First Ride: Bold Linkin Trail

May 5, 2015 at 6:21
by Paul Aston  
Bold Linkin Trail test


It was clear to see where Bold's inspiration for their 130mm travel bike came from while driving around Lac Neuchâtel to Lengnau, then passing through Biel, the town that produces Rolex, Breitling, Omega, and other things of typical Swiss precision. The new company is clear in saying that they don't want to compete with the value brands or big guns out there - they're purely focussed on creating their best machine rather than backtracking to a price-point or competing against massive buying power. Bold's new Linkin Trail 29er is expensive, but they're not offering any apologies for that, and they're aiming to create something a bit different here. And different it certainly is.

The official launch of the Linkin Trail will happen this coming weekend at the Solothurn Bike Days festival, with the website opening at the same time, but I was able to get some pre-release seat time on the bike in order to offer some early opinions. Bold are initially concentrating on the Swiss market to start with, but they do plan to expand across Europe and then on to global sales and partnerships at a later date.



Linkin Trail Details

• Intended use: XC / trail
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Full carbon frame
• IST - Internal Suspension Technology
• 439mm chain stay length
• 68.5° head angle w/ 130mm fork
• Weight: 26lb 6oz
• Colors: matte carbon w/ red, white or turquoise detail
• Sizes: small, medium, large
• Price: 8455 CHF / 9082 USD (Race Day model shown)
boldcycles.com




Bold Cycles LTD
There's clearance for both 29" and some 27.5+ tires.
Bold Cycles LTD

Frame Design

The frame is constructed from carbon using an EPS construction method. A polystyrene mandrel allows the interior of the carbon to be controlled (mandrel shrinks as the carbon has been cured then removed) to shape the cross-section of the tubes. Bold haven't scrimped on carbon and made the main frame, seat and chain stays from this material. The shock is hidden inside the frame's seat tube and down tube junction, allowing clean lines, a low centre of gravity and less influence from the shock and pivot placement across varying frame sizes. All cable routing is internal, and intake ports in the head tube allow air to flow through the frame and exit from ports in the plastic down tube and shock covers, something that Bold says helps to cool the shock, although it's fair to question just how much difference this actually makes. Bold have chosen a Boost 148mm rear axle to allow extra space for 27.5+ size tire clearance and improve rigidity for 29" wheels. An injection moulded chain stay guard has a tab to prevent chain suck, metal protection for the carbon close to the chainring isn't needed and Bold didn't have to compromise the carbon lay up in this area. Last but not least, there's plenty of room for a bottle cage.
Bold Cycles LTD

Bold Cycles LTD
More clean lines, with direct-mount caliper fitting for 180mm rotors.
Bold Cycles LTD
The small tab on the chain stay guard is designed to prevent chain suck.



Bold Cycles LTD
The Linkin Trail uses a four-bar layout with a short rocker to drive the internally mounted shock.


Bold Cycles LTD
Looking down on the massive shock housing and bottom bracket area.
Bold Cycles LTD
This cutaway shows how the shock fits neatly inside the frame.

Suspension Design

The IST (Internal Suspension Technology) positions the shock inside the frame, with it being driven by a short link, and this also allowed Bold to create their desired kinematic as they could use a much shorter link than conventional designs. Bold say the kinematic is slightly regressive up to the sag point for small bump sensitivity, and then linear through the rest of the stroke until the final 20mm of travel when it ramps up for big hits. Unfortunately this shock position means that an internally routed dropper post can't be used.


The bike is designed around a custom DT Swiss 313 shock that measures 200mm x 50mm. The shock, along with the DT Swiss OPM fork, can be controlled using the O.D.L. (Open. Drive. Lock) lever mounted on the handlebar. This allows on the fly adjustment similar to Scott's Twinloc system but with a prettier, slightly more ergonomic lever. 'Lock' is a true lockout mode, and 'Drive' is designed for trail situations, and 'Open' for downhill riding.


Accessing the shock is made simple by removing the plastic down tube protector/cover that's attached by two M3 bolts. From here you can adjust the air pressure, the cable tension for the O.D.L. system and the rebound. Reaching the rebound adjuster is a little tricky, but it gets easier with a little practice. The shock has 40 clicks of rebound to play with, from fast to "is this actually rebounding?" A plastic sag indicator is included, which clips in place of the top shock mount cover - simply line up the markers for desired sag amounts.

Bold Cycles LTD
Remove the plastic cap and pop this sag indicator in to the frame. Jump on the bike and line up the marker on the shock mount with the lines on the indicator.
Bold Cycles LTD
The de-constructed top link and 3D printed samples. These pivot bearings are the same as you find in a BB30 bottom bracket.

Bold Cycles LTD
The O.D.L. system simultaneously changes front and rear suspension modes on the fly.
Bold Cycles LTD
The shock is easy to access. The plastic shock cover doubles as a down tube protector is easily removed via two 3mm allen key bolts. The custom shock valve is easy to reach. The rebound adjuster is more difficult to locate, but after some fiddling you get use to it.


Components

Specifications
Release Date June 2015
Price $9043
Travel 130mm
Rear Shock DT Swiss X313 custom
Fork DT Swiss OPM130, custom
Headset Cane Creek 110
Cassette SRAM XX1 10-42
Crankarms Race Face Next SL, 175mm
Bottom Bracket BB Race Face Cinch BB92-30
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1
Chain SRAM XX1
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1
Handlebar Race Face Next 35mm, 10mm riser, 740mm
Stem Race Face Turbine, 35mm clamp, 40 / 50 / 60mm
Grips Race Face Half Nelson
Brakes SRAM Guide RS, gray
Wheelset DT Swiss Spline XMC 1200 29, Boost 148
Tires Onza Ibex 29 x 2.25, RC255a, FRC 120, Kevlar
Seat WTB Volt, custom design
Seatpost Rock Shox Reverb


Bold Cycles LTD
The Race Days model comes with this new XMC1200 carbon wheelset from DT Swiss


The Linkin will be offered in three models called the Sick Day, Early Bird and Race Day. The questionably named Sick Day comes in a 27.5+ version with 2.8" WTB Trailblazer tires. I was lucky enough to ride the flagship model. This machine is no-holds-barred, with DT Swiss suspension and their new carbon XMC 1200 wheelset, XX1 gearing, and a Race Face Next SL carbon crankset and bar/stem combo. Bold have even spec'd a Cane Creek 110 headset in an area where many manufacturers will try and cut back the budget. Pre-ride we changed the stock Onza Ibis 2.25" tires for chunkier 2.4 versions to suit the drenched rocky and rooty trails we were heading for. With these bigger tires (with tubes) my test bike in a large size weighed in at 26lb 6oz. Bold have attended to the small details, with a custom branded WTB Volt saddle, and their own allen key seat clamp with routing for the dropper post housing. Customers ordering one of the first one hundred bikes will receive their new beloved machine in a wooded crate, inspired by Chinese tea chests that are known to last for years of use.

Bold Cycles LTD
Due to the location of the shock, there's no option for an internally routed dropper post.
Bold Cycles LTD
Attention to all the details, including this Bold branded WTB Volt saddle.


Bold Cycles LTD
  Designers and owners Oliver Kreuter and Vincenz Droux are passionate riders themselves. Oli has cycled around more of the world than most. They have lived up to the Bold name they chose with this full carbon fiber, 29" wheeled bike with an internal shock, only with the most upmarket specification. Brave indeed, or perhaps this is just Swiss style.




Bold Linkin Trail test

Sizing and balance felt good from the outset. My Linkin was built with a 60mm stem, but they have certainly underpowered themselves in the handlebar department. The Race Face handlebar measures in at a narrow 740mm, especially considering that the large frame is aimed towards six footers. My 35.5" inseam also meant I was close to the top of the 125mm travel Reverb's height limit, so taller riders might struggle for seat height. The chain stay isn't super short at 439mm, which I think is a benefit for larger frame sizes. For me, finding weight balance between the wheels is tough with a long front centre and short chain stay. I'm a longterm fan of big wheels, and like the feeling of a comparatively steeper head angle for fast response, but the stability of the bigger hoop and lower chance of being sent over the bars.

The frame feels super stiff thanks to the carbon layup, the short rocker link with the 30mm axle, and added to this the carbon wheelset meant it was a little harsh on small trail chatter, but power transfer is direct through the pedals all the way to the rear tire and trail feedback is accurate. Climbing was a breeze thanks to the weight, stiffness and suspension adjustment options. Pedalling forces were neutral and traction isn't compromised when on the stoppers thanks to the Horst link configuration.

Bold Cycles LTD

The 130mm travel DT Swiss fork was admirable. Progression, support and control are all there, but there's also a bit more flex than a Pike allows for, and certainly more than a FOX 36 in the lengthy 29" stance. The DT Swiss shock has a whopping 40 clicks of rebound, from fast to "'is it actually moving" slow. I'm not sure why such a wide range exists, but it does. I settled on 32 clicks from closed for my preferred fast rebound action. I felt the shock was over-damped for small roots and rocks, and for finding grip on cambers, but this was certainly rewarded on high speed and flowing trail. Support was huge for the mere 130mm of travel, with a feeling heading towards bottomless on drops and compressions.

The O.D.L. system worked without issue. Lock-out mode is true, and the 'Drive mode' offers a heavily damped middle ground that's perfect for pumping and flowing trail, but it is lacking sensitivity. As a rider who mostly goes all the way to the top of the hill, then all the way down in one go, I'm still not convinced by locking out both ends simultaneously. Suspension lockout or compression adjust from the bars is a huge benefit without question. Changing both at the same time leaves a geometry that keeps the front end high when climbing. Leaving the fork open and stiffen the shock gives an improved dynamic geometry for climbing. Dual lockout is more suited to riders who spend more time on long distance XC or trail riding situations, although that is how this 130mm travel 29er can (and likely will) be used by most.

Bold Cycles LTD

Descending and cornering presented no issues except my oafish grins for the cameraman. The bike's low and centralized centre of gravity helps stability, and I like the feeling of my weight sitting below the axles of the larger wheels. The aforementioned climbing benefits of the light weight, stiffness and damping meant the bike was a little skittish, and small deflections on the wet slime and roots were common, but it was generally happy to plough a straight line down the hill.

Bold Cycles LTD

Issues

The carbon handlebar is too narrow for the modern trail rider and pricey to replace, although maybe suitable for the small sized frame. Frame-wise, this small first batch of bikes presented some problems. There was slight noise from the internal cable routing when compressing and extending the suspension, and Vincenz was aware of this and says he has a solution for the production version. The plastic cap that hides the top shock bolt needed more flange to stay put, again should be fixed for production. Cable routing on the DT fork is designed around a front brake on the left-hand side, and wasn't neat when I flipped the levers to moto-style, but this could be improved in the workshop. Suspension-wise, the over-damped feeling of the shock concerned me - maybe it would bed-in over time from its out of the box state? If not, it surely could be solved with some internal work to the shock tune. I loved the level of support and feedback given, but maybe too much compromise on small bump sensitivity. Shock compatibility is also a relevant issue, as you can't "up shock" the Linkin with a heavier duty damper, due to space constraints.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe price...it's a lot of money to exchange for an unproven brand. First impressions were positive and the attention to detail and quality appears to be there with no skimping on components. It has nothing ground breaking in the riding department, but the great support is notable, even if it comes at the cost of small bump sensitivity. Geometry is well rounded and I'm pleased that the big wheels are still alive and kicking. If you crave niche, quality and style, this is a great choice. - Paul Aston



View additional high-res images in the gallery

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145 Comments

  • + 240
 I'm gonna wait for the "Linkin Park" freeride bike.
  • + 284
 I can't see that happening, but in the end does it really matter
  • - 35
flag CarlW (May 8, 2015 at 3:43) (Below Threshold)
 ........
  • - 40
flag mnorris122 (May 8, 2015 at 3:59) (Below Threshold)
 Hells to the yes it matters!
  • + 28
 @Steezysix ride that bike to somewhere you belong until you faint
  • + 46
 Steezy's right - it's one step closer to breaking the habit
  • + 39
 They put their trust in you, and pushed as far as they can go with this design
  • - 48
flag WAKIdesigns (May 8, 2015 at 6:27) (Below Threshold)
 I could totaly ride any park on that!
  • + 41
 I really want to not like the bike, but something about it just keeps crawling in my skin.
  • - 14
flag AznKiDrew (May 8, 2015 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 SHUT UP!!!!
  • + 7
 You need to break that habit, then you'll be one step closer to somewhere I belong
  • + 80
 KEEP ROLLIN ROLLIN ROLLIN ROLLIN ROLLIN,.................... Oh shit wrong band
  • + 6
 Im pretty sure you either used or copied this exact comment from the video that came out a few days ago about the bike
  • + 8
 do you think that this frame is about to break?
  • - 1
 Not sure if I could handle that shock. I've become so numb, I can't feel it there, Become so tired, so much more aware
  • + 9
 I'd ride this bike across the new divide.
  • + 2
 Hiding the shock in the frame really is their final masquerade. I bet it would do pretty well on roads untraveled. You could say its the catalyst for a new generation of mountain bikes.
  • + 4
 if you guys knew what I've done
  • + 5
 I think these linkin puns should stop here now, please leave out all the rest Wink
  • + 2
 Is this the Linkin Park before or after they turned shit?
  • + 3
 Jeez guys, enough with the puns, I need a little room to breathe here.
  • + 72
 All this trouble hiding the shock and making the bike look clean. But no internal routing for dropper post cables....
  • + 18
 There was a comment on the article that because of the shock location an internal dropper wouldn't work.

But all that space and only one water bottle mount?
  • + 7
 They simply forgot to think about the space they need to include the internal routing. I can accept that two mounts wont properly fit in smaller sizes but a large frame should have two mounts.
  • + 0
 idc... it is one of the best looking bikes i've seen in a while. won't ever buy one but if they perfect it a bit more they'll have a winner. just get the suspension worked on a bit, maybe make it piggy back compatable
  • + 4
 There is plenty of room to poke out a stealth dropper hose/cable. That's a serious miss.
  • + 42
 i don´t think that a 740mm handlebar is narrow. It depends on the rider, if you are small or tall... it´s a XC - Trail bike! What were you waiting for!
  • + 10
 We see this time and time and time again in bike reviews. Why don't bike manufacturers just spec 780+ mm bars, and then allow us to cut them down to our preferred length?
  • + 9
 Carbon bar wall thickness is designed to provide the desired amount of flex at a given length. When a lot of length is cut off, you end up with a stiffer bar than intended. At least this is true for some models. That's why there is a recommended minimum width.
  • + 16
 740 is plenty wide in my world for a trail bike, carbon 740 at that
  • + 1
 You've got to consider cost to the manufacture with this scheme as well. Giant are leading the way with their 800mm bars on the new Reign but for some of the big companies lots of narrow bars cost less in material than lots of ones that people are going to cut down anyway
  • + 5
 JMO, but I think a fair comparison would be to the Giant Anthem, it comes with 730mm bars, A reign is pretty much a mini DH bike
  • + 2
 @brownstone Surely if you are comparing this to a giant bike it would be the trance? The Anthem is an XC race bike.
  • + 2
 An extremely capable xc bike. I used a 29er fs advanced version. It does the job and then some.
  • + 2
 The extra material doesn't cost more. Even in carbon the extra 40mm is literally pennies. The cost isn't in the material but layup.
  • + 1
 Regardless of the price of 40mm of material, multiplying that a fair few times will reach a higher number than using less material
  • + 30
 A mud catcher / downtube protector easily removed by two 3mm allen key bolts?
Good luck with that after 2 belgian rides. You'll need a 2.5mm drill instead of a hex key.
  • + 8
 Adding to the bad ideas, does anyone else think the small tab on the chain stay guard designed to prevent chain suck is a horrific design? I could see someone quickly getting their leg stuck on this and having a nasty cut or hole in their leg. Seems a bit dodgy to me...
  • + 1
 I thought so to @n8dawg82
  • + 3
 @n8dawg82 looks like that tab is so close to the chainring that I can't imagine that being an issue
  • + 1
 What exactly is 'chain suck'?
  • + 3
 When the chain gets sucked between bb/chain stays and chain rings , usually happens with worn teeth when back pedaling
  • + 5
 The tab on the chainstay guard is moulded from a rubberised plastic, and is pretty blunt. I think it would be tough to injure yourself with it, I'd be more concerned with brake levers!
  • + 1
 Haven't had chain suck since I switched to 1X but I used to hate it immensely when down shifting to the small ring. I wonder if it works?
  • + 19
 A bike for the Maserati crowd. Hey, everyone needs a ride.
  • + 5
 would match my Zenith watch LOL
  • + 53
 Rich Swiss guys haha I'm gonna stick with my Casio and hardtail
  • + 3
 I'd ride this, over that Pinarello attempt at a mtb.
  • + 1
 I thougt that Pinarello mtb looked awesome. I'd lovr to ride one. But I definitely wouldn't spend 11 grand on it. Not that I would ever have 11 grand to spend on anything, but you get the point.
  • + 16
 1800 rotors????
Another new standard!!!!
Wink
  • + 12
 I only have one question:
On a bike with that open-triangle design, HOW THE HELL DOES IT ONLY HAVE ONE BOTTLE MOUNT?????

I want to be able to pack enough growlers to get a busload of riders drunk. This bike was my hope for doing that, and I was thinking you could do four, maybe five of them. But nooooooppeee..... one lousy bottle mount. My dreams are crushed.
  • + 6
 I agree - this bike is a total no go for ever popular, super fun 24h races or multi stage endurance events eating hundreds of miles of fireroads where riders can go beyond their own limits and find themselves in pain, reach athletic transcendence the day after, just before they book an appointment with proctologist to treat worn out tissue, hemorroids or maybe even cysts slowly filling with pus. If you film it, you may become a candidate to youtubes zit of the month. I think I got carried away, it escalated quickly. I apologize - please proceed as normal.
  • + 1
 Clamp-on mounts.
  • + 1
 @tsheep Have you looked at the frame? There is no space if you already have one bottle in there. You'd have to move it up in order to clear the first bottle and then you're hitting the toptube. Aside from that, you also need to have clearance for the ends of the bolts on the inside of the frame and that's where the shock is currently mounted. . .

So no second bottle mounts (which is kinda disappointing) because there just isn't room.
  • + 2
 Specialized fits two bottles on the full suspension Epic...
  • + 4
 Why the hell would you need more than one water bottle? Get s backpack and put a water bottle in it! With s bike like this and the terrain you would take it on, a water bottle would go flying off anyways
  • + 13
 Very clever design - at first thought i thought it would be a nightmare to service the shock, but appears not. Well played.
  • + 7
 indeed its a clever design but looks like you'd be stuck with a DT swiss, custom i may add rear shock.
  • + 2
 This came out of the blue! I enjoy all new innovations and I wasn't expecting this... Nice work...
  • + 13
 How is 740mm not wide enough for a handlebar? Am I missing something?
  • + 7
 Its certainly refreshing to see an original design like this, but at 9000 bucks for a bike that doesn't really fall in to any sort of race category I cant imagine too many people with the money throwing open their wallet's! It certainly seems a well engineered bike, but a little too fidly for my taste!
  • - 10
flag richierocket (May 8, 2015 at 1:40) (Below Threshold)
 Cool looking and sounding. If I test rode it I just might be "Linkin" it.
  • + 1
 " bike that doesn't really fall in to any sort of race category"

I'm not sure if it has to... I wouldn't market it as a race bike, 'cause there are no real benefits of this design for the racers. Internal shock is only good for keeping it away from all the mud or dust... It would be a nightmare to work on it on a race day tough...
  • + 3
 Could be nice parked near the Lambo: Same colour! Ahahah CHAMPAGNE !
  • + 5
 What I meant by that is that if somebody is willing to spend that amount of money they are likely to be a serious rider and probably (not always) going to want to race, so the bike doesn't appeal in this sense as its not a specialist tool. It sounds like a have a downer on this bike but I quite like it actually! Smile
  • + 4
 Dude. If someone's buying this bike and they race... They're going to have more than one ride. Have you been to Switzerland? Walking around Geneva or even Zurich it becomes rather apparent that the price is NOT going to be an issue.
  • + 3
 lol, "doesn't really fall in to any sort of race category".

Middle age professionals with disposable income have some of the most expensive bikes around. Racers are actually a small percentage of the bike market, including the expensive bike market.
  • + 5
 Brilliant clean design. Not sure if that is enough to make it appeal to the wealthy crowd though...mostly because I am not wealthy. I am reading Pinkbike in the middle of the day for christ's sake.
  • + 4
 It's an unproven brand but the price isn't that far out of line with other carbon, full suspension, XX1 bikes. Take the Tallboy LTc for example. The XX1 model comes with aluminum shitty wheels @ $8k.
  • + 5
 Swiss people will buy it. Swiss love buying Swiss made, and place a high value on exclusivity, which this bike is certainly exclusive.
  • + 7
 9000? that's a bold move
  • + 2
 for an unproven brand with a bike loaded with DT Swiss components, carbon all the way and according to pinkbike's take info, "nothing ground breaking on ride quality".

pretty bold indeed.
  • + 3
 Are DT components not good? I've only ever used their spokes/hubs/nipples but have been pleased with those...
  • + 2
 Dt components are pretty good. although earlier rear shocks were problematic as far as I've read online. I wanted to get an XMM and a dt shock before too for my trail bike. but a friend of mine told me it wasn't a good idea because of the lack of servicing here in our place. as for anything on the wheel department, pretty solid!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah I didn't even know they made shocks until this article.
  • + 3
 I love the shock layout. Just a dam shame that its another bike made out of glorified plastic. Give it a rest on the pissing carbon its just NOT needed!!!
  • + 3
 I like that it is progressive, but it needs to be a killer ride like The Following to make me want to buy it. Aesthetics only go so far.
  • + 1
 Since I ride a Scott Genius and know that Scott used to use a proprietary rear pull shock made from DT Swiss I can't help but notice how similar this bike is to a Scott Spark or Genius. I'm still trying to figure out what the difference is between this lock out remote vs. Scott's patented Twinlock remote. It's gotta be different or else DTSWISS may get sued. However, they both are long time partners and still work with each other so I'm sure no one's infringing upon any patents. in my honest opinion having the rear shock inside the frame is annoying. Unbolting the plastic cover may be easy but i'd imaging it'd be annoying any time you wanted to set up the rear shock. I can imagine being on the trail and needing to mess with the rear shock and then realizing I don't have the right tool to take off the cover. Sure it looks clean with the shock on the inside but seriously, I've never complained about how a rear shock looks exposed.
  • + 1
 I dunno... to me i feel what they are saying is basically that if you have an extra ten grand in your back pocket, and want a bike with no real ground breaking advantages that looks kinda strange, and is a new company that may not have the amount of power as a a larger one... then go ahead and try it. Just my view of this tho
  • + 1
 How many of you just LOVE taking your dash apart in your car to access certain components in your car or dropping your tranny to replace a clutch?
No one does!
To try to beautify something by concealing vital components is FREAKIN RETARDED! And completley unnescessary.
Apparently these morons think they are making life easier for bikers when they are actually doing the opposite.
They say" just two bolts to easily access the rear shock and with practice you can adjust the rear rebound......um i can do that while im riding thus not requiring me to stop, get a tool out and with practice adjust something.
Dumb dumb dumb.
  • + 5
 whoa!1800mm rotors!?that thing must be a super fast bike.
  • + 2
 No rotor is a fast bike
  • + 1
 At first look I didn't notice the hidden shock!. Its a great design but who really wants to hide there latest expensive shock so no one can see it...I suppose it could be good for test riders to hide proto type shocks that they don't want no one to see...
  • + 3
 Probably people like me, that think rear shocks look ugly on bikes.
  • + 0
 This is the answer to a question that NOBODY was asking. All I can figure is that these guys know a bunch of roadies who hate the aesthetics of MTB's and wanted to hide the whole thing. No other explanation. Good luck with that.
  • + 3
 I want to not like this bike.... But I feel as if that is not possible.... Lol
  • + 4
 That is a really cool design! Very clean looking and innovative!
  • + 0
 Wow, such innovation! I can only hope that "hidden shock" becomes a new standard. We need more new standards. Boy do we EVER need more new standards! Can I PLEASE HAVE MORE NEW STANDARDS, PPPPPPUUUUUUHHHHHHHLLLLLLEEEEEEEAAAAAAASSSEEEEE??!!!
  • + 4
 I'd opt for the following by evil.
  • + 1
 Holy crap this is crazy... What happens if you were to blow the suspension or somehow destroy it? You'd probably have to destroy the whole bike! HAHAHAH
  • + 1
 740mm plenty wide for a lot of people. offering different bar widths/stem lengths with a bike would be the way to go. 780+ is too wide for me.
  • + 0
 lol I guess they didn't think...that you need to cool and allow heat escape from the shock when your riding it....so i would assume you'll have lots of shock performance problems....but its a cool idea..
  • + 1
 It is indeed interesting but I'd rather have the seat post cable inside the frame and the shock out. It looks like a source for shock and linkage issues.
  • + 2
 I think it looks super slick. But they lost me at no XL, and mandatory DT Swiss shock.
  • + 3
 @ Paul Aston

Which bar would you prefer to see on this bike?
  • + 0
 Probably 780 at that size
  • + 4
 If you're spending 9k on a bike, I'm sure you can afford to replace a 150usd part easily. I know you should base review on how it come spec from the factory, but a lot of us always ends up replacing seats, pedals stems and bars to our own fit/riding style.
  • + 1
 If you're spending 9k on a bike you really shouldn't have to spend any more to make it right!
  • + 5
 @B650wagon for a large size frame I think 780mm, then people have the option to trim them a little. I think the following sizes and widths would suit the masses.

Small - 740mm
Medium - 760mm
Large - 780mm
  • + 3
 Anti-chain suck device looks scary.
  • + 1
 right!!! that thing looks like it would do damage...but maybe it's smaller than it appears in the pic?
  • + 1
 id be happy on a 10,000 use bike. id be ever more happy if the rear break did not bolt into the frame.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/12163922
  • + 3
 brilliant system
  • + 0
 9082 USD. No thanx! I prefer to pay less and see the suspension. That goes to every bike that costs that much. With half the amount you can get a hell o a bike.
  • + 2
 lovely looking bike ! beautiful !
  • + 3
 Its over 9000!!!
  • + 2
 So how do you look at the sag indicator when you're sat on the bike?
  • + 36
 You have your buttler do that.
  • + 2
 Exactly. Midget butler in your backpack. Just pull him out when you need that sag looked at. Anyone with more money than brains would know that.
  • + 3
 LOL, pieterp wins at comments for the day!!
  • + 2
 Looks like it would be easy to maintain that shock.
  • + 0
 I see no real advantage here, though it is definitely a clean looking bike. Review leaves doubt as to whether this bike is at all close to being worth the money.
  • + 1
 You must not live in a muddy area. ;-)
  • + 1
 It will still get muddy brakes, derailleur chain, fork and so on, so yep I agree, not much of an advantage. My shock runs fine with a bit of protection from the seat tube. Swiss miss I think as far as the rest of the world is concerned...
  • + 1
 If anything the hidden shock is a disadvantage because it comes at the expense of no internal dropper post routing. Exposed shocks have never been a problem, even in muddy conditions.
  • + 5
 Do we know it is not an advantage?

What if the shock can go 3 or 4 times as long without maintenance?
What if the shock stays perfectly tuned because the seals work better?
What if the stiction can be drastically decreased by using different material that otherwise wouldn't stand up to the grit of non-sealed environment?

There are some interesting implications to this design. I'm curious to see the results after people have a few years of experience with it.
  • + 2
 Oh awesome, the shock is hidden! But, why?
  • + 1
 Too make it harder to adjust. Lending more weight to the argument, set it and forget it.
  • + 3
 hipsters bike
  • + 1
 So its an insanely expensive bike and the ride quality really isnt verry good? Yeah ill pass.
  • + 1
 I don't get why it's so heavy. It should be way under 26lb looking at the parts spec?
  • + 2
 looks nice and smooth looky - fancy bike
  • + 2
 I think internal gears to go with the shock
  • + 0
 hahahaha still pushing for the new "Shock Ventilation Technology" seriously all they did was poke a couple holes in the side of the headtube and call it some fancy bullcrap
  • + 1
 I told you the bottom cover comes off and the shock comes out that way...
  • + 1
 Only $9000 , what a bargain .....
  • + 7
 of course $9000 is a lot of cash
but other brands (Spesh, Trek) have bikes with similar components and they are in the same price range
  • + 2
 If they cared about value for money they wouldn't go for the hidden shock in the first place
  • + 7
 Yep! Specialized also have 9k bikes. But, when I put 9k on the table in Specialized bike shop I'm getting, if not the best, than one of the world's best bikes in it's category. In this storry I'm getting bike that can be compared with Pinarello's fully.
  • - 1
 said nobody. ...
  • + 2
 @vhdh666 so what? It is a lot of cash for any bike that costs that much. It's not about the brand.
  • + 3
 Well, Mr. Krabs. Do you want to know what I think? UH REGGA FLEBBA BREECKA BRECKA SMULLEN-ELLEN MR. KRABS!! YEGGA HEGGA MERGIN Wallet!!!!! DIMMY MIDDY SPEND! RIVY FLIVY DIVA SHIVA MR. KRABS WALLET!!
  • + 1
 You don't say.
  • + 1
 I simply can't distinguish with scott genius though.
  • + 1
 way too fancy for my likings Big Grin
  • + 1
 Sweet, its got Boost 148.

/sarcasm
  • + 1
 i can't imagine riding a bike with the saddle adjusted at that angle...
  • + 1
 An answer to a question that no one asked.
  • + 4
 Just like smartphones back in the day I guess Wink
  • + 0
 Hidden shock? Hide the whole bike.
  • + 0
 Not even with a 20FT pole since DT Swiss is far from being reliable.
  • - 1
 I'm wondering is the 130mm trail fork more flexy than Fox 40s too? Wink
  • + 2
 Probably not Smile
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