Cannondale Launches New Jekyll and Trigger - First Ride

Apr 5, 2017 at 6:54
by Paul Aston  




It's no surprise for the prototype hunting hawks online that there was a new Cannondale Jekyll platform on the horizon. Jerome Clementz was racing an unbadged green machine for most of the 2016 season, his vocal cords tired of repeating "no photo" to the smartphone camera sneaks trying to get a snap.

What we weren't expecting was a smaller-wheeled 27.5" Trigger to come along for the ride, new travel adjusting rear shock technology and to say goodbye to the Lefty in its long travel guise after 19 years of service.

Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018

Of course, we are also looking at longer, lower, lighter, slacker, stiffer, steeper and wider – the same as every bike coming fresh from the mold recently. Both Jekyll and Trigger models share very similar DNA, with plenty of new features and changes over the previous bikes.



Gemini Technology

Cannondale have long been fans of adjustable travel/geometry systems. Gone is the Fox Dyad shock of old, replaced by another Cannondale/Fox collaboration – the new Gemini system. Gemini allows the use of an almost standard shock and all of its damping and tuning options, it can be swapped out for any other metric-sized shock on the market, unlike the proprietary Dyad.

Pressing the handlebar mounted remote simply cuts down of the shock's air volume, basically like adding a huge volume spacer into the air can at the flick of a switch. This means that the travel is reduced by 20% by making the air spring so progressive that you can't push any further through the travel, but the damping control and sensitivity remains similar. This differs to compression adjust levers found on many shocks which adjust the oil flow inside the shock to provide a firmer feeling.

Tuning options are as per normal on a Fox Float X: air pressure, low-speed compression, and rebound. Two 'Ramp Rings' can be added or removed from the supplied two, to the green Gemini head to adjust the air spring curve. The frame kinematic is a 'linear progressive' ratio which is said to give a predictable but supporting feeling.


Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
Do you want to Flow or Hustle? The Jekyll has 165mm of wide open travel, or cut it down to 130mm for an agile ride.
Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
The remote lever is the same as is used DOSS seatpost and Float X compression adjusters.


One major benefit of the Gemini system is that no body movement is required to change between the two modes. Some systems, like Canyon's ShapeShifter, require the rider to compress the suspension at the same time as the remote lever to change the setting. The Gemini is controlled purely by the handlebar remote.

Cannondale were keen to point out that Gemini is a riding feature, not only a climb feature. Riding in 'Hustle Mode' will give more playful and responsive feeling, but when charging downhill the 'Flow Mode' will take on the rough stuff. The Float X shock still has the compression adjust lever if you want to really firm up the ride for those long climbs.



Ai, Si, and Frame Details

When Cannondale launched the F-Si cross country racer, they were vocal about the lack of need for boost spacing when a 142mm hub could simply be shifted across 6mm, gaining the same benefits of spoke symmetry, tire clearance and keeping options open for front derailleurs. The Ai asymmetric design is found on the new Jekyll and Trigger platforms, this time combined with a 148mm boost hub. The rear triangle is again offset, this time by 3mm to give symmetrical spoke angles for a stronger, more reliable wheel. Cannondale say this also helped them to create plentiful mud clearance, 2x drivetrain compatibility, and super-short 420mm chainstays.


Cannondale Jekyll
Ai: It's boost Jim, but not as we know it. The asymmetric swingarm moves the hub over 3mm towards the drive side for an improved wheel build.
Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
Si: Cannondale uses the System Integration tag for various technologies. On the Jekyll and Trigger, this relates to the internal mount for a Shimano Di2 battery.

Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
A carbon link is found on all models of Jekyll and Trigger.

Cannondale Jekyll
Plenty of tire clearance and short 420mm chainstays
Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
Full internal cable routing is found on both the Jekyll and Trigger.

Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
A carbon downtube protector is fitted for added insurance.



Lefty out in the Cold?

What happened to the Lefty? The single-sided stanchion is still featured on most of the Cannondale range and will be in the future, but these two new machines see a standard fork installed. Cannondale says that the weight and stiffness gains become less significant as the travel increases, so when the fork is bumped up to 160 -170mm there isn't much to gain between having one or two legs. Plus, the extra abuse that a long travel bike takes, and trying to squish all of that elongated spring and damper tech into one leg was leading to some reliability issues. Goodbye my Lefty, goodbye my friend, you have been the one...






Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
Cannondale Jekyll Details

• Intended use: enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Gemini suspension system
• Rear wheel travel: 165mm / 130mm in Hustle mode
• 65º head angle
• Frame material: carbon and alloy versions
• Metric shock sizing
• Boost hub spacing
• MSRP: $3199 - $7749USD (complete bikes)
www.cannondale.com


There are four models of Jekyll to choose from. Starting with the alloy framed Jekyll 4 at $3199 which is fitted with Fox Performance series suspension, 1x11-speed Shimano SLX and all the parts you require to go actual mountain biking: wide bars, short stem, and a dropper post. As we move up the range carbon starts to take over, the Jekyll 2 and 3 have a carbon front triangle combined with alloy rear. The top of the range Jekyll 1 is loaded with a full carbon frame, Kashima coated Fox Suspension, SRAM Eagle and Cannondale's Hollowtech carbon wheels.



Jekyll Geometry

Cannondale Jekyll Geometry
Cannondale Jekyll Geometry

The Jekyll boasts a slightly above enduro-standard 165mm of travel, which drops to 130mm in Hustle Mode. Cannondale haven't gone to the extremes of geometry land, but the boat has been pushed a fair way out into the ocean. A 65º head angle with the 170mm travel fork, 420mm chainstays and a reach range of 425 - 494mm over four sizes. All Jekyll frames are designed to be used with a short 35mm stem.






Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger 2018
Cannondale Trigger Details

• Intended use: trail / all mountain
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 145mm / 115mm in Hustle mode
• 65º head angle
• Frame material: carbon and alloy versions
• Metric shock sizing
• Boost hub spacing
• MSRP: $3999 - $7749 USD (complete bikes)
www.cannondale.com


Gone are the 29" wheels of the previous Trigger. Cannondale woudn't say if there was a big-wheeler on the horizon, but at the moment were interested in keeping the range simple and cutting down on consumers confusion. Only three models of Trigger are available, compared to four Jekyll's. The full carbon Trigger 1, and the carbon front mixed with alloy rear Trigger 2 and 3 sharing similar build kits and prices to the Jekyll, ranging from $3999 - $7749 USD.


Trigger Geometry

Cannondale Trigger Geometry
Cannondale Trigger Geometry


The Trigger is very close in terms of geometry compared to its bigger brother, in fact, only a degree here and there separates them. Rear wheel travel begins at 145mm and drops to around 115mm when you get your Hustle on. The head angle sits at 66º, the seat angle is slightly slacker than the Jekyll and 74.5 and the reach figures 10mm shorter. The Trigger is designed to be used with a slightly longer 45mm stem.








Finale Ligure, Italy, was chosen for the launch as one of the original homes of enduro racing. Rocky and rugged limestone combined with superb flowing dirt lines was a great test bed to see what this bike could handle.

Out onto the trails, both bikes were stiff and lively. Initially, reaching the remote to adjust the Gemini was awkward even after playing around with various setups, but this will become easier with habit. There is a noticeable difference between Hustle and Flow modes. The Hustle really does do as it promises by making the back of the bike super responsive and agile, letting it ride higher in the travel, but still maintaining a true action in terms of grip and tracking. Although the static geometry doesn't change between modes, the dynamic ride is quite different. My personal taste in downward predominating trails in Finale was to set the bike to my preference in Flow Mode, switching to Hustle for short climbs. If I was riding UK trails centers or more undulating terrain, I would set it to my liking in Hustle mode for general shredding, and save the Flow mode for the occasional extreme circumstances per ride.

In Flow mode, the suspension was predictable and balanced well with the fork. The geometry is ready for attack on both bikes, the Jekyll's numbers point it towards the sharp end of the pack. The sizing has a wide range for nearly all riders, and the other angles are in check with their desired purpose. I'm still not a short chainstay fan, but many people are, and these are about as short as you can get. The 35mm stem is a welcome addition for me on an off-the-shelf bike, as it is what I use most of the time.

As always, a few hours on two fresh bikes isn't enough to get a real feeling for the bike, so expect a full review of the Jekyll in the future.


Cannondale Jekyll and Trigger






MENTIONS: @Cannondale




201 Comments

  • + 314
 Cannondale has finally made the Righty decision.
  • + 98
 Dually noted.
  • + 58
 Looks like they pulled the trigger
  • + 103
 They were getting Left behind.
  • + 43
 In the past, they Left a lot of consumers scratching their heads. I bet more will be willing to fork over their money now.
  • - 25
flag Yudistira (Apr 5, 2017 at 7:48) (Below Threshold)
 hahahah.....bothly bro Big Grin
  • - 13
flag SonofBovril (Apr 5, 2017 at 7:50) (Below Threshold)
 No more left of center suspension choices to be found here
  • + 39
 I knew this article would trigger puns in the comments, but I feel they really left me wanting more.
  • - 33
flag oldtech (Apr 5, 2017 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 Canofsnail
  • + 2
 Every day I'm hustlin!
  • + 4
 No more Strutting their stuff.
  • - 10
flag sask250 (Apr 5, 2017 at 10:06) (Below Threshold)
 @properp: *Crackandfail
  • - 10
flag oldtech (Apr 5, 2017 at 10:22) (Below Threshold)
 @sask250: lol just one more SELLOUT
  • + 3
 @tornateo: I'm just here for the comments
  • + 16
 Cannondale's last attempt at making a fork was halfhearted Wink
  • + 4
 Can't believe they sprung this
  • + 4
 I was Shocked to see the carbon linkage, now Cann anyone explain how it works.:?
  • + 1
 Wait can someone please explain this comment to me:

"The rear triangle is again offset, this time by 3mm to give symmetrical spoke angles"

Does this mean that the rear wheel that comes with the bike is centered over the center of the hub shell between flanges, as opposed to centering on the entire axel? If so, that means you can't just throw any standard wheel on the back, but the rear wheel would have to be built centered between the flanges. It would also mean that you would not want an asymmetric rim, as there is no cassette dish to compensate for.

So having to always build a lefty specific wheel on the front, has now been replaced with the need to build an "asymmetric wheel" that is centered in the "asymmetric triangle". Or am I reading this wrong?
  • + 7
 @todd: thankfully its pretty easy to dish a wheel 3mm to one side.
  • + 10
 @todd: You can take any standard wheel and dish it over 3mm. You don't need a specially built wheel.
  • + 2
 Here's my right thumbs up for you
  • + 1
 I'd be happy to pull the trigger on these bikes
  • + 2
 @todd: It's an asymmetric rear triangle so that it can accommodate a symmetric wheel build, which apparently makes for a stronger wheel.
  • + 57
 Nice to see Cannondale go to standard rest shock options. I've liked their frames but the no aftermarket shock option was a turnoff
  • + 6
 I like their frames two until two of them broke in the exact same spot. I guess it's just ballistic fubar.
  • + 5
 @properp: Same here, two Trigger 29ers in the same place. And since they no longer make a 29er, I'm having serious trouble getting them to warranty it...
  • - 8
flag oldtech (Apr 5, 2017 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 @joshaw: CracknFail CanofSnail.
  • + 2
 @joshaw: two broken upper carbon seat stays
  • + 2
 @properp: Mine was the downtube (very near the headtube), one just completely sheared and the other bent in like a pop can.
  • + 0
 mmm metric yes but GEMINI...so cannondale..where is the trick this time?
  • - 5
flag rrsport (Apr 6, 2017 at 12:16) (Below Threshold)
 There's a reason they are known as cranknfail
  • - 2
 @rrsport: there's also a reason they are known as canofsnail
I do completely approve of Cracknfail
  • + 42
 A normal fork and a semi-normal rear shock? is this really a Cdale bike? Good to see these bikes become a bit more normal, since IMO they had a bit too much proprietary gizmos.
  • + 2
 Yeah similar to some of Scott's bikes. Sexy in a way, but way cleaner if they lose the extra cables and BS.
  • + 5
 Can CDale compete with non-proprietary parts? That was always their value prop, selling something that was designed to work together and offering parts no one else had. Will anyone choose CDale over other options if there's nothing to differentiate them from every other linkage-driven single pivot in the same travel bracket?

I know why someone might have picked the old version, it had a Lefty and a cool travel adjust. Why would I pick this over a Kona or a Trek?
  • + 8
 @dthomp325: Because Treks are overpriced, BallisTec is better than whatever Kona is using, and C-dale does single pivot better.
  • + 1
 I bought the new Jekyll, owned the first one in NZ. I bought it because it was on paper good value for money and totally updated. Turns out a number of parts in the build happened to be the wrong specs, headset bearing the wrong size, wrong front brake mount, rear axel snapped in 2 weeks, the rear shock came out the box broken and the dropper is on its way out. Despite all of that after owning it a month and lucky enough to work in a bike shop and sorting those problems out on the cheap, it's a serious contender with any other bike on the market
  • + 28
 It sounds like the Gemini shock adheres to the metric standard......meaning that if you had another bike with the same sized metric shock you could stick the Gemini in it and get the same functionality - provided the base compression/rebound tunes arent significantly different.... interesting....
  • + 4
 interesting point...
  • + 9
 My immediate thought was that this shock feature could be utilized on any frame. I would rather see a flick-of-the-switch travel limiter than a lockout on my bike. The climbing traction of an open shock without the squishiness and sag.
  • + 1
 I would be careful though. You would want to check the leverage ratio of a different bike because that could lead to some juju.
  • + 2
 That's a damn fine idea. C and R tunes can always be changed anyway, it's only a shim stack. I bet Cannondale and Fox will be very tight about letting any shocks get out of their hands. Warranty only, with the faulty unit returned first I'd expect.
  • + 1
 @brit-100: I have one of these, cable routing is easy so, if it fits in the bike you are golden
  • + 23
 These bikes are a huge step towards finally offering something cool. Good stuff (thumbs up emoji).
  • + 9
 And if the part spec on the the cheap models is actually as reasonable as it sounds, they might just sell well!
  • + 4
 if only they had put a threaded BB in there (sad face emoji) but definitely a step in the right direction.
  • + 2
 Left Thumb emoji? sorry.. couldn't resist....
  • + 4
 I like this, let us decree too spell out our intended emoji's since pinkbike changes them to question marks. (Smiley-face-winking-whilst-sticking-out-tongue emoji)
  • + 5
 And they have the ideal chainstay length
  • + 23
 Is the water bottle mount vertical beneath the linkage on the seat tube? Like a hardtail? That's kinda neat.
  • + 1
 Same thing I was thinking.
  • + 23
 An entire suspension system built around a water bottle.
  • + 3
 more a barrel than a bottle
  • + 9
 Gemini system? The bike looks pretty good and everything but I would have rather seen a re-hash of the Gemini itself. Cannondale needs to get back in the DH game.
  • - 9
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 5, 2017 at 7:10) (Below Threshold)
 Cuz Gemini was such a great bike... NOT Smile
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: You crazy.
  • - 9
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 5, 2017 at 7:19) (Below Threshold)
 @Rucker10: I had one. Team Replica with the floating brake mount. It was beatiful, but it sucked. First SC Nomad was a better descender than Gemini.
  • + 15
 @WAKIdesigns: I find it incredibly difficult to argue about the merits of a bike from 2004. I vaguely remember it being pretty rad, but at that age and experience level I thought anything with two wheels and at least one brake was awesome.
  • + 5
 I think this tech but brought back on their old Claymore model would be cool. 180mm mini DH destroyer with gemini version X2 that drops suspension to 150 for lighter duty and climbs? I'd be very very intrigued.
  • + 26
 @Rucker10: Arguing about a bike from 2004 is expert level pb trolling. Not everyone is up to that task.
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: I have a friend that still rides a Claymore. It's a badass bike, I'm surprised that they didn't catch on more.
  • + 3
 @DARKSTAR63: Wins the day
  • - 3
 @DARKSTAR63: as soon as I get depressed enough I can argue with deeeight about some sht nobody remembers.
  • + 3
 @Rucker10: the jekylls geo is closer to the claymores now..
  • + 3
 Looks like they are (gasp!) listening to what mountain bikers actually want.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: CG won Rampage on that shitty bike though.
  • + 7
 Cannondale definitely needs better marketing. This new Jekyll is longer and slacker than most "enduro" bikes at the moment and yet there's barely any buzz outside of this Pinkbike article.
  • + 10
 Did anyone else get aroused by those geometry figures? Damn.
  • + 7
 I figured this day would come but I can't say I'm sad to see the Lefty's go away. I've always leaned more towards the right anyways.
  • + 4
 "Cannondale says that the weight and stiffness gains become less significant as the travel increases, so when the fork is bumped up to 160 -170mm there isn't much to gain between having one or two legs. Plus, the extra abuse that a long travel bike takes, and trying to squish all of that elongated spring and damper tech into one leg was leading to some reliability issues. Goodbye my Lefty, goodbye my friend, you have been the one..."


Never thought I'd see the day Cannondale say something like this about their lefty. 0_0
  • + 8
 Wow, Cannondale is actually not that different for once.
  • - 3
 I rode the old pull-shock/Lefty Jekyll for a few days as a loaner when my bike needed service. The whole dual-mode bit was great, worked really well. But I never would have considered buying one, with all that proprietary bullshit just waiting to leave you stranded waiting for parts (and hoping for long-term parts availability).

Key here, though, is your phrase 'not that different' - I can forgive them the 3mm offset on the hub (although it bugs me that you'd have a hard time just quickly grabbing a loaner wheel if, say, your hub needed replacing). But the "almost" standard shock is a turnoff. Yep, you can put a standard shock in it - but then you lose one of the key features. And I doubt they would have spent so much effort on engineering all that stuff if they'd figured out how to do suspension kinematics that could do an adequate job without all that.
  • + 2
 @g-42: From the Vital MTB release - "​Rather than try to come up with a linkage design that pedals as well as it descends (always a compromise), Cannondale wanted a system that would allow you to change the behavior of the bike at the press of a button."

The compromise is an 'almost' standard shock instead of sacrificing performance. With Jerome running Rock Shox there will likely be other options in the future.
  • + 9
 420mm CS for the WIN!
  • + 3
 Riding a Trigger carbon 2 with xt di2 and an e13 9-46 cassette. Crammed a 2.6 noni in the back and 2.8 noni in the front on the stock wheels. First ride tonight, so far really digging it. 30lbs dead on ready to ride with cage, xt pedals, race face next sl crank and bars. Geo is way more dialed then the bad habit, a bike I wanted to love, but hated.
  • + 6
 that blue on the Trigger looks slick.
  • + 3
 Yeah, gotta love a flake
  • + 2
 Well hopefully Fox takes care of folks with the Gemini system better than they take care of those with Re:Activ shocks...

Holy shit what a mess it is to deal with Warranty claims with Fox and their service centres. Just counting the days till I can put a new Super Deluxe on the bike and call it a day.
  • + 1
 What issue have you had with the re:Active damper that fox couldn't address?
  • + 2
 @allenfstar: the odd knocking sound it makes when standing and riding over small chattery bumps.

Apparently its a very rare issue but is known... Fox service techs want to bassicaly bypass Re:Activ and install a custom setup. They told me parts will take over a month to get... Well been over a month and when I called they just said " lets us call you back"

Im not gonna go into the whole fuxking thing as I dont have the time or do I want to keep relivinf this cluster f*ck lol all I can say is that Proprietary stuff may be pretty awesome when it works but come service time there is nothing awesome about any of this shit.
  • + 3
 Dude, at least with fox you can send it in yourself instead of having to go through a shop like w RockShox...Fox all the way just for that reason alone.
  • + 1
 @El-Train: yeah I strted with contacting them directly and after a few emails they just went quiet.... Greeeaaat service....

So now its at OGC where the Fox service techs are and im getting the run around treatment from them as well.

I love this re:activ shock but man this is my firat proprietary part and I fully underatand why people stay away from this shit haha.

This shock is most certainly coming off this bike fixed or not im putting something on that doesnt have any special parts.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: maybe its different in Canada, here you just send it to Fox in CA and in two weeks it comes back. Never had any problems doing that.
  • + 1
 @El-Train: Is that true? You can't send back to RS directly? ...I always loved that about Fox. I just ordered a Pike Solo Air...
  • - 1
 @El-Train: yea but most shops can fix your rock shox in house with out needing to send it back for over price service. Fox's customer service has gotten better I the past year or so but rockshox and srams customer service is waaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyy better
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: talk to the guys at vorsprung it may be worth an email or phone call
  • + 1
 @sevensixtwo: any good shop will help you send it back even if it wasn't purchased there
  • + 1
 @El-Train: They need to actually have parts for this shock to fix it... The issue is now apparently they built these shocks and have zero parts for them...
  • + 0
 I assumed the knocking sound/feel in my reactive shock was normal as it happens in the first 10% of travel where the system switches
  • + 1
 @rrsport: I have a re:Active shock and it doesn't do that
  • + 1
 @allenfstar: The couple I have played with all do it. Must be very hit or miss
  • + 1
 @rrsport: weird I've had both the performance and factory versions and haven't noticed it
  • + 4
 Hoooooly crap those Reach numbers for the Jekyll are MASSIVE.
494mm reach for an XL.
This bike might actually fit riders over 6'2"
  • + 5
 Seriously, my money, it's your now, send me one of each and I'll call it a day!
  • + 2
 "The remote lever is the same as is used DOSS seatpost and Float X compression adjusters." I own a Fox DOSS, I can attest that the lever pictured for the Gemini shock is definitely not like the DOSS lever. In fact, my DOSS is still going strong, on a 2015 Trigger Carbon with the DYAD still going strong. Albeit, with no Lefty since I built the bike from the frame up. I love the performance of the DYAD, the travel change is great when needed.
  • + 3
 They haven't made a 29" Trigger in over 2 years. Last Trigger model was 27.5, so no thats not new.

Hopefully one day a monster 29" will come back from Cdale. The Evil and Enduro are super rad bikes for us tall dudes.
  • + 6
 top up your stash before you ride in "hustle mode"
  • + 0
 COD! (comment of the day)
  • + 5
 an actual real fork. wow.
  • + 4
 2 year old jekyll4 dyad working properly.I like these new ones though time to fill the piggy bank.
  • + 4
 Short stays and a damping adjust without lockout... nice. Just as I thought new bikes weren't my style.
  • + 1
 My biggest complain with my trigger isn't the DYAD, that shock has been awesome, its the fact that a full bearing service was 10 fucking bearings. That's too many, completely not needed, my next bike will be single pivot for sure.
  • + 1
 If Gemini just effectively inserts a huge volume spacer in Hustle mode, wouldn't this mean the travel change will be different for different riders? I need way more pressure at 220 lbs than my buddy at 150lbs... either I'm going to get more than 130mm or he's going to get way less travel. The progressiveness change is going to be massive for the lighter people, which is probably what they want, but maybe not so much of an increase for bigger folks. Also, does the shock take the normal volume spacers, too?
  • + 1
 They put the Dyad aside to try a more commercial bike and so sell more, ok I understand but it's a shame. For me, the differential of the bike ended. Whoever uses the Dyad rt2 knows what I'm talking about, the shock really is better than the traditional and "commercial" shocks. It has become more of a bike with a very similar damping system of other brands that try to sell how to be different.
  • + 6
 Triggered
  • + 1
 'and trying to squish all of that elongated spring and damper tech into one leg was leading to some reliability issues. Goodbye my Lefty, goodbye my friend' i spit out my coffee at 'some reliability issues' lmao good riddance! technically interesting as it was, realistically it was a customer service nightmare.
  • + 1
 Squeezing in a James Blunt reference here is really impressive. Nice article! @PaulAston
  • + 2
 We've had the new Jekyll in our shop for a few days now. I've only pedaled it around on solid ground so far, but it has a nice, balanced feel to it.
  • + 2
 We were lucky enough to ride the Jekyll in Finale Ligure just a day or two before the press and have ridden the shop's test Trigger on home soil in Switzerland a little bit... Your until feeling is to the point; that bike just feels right! I ordered one for myself right after test riding it, it's that awesome ; )
  • + 2
 I remember seeing one of these up at Kingdom trails in Vermont last year, and absolutely hating myself for thinking A: that looks like fun, and B: I kind of want one...?
  • + 5
 My new bike is here!
  • + 2
 kinda sucks they ditched the lefty, as that's always been a nice novelty to get a cannondale, as no other bike came with one.
  • + 5
 Only on their big bikes. Its still around on the Trail and XC. Thats where the Lefty really shined anyway.
  • + 2
 Go 1x11 to make bars less cluttered they said.. Now chuck a load of other triggers on there? Not a 1x bash btw.. Looks quite a cool feature, but not for me thanks.
  • + 12
 It's one extra lever for the shock...
  • + 2
 @Gossa: one ugly arse lever
  • + 4
 Trigger 3, ordered!
  • + 1
 My experience has been just the opposite. I notice significant stiffness gains in my lefty when I get between 160 and 170mm.
  • + 2
 Jekyll owners who had the DYAD shock, what was maintenance like? interested to see what y'all think of this new one
  • + 6
 I have ridden and raced with the DYAD shock and never had any issues...luckily.
  • + 10
 Had a Jekyll with a Dyad for 2 seasons. Zero issues.
  • + 1
 Good friend of mine had to get a warranty twice within the span of a year. He finally switched over to a Nomad. The Jekyll itself was an awesome bike, that shock was just troublesome.
  • + 6
 I had a Jekyll with DYAD for 3 seasons - no issues - loved the bike.
  • + 6
 I'm a Jekyll owner for more than five years now. Never had any troubles with the DYAD shock at all. It still works absolutely fine. In all conditions. I'm looking forward for the test rides with the new Jekylls and Triggers.
  • + 5
 Two seasons, zero issues.
  • + 3
 Had my trigger for about 18 months now, no issues with the DYAD from me.
  • + 3
 NO issues with mine.
  • + 3
 So the verdict is that you can ride the dyad shock hard and put it away wet for years on end without servicing it?
  • + 3
 Been on the 2016 Jekyll2 for a season. No issues with the bike/shock yet. Good to see others here saying the same thing!
  • + 3
 Raced on one hard for a full season in 2013 without service.
  • + 3
 I've got 2011 jekyll and after 3 years I was unable to use full travel.. but the lbs solved it by giving me new one. Impressed.
  • + 2
 @thebigschott: That has been my experience
  • + 2
 Nice looking bike geo and travel. I learned my lesson with proprietary shocks with my Specialized though, never again.
  • + 2
 Just got my staff price on both models, wow, now that's a decision! New Bike Please!
  • + 3
 Cannondale is moving in the right direction with these bikes.
  • + 3
 Super busy cockpit but looks like a pretty sweet ride.
  • + 4
 Nice improvement!
  • - 1
 Wow this Gemini system seems to be really close to a direct rip off of Scott's Fox Nude shock setup. It looks as if they did a better job of the linkage design than Scott though; it actually looks like it will be quite progressive.

I wonder how it rides when in the "Hustle" mode - I'm guessing if the damping doesn't change between modes the rebound damping might be too light at full travel in the short travel mode leading to too much pop or kickback.
  • + 5
 Complete different! The object of the two shocks is completely different. Look at the two shocks side by side and you can visually see the difference.
  • + 0
 gemini does indeed look similar to the nude/twinloc.
  • + 1
 @peterguns: I fail to see the difference. Could you help me out here?
  • - 2
 Nevermind Scott, it looks like a remote version of Specialized/Foxs Itch Switch from the 2004 Enduro.
  • + 2
 @TerrapinBen: The Nude is similar to the old Trek/DRCV. Travel actuated air volume. Where as the Gemini is a Travel reducing system. Changes the geo of the bike by moving air from one chamber to another. basically. For the Nude, just like to old Trek DRCV, the extra volume is in the eyelet. For the Gemini, the air chamber to reduce travel is in the air sleeve.
  • + 2
 @peterguns:

this is only 1/2 right. The nude and gemini both are using remote based adjustments to the air volume. they're both using reduction in air volume to change the spring curve. throw out the trek part because that has no remote actuation at all and really isn't the same as what they're trying to do here. Regardless of where the air volume is present in the Nude shock, it is doing the same as the Gemini, just slightly better. Either way, you're having to use remotes to get better performance out of a single-pivot suspension. Why not just get a better suspension system and focus on riding vs flipping switches?
  • + 1
 @raditude: Ah the remote actuates the compression settings on the Nude, NOT air volume. Open, Medium, and Firm compression settings. Therefore it is NOT doing the same thing as the Gemini. The Nude is in fact a different version of the DRCV.

I know all three shocks inside and out
  • + 2
 @peterguns: Why are you getting this wrong then?

Trek's DRCV has no travel adjust to it whatsoever and is actuated automatically during travel via a piston. Despite it having different air volumes, the goals of that shock were to offer small and large air can benefits in one design without having to select a mode. There is absolutely no different travel adjust to it.

Scott's Nude and the Gemini are both adjusting spring curve based on air volume, using the remote to ramp the spring curve effectively limiting travel and increasing efficiency.

Scott talking about Nude multiple chambers and AIR volume adjustments:
www.sicklines.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/fox-nude-shock.png

Look @ the chambers, they're adding air volume under the open and cutting it off in the traction modes. YES, the compression of the air will affect the overall travel but it is not just a remote unlock/lock 3 pos adjuster like many fox Float rear shock'd bikes have.
  • + 1
 @peterguns @raditude: Very helpful discussion. Thanks guys!
  • + 2
 @raditude: YOU sir, no disrespect, at this point. I agree to disagree.

Have you ridden any of these shocks?
Have you disassembled these shocks?
Have you reassembled these shocks?

Have you heard of marketing?

Sorry man.
  • - 1
 @peterguns:

Yes
Yes
Yes

Did you work at Trek?
And Cannondale?
And have a friend who's a former Fox engineer who read over your Pink Bike post to make sure what you were saying is correct?

The only thing that is wrong with what i said is that the Nude system simultaneously adjusts air volume and compression, not just air volume as i stated above.
  • + 1
 Clements on Rockshox suspension is going to be all flow and no hustle at the EWS?
  • + 1
 The first time building one of these..... all I can say is that this dropper post install is fussy as hell!
  • + 1
 my girlfriend says i do not need anymore stiffness gains.. I am good as is.
  • + 1
 That's a flop!
  • + 1
 did they leave room for motor or something? couldnt get that shock any higher up.
  • + 3
 Water bottle clearance.
  • + 3
 LETS GO!
  • + 2
 Sad day for us dyad/lefty equipped jekyll owners...
  • + 2
 No 29er version.. no sense...imho
  • + 1
 always thought if the lefty had a righty ,it would be a great looking dh fork
  • + 1
 What do they mean by "Linear-progressive" suspension? Does it start out linear and then become more progressive?
  • + 3
 The change in leverage rate is constant, from a higher initial leverage rate to a lower ending leverage rate. It provides a consistent feel to push against throughout the travel.
  • + 1
 Rather than a curved rate that can feel inconsistent or wallow in the mid stroke etc, it's a straight line from zero to full travel.
  • + 1
 they were the originators though with the headshok
  • + 1
 Proprietary is the dead that keeps dead.
  • + 1
 Should be able to ride with no hands now.
  • + 1
 But where is lockout mode, sorry I mean struggle mode?
  • - 1
 Instead of making their own wheel standard, they could have just used a current one - Superboost!
  • + 1
 Uhh...these bikes don't use a new wheel standard. It's a boost hub and the rim is dished 3mm to the non drive side. You can re-dish any off the shelf boost wheel to work on these.
  • + 1
 Oh I see
  • + 0
 All new Focus Sam with bottle cage.
  • + 0
 Righty tighty. Lefty loosy
  • + 0
 Hey there C-Dale, W Way to start making bikes instead of gimmicks.
  • + 0
 I am sorry that is one ugly bike haha
  • - 3
 I broke two Canofsnail Jekyll ballistic carbon rear seat stays in the exact same spot. Cannondale left me hanging both times. Refused to warranty the frame. That's all I have to say about Canofsnails.
  • - 1
 That Ai hub spacing, is it any different than Evo6? If not, why the new name?
  • + 2
 Jekyll/Trigger feature boost 148 spacing. On these bikes, the rim is only dished 3mm.
  • + 3
 @dcg42a: Thanks but I still don't get it.

Evo6: Take 142x12 as a reference and add 6mm to the right.

Boost: Take 142x12 as a reference and add 3mm to both sides.

Ai: Take Boost as a reference and shift everything 3mm to the right. You can say shift the rim 3mm to the left but I'd say the rim should still be centered in the frame so basically it is the hub which shifts.

In my perception, that Ai gets you what Evo6 was in the first place. I sure must be wrong, considering the downvotes. But I just don't see where it is different. Ai, Boost and Evo6 all use the same hub.
  • + 2
 @vinay: downvote on principal because you're trying to make sense of rear end spacing, two downvotes if i could because you mentioned boost.
  • - 1
 @WasatchEnduro: Yeah but I wasn't curious what the votes were for. As you just illustrated, they don't make sense indeed. My question was: is Ai the same as Evo6 or not?

That said, this additional post gives you another opportunity to reach your daily downvote fix. Enjoy.
  • + 2
 @vinay: Good question. I need to learn more about Evo6.
  • + 2
 @dcg42a: Evo6 is from Syntace (you know, the ones who also came with 142x12) though Tune claims to have been the first. What Syntace typically does is try to improve interfaces without turning the world upside down. Many 135x12 hubs could easily be converted to 142x12 and Evo6 is just a different (asymmetric) alignment of the rear end of the bike whilst using the standard Boost 148x12 hub spacing. As far as I know, at least Liteville uses the Evo6 spacing on their bikes. Asymmetric rear ends aren't new though. I have an old Specialized P1 which also does have that. Of course it doesn't make much sense on a single speed DJ bike like that (though it could be made to use gears) but they used it on their other geared bikes as well. So they had a 6mm offset rear end even with their 135mm hubs to achieve even spoke tension. I still don't get why not more frame manufacturers do it like that. It doesn't rely on new standards, just lace your wheels differently and weld a different frame.
  • + 2
 @vinay: done and done... but I still haven't reached my quota for the day. Time to troll that new Stumpjumper article.
  • + 1
 Meh....
  • - 3
 Its a hoax
  • - 3
 better
  • - 3
 Well the shock is so close to the frame forget any coil or bigger piggdy back shocks on this :/ This kind of sucks?
  • + 1
 Obviously cannondale fanboys voted down, its f*cking true, cannot you see the pictures, float x isn't a big shock. Something like a X2 or a Creek Cane is bigger and obviously wont fit? Forget any coil
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