.
  • + 1
 I just went from an AL HT with whippy chain and seat stays (the latter conventionally welded to seat tube) to one with a rear triangle that looks like part of a tiny railway bridge. The whippy one was definitely softer in the back, but it also vibrated like hell and felt vague. Wonder if steel would resolve the vibration a little and make that flex actually nice instead of scary. Looks frickin' cool anyway!
  • + 7
 @ryetoast: Is it the material or the frame design that makes a bike hurt is the age old debate, but in all my experience steel has always had less of a buzz. Alu seems to resonate ever bump straight to your back. Even noticed it on an alu fatbike with 5" tires. I've got (and have had) pretty burly steel frames which were easier on my back even though they're quite stiff. There's something too "Steel is real" which I only think alu frame riders might argue against. They are very different metals.
  • - 7
flag WAKIdesigns (May 2, 2016 at 11:31) (Below Threshold)
 I went from 7020 aluminium HT to a steel one and honestly? I don't really feel that "vibration" damping. At least through my crappy fork and WTB saddle. Or am I just a blunt hater?
  • + 25
 @WAKIdesigns: You, Sir, are a troll.
  • + 9
 It does look good indeed but the geometry charts does not impress: short reach and long seat tube...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Someone needs to do some proper tests. I had a steel AM frame I converted to a commuter and it rode super smooth on pavement. Sold it and slapped together a bike using an older specialized Hardrock frame with the same wheels & 2.0 tires and I hated it. I've been on a few other alu bikes as well with big rubber and it just feels off compared to my steel. Might all be in my head.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm with you on that.In order to feel what little flex a steel triangle might have, would'nt you have to go through all your fork travel then all the air in your tires and finally all the flex in your rims. And thats why I will never pay double for a steel frame.
  • + 2
 I remember riding a fully rigid steel bike down a dry stream bed in the 90's and having my shoes vibrated right out of my clipless pedals. Material, tube size and geometry should all make a difference to the frequency response of the frame... Proper tests! @JesseE, that is genius. You've just determined my procrastination strategy until...the next shiny object comes along...
  • + 1
 @ryetoast: a rigid bike is a rigid bike, there's no debate there. The diff between steel & alu is almost like the difference between better and worse mp3s. You're still hearing music, just the quality is noticeable to people who think too much, while most people just don't really give a shit. A proper test sounds very complicated, but would be interesting.
  • + 11
 Steel rides nicer than aluminum. Either you boys don't have rocks or you haven't ridden enough bikes to tell... but there's a ride quality to steel for sure. As they say, steel is real.
  • + 1
 @Happymtbfr: Yeah, I don't know what's up with Commencal sizes. I brought a Meta HT AM frame, size M, but realize it wouldn't let me use a 50mm or smaller stem comfortably, but if I size up I couldn't use a 125mm dropper post. So ended up selling it (with no loss, luckily) and got a Ragley Marley, wich is similar in geo but longer, still I wish I could keep the Meta frame because build quality is better than the Marley.
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63: Sure does! The real concern here should be that EXO casing tire out back on hard tail meant to get rowdy on. Have fun fixing a flat every ten feet!
  • + 0
 @Happymtbfr: too many people buy because of spec sheets. I'm 6' tall and the large is perfect. Had a Giant Reign before it & I can honestly say I'm quicker on this. It is fun, wants to be thrown, great bike. Not like the new point & shoot boredom mobiles everyone that's been riding two weeks can hop on and be better than you. It is a great, fun, inspiring bike. And yes, the rear end is smooth as silk and still rails the corners. Matter of fact I nearly took my rear tyre off the rim in the forest last night!!! Buy one!!!!!
  • + 1
 @Satanslittlehelper: Tubeless and ample pressure but yea.... always a concern
  • + 0
 @DARKSTAR63: I am pretty sure there is ride quality to quality tubing and forming, whatever the material is. As far as my riding of HT goes, you can't get it rougher and still find it enjoyable than what I have here Big Grin And... If I was to get a HT to ride in the woods, I'd go for PLUS. OR at least for Titanium. For looks of it. I don't care how it rides, I do the riding bit, my hardtail is there to survive it.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: Have you ever ridden steel and aluminum road bikes back to back? There is a damping effect from steel.
  • + 0
 @ryetoast: Aluminum and carbon hardtails are really harsh especially with shorter chainstays; nice and stiff for racing but do vibrate a lot. Steel and Ti are way more forgiving, much nicer to ride. The weight penalty for steel isn't that bad either; 4.5-5 pound frame is not so bad.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: I know that data can be easily found on dampening qualities of steel and aluminum tubing. However, yes, design plays a lot into it as well, but the steel in bicycles is definitely more elastic that aluminum, and the aluminum is stiffer. You can expect to feel a difference because of that.

I would wager that I could blind test, on the same components, a steel and an aluminum (hardtail) frame back to back and pick which one was which >70% of the time. I'm sure there are guys with way more time on a variety of frames who could easily beat those odds, as well.
  • + 3
 I've ridden plenty of alu an chro mo over the years an while chro mo is definitely more comfortable I love the power and precision that comes from an alu frame. I can live with the fatigue an ahcing joints from a hard forrest loop.
  • - 3
 Looks like a girls bike from 25 years ago to me lol except no v brake mounts
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63: Oh I don't run anything less than 28-30psi tubeless and still manage to shred tires fairly often! Had good luck so far with the new DD casing though, first time I've gone more than 3 months without a flat.
  • + 0
 @Satanslittlehelper: Man, my clay trails have tires lasting for ages, it's the pavement kms to the trails that trash mine more than anything. I dig schwalbes but they really don't last on anything but dirt.
  • + 1
 @ryetoast: had all kinds of ally frames kona,boardman,gt,on one and they all felt hard on the arse and back.steel is mellow in comparison but you do end up bobbing about on the saddle to be fair.big lover of cromo but you feel the steel when pedaling it around.
  • + 1
 I recently went from a Surge to a Bluepig and notice a big difference. The rear stays are smaller on the pig and flex more than the big ones on the surge. I'll be looking for bikes with the same character in the future. The Pig is far more compliant than other steel hardtails I've ridden before.
  • + 2
 I tried to order a meta am frame for a steal of a price for 350+ shipping or something.

Emailed commencal as their terrible website didn't list my size. They told me to get it from the euro website wich was also terrible and it ended up being a few hundred more dollars.

Decided i didnt need one that bad
  • - 1
 @conv3rt: pigs are the bollocks.had a mark one in 'Taiwan racing green',wish I'd never sold it.just waiting to see if the on one dee dah materialises,looks the absolute dogs bollocks but as ever on one website is shite with infoFrown
  • + 1
 @Earthmotherfu: wait...bollocks is good right?
  • + 7
 @conv3rt: the bollocks=excellent .load of bollocks=bullshit or rubbish. The dogs bollocks= Superb (bulldog being no1 as they stick out the most.Smile
  • + 2
 @conv3rt: hahah
  • + 4
 @Earthmotherfu: I think in 1000 years brits are gonna have like 6 words.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: parts of it have less than that already.welsh wouldn't know what a 6 is Wink
  • + 3
 @Earthmotherfu: that explanation was the bollocks. Am I right?
  • + 5
 @conv3rt: as far as explanations go that was THE bollocks. Ha ha,yep you've got it.
  • + 2
 The whole steel thing is reletive to the frame. I love steel hardtails. I have a Stanton Switchback in my quiver and let me tell you that I would be happy if that was my only bike. Dont get confused though with steel and 'steel'. I have found that some 4130 frames are harsh. Equally its about the design. You cant compare that GT Timberline you had in '95 to bikes of today. Sounds obvious but steel used to be about cheap now its about being awesome. That said, if you want an aggro steel hardtail, you are spoilt for choice in the UK at the mo and thats before you look at Commencal, NS, Transition etc. So many UK comanies. Even Stif bike shop just brought one out!
  • + 1
 @cunning-linguist: thanks for your feedback!
HT are not so good at point and shoot and maybe that's the point! ;-)
I'm settled with a large Surge being 5'9. I run it with a -2 angleset and a 120mm fork which makes it low and fun.
160mm on a hardtail seems like lot. I ran my Surge with a 150mm fork at first, it was confidence inspiring on the way down when it gets rough but generally I enjoyed it more with the shorter fork: it is more versatile but still capable.
  • + 1
 @Happymtbfr: endless problem from Commy..
  • + 1
 @Happymtbfr: are you kidding me? how low would you like your saddle? It already looks as low as on my dh bike!????
  • + 2
 @buzzdeee: the seat tube on my NS surge is 432mm and I do some time run it with the saddle at the bottom without dropper which gives a lot of freedom to move around.
Concerning the Meta Crmo, I would have to go for at least a large to get enough reach and with a 480mm seat tube it would allow me to use a 100mm dropper at most... I would like Commencal to do like Transition with the seat tube length so that people get the possibility of sizing up without compromising with their dropper post.
  • + 2
 @Happymtbfr: Agree. And the 585mm horizontal length for a Medium is way to short or pretty much out of date if you want to shred her down with stubby stem.
Not so worry about the seat tube as standover looks pretty low.
  • + 0
 (duplicate post)
  • - 3
 That hardtail looks like a pile.
  • + 32
 Those Bold frames really messed with my head...
  • + 9
 I hope someone told them they need a shock on a full suspension bike... unless this is a new standard or i'm just not up on the times
  • + 21
 @steve9train: i don't want to make a bold statement, but the shock is hidden in the seat tube
  • + 7
 @steve9train: I've been looking for it then gave up. Apparently people have been calling for bottle mounts so much that the designers decided to forgo the shock. You'll be fine until you take the bottle out for a sip and the bike collapses. It will be only then that they go against the grain, ditch the bottle mount and get the shock back in place again.
  • + 4
 @steve9train: its in the frame my dude.
  • + 3
 I remember the first time I saw one in an ad for another product... Witchcraft! No idea how they ride, but damn it just plain looks cool, imo.
  • + 2
 Had to watch this video cause it was messing with my head also.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=cl1-M4WaA1w
  • + 1
 How on earth would you measure your sag? There must be some way to see what is going on.
  • + 1
 @aelazenby: IIRC there is an access port near the upper shock mount that you can open to check the sag. If you look at the pic of the frames in boxes, you can see it on the orange frame - the non-drive-side.
  • + 21
 Nice to see DT Swiss has put all their engineers to work and invented... ...the Allen wrench.
  • + 2
 The Syntace version of this is much better
  • + 16
 The hidden shock is a cool idea, but I don't think its all that necessary.

It would be great if pinkbike could review these custom, expensive rear shock options (like the PUSH one and these) and pit them against the big boys.
  • + 10
 Hidden shock isn't neccesary, but the cool thing about the Bold design is that if your a bikepacker they provide great space for a frame bag.
  • + 14
 EXT are building one this week for my new test rig ;-)
  • + 1
 where is it btw....? Big Grin
  • + 10
 @PHeller: No, the hidden shock isn't neccesary, but if it is accessible with a cover, performs properly, and is totally removed from the elements it isn't a terrible idea either. It seems with every new rear suspension design we see, someone is bound to mention that it looks like a mud catcher. Can't say that about the Bold bikes. I haven't ridden it, all I'm saying is it is interesting. Plus it would be an awesome convo starter at the trailhead.
  • + 2
 @VwHarman: convo going like "so you got a motor in there or what?"
  • + 4
 @b26-4-Life: ha! Didn't think about that. I was just watching the e-doping video on gmbn today too!
  • + 18
 Bold now offers their standard Linkin frame and the longer-travel Linkin Park.
  • + 12
 "new and nifty quick release lever that can be removed for a flush finish"

or... is actually just a wrench and falls the f*ck out if you leave it in... so you better remove it for that flush finish or you'll never see it again.
  • + 5
 All i see at these trades shows is "MORE SHIT", nothing ground breaking or revolutionary.. . But those clear covers on the shock body, DAMN give me that! That just makes me giddy.
  • + 3
 can't see internal shocks catching on. there must be a way to get at it, but it's not gonna be easy. and sure it will stay cleaner, but at the end of the day its gonna mean you are going to have to put more work in when it needs a service or whatever. what about lockout, or adjusting the shock? I change my shock about on my bikes all the time, different rebound, hell different pressures for my enduro bike, and of course compression sometimes, i don't know half the time so like to experiment. Also, some shocks probably won't fit, and i can't see a piggyback shock fitting in there (although i just skimmed it), and I'm not gonna ride a dt swiss shock, would rather get a cheap and cheerful monarch which does the job for me, so although bold have made a bold move (get it?), i don't think it's gonna be mass market. Nice and innovative though, which is kind of nice to see, smaller companies pushing the boundaries, giving some bigger companies competition. my 2 cents
  • + 2
 Access isn't too bad, just have to remove a cover on the frame. That said, it's never going to be as practical for quick adjustments as a normal frame. I love the look of it, but definitely not for everyone
  • + 1
 could make the same argument about internal cable routing, and i would completely agree, yet there's no shortage of that...
  • + 1
 @b26-4-Life: well half and half. on the one hand it is internal like the shock, but on the other hand in the 12 months my dad has owned an internally cable routed bike, not once has he had to change the cable etc. Same here, never had to, whereas i change my shock all the time. internal cable routing was to clean up the bike etc, but i never minded the look of a shock on the outside. I have literally no qualms with a shock on the outside, i think it looks weird on the inside, although you could pretend to be a wizard at your local. I won't be a customer, at least not in this decade
  • + 3
 you have to test this bike... rode the 130mm linkin trail, and i was a little bit sceptic... but... man! what a great bike! travel feeled more than it is in reality, it rides allmost better than my specialized stumpjumper expert carbon evo!
and i can^t wait to ride the new one with 154mm of travel!
  • + 2
 EXT or Arma shocks- they are brilliant. A couple of friends are running them on their DH bikes- Demo 8, Kona Operator carbon and they are amazingly happy from the shock performance. First impressions are - very smooth and buttery performance, amazing small bump absorption, great progression, unlimited tunes.
From first hand of this company, they do know what they do- proper shimstack testing, etc as they have the dyno to test them. What i`ve learned from them is that even if you replace one shim in your shimstack, this would change the whole shock performance in a non-logical way, eg, we need to test on the dyno for every change made to be sure that this is the correct setup.
  • + 2
 Bicycles are a kind of strange industry. All they do is have someone design a frame on a computer. They don't design any of the components that make the bike work, few even make their own frames and allot of bikes are outsourced for assembly! All you have to do to start producing mountain bikes is have some financial backing and live in your parents basement with a computer. No wonder why so many people are getting into it.
  • + 4
 designing a frame migh require more than drawing it... just sayin'
  • + 2
 @GabrielDugas: I guess you didn't get my point. They are not making anything but jobs in countries that pay next to nothing. Why do you think the Canadian economy is so bad? The last time Rocky Mountain built bikes here was 2011.
  • + 3
 @Manx you should design a frame and try it out.
  • + 2
 @Manx: Devinci still fabricates their aluminum bikes in-house, obviously it just made more sense for Rocky Mountain to do what most others do. Companies like Giant manufacture frames for so many brands that it's just a more cost effective option. Their fluidform technology and carbon factories (all nine of them) are state of the art and produce fantastic products. But hey, it's easy so anyone can do it right?
  • + 5
 Yes, you do have a very good point Manx. 99.9% are outsourced to Tawain. Then Kenfire24 has another point. We build them here in our shop, fabricate just about every part in our shop except for the links and pivot hardware which are CNC'ed buy a local shop. But we are not out to make an easy buck. It is extremely rewarding to take raw matrials and make something you want to ride because it is better than the same old stuff the industry produces. And then to have other people ride them and feel the same way.
  • + 1
 @Manx: I get your point now. One of the problem with building bike in-situ is that the cost of the equipment vs the amount of bike produce is, most of the time, very hard to work with. Normally, the factory that equips themselves with such equipment (CNC, Laser cuters, tube bender, heat treatment stuff, carbon stuff, quality equipment etc), will be able to pay for them is they work all the time and they will be building bikes for many providers. That is how the industry works in most fields : designers and engineers design the stuff, factory that have the equipment to build it receive the contract.
  • + 2
 @GabrielDugas: Yes, that is the way it works for large scale production. We started, because no one was building what we wanted to ride. So we did it ourselves. Once you are set up with equipment, it is great. Then you can design and do what you want and test your designs. You are not pigeon-holed by the industry. We still prefer bikes with 26" wheels. We build what we want. Now we are onto to Pinion gearbox frame development for All Mtn frame and DH frames because we want to have the advantages they offer.
  • + 5
 commencal paint jobs look really good !!!!
  • + 5
 "This is a Bold strategy Cotton, let's see if if pays off for them."
  • + 1
 Those Bold frames are cool. they look really nice. I have never seen a bike with an internal shock before. how does that work when setting sag or using rebound/compression adjustments?

Just pm me and i'll give you details of where you can send one to me for review... Smile
  • + 4
 How'd you check the sag on that?
  • + 2
 the steel meta looks sick and would love one, but i am not a fan of the seat clamp.
  • + 1
 I've tried numerous times over last year to make contact with the EXT supplier in UK, zero response ????
  • + 1
 Am I blind or can someone explain to me where the rear shock is on the Bold bike. The bike looks mighty impressive
  • + 1
 what kind of trail conditions call for a DHR 2 in the front? i tried it once, didn't care for it, but I know YMMV, etc
  • + 1
 ask Minnaar
  • + 2
 Those EXT Shocks are a thing of beauty!
  • + 1
 Lookn forward to these new shocks. Im surprised many dont have larger shafts. Push air shock plz
  • - 1
 Wow these all look like sharp products. Surprised by those BOLDs! I do wish that steel Commencal was a 29er. And as of now it's marked down to 2299.
  • + 1
 A commencal Honzo! Looks good!
  • + 1
 650b wheels though
  • + 1
 Just built up a Kona Honzo Ti...Loving the feel of the bike.
  • + 1
 Really tough to get the storia in the US.. I tried.
  • + 1
 And a shame too because they are competitively light weight for being a coil shock. By comparison, a Vivid Air is 592g for similar sizes.
  • + 1
 there aren't any bottle cage mounts on that commencal. deal. breaker.
  • + 1
 Nah, I like it like that actually. Break a deal, get another. Sure there will be frames out there for those who do prefer bottle cage mounts.
  • + 1
 @vinay: i dont actually mind the lack of mounts, just a bit odd considering the shift in the industry/racing where people try and get rid of the backpack and strap shit onto the frame. wouldnt stop me from buying though... the new evil bikes have already done that
  • + 1
 @lozzerbiker: The bicycle industry is multidimensional. I'm surprised to see the comeback of the bottle indeed. I was actually happy so see it go so that it wouldn't litter the bumpy descends anymore where apparently people lose them and are too lazy to climb back up to pick them up. So loads of full sus bikes now are being released indeed with either relatively high top tubes or curved downtubes to accommodate the bottle. Yet at the same time we're seeing hip packs, waterpacks with integrated back protection or even protection vests with room for a water bladder. So people have got choice now, the racers included. I'm not too much into XC racing but at least in enduro racing you'll see both. Anneke Beerten rides with a protection vest from Alpine Stars she helped develop and which indeed contains a water bladder. Luckily as the GT Sanction she rides now doesn't allow for a bottle.

As for that Commencal, to me steel (and titanium) hardtails relate to clean, simple looks and the lack of bottle mounts definitely contribute to that. I didn't think of it as a racer bike, just good fun.
  • + 2
 That Commencal...
  • + 1
 Anyone ridden the storia shock? Intriguing bit of kit...
  • + 1
 Was going to buy one with my new Starling Swoop but Joe the guy who makes them stopped selling them with his frames. I really wanted one but he said there were some long term reliability issues. Now I'm getting a FAST holy grail shock instead.
  • + 1
 How can a shock be tuned to wheel size?
  • + 1
 not sure, i could see how different wheels on the same frame might make a difference
  • + 3
 Suspension will react differently because the axle is higher so absorbing square edge bumps will be tuned differently.
  • + 1
 bigger wheels react differently to smaller wheels vice versa, im guessing its more biased towards the rebound damping
  • + 2
 @bradfreeride: Do you think the relative distance of the axel/crown has an effect on damping?
I dont know... so i am asking, but i feel its got more to do with that "contact" angle, and general dynamics of the tire with the ground, and how that affects the damping. You know, that feeling of a 29 rolling smoother then a 26" wheel, well if it a smoother ride, you could probably use more damping. Make any cents?
  • + 1
 Somewhere in there they are talking about the influence of the wheel size on the suspension:
www.vitalmtb.com/photos/features/PIT-BITS-2014-World-Champs,7725/EXT-Stendec-Arma-and-Storia-MTB-Rear-Shocks,81841/sspomer,2
dirtmountainbike.com/longform/world-exclusive-inside-the-extreme-racing-shox-arma-rear-shock

And btw SA Racing Springs are also a product of EXT Wink
  • + 1
 @zion-i: I think I know what your talking about. Using the same size square edge bump the 29 inch wheel would contact it more towards the top of the bump compared to a 26 inch wheel. Because the bump is being contacted at a higher point it should need less travel to roll over. This allows for more high speed damping, while still maintaining the same feeling to the rider.
  • + 1
 looks like a GT
  • + 1
 nice.
  • + 0
 But WHERE IS THE SHOCK on the bold bikes???
  • + 1
 inside the frame, above BB
  • + 1
 @roterblitz: I was guessing..would love some detail pics!
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