Review: Commencal's Supreme DH 29 is an Unflinching Race Weapon

Jul 17, 2018 at 6:50
by Paul Aston  



Commencal's Supreme platform has been around for a number of years, but 2018 saw it gain more length, bigger wheels, and three World Cup wins in a row. The Andorran race vessel was also the first complete production-ready big-wheeled downhill bike - and it sold out two production runs.

Commencal initially offered the frame kit including a Fox 49 fork, DHX2 shock, and an e*thirteen wheelset for $4,599 USD, and as a complete bike with a high performance / low-cost component selection for only $5,399. That inventory sold out almost overnight, but the 2019 range has just been released with new color options, including a RockShox-equipped team replica that can be had as a complete build for $4,599.

Supreme DH 29 Details

Intended use: downhill
Travel: 205mm rear / 203mm front
Wheel size: 29"
Frame construction: Aluminium 6066-alloy, triple butted
Suspension Design High-pivot swingarm with idler wheel
Suspension: Fox 49 fork, DHX2 shock
Sizes: M, L, XL
Weight: 16.99kg / 37.08lbs (actual, tubeless, w/o pedals, XL)
Price: $5,399 USD (exc. tax) / €5,399 (inc. VAT)
More info: commencal-store.com

bigquotesCharging into rough rock gardens and braking bumps is unreal - I tried a section in Pila faster and faster, and the Supreme was the first bike I have ever ridden that genuinely became easier to handle the harder I pushed it. It never even came close to flinching. Paul Aston

Contents




Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review -


Construction & Features

The Supreme is an all aluminum frame, that is constructed using a hydroformed, triple-butted tubeset, and a number of forged and machined linkage parts. All the details have been taken care of, including a non-tapered ZS56 head tube that provides the maximum range for reach and angle-adjustable headset cups. There are fork bumpers that double as internal housing ports, a rear mudguard, chain-slap protection on the rear stays, and a chunk of moto-foam to keep the dirt out from under the forward shock mount. The dropouts are replaceable (in case you trash a derailleur hanger) and finally, there is a wide downtube guard to stop incoming debris from harming the linkage system.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - factory fitted mudguard
A factory fitted mudguard comes as standard.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - removable dropouts
Replaceable dropouts. The chain runs close to the rubber protection, giving it nowhere to go and very quiet ride.
Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - used and abused fork bumpers
The fork bumpers did their job and were used and abused more than once.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - factory fitted moto-foam
A chunk of factory fitted moto-foam under the front shock mount.


Geometry & Sizing

Commencal were late to the longer frame club, but came back to prove a point on this big wheeled version. The smallest option is the medium size, with a 445mm reach, with 470mm for the large, and a whopping, 495mm for the XL. I believe that if those numbers are too big for you, that you shouldn't be trying to buy a 29er DH bike anyway (the 27.5" version offers smaller sizes). The rest of the geometry is standard downhill fare, with a 63.5º head angle, a 439mm chainstay, and a -15mm bottom bracket drop (not a huge drop compared to some 29" wheeled DH and enduro bikes).



Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - non-driveside swingarm


Suspension Design

Commencal's now-famous DH suspension employs a stiff, triangulated single-pivot swingarm that hinges high above the chainring, but the arm tapers down towards the rear axle to allow flex at the wheel. An idler sprocket wheel that is placed slightly lower than the swingarm's pivot so the chain runs directly through the pivot point, eliminates chain growth (between the top of the chainring and cassette) and any negative effects that the chain may have on the rear suspension.

The high swingarm pivot location gives 76mm of rearward axle travel (and a 515mm effective chainstay length) at full bottom-out. At 28% sag, the chainstay grows from 439mm, to 468mm. My bike's
Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - idler wheel
The idler wheel is tightly sandwiched in the swingarm and secured with a large bolt, as there is a huge amount of force being put through it when pedaling.
wheelbase measured longer than the stated 1307mm (it was 1320mm with the shock fully extended and the fork stanchions at the top of the crowns). With the front and rear suspension bottomed out, the wheelbase was 1256mm. Essentially, the Supreme DH 29's 63.5º head tube angle and high-pivot rear suspension move the rider's center of gravity forward between the axles as the suspension compresses.

That pivot location also means the suspension squats into the travel when braking while striking bumps, in addition to swinging back as the rear wheel is being impacted. When pedaling, the system has no effect on suspension bob, and no pedal kickback (the cranks don't try to rotate backward as the suspension compresses).

Keeping the weight low in the frame, the swingarm activates the suspension by pulling a yoke that compresses the downtube-mounted shock through a two-stage linkage. The configuration gives Commencal's designers ample opportunities to tweak leverage ratios to their liking by altering pivot locations and linkage lengths.

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This video shows the suspension action with no brakes...
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...and this video shows the suspension action with the rear brake applied.


The Build

At $5,399 USD, the Supreme DH featured here is a bargain build, especially considering Commencal were way ahead of the curve in offering a complete bike, in stock, and for sale, when many other brands were panic-building prototypes and trying to play catch-up with ordering parts – hats off to Commencal who suffered a few rough years with their standard dealer/distributor model, and are now one of the leaders of the direct-sales pack.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - Alpha cockpit
The bike is spec'd with Commencal's house-brand Alpha parts, including bar, stem, grips, saddle and seatpost.
Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - worlds biggest brake mount
SRAM Code brakes. The Supreme might win the award for the world's biggest brake mount.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - LG1 rear hub
The e*thirteen LG1 rear hub is one of my favorite 150mm downhill hubs, as it uses the center of the hub to gain strength and stiffness, instead of creating a waste of space. The miniature 7-speed cassette is also from e*thirteen.


Components
Specifications
Release Date Spring '18
Price $5299
Rear Shock FOX Factory DHX2, 250 x 75mm
Fork FOX Factory 49 FLOAT RC2
Headset Ride Alpha, semi integrated,
Cassette E*13, 7 speed, 9–21T
Crankarms E*13 LG1, 34T, 165 mm, 24 mm axle
Chainguide E*13 LG1+ WideGuide
Bottom Bracket E*13 Pressfit BB 92
Chain KMC X11-EL BPBP
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX DH, 7 speed
Shifter Pods SRAM GX DH, 7 speed
Handlebar Ride Alpha, Alloy 7075, double butted, 30 mm rise, 780 mm, Ø31.8 mm
Stem Ride Alpha DH Direct Mount, 50 mm, 31.8 mm
Grips Ride Alpha, Alloy one lock, super soft compound
Brakes SRAM Code R, 200mm / 200mm
Wheelset E*13 LG1, 30mm, with integrated cassette
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR 29 x 2.5 WT, 3C/TR DH Casing
Seat WTB High Tail Pro
Seatpost Ride Alpha DH, 31.6 mm



Commencal Supreme DH 29







Test Bike Setup

The Supreme was ready to ride out of the box, I changed down a spring weight on the Fox DHX2 shock from 450lb to 400lb, pumped up the fork to 76psi, opened up most of the compression front and rear, and set the rebound on the fast side with a couple of extra clicks on the shock's HSR to for a little more control under big hits.

Tire pressures were set at 22/24psi and that was it. I kept the fork stanchions at full extension and the bar as high as possible - this was the ideal height for me, but taller riders may want something more than the 20mm rise Ride Alpha bar.

Testing took place on a variety of trails, from Finale Ligure, Pila, Les Gets, and some of Piemonte's best kept secret bike parks.

bigquotesIt was my first ride on a downhill bike for a while, and first time ever on a 29" model.Paul Aston

Paul Aston
Paul Aston
Location: Finale Ligure, Italy
Age: 32
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 75kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @astonator
KM's ridden: n/a. used in Finale Ligure, Portes du Soleil, Pila, and Piemonte bike parks.


Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - Riding


Riding

There were a number of things about the Supreme that were welcome surprises from the start. It was my first ride on a downhill bike for a while, and first time ever on a 29" model. Despite the sheer size of the bike (it barely fits in my van or garage, and it likes to fall off shuttle trailers and chairlifts), it takes off swiftly on the pedals, and from the first run, I felt like I could do nothing wrong.

Well, almost. I instantly found myself over the working speed limit of my mind and eyes on my everyday trails (normally hitting the bikes limit comes first). I was riding faster than ever, but well below the bike's limit. Strava isn't the most accurate way to time runs, but four PR's out of four on my regular trails, starting from the very first run? That was impressive.

From the outset, the Commencal was as close to silent as possible, with no need to add tape here and rubber there to keep things quiet. It was also so smooth on the initial strike of each bump that it eliminated small trail feedback, and even when landing small jumps and hops I could barely, if at all, feel the rear wheel coming back in to contact with the ground.

After the first couple of rides, I had to wait patiently for some more big wheel DH bikes to turn up before I could to make some back-to back comparisons. Was the Supreme that good or was it just big wheels combined with a DH-sled that surprised me?

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - Riding

More testing ensued, and things only got better. Charging into rough rock gardens and braking bumps is unreal - I tried a section in Pila faster and faster, and the Supreme was the first bike I have ever ridden that got easier to handle the harder I pushed it. It never even came close to flinching. As mentioned in other reviews, for me, the high pivot system is the holy grail for a flat pedal rider who wants his feet planted on the pedals at the worst of times. The increasing chainstay length gives more confidence as it extends through the travel. The stiff but not harsh front end, combined with a fairly flexible swingarm, allows enough give at the rear wheel for fantastic tracking and line-holding through rough and off camber sections, without springiness found with some carbon bikes.

Rider-forward handling: What else to say about the Supreme? Despite its massive 495mm reach number, it didn't feel as big some similarly sized bikes I've tested. I put this down to the long chainstay and rearward axle path, which helps my center of gravity move forward between the axles as the suspension compresses, and keeps me more centralized on the bike. The front end rarely felt like it was getting away from me, and I never needed to lean back over the saddle when things got steep and gnarly.

That forward stance may be a sticking point for riders who are used to parking off the back of the saddle when things get gnarly, as the Supreme will feel horribly out of control. A change of technique is required to stay forward, and more upper body and arm strength will be required to stay in the middle of the bike and keep charging on.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - Riding

Cornering: Anything without a berm for support, with camber and rough is a traction treat, the small bump sensitivity is fantastic and the flex in the rear wheel and triangle seem to glue the bike to the dirt, while still having plenty of support to push against. The bike feels big in the berms, but the not-so-low bottom bracket height makes it easy to flick between opposing corners.

Braking: Under braking, due to the high-pivot location, the bike squats into the travel, but I am a fan of this. This bike should be ridden down steep and gnarly downhill tracks, and you should not be braking on flat ground over bumps. You are, however, going to be hard on the brakes on steep sections into corners. The suspension will become slightly less sensitive, but I believe you will always have more grip on the rear wheel, a feeling I prefer compared to having a bike that pitches forwards and un-weights the rear wheel, despite their suspension being more active under braking.




How does it compare?

Compared to the pro-level carbon-framed Norco Aurum HSP-1 you'd get at your local retailer, the consumer-direct aluminum Commencal really does kick ass by being $2,700 cheaper (disclosure: the second-tier Norco Aurum is only $5,500 USD). Plus, the Supreme 29 has a smoother ride and has a much bigger XL for taller riders like me. Yes, Commencal's Supreme 29 is not carbon, and not sold with dealer support, but that's still a serious amount of money.

Compared to other more traditional four-bar linkage bikes on test, the Supreme has better tracking across rough terrain and camber, as well as a more forgiving and easy ride, especially for flat pedal pilots.



Norco Aurum HSP Review - hero shot


Technical Report

LG1 crankset: One of the aluminum e*13 crankarms bent during a crash between the legs of another test rider. Nothing serious, and the wobbly feeling of a bent aluminum crank is nothing compared to the possibility of a snapped carbon crank. This is the budget crank from the e*13 range and is one of the places Commencal have saved money to give this bike great value. After years of racing downhill, I think a bent crank is par for the course when smashing downhill runs day after day.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 Review - miniature E13 cassette
Commencal Supreme DH 29 review

Integrated e*13 cassette: The miniature integrated 7-speed cassette from e*thirteen worked without issue, and the 9-21 tooth range means you can use a smaller chainring for more clearance. This is a downhill racer of course, but if you take it on a trip to the Alps, you might want some lower gearing to get between lifts and tracks.


Pros

+ Unbeatable bump and high-speed performance
+ Ready to go racing out of the box
+ Great price and specification
Cons

- Requires some adaptation to get the best out of the bike
- Falls off chairlifts and shuttle trailers and might not fit in your car or garage
- May make you ride too fast for your own safety


Is this the bike for you?

If you want a bike that is going to truck through anything that is in the way, then the Supreme 29 is for you. It has near endless grip and composure on gnarly terrain, if you want something more 'poppy' or 'playful' or 'fun' then look elsewhere. I think going as fast as you can everywhere is the most fun part anyhow.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesCommencal really have covered all the bases with the Supreme DH 29, and I genuinely do not know what would make me like it more. Maybe an all black version?Paul Aston








300 Comments

  • + 98
 “It’s not a big, it’s a feature”

Rode one of these at a demo. Didn’t have a ton of runs to get really comfortable, but I can confirm that it is indeed really, really fast. You really need to be a really good rider to get the most out of it. If not ridden at ten tenths it feels like driving a 60 foot stretch limo thru city traffic. This is not a park bike. If your day at the park includes stopping at every trial junction to bro down before this is not the bike to you.

It’s a weird time for DH bikes. The bike industry has convinced us all that 29 is better. And it is faster as proven by the World Cup. But most people can’t ride them to their potential like Paul Aston can. In fact, most people are not going to enjoy riding a 29 DH bike. The bike industry knows this. This is why Santa Cruz is milking as much money as they can out of the current v10 molds before coming out with the v29. The serious racers will buy them but how many regular park bros are going to buy one when they become a more known commodity? Add in that you have a lot of people that go to bike parks 2-4 times per year (the majority of bike park visitors) are buying Nomad/Capra/Torque and bikes like that are more versatile than a full on DH bikes and you have sales going down. Less sales mean that the cost has to go up to cover development costs. How many people have bought the Session 29? How many people are going to buy an 11,500$ v10?

500 two stroke analogy?
  • + 35
 I think it's about the rider being fast not the wheel size, that's what has been proven on the World Cup this year and last.
  • + 4
 Clash race.
  • + 3
 Fully agree with you, so true.
  • + 17
 Well spoken.
I rode an R6 for 10 years (until it finally let go). Around town it was difficult to ride. However, at full tilt - 10-15k RPM and hammering the corners, it was fantastic. Definatley better the faster. I now ride a Triumph Thruxton R. Not nearly the superbike, but a lot easier to ride every day.

500cc two stroke. Yeah, incredible, but who can really ride them to their potential?
  • + 17
 A lot is going to change in the next 1-2 years. We've all got these ingrained concepts & ideas of what geometry works and what doesn't (even though bikes like Pole, Mondraker, Nicholai tell a new story). As a 29 hater for years I recently got to ride Pole's bikes for an afternoon at Mulberry Gap, GA. Wow, what a revelation! On paper those bikes look like ridiculous geometry that can't possibly ride well anywhere but straight downhill... In reality, those bikes are the best rides uphill, downhill, popping off bumps and logs, blazing through creeks, that I've ever experienced!
I ended up buying the Pole Evolink 140 29" and everyone who rides it exclaims how they couldn't imagine it would be so maneuverable, so fun!
When Prince tennis racquets arrived they got crap from everyone... everyone who hadn't played them. 1-2 years later every pro & am were playing with an oversize racket! That's what's coming to mountain biking as soon as the major brands can find a way to sell their current "out-dated" tech they will be singing the tune of long chainstays, longer reach, long wheelbase and saying it was their idea. Remember Specialized saying they would "never" do 27.5... yeah, right!
  • + 23
 @manco: I'm looking forward to seeing how this tennis racquet analogy goes down here in the world of Pinkbike.
  • + 30
 @manco: to their credit, spezialized saw 29 as the future and saw no need to make the change from 26 to 650b for the smaller bikes... looks like they were correct while Giant has some crow to eat.
  • + 14
 @feeblesmith: The have to make 29" specific bike parks now.
  • + 9
 @manco: Specialized was actually ahead of the curve and came out with the Enduro 29 first. Then so many people bought in to 27.5 they had to make a franken bike 27.5 out of parts on hand. They should have stuck to their guns. Turned out 27.5 was better than 26 but people weren't ready to go full 29. Now they are.

And now all the early adopters/internet taught experts with money are jumping on the extreme geo train.

There is a lot of confirmation bias with these new age geos. Most people that drop 6k on a strange bike nobody else has bike aren't going to say it isn't way better than their last one. And nobody wants to admit they don't have the skill to ride the bike to it's full potential. Dr. Toothpuller has never had has Porsche above 81 MPH and sure as heck never pushed his Nicolai to it's limit. (just like he never hit a 300 yard drive with his Taylor Made's back in '04)

real rippers gon' rip.
  • + 5
 @thejake: Gwin, nuff said
  • + 4
 Maybe they could go back to building 26" wheel bikes, instead of bikes with 26" effective top tubes?
  • + 3
 @fecalmaster: Don't you mean 26" bikes for use in the bike park?
  • + 7
 yuuup. I went back to a Megatrail after some 29ers since I"m short, and just don't fit it for fun rides. If I was really racing, I'd figure out how to fit a 29, but I'm not so who cares.
  • + 10
 @wibblywobbly - no one can win a popularity contest on Pinkbike with this opinion, but at the risk of appearing as a heretic I will say that what you wrote about these DH 29ers is true for most riders out there on most DH bikes out there. DH bikes feel great on steep stuff at speed. Most people are unable to deliver that. They use DH bikes or those super slack, super long enduro bikes to feel confident on straight lines since they suck at cornering anyways. Yes DH bike provide error margin like no other, and it's all fine, but when you ride a particular bike only for that error margin it becomes counter productive. Yes DH bikes will take way more beating than almnost any Enduro bike but that's the fault of how most Enduro bikes are made, because market wants light stuff and finds it unacceptable to see a 160 bike at the weight of a 200mm bike. So well... it's not just an issue of 29" DH bikes. As someone wise told me here long time ago: progress is for the one who is willing to progress. One that wants to cover up his lacks of skill will not progress.
  • + 33
 I think that's where commencal have an advantage in running only aluminum. They don't have pricey molds to pay off so they can afford to build both this absolute monster and then turn out hundreds of furious models for the park rats to please everyone while still laughing all the way to the bank.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: funny you mentioned the cornering thing - it drives me nuts when I see someone with their feet at 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock position in a turn and grabbing brakes during the corner! brake before entering the corner, get that outside foot at 6 o'clock let off the brakes during the corner and go faster!!! Also with the longer wheel bases means turning apex/radius changes, so it does take a bit of re-learning the best line into a corner
  • + 4
 @CONomad: It's a good business model and everybody is happy... Smile
  • + 0
 @Grmasterd: it's a whola lotta can of worms.
  • + 2
 @Grmasterd: thats where most of my riding friends pull away from me is in the corners, i can not get around a corner fast to save my ass.
  • + 2
 Industry needs to move to DH bikes being able to accommodate both 27.5 and 29 wheels. Dropout, shock, and headset adjustments will allow you to maintain geometry with either one. If companies want to continue selling DH bikes they need to become more versatile, not more specific. Engineering maximum adjustment will allow the bike to evolve with an owner and be ready to suit their needs instead of collecting dust in the shed. Bike parks will become more common as climate continues to change, so I believe the DH bike will always have a role to play. But the biggest mistake a company can make right now is only offering a long 29" DH without anything snappier and more approachable for the unwashed park rat masses.
  • + 1
 @hypermoto: and like, the champ from the past several years running..... Him too.
  • + 4
 @hypermoto: Good thing Commencal offers both 27.5 and 29 in this bike as well as several other companies doing the same. Also, Commencal, as well as several other companies, have bikes designed a bit more for park and/or 'Freeride'. So there is that...
  • + 5
 @brncr6: I'm obsessed with cornering - when you nail it you get a bit of acceleration during the exit and or a good roost, very additive sensations
  • + 4
 @Grmasterd: Gwin what? Gwin has said he prefers 29 because its more like moto and YT is reportedly working on a 29 DH bike for him.
  • + 1
 @hypermoto: Nah, there will just be differentiation of park vs race and a pile of new park/freeride bikes will come out.

Commencal has both the Furious and the Clash for thee non-racy park rat horde, showered or not.

I'm all for versatility, but that's for the trail/enduro and freeride/park segments - for the party everywhere people, not for the beat-the-clock-on-raceday people.
Race bikes are race bikes due to them being super-specific and probably shouldn't try to do everything.
  • + 6
 How tall are you?

The reason I ask is that I just purchased a Supreme 29er and I can confirm that even on my first lap it was more fun and better for me than my old V10, no matter what speed I was riding. However, I'm fairly tall (6'4"), and I can imagine how it might feel like too much bike for someone smaller.

I'm not trying to poke holes in your comment, I'm honestly curious because I have a couple shorter friends interested in the bike after hearing my praises and I would hate to see them waste their money.
  • + 7
 I've tried this bike for 2 full days in Vallnord and more or less I agree with you.

I've been racing the Supreme V4.2 for all these season so I suposed the bike should not be very different. First day the suspension was not set up for me. 1 full day making some changes and then the second day of riding.

I ride every week for at least 3 days and train for 4 or 6 days per week and I ended totally exahusted. It felt faster and you have to work harder to ride it properly and not crash.

In the berms you have to push harder, you have to bend the bike more and have a good technique level to understand how you have to ride it.

In the technical parts you have to work a little bit more also and I didn't felt comfortable when breaking (it's different from 27.5).

When it comes to jumping it was very stable but different timing and very easy to overjump everything.

People in Commençal agreed with me when I said that it is harder to ride and definetely more racing oriented. In the best case you have the same fun than in 27.5 but most people won't.

Some friends here told me that I just needed more time with the bike to get used to it but I don't know. In less steep trails I really think you need to work even harder to keep this bike moving.

I hope the Norco was different and more friendly but after reading this, maybe we have to wait 1 or 2 years to see how these bikes work for the average rider
  • + 3
 @Grmasterd: agreed, but putting your foot straight to 6 in every corner is the "intermediate" move... depending on the corner (i.e. how flat it is), you want to be able to drive the bike out of the corner, so if you watch the best riders, you'll see they are more like 1 and 7, and not totally slammed to 6. Obviously, some corners the 6 o'clock outside pedal will be necessary, but many you will be faster keeping a more "dynamic" stance
  • + 1
 @CONomad: Agreed, I think commencal is on to it with aluminium only, the frames look incredible now but seem to be overshadowed by carbon bikes, & you can get a bike with good parts on it without needing to fork out $$ for a carbon model just to get decent spec.
  • + 3
 Someone tell Sam Hill long 29ers are faster, I don’t think he got the memo.
  • + 3
 @wibblywobbly: You are forgetting about taller/bigger people that will appreciate larger bikes and 29” wheels. some people can actually ride and will push these bikes to the limit so why should they miss out just because the average joe/ weekend hack can live with a regular 160mm bike (they make those too just fyi..)
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: I don’t disagree with you. They need to make these bikes for pros, people that ride like pros and people that think they pros. I really hope Santa Cruz does not neuter the V10 by giving it toned down links from what the pros ride. It’s a bummer that the Session has to have all kinds of suspension trickery to overcome the fact that the frame doesn’t have the necessary progression.

I’ll buy one, you will buy one and how many more people? If the next V10 costs 7 grand with a garbage build how many people will just buy the Commencals and how long will SC make it. Does Specialzied make another Demo or do they decide to come out with an electric Demo?
  • + 2
 Is this 2004 all over again?
Same comments here as back then, when 29ers hit the big market.
Yeah they are faster unless you ride very tight stuff.
  • + 6
 @RedRedRe: as you get older you don’t look for tight stuff... you want chatty and willing... nevermind
  • + 1
 @geoffmann: Not that it helps much for comparison's sake as I'm the same height as you but I've been on mine for about 2 months now, including a trip out to coast and whistler and completely agree that I find the bike to be a whole level above the xxl V10. It just rolls out faster and holds a line better than everything I've ridden. I think for taller riders it really does help and I honestly notice the crazy long wheel base more than the mass of the wheels (but this is mostly in tight berms on flow trails and such where the bike is over kill anyways).
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: Oh yeah! Because everybody knows the speed comes from the bike, not the rider, for sure...
(enduro-mtb.com/en/nukeproof-mega-290-factory-review)
  • + 1
 @etga6657: we always look at bike stuff as if there was a paralell universe. You on one kind of bike in one universe and you on a slightly different kind of bike in another. Looking at things this way, there is a high chance that you on 29” Meta is a bit faster than you on 27,5” Meta. But that is irrelevant in reality because in reality it’s you against Jerry and Jerry is either faster or slower than you. In all paralrll universes.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: they already did apparently. Hes on 27.5 as a DH bike is different than a trail bike where he prefers 29. Loads of top guys had both options and stuck smaller. Like loads of the fastest guys and gals around. Plus ews champ having the option. It's down to the individual.
  • + 1
 @atrokz: I can almost grantee when Yt releases a 29 tues, Gwin will be on it.
  • + 1
 @atrokz: Gwin says he prefers riding the larger wheel as it is more like moto. I believe he said they threw some 29 wheels on a Tues and it felt off and he won't be racing with them until there is a bike that is engineered for them from the ground up.
  • + 0
 @Rubberelli: well aware of what he said. They had test mules. They race whats fastest. Danny hart wasnt faster on 29. It isnt as clear as you think. Media tries to sell bullshit like its fact and races have proven it isnt as clear as that. Which makes more sense than thinking it would be faster for everyone on every track. Looknat enduro. Even Nino was smoking everyone on a 27.5 until they made a 29 more suited to him.
  • + 1
 @atrokz: what exactly is your point? Gwin saud he prefers a 29 wheel. Obviously, any 29 prototyped is not faster than his current steed because he did not switch this season. But as soon as YT make a 29 that's faster than the Tues, then obviously Gwin will hop on that. This is what he said, not speculation.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: Rider preference/comfort zone is of course critical - If a bike just doesn't gel with the rider's body/riding style it will impact performance.

That said I think it's fair to say that assuming fit/suspension/geo work for a rider, all else being equal a 29er will be faster on a majority of tracks. Yes this is parallel universe stuff as @WAKIdesigns says, there are always too many variables in the real world.
  • + 0
 @Rubberelli: @Rubberelli: what exactly makes you think they havent tried it. Im not speculating. Im doing the opposite. Anyway. Enjoy the day.

@dontcoast I agree with your points. When that day comes it will change things. As it stands today its all over the place. I just enjoy the comical marketing.
  • + 0
 @atrokz: i believe he said they did prototype it, but one based on the Tues. He said it needs to be engineered from the ground up as a 29er to be dialed I believe.
  • + 1
 To me saying that wheel size change between 27,5 and 29 is so powerful is just a sign of zooming in a bit too much and losing the greater picture. And I’m guilty of it as well. 29” wheels have bigger gyroscopic effect, which makes them naturally more stable, but that can mean a too stable bike. They require more BB drop and longer chainstays which makes it this bit harder to lift the front wheel. Fork offsets are different. The whole geo of the bike needs to be changed.
  • + 1
 I refuse to believe anyone says 29 is as much fun as 26 or 27.5 in a bike park. Maybe on the black lines with maximum ruckus. But if you like me that like more easier stuff and "surf" down the mountain on easier trails, jumps and velodrom in less then lightspeed those big wheel will feel more sluggish. Its like skis. Me going from 1.9 meters skis to 1.7 skis with more radius made my skiing 50 times more fun.
  • - 1
 @reqq: fair enough, but I wholeheartedly refuse to believe that owners of smaller wheels are good at playing with the bike by some default. Most importantly, majority of 29” trail bikes WILL ALWAYS be more playful than any DH bike built after 2010,regardless of the wheel size. So well... I see no slope style bikes on trails or in bike parks, where are all those fun seeeking riders?
  • + 44
 "..but I think a bent crank is par for the course when smashing downhill runs day after day." -Paul

Actually, No. No it's not. I have a set of Saints that are several years old. Multiple Whistler trips (expert level riding) and countless park laps around Colorado. Zero issues. I even have a set of Carbon SixC's 2+ years old without issue. Those e13 cranks sound like garbage, at least for that bikes intended purpose.
  • + 5
 check their user reviews on crc, they dont review well
  • + 7
 I'm pretty sure the bent crank must've been from like an actual crash. not to be in defence of these cranks though I know nothing about them.
  • + 2
 Those are the base LG1 cranks (Deore level) so not comparable to Saint or SIXc. Commencal should have spec'd a slightly higher end crank on here for real abuse. The LG1+ is made of higher end alloy so might have been a better fit...
  • + 0
 really tired of reviews that make excuses for the product/company falling short. "but to be fairrr...." etc.
  • + 9
 Friend of my is on the supreme v4.2 that came with e13 cranks, both bent within 2 weeks.. His old bike had saints that were over 2 full whistler seasons old, even my zee cranks are on their 2nd full whistler season are not bent. Over 10 years of racing I've never heard anyone say it's normal for cranks to bend or be ok with it
  • + 5
 @jazzawil: I think I know that guy. Those cranks are an absolute joke. First one bent within 8 runs, no crashes, second one clipped a pedal (not even enough to actually crash). Not sure if made from butter or cheese or some kind of emulsion of the two.

Last set of cranks I bent, even in a crash, was more than 10 years ago. Since then I've mostly run Shimano and even when snagging them on stuff super hard, or casing jumps hard enough to snap rims, they've been fine.
  • + 1
 @covekid: I haven't bent or damaged the lowest tier raceface cranks and I've broken 2 saint pedals and 2 aluminum rims.
  • + 2
 yeah um no the only cranks that should bend are the steel one piece cranks on the rusty cruiser. no crank that comes on a DH race bike should be bending shy of a crash that does a lot more damage than just that.
  • + 10
 @Socket: Sorry to hear you had some crank trouble. This is certainly not the norm with our cranks and we hope you are willing to give us another shot. Sent you a DM.
  • + 3
 I've bent 3 cranks from rockstrikes while riding DH. All different brands, but no Saints.
  • + 0
 @jazzawil: im happy with zee cranks too... all ive heard from people with ethirteen is how unhappy they are with there products ei creaking and breaking all the time
  • + 39
 I find it weird to compare head to head with the Norco and not, you know, actually compare how they ride. You mentioned you also rode some other 29" DH rigs - so how does it compare to those?
  • + 2
 Ya we need a head to head of these bikes - NSMB's "first impressions" of the Norco - nsmb.com/articles/all-new-norco-aurum-hsp-dh-bike
  • + 16
 @islandforlife @heinous a full comparison of modern 29er DH bikes is in the works, including the Aurum and Commencal. Stay tuned!
  • + 6
 @brianpark: great - that paragraph about the Norco reads as oddly critical without any real comparison.
  • + 34
 The comments on this review show the value of winning races. 3 WC wins and suddenly it's 'the best bike' and everyone wants one. Including me.
  • - 2
 Remember the hype about the Session when Gwin was riding them?

Not even sure they exist anymore..
  • + 1
 @t1000: lol scroll all the way up and open your eyes
  • + 27
 I really dig the new V4 platform (+ the new Supreme SX).
Would love to trow a foot over it as Ive never ridden a 29er before.

Commencal is doing a lot of things right - hats off!
  • + 47
 nooo we're supposed to hate 29ers
  • + 6
 no sx in 2019 !? feels bad, would love to get one, I just dont have the money yet
  • + 43
 How does it climb?
  • + 13
 @chyu: Not like a goat.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: they just brought out the clash to fill that void, don't worry they got you covered buddy
  • + 6
 @lozzerbiker: i know, i just like the sx much better, the clash is just another splitpivot 6 + inch bike
  • + 1
 There sure are a lot of 27.5 parts on sale right now.
  • - 1
 There’s no room for a water bottle!
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: think the clash replaced it
  • + 9
 @Wilovanny: bottles are for infants and babies
  • + 1
 @sevensixtwo: really where?
  • + 1
 No water bottle mount!!! Shucks I would have gotten this bike if it had one lol.
  • + 1
 I'm saving for my hover bike. Tired of actually riding, maybe I want to take a nap while blasting down the mountain.
  • + 1
 @lozzerbiker: In the press release it says that the Clash replaces the Meta SX. Not Supreme SX, but it is indeed not included in the 2019 range which is quite strange. To only keep it for a single year sounds like bad business.
  • + 1
 @Startgas: oh fair enough, the supreme SX looked so sweet too
  • + 17
 Well written review, but shouldn't someone who's put a lot of miles on DH sleds, and at least some miles on 29" DH bikes be writing these reviews?
Not much to compare against here, and feels like a lack of experience may be contributing to the "WOW" factor.
  • + 1
 I had the same though but at least he openly admits it in the article. The review would carry a lot more weight if he had spent more time riding other DH bikes prior to or during the test time for a better baseline.
  • + 70
 @Abacall I've been riding five 29" downhill bikes for the last few months: forthcoming reviews include Trek, Cube, Norco, Banshee, and later in the year Saracen, Intense and NS. I'd argue that I have ridden more 29 DH bikes than anybody else in the world.

I did say in the article it was the first one I rode, and had to wait for the others t arrive to make a comparison, I had this Supreme since December last year.

Thanks, Paul.
  • + 17
 @paulaston: well that should shut them up!
  • + 1
 @paulaston: may i know which section of Pila you were talking about? Just raced nats there and it'd be cool to know
  • + 4
 @paulaston: "I'd argue that I have ridden more 29 DH bikes than anybody else in the world."

Ha, that's kind of rad! Hard to argue with that.
  • + 1
 @paulaston: how do you like them, in general, compared with the 27.5 crop?
  • + 3
 @paulaston: Right on Paul. That wasn't clear in the article. Thanks for clearing that up and the review.
  • + 17
 Commencal - PLEASE MAKE A 130mm TRAVEL VERSION and you can take my money.
  • + 1
 they stop the sx -so your wish will probably never come true
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: why was the sx stopped?
  • + 4
 @Shimanosaint0097: i dont know it just does not appear in the 2019 lineup, the space is probably filled by the clash, which is a lot more simple (and boring)
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: It would be interesting to see a Supreme built up as an enduro bike with a shorter shock and shorter forks.... maybe 150mm travel F+R. If you could get the geo to work it would be an awesome bike.
  • + 2
 @Shimanosaint0097: they brought out the clash instead
  • + 2
 mmmm shame
  • - 1
 @fartymarty: you can buy it as a frame only (with or without shock). you could also set it up hard and use just 6 inches, it is fairly low so it should ride fine. weightdifference of lyrik vs. pike is also not the biggest of deals
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: Yeah I did see on the Commencal www that you could go frame only. My biggest concern would be the STA and whether it would still be too slack to climb. I suppose an angle set may help but then the BB maybe too low.... Would be a killer bike though if you had some big terrain.
  • + 1
 I think I read somewhere that high pivots don't pedal that well, so that may be a reason for them to stick to a low pivot on the Meta TR (140/130).
I do own the Meta, and it is an amazing bike, and definitely feels like a bike with way more than 130 on the back.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: i think if you make the rear harder the dynamic seatangle should be ok, if not, you can still ad a -0.5 cup. bb should be ok, after all the rear does not sit as deep in travel as if setup normaly. but its hard if you can not try. honestly i do not have the terrain, but since fitting big tires cushcore coil etc to my bike trailriding is already not the most fun anymore. on the otherside the bike is still no mini dh bike.nowerdays i just ride my steelhardtail with big fork and fast tires on trails and dirts. for #backtothepark this bike would be great
  • + 1
 They already did. There's even a British racing green version Big Grin
  • + 0
 @fartymarty: it’s called a meta ! Lol
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: it's too much bike for me as well hence my original comment on a 130mm version.
  • + 3
 @Matt115lamb: The Meta doesn't have the high pivot / idler.

@pakleni: They should pedal fine with an idler
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Or you could just buy an endure bike with proper geometry?
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: question is how do you get the antisquat in the right place with the idler?
  • + 2
 @ibishreddin: a larger or smaller idler will change the AS. It is going to be around 100% as the chain pulls close to the pivot.
  • + 17
 Ok, but how does it climb??
  • + 40
 And no water bottle mount? WTF?
  • + 1
 Like a goat i guess...
  • + 7
 @mikelevy: #makehydrationpacksgreatagain
  • + 15
 Its great that someone has made a bike that isnt light, isnt carbon, has a low unsprung mass, long rear end and is affordable. Well done Commencal.
  • + 4
 ...and is not only competitive, but arguably flat out faster than most (all?) of the competition.

#saynotoplastic
  • + 13
 What's more impressive is that nobody here has complained about the weight yet!
  • + 3
 @paulaston: and since when did Commencal ever make a light bike?
Gee Atherton's best years were on a Commencal which was well known as the heaviest bike in the race paddock.
Chasing light weight DH bikes is utterly ridiculous
  • + 3
 @paulaston: 17 kg does not seem so heavy for a bike like this IMHO
  • + 4
 @paulaston: 37 lbs for an XL AL 29 DH sled? That's featherlight.
  • + 1
 They are getting popular just now... the ones that people are riding are a fair throw from 37lb, but at WC level when people are racing 32lb bikes, then 37lb is heavy. Have a normal session 29er build and compare it to a normal commy 29er! The commy isnt light. Personally I like my bike between 36 and 38lb.
  • + 1
 @betsie: what WC rider is riding a 32 lb bike?
  • + 9
 I can only say that I was riding my Antidote Carbon Jack, following my friend on Session 29, I was highly possibly braking in same spots he did and he still rode away... off course he is fast as fuk, but so were some dues I rode the same trail on trail bikes. He just fkng disappeared. Basterd. And his big wheels. Two days ago I rode a high pivot Antidote Dark Matter and again, what the hell... eats chunk for breakfast, even under braking. So high pivot + 29" wheels must be easily fkng up everything out there, Santa Cruzes, Intenses, Sessions, etc... @Protour #rightallalong
  • + 9
 Protour, peace be upon him
  • + 2
 I too was thinking of ProTour, especially while reading the 'Braking' paragraph.
  • + 6
 I can confirm everything the reviewer says here. I own both the Supreme DH 27.5 and 29 versions. The 27.5 is now for sale. The big wheels monster truck everything and make you faster, got my first expert win on the bike a few weeks ago. It is a handful in tight corners but that is missing the point. Best DH race bike I have ever ridden - period!
  • + 1
 I own the 27.5, how do they compare? Is the 29er that different? I am loving the 27, and I can relate to a lot of what Paul has described on the article
  • + 4
 @Caiokv: The 29 rolls over everything much better. Faster everywhere except tight corners. Great race bike, not so great park bike.
  • + 3
 Serious question, how did we ever think 650b was better for dh oriented riding styles? I'm not being a dick, I'm just a trail/all mountain rider who has never considered anything but 29ers (I always demo 650bs to try and change my mind) To me it just seems...painfully obvious that big wheels would roll over stuff better and quicker. Offroad 4x4s have huge wheels right? Whats the rationale behind 650b??
  • + 6
 @cole-bikeva: I , am many riders like me, really enjoy the slightly increased speeds of 650b while maintaining the 'playfulness' (way over used descriptor) or maneuverability compared to a 29" wheel. I am not against 29" wheels and may end up with a trail 29" down the road as they progress. However, currently I ride 650b on both my trail/enduro and DH bikes. My DH bike has hands down better than my previous 26" bikes. Sam Hill seems to be doing just fine on 650b in a field with plenty 29" wheels. Your comment on off-road trucks is relevant. However, take a Baja truck. The have found a nice balance of diameter. Not Monster truck size, but bigger than the average street truck as well. All boils town to right tool for the right job AND the user/operator/rider.
  • + 2
 I want your job.
  • + 1
 @cole-bikeva: Because I guess a bike is so much more than its wheel size. At the lower end of the market, bigger wheels mean even greater weight. I'd far rather have a sorted and not too heavy 650b bike with great suspension than an even heavier bigger wheeled bike. In certain conditions, a 26" hardtail with sorted geo and a modern fork will still hold its own. Ride more and worry less about wheel size.
  • + 9
 shame it doesnt have a 170mm x 12mm ultimate boost rear axle
  • + 2
 Yeah I think I'll wait for next year's model so I don't end up with an obsolete frame.
  • + 5
 Even worse is that Commencal have given it replaceable dropouts - on the both sides, so they may offer different axle options in the future.
Did they not get the memo?

You're supposed to make your bike as incompatible as possible!
  • + 6
 So Pierron's secret is out! Kudos to Commencal for beating the big boys to a race ready 29er DH bike for relatively good money.
  • + 4
 If the bike is falling off from chairlifts then that would have to be rider error? Or the bike is desperately trying to tell you to go bigger? I don't get it, how is this possible?
  • + 12
 Or is it because its a 29er? (I chose my size and now I'm being a dick about it) Wink
  • + 18
 It's not really rider error ... Those long bikes (lets say 1300+ wheelbase) are crap when it comes to mounting them on chairlifts. My bike fell of chairlift as it hit the ground on upper station. Bike parks will need to consider bikes getting longer.
  • + 4
 @Buggz0r: so it must be the front wheel/behind chair loading system and the departure and approach angles on the landing platforms. This makes sense. However changing the platforms angles might not make sense as this would make it more dangerous in the winter when it's uploading skiers. Maybe a pivoting mechanism on the bike carrier? Changing platform angles but have another add on structure for winter? Rambling thoughts, will shut up now.
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69: Well ... Mine is 27.5, so wheel size aint a problem. Smile
It happened to me with loading system you mentioned. I think that if mounts are moved a bit higher there should not be a problem any more. Anyway that happened on one of two mounts that were on the chair. So I just needed to be careful when choosing my chair lift line Smile
  • + 3
 Yes I’m running 1320 w/b and and chairlifts are a pain...first world problems hay! The new ones in Morzine are a lot better and don’t suffer this issue @Buggz0r:
  • + 2
 @PB-J: 1320? what you riding? a bus?
  • + 1
 Yeah I have a 1320mm Nicolai G16 and keeping it on chairlifts is a total pain in the ass. I bent 2 mech hangers in a week (they're not cheap to replace either) before I just removed the mech and chain when I'm just smashing out bike park runs.
Bike trailers have similar problems.
Trust me, it starts to get really fu**ing annoying, especially when the lift attendant is shouting at me to let go of the bike and let it hang freely - when I KNOW it will fall off (again) if I let go
  • + 1
 @IllestT: you must be doing something wrong as My g16 is whole 40mm on yours and didn’t have any problems in France, they seem really good as I always told them it was a huge bike before I go on. I did rock a French flap on my helmet due to words cup win so maybe that was what done it for me, but I’m the Uk bike trailer are a pain I give you that and most uplift drivers don’t care.
  • + 1
 @mccoy: to be fair I've never taken it on French chairlifts, mostly Italian, Austrian and Swiss. Maybe the French are one step ahead!
  • + 0
 @Boardlife69: In case anyone wants to read the more technical details of chairlift bike racks liftblog.com/2016/07/01/hauling-bikes-how-far-weve-come/#more-23830 As @Buggz0r mentioned when that happens its only usually with Alpim's rack that that happens with. Its completely over complicated and I've had a friend whose bike fell off since he didn't shove his bike quite all the way into the wheel receiver so I would blame bikes falling off on these racks partially on shitty engineering and partially on human error.
  • + 0
 @Boardlife69: In case anyone wants to read the more technical details of chairlift bike racks liftblog.com/2016/07/01/hauling-bikes-how-far-weve-come/#more-23830 As @Buggz0r mentioned when that happens its only usually with Alpim's rack that that happens with. Its completely over complicated and I've had a friend whose bike fell off since he didn't shove his bike quite all the way into the wheel receiver so I would blame bikes falling off on these racks partially on shitty engineering and partially on human error.
  • + 0
 @Boardlife69: In case anyone wants to read the more technical details of chairlift bike racks liftblog.com/2016/07/01/hauling-bikes-how-far-weve-come/#more-23830 As @Buggz0r mentioned when that happens its only usually with Alpim's rack that that happens with. Its completely over complicated and I've had a friend whose bike fell off since he didn't shove his bike quite all the way into the wheel receiver so I would blame bikes falling off on these racks partially on shitty engineering and partially on human error.
  • + 0
 @Boardlife69: In case anyone wants to read the more technical details of chairlift bike racks liftblog.com/2016/07/01/hauling-bikes-how-far-weve-come/#more-23830 As @Buggz0r mentioned when that happens its only usually with Alpim's rack that that happens with. Its completely over complicated and I've had a friend whose bike fell off since he didn't shove his bike quite all the way into the wheel receiver so I would blame bikes falling off on these racks partially on shitty engineering and partially on human error.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: In case anyone wants to read the more technical details of chairlift bike racks As @Buggz0r mentioned when that happens its only usually with Alpim's rack that that happens with. Its completely over complicated and I've had a friend whose bike fell off since he didn't shove his bike quite all the way into the wheel receiver so I would blame bikes falling off on these racks partially on shitty engineering and partially on human error.
  • + 2
 @vtracer: Bold move with the triple post Cotton. Let's see how it works out for you.
  • + 1
 @OriginalDonk: I got auto banned for the quadruple post and it took a while for the moderators to reinstate me, guess I'll try not to do that again
  • + 4
 "....and as a complete bike with a high performance / low-cost component selection for only $5,399. That inventory sold out almost overnight..."

I thought downhill bikes were dead??
  • + 2
 inventory of not many bikes maybe?
  • + 1
 Nay! Wait till 26” Freeride Bikes come back as the new trend...
  • + 3
 Wish companies would ditch the e13 cranks. So far to date I have heard more bad things about those cranks on any bike than any other part in recent years. No one get's it right 100% of the time though, I still love their rims, hubs, chainguides, cassettes, and overall company/customer support.
  • + 6
 " may make you ride too fast for your own safety.."

Thats a world cup winning bike right there.
  • + 1
 I really think any sort of back to back testing for downhill bikes that are as racer orientated as the Norco and Commencal are should really really really come with some lap times. Throw a Mondraker Summum in there as well since it also appears to be a career rejuvenating beast.
  • + 4
 468mm chainstay at sag going to over 500mm when riding. Long chainstay seem to be the ticket for a fast bike
  • - 26
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:31) (Below Threshold)
 Quite frankly your comment holds zero validity in my eyes due to the fact that you are from Arkansas. You may have more clout on a forum about something like ancestry.com or a website about dating your cousin. Hope this was helpful! Smile
  • + 5
 @Joelukens00: absolute wanker you are wow...
  • + 2
 @andydhteam: Agreed, most of his comments are extremely childish
  • + 2
 @Joelukens00: You obviously don't know about Northwest Arkansas and how it's a huge riding destination now.
  • + 1
 @casman86: dont bother man dudes just stays at home smoking grass and thinks he has the best life.. guys got no hope
  • - 1
 @Joelukens00:

You sir. Have made me laugh multiple times today. Whats even funnier is people taking your shitposting seriously. Keep it up dude.
  • + 6
 Dear santa ...
  • + 20
 Cruz?
  • + 2
 Nope, you've been naughty.
  • + 2
 It's clearly the best bike on the world cup circus. Head and shoulders above the rest the way it allows its riders to attack. I would love to ride/own this bike it looks amazing.
  • - 13
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:36) (Below Threshold)
 Miss me with your opinion driven comments. You are probably a fascist. sad!
  • + 1
 E13 components are total trash, unfortunately. Their rims do not hold up to any abuse, and fail in bizarre ways. This isn't the first I've heard of their cranks completely falling apart either. On the other hand, I've heard great things about these Commencals. I bet this thing hauls AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
  • + 1
 Lol. How did the crank fall apart? Me and my buddies have had awesome luck with their rims and wheels (as did this reviewer as there was no issues written about). In fact he praised the hub (their base level hub) and cassette. I had some hub issues with E13 years ago, but their components the past few years have been spot on for me. I've had way worse luck with DT, Mavic and Spank rims the past few years...
  • + 2
 @covekid: the cranks just bend if you look at them funny. When I emailed e13 about a 2 day old crank bending on a heavy landing, their response was basically "no they don't". Few days later, bent the other side.
  • + 3
 @Socket: Fair enough. I haven't ever ran any of their lowest level cranks (what are on this Commencal) but I've ran their TRS+ and LG1+ cranks and they have been great. I've bent Descendats a few times but the Plus level E13 were perfect. Plus level E13 cranks are comparable to Saint/XT cranks in terms of aluminum used...These E13 LG1 would be similar to a Truvativ Hussefelt.
  • + 4
 @kmg0 sorry to hear you had some trouble with our rims. I sent you a DM so we can get you taken care of.
  • + 1
 Their dropper is very nice and reliable, especially the remote.
  • + 1
 @OliChando: Their dropper actually looks cool. E13's warranty response was actually really good.
  • + 1
 You broke the site lol
  • + 3
 I'll never be good enough to fully get all out of the bike that I should, but I'm going to get me one. Lol
  • - 8
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:40) (Below Threshold)
 Ya you probably aren't good enough tbh
  • + 3
 Commencal is on fire. Seriously considering getting a custom Meta AM 29 in October.
  • + 2
 same, but I cannot decide between meta and clash.
  • + 0
 Nukeproof Enduro 29er looks great too.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Is that the Mega u r referring to?
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: It sure does. Going to andorra in August and renting a supreme dh 29. I wish they had meta 29s for rent. I want a bike that I can bring to the highest mountaintop and ride down on natural trails. Love the Alpes and natural terrain, not so much into the smooth skate park trails I see so much of in North America.
  • + 1
 @dumr666: For me it depends in what type of trails you ride. If you ride mostly park the clash is better. But if you ride high alpine rough trails the meta 29 is the way to go in my opinion.
  • - 1
 @beerandbikes: huh, I gety ass shaken so much by Scandinavian rocks and roots that I do like smooth tracks when I can get them. So many tracks here are just like choking on a dick. I guess I like mix the most like KGB in Hafjell. And if it must be bumpy it better look like Illenberga in Hafjell or Czarna Gora in Poland.
  • + 2
 @beerandbikes: I ride both quite a lot. Current enduro bike always suffers to much and I don't mind heavier bike with more travel.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the pictures, looks like they were taken up at "Base NATO" in Finale...was just there a month ago. Amazing area to ride, started many laps by the graffiti buildings at the top.
  • + 3
 Whoever mounted that rear tire and didn't match up the tire and rim decals should hang their head in shame
  • + 4
 ....no room for a water bottle?
  • + 0
 Add a floating brake mount and I'll be throwing my money at Commencal. Having ridden a high pivot bike back in the day, I am not a fan of brake squat. Having a DH bike turn into a hardtail under heavy braking is not my idea of an ideal suspension design. Sure, any pro rider could win races on this bike. But I'm not that pro rider... I want always active suspension. My 9 year old canfield Jedi has lots of rearward travel and an idler... but is short in the cockpit and not slack enough compared to most modern geos. Hmmm. Bike lust is strong this season.
  • + 2
 i like the idea of a hpp 4 bar, so you can tune the antisquat without a floating brake. the design of 77designs looks very good; you lose the low mounted pull linkage tghough.
  • + 3
 Well what is the wheel base of bike under full comression? You would have to compress fork too!
  • + 20
 Are you the new Protour?
  • + 3
 1256 mm. "Suspension design", paragraph 2.
  • + 3
 I can't see ever buying a 29" DH bike, I'm not a racer. I'm not even fast! I like the stiff 26" wheels, call me crazy.
  • - 9
flag SnowshoeRider4Life (Jul 30, 2018 at 8:43) (Below Threshold)
 29 on boost has the same stiffness as 26 non boost.

That being said, ill take 27.5 dh wheels. on boost, they're stiffer than 26 and 29, and the bottom bracket is below the axles unlike 26", thus lowering the center of gravity, which means MOAR corners.
  • - 3
 @nojzilla: sorry thinking more trail bikes there but with 29er wheels, the flange spacings are greater than 26" to give them the stiffness. alot of the 26" wheeled bikes are 135, except for some late 26" dh bikes
  • + 5
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: this is the worst comment I've ever read on here. You have bought the marketing jargon left right and centre.



*its not really the worst
  • + 1
 @russthedog: the marketing jargon is actually true though. why because science, and math unfortunately. ive never liked boost 148, why not just use 150? Boost 110 though is why 29 and 27.5 has become so successful.
  • + 1
 is there any reason or advantage of having a brake mount in the position this is? surley it would make more sense, and look better if it was closer to the seatstay/swingarm?
  • - 8
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:37) (Below Threshold)
 Miss me with your opinionated bullshit. I bet you are a HILLBILLY
  • + 2
 Replaceable dropouts are nice in case threads get stripped or hub standards change. Its cheaper and easier to manufacture if the dropout mount is shared with brake adapter.
  • + 0
 Interesting how much chain growth there is on the bottom section of chain. I wonder if this will create a problem maxing out the derailleur cages on trail bikes with high suspension pivots?
  • + 2
 The bike must be really good. Every commencal wc rider is doin pretty well this year!!
  • + 1
 "I think going as fast as you can everywhere is the most fun part anyhow"
This sentence says it all. I've had this bike since May and love it more everyday.
  • + 3
 It’s a rock crushing, baby head smashing DH missle!
  • - 8
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:53) (Below Threshold)
 I don't know who you think you are but I take threats of child abuse very seriously. If you are openly making comments about "Smashing baby heads" that is an immediate red flag for me. All I'm saying is that you better be prepared for a talk with your local law enforcement if you are going to keep saying twisted things like that.
  • + 2
 @paulaston still riding the Catalyst pedals regularly? Any new thoughts on them since your first review?
  • + 2
 Not @paulaston here, but here's what I think as a regular user: 13 years I ride clipless. Just before I bought the Catalyst pedals, I ordered a pair of Shimano Saint clipless pedals. I thought I would ride in the winter and work my technique with the catalysts and put the Saints for the spring enduro races, and especially the Megavalanche.
Result: I did all the races with the Catalyst pedals, including especially the megavalanche, and my clipless pedals are always in the box, never mounted, never ridden.
  • + 3
 @Agleck7 I'm still riding them and they are my first choice every time. I actually just got another three pairs delivered for consistency across test bikes. Since very recently, they are being made in the UK and come with longer 8 and 10mm pins as standard. I have been riding the same pair for two years on most bikes and the bearings are still great, the only problem I have had is knocking out a few pins along with the threads so they can't be replaced. The latest version also has extra pins on the left and right sides of the pedal.

The most important thing is to get the right shoe. Many shoes have a pre-curved convex sole which means you slide around in the middle of the pedal and don't get great contact with the pins. Five Ten Freerider Pro's are the best I have found to date, they are nearly completely flat from new and bed in quickly. If you have a good contact here, I think power output, grip, and balance is all improved.
  • + 1
 @paulaston: thanks for the reply and really interesting to hear your thoughts. I rode them for a season on my trail bike with Freerider Pros (never tried them on the DH), but went back to Vaults. In my experience it seemed like the concave outweighed the longer platform. But sounds like the changes you mention might tip the scale.
  • + 1
 @Agleck7: I ride them with a pair of Adidas Crosstrail Protect (Five Ten Stealth totally flat sole) and although they certainly don't offer as much feel of contact as the Freerider Pro, the arch support and extra protection are great.
  • + 2
 26” Supreme Park 4lyfe - might buy into this whole dumbf*ck industry malarkey and finally run a 24” rear wheel tho
  • + 1
 Same here, AND a medium at 5'11. Don't really see the point of a DH bike that's Soo long it's a slug in corners
  • + 3
 @nojzilla: word. 99% of the clowns here dont even race DH, they just ride park and wear matching kits like theres so much dumbf*ckery everywhere
  • + 3
 when will the 29er supreme sx come out? i'm waiting!
  • - 7
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:38) (Below Threshold)
 Good for you! Patience is a good trait! Especially when you have no money to actually buy anything other than the basic essentials to live. Peasant!
  • + 1
 That brake mount though... :\
Not sure why they wouldn't have just mounted it to the stay. Everything else about the bike looks sick though!
  • + 1
 Mounting the brake up on the seat stay would probably interfere with how the stays and dropouts are designed to have flex for traction and control
  • + 1
 No no no, this bike is in the needs of a pull shock and 225mm brake disks...
  • + 1
 Try to make progress depend on you and not on the bike you have, that has always been my principle
  • + 1
 #DeathTo29ers

Every video about brake influence on suspension is... fake, because the wheel is not rolling on obstacles.
  • + 2
 Saving my pennies for this rig
  • - 13
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:58) (Below Threshold)
 Did you mean another word that includes a p,e,n,i and s? because you are probably gonna have to start renting that out in order to afford this bike
  • + 0
 @Joelukens00: nice comment you jelous twat... your the only one who is going to rent out there penis for this bike. Why? Because your stupid with your money or your probably married with kids(if she hasnt left you by now) or you go out drinking everynight, Im not married i dont have kids, i dont drink and i have a well paying job and i can afford this bike Smile . Grow up, you don't know other peoples situation before making assumptions about them because you look like a dickhead.
  • - 12
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 20:54) (Below Threshold)
 @andydhteam: LMAO I am 18 and wildin out. I don’t have to rent it out I got hella thots on it already and they the ones paying me. I’m so sorry you are single and not going out and having fun. But at least you have a really cool career! Lots of love!
  • + 2
 @Joelukens00: im not single bro...and im having lots of fun.. im currently travelling the world. You got a lot of leasons to learn kid, start showing some respect it goes a long way.
  • - 6
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 23:49) (Below Threshold)
 @andydhteam: I’m not going to start showing respect to a crusty career having prick like you. By “traveling the world” you probably mean you are a roaming vagabond with street corners being the closest thing for you to call home. I am honestly praying for you with my Rosary right now. I pray that He can find you a path to a life beyond poverty.
  • + 1
 @Joelukens00: keep smoking that grass ya dickhead!! Its working great for you, ya brain dead peasant!!!
  • - 5
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 31, 2018 at 0:31) (Below Threshold)
 @andydhteam: The saddest part of this is that you are getting so upset about some kid trolling you on a bike website. Do you really not have better things to do while you are “Travelling the world”? You must not have many hobbies.
  • + 1
 Man, I remember when a 67 degree head angle was the bizz. 63.5 on a 29er is hella slack!
  • + 1
 Why would you not line up the front tire correctly when you did it with the rear one? Why tho?
  • - 6
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:42) (Below Threshold)
 Just because you don't think it's lined up doesn't mean I don't either. You need to learn that your opinion does not overpower those of everyone else. Just stop you immature bottom feeder.
  • + 1
 I don't get how the wheelbase can become shorter when bottomed out, as we can see the wheel rolling backwards ?
  • + 12
 Fork
  • + 2
 Not looked into this bike specifically to say exactly how much but most will follow a rearward then forward axle path as they follow a constant arc.

It might be later into the travel but I would expect this to be the same - it is probably at its longest around 3/4 into the stroke before getting shorter again.
  • + 3
 @issse: Two things are going on. Super slack head angles cause the front wheel to move toward the center of the bike at full compression, which dramatically shortens the wheelbase. Also, the rearward axle path caused by the Commencal's high-pivot swingarm is exaggerated in the early portion of the suspension's travel, but does not continue to extend much in the second half of the travel.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: Thanks, I never thought about slack head angles like that, I just focused on the seatstays expanding the wheelbase, much like on a Zerode !
  • + 2
 OMG someone line up the wheel/tire logo on the front!!!
  • + 2
 Doesnt have to be carbon fiber to be fast ????????????????
  • - 7
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:49) (Below Threshold)
 You need a lot more than a carbon bike to be fast my friend. Including a MUCH higher IQ. Sorry mate, sometimes it is just like that in this brutal world
  • + 1
 Interesting that Paul prefers this over the session.
  • + 1
 Why does a European bike cost more in Euros than it does in dollars?
  • + 1
 Great bang for your buck. It’s a beautiful set up Drool
  • + 1
 looks DAF but there is just one little tiny problem... its a 29" DH bike
  • + 1
 I hope high pivot bikes are the future, they're brilliant!
  • - 10
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:49) (Below Threshold)
 Well you sure aren't
  • + 1
 We need better brakes now!
  • + 2
 but how does it climb?
  • - 7
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:54) (Below Threshold)
 Sir this bike is meant for downhill riding. It has a lot of suspension (that's the part that goes up and down) to go over big obstacles! To answer your question it would climb very poorly because of these downhill oriented features. Hope this helped!
  • + 2
 27.5 ain't dead
  • + 1
 Not yet, but it's comming.
  • + 1
 At least until Guerilla Gravity comes out with a DH bike.
  • + 0
 How are we supposed to brake when riding single pivot and still getting grips?

Just grab a handful of front brake.
  • - 4
flag Joelukens00 (Jul 30, 2018 at 13:45) (Below Threshold)
 you just squeeze the lever and then the hydraulic fluid travels through the brake line and squeezes the pads by using pistons which press onto the brake rotor attached to the spinning wheel. This process creates friction and henceforth thermal energy creating a slowing sensation for both the rider and bicycle alike. Let me know if you need more clarification!
  • + 1
 Agreed. Touch the rear brake on bike park braking bumps and the rear of this bike will be bouncing all over the place.
  • + 2
 @dfiler: have you seen the braking bumps on a WC track? You can hide pumpkins in some of them
  • + 1
 @bman33: Yes. I've seen the braking bumps.
  • + 1
 I miss my Balfa BB7
  • + 0
 When is the e bike version comming out?
  • + 3
 If they bring out an e-bike version I'll be at the loading dock in Andorra waiting for them to arrive. Adding a motor to this frame layout would be tough, though, as the linkage and shock are exactly where you need to place the motor and battery.
  • - 1
 @paulaston: Well if they need any help gettting e-version built I am happy to help out, just got a Shimano steps motor on ebay for £150 so I am half way there, WHO should I speak to to get a back end?
  • + 1
 @paulaston: I'be next in line at the loading dock.
  • - 1
 Thats not a good review, he said that he hasnt been on a dh bike for a while how can he compare than?
  • + 6
 You didn't read it properly, it was the first bike to be delivered, and had to leave it in the garage for a few months waiting for the others to arrive to compare them. I have had five 29 DH bikes on test now for a few months.
  • - 2
 Dollar Euro Price difference is cool - NOT
  • + 7
 USD prices are subject to added sales tax depending on state.

EUR prices always include VAT/TVA, so the prices will be comparable.
  • + 4
 @paulaston: hi Paul, how do the pedals work? They are the "pedaling innovations" ones, right?
  • + 1
 @vhdh666: Not @paulaston here, but here's what I think as a regular user: For 13 years I rode clipless. Just before I bought the Catalyst pedals, I ordered a pair of Shimano Saint clipless pedals. I thought I would ride in the winter and work my technique with the catalysts and put the Saints for the spring enduro races, and especially the Megavalanche.
Result: I did all the races with the Catalyst pedals, including especially the megavalanche, and my clipless pedals are always in the box, never mounted, never ridden, for sale.
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