Pinkbike Poll: Flat or Clipless Pedals, What do you Ride?

Jul 29, 2016 at 2:36
by Paul Aston  
An age-old question: Do you ride flat pedals or clipless? I spend most of my time on flat pedals, I find they are less hassle, there is less to go wrong mechanically, they are safer and they improve riding skills and technique. I do switch to clipless some of the time, which is when I find that I get the best performance - when my flat riding technique is dialed but I am clipped in. Spend too much time clipped in, though, my technique wanes and I get lazy.

Five Ten Sam Hill 3 shoes Review. Photo Olly Forster
Five Ten is the only mountain bike shoe brand whose current range focuses on flat pedals.


In a recent search for alternative flat pedal shoes, a void became apparent, even though I would hazard a guess that the majority of mountain bikers use flat pedals most of the time. Manufacturers seem intent on producing clipless compatible shoes in a multitude of disciplines, styles, seasons and sexes. Is this because they are better? Because there is more demand? Or because there is more technology for engineers to develop and abbreviations for the marketing team to get their teeth into?


Inside SIDI. Asolo Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Sidi, on the other hand, focus solely on clipping in.

I quickly totted up the numbers of types of shoe produced by some of the big shoe players. Don't quote me on the numbers as some of their shoes arguably are not purely for off-road, some are different models of the same shoe and men/women/children specific. But I think it's clear what we are looking at:


Flat or Clipless Shoes


I think we get the picture, so which do you prefer? Is it time that we saw more flat pedal shoe options and innovation?


Do you ride with flat pedals or do you clip in?




Regardless of your preference, which brand is your favorite and who do you hand over hard earned cash to?


What is your shoe brand of choice?









253 Comments

  • + 376
 im pretty sure you cant conduct a flat shoe poll without Vans being on the list
  • - 176
flag sam264 (Jul 29, 2016 at 5:55) (Below Threshold)
 Vans don't make MTB shoes.
  • + 16
 @sam264: not anymore, they made the Werner clipless shoe for bmx and it was used in US DH racing for a few years (2010-2012ish). you're not wrong, as they don't make em anymore
  • + 1
 @sam264: they used make a specific shoe for MTB no idea if they still do though
  • + 32
 @sam264: don't tell my buddy Alex that... one old school, slip on vans (red /white checker pattern) wearing, fully rigid, single speed, 26er -old (like at least a decade old) SC Chameleon in yellow. Yet still one of the fastest guys I ride with who can climb and descend anything I've ever tried with my 6" travel FS... I must suck.
  • + 4
 @sam264:
at one point they did- The warner and the gravel. The gravel had ecotrax rubber- same used on Evolv climbing shoes. The warner was the clipless version.

I dont think they sold very well as they were around and poof-gone.
  • + 2
 @sam264: they did. As I have a pair of size 12 spd cleat Vans in red. Never really got comfortable being clipped in. FLATS the REAL clip less pedal
  • + 13
 still kickin it with my vans gravels. teva links were also dope
  • + 10
 @funkzander: yeah and speaking of the Teva LINKS, there was that awesome promo clip with Kelly McGarry at the time... Watched it at least 20 times! Just watch youtu.be/BvqbHVY9Q3k
#McGazzaForever
  • + 33
 Shoes i saw at whistler last month- (i was wearing Vans)
Etnies, Airwalk, DC, Nike Skate, Adio, World Ind., Circa....

Seems like the budget conscious rider is alive and well
  • + 8
 got my vans on but they look like sneakers
  • + 2
 @funkzander: amen. have 2 pair. back up in box
  • + 1
 Agreed. Only shoes I wear
  • + 8
 Many skate shoe companies make what they call bmx shoes. What the real difference?
  • + 2
 First thing that jumped at me, Vans all the way!!!
  • + 2
 vans half cab. maybe the best flat shoes to ride with.
  • + 2
 I ride Vans Warner. Solid shoe in terms of protection from rocks and all that. Comfortable and look better than walking around in pointed ballet slippers. I find them better for walking around on rocky terrain compared to some more traditional cycling soles. If you were an enduro racer, or cross-country racer, you could probably find a stiffer sole for performance.
  • + 4
 @brassinne: MTB shoes tend to be stiffer with a stickier sole and slightly more protection, weatherproofing and usually slightly less sponge like (water absorbent)
  • + 4
 @funkzander: Deeply saddened by the fact that they let the Gravel model die. Once every few weeks, I get hopeful and spend way too much time trying to unsuccessfully hunt down a pair online in my size... *sigh*
  • + 3
 @countzero1101: i did the exact same for the last pair i found. 6mos nothing then boom. craigslist. i believed in that fat bastard santa again for a moment.
  • + 1
 @piersgritten: totally agree. I'm in need of something with a stiffer sole myself. I'm debating between the new Sam hill shoe or the specialized 2FO.
  • + 1
 I just go to Ross and get some cheap skate shoes like Etnies, or DC's. decent quality, affordable price and a wide sole. I'm going on season 2 in my Etnies and they still stick like glue to the pedals.
  • + 3
 I know right? I was looking for Vans in the list and nowhere to be found. Someone should be fired. Vans Ultra Cush for life!!!!
  • + 6
 Can't fault the way Vans grip but the protection they offer when things go wrong isn't great.
  • + 3
 @murfio: very valid point.
  • + 1
 @wolfman00: poof-gone???
  • + 2
 or Etnies
  • + 3
 @RedBurn: TEVA LINKS are THE BEST
  • + 2
 VANS
  • + 1
 @brassinne: I use the 2FO. Awesome shoe. You won't be disappointed. I have the clips and my buddy rocks the flat. Both an improvement over 5/10
  • + 1
 @ampett: are the half cab soles reasonably stiff? They don't come apart after some rough days of riding?
  • + 3
 Cowboy boots, by god.
  • + 1
 Agreed. I have always worn Vans. Lately been using Chukka Lows
  • + 1
 @AlpineNate: for life!
  • + 1
 Vans are so, so, sooooo good right up until mud then they go to crap.
  • + 1
 Vans rider here
  • + 1
 @brassinne: usually bmx shoes are mids or hi tops to protect your ankle bone, and maybe a thicker sole. Otherwise, just a skate shoe
  • + 1
 - Guy who hasn't had fivetens
  • + 0
 Fivetens are too fat, I like to feel my pedal, I'd rather ride in converse.
  • - 1
 Don't really see vans as a trail shoe. More of a BMX and DJ shoe. VANS does have a collection called "Mountain Edition", but the shoe is still more flexable than 5.10's. If one wanted a stiffen the sole, they'd just need to find an insert. I agree though, VANS should be on the list since this site host content on BMX and DJ, and this pole was not specific to ride discipline.
  • + 2
 Teva Links are ace. I've had mine for 3 years now. Less grip (slightly) than my freeriders but they've outlived my 5:10's which f*cked up after putting them in the washing machine. Cardboard heel just crumpled. The Teva build quality is mint, shame they pulled them!
  • + 63
 I look forward to tomorrow's ground breaking poll on wheel size preference and if this new 'Enduro' thing will take off.
  • + 64
 You mistake thinking that these poll are for your benefit. They are market research, the results of which are a sellable commodity. Which is cool- I don't begrudge the site owners making money where they can. However, I always vote the opposite of what I think in polls, in silent protest against modern capitalism.
  • + 48
 @unconvinced: Nice logic, tell the people making your future products to make stuff you don't want. Capitalism was and is the method for the birth and proliferation of mtb'ing. Long live responsible capitalism, where our vote, see money, actually counts. I'm trying to be nice, but those that foster the attitude you're displaying are very irksome to me.
  • + 21
 @wasea04: people who think the internet is meant to be some sort of serious business meeting are the real irksome bunch.

long live boaty mc boatyface!
  • + 1
 @unconvinced: every marketing company knows that some people will form demand characteristics and have to put that into account. So really, you aren't throwing a wrench into things *shrug*
  • - 1
 @unconvinced: yep fk market research there just gona do and sell what ever they want anyway regardless of how we vote on shit.
  • + 14
 @unconvinced: I'm totally fine with it being market research if it gets the message across: HEY SHOE COMPANIES I WILL PAY GOOD MONEY FOR COMFY SHOES THAT HAVE THE FIVE TEN GRIP BUT NOT THE LOOK!!!
  • + 5
 @unconvinced: in that case I hope they read this: I chose Five Ten because it was my only option. Would love to have other choices that were reasonably priced, but none existed. Vans are not rigid enough. Only reason I have Five Tens is they were hugely discounted as a return.
  • + 1
 @wasea04: hahaha,youre awesome...and way too nice.
The dude has 4 times your upvotes. This displays the very reason we are all doomed.
  • + 2
 @Imnukepf: But they're not going to sell what we don't buy. That's where you really vote -- with your wallet.
  • + 10
 Folks, try all you want to explain it, he will remain... @unconvinced
  • + 2
 @TheR: who asked for different wheel sizes who asked for different shocked dimensions?
  • + 12
 @Imnukepf: It's not a matter of asking for it, it's a matter of buying it. If the first company that came out with a 29er didn't sell any 29ers, it would be out of business and 29ers wouldn't be a thing. But some company did come out with a 29er, and XC racers said, "You know what? This is pretty cool. I want one." And so some company had success with 29ers. So other companies decided that in order to be competitive in the market, they, too, had to make 29ers. And 29ers evolved into what you have today. So 29ers didn't become big because these companies decided to "force them on us," they became big because people wanted them and bought them. If there were no customer, these companies wouldn't sell them.

It's the same thing with the dreaded "boost." If people didn't buy Trek because they didn't like boost, you can bet your life Trek would stop making bikes with boost.

In the end, these companies are here to sell you what YOU want. Yes, they'll come up with innovations they think will make their products better, but in the end, if the innovations don't sell, they're not going to stick with them.
  • + 1
 @TheR: dude, you pretty much nailed it.

+many
  • + 6
 Look at Specialized. They were the last major company to go 27.5. They were like, no, we are going to stay with 26. About a year later, they phased out all their high-end 26ers. Why? Because people wanted to buy 27.5. They were getting their asses beat. So they had no choice. All you people here can say you still want 26, but the people who are actually buying bikes say otherwise.
  • + 32
 There are 1,000,001 flat pedals out there, 90% of them aren't significantly different from any other. Saying we need more flat pedal options... really?
Shoes, well you don't *need* special shoes for flats, most people I know that ride them all the time list that as a reason why. And 5.10 perfected the flat pedal shoe; there are a lot of us that would never consider another brand, so I can see why other brands are reluctant to invest (really, if Sidi were to make a flat shoe, what would they offer that 5.10 didn't, aside from a hideous color and absurd price?).

I have a real question: why the hell do flat pedals cost so much more than clips? The cheapest even remotely serviceable flats run about $50, most I see at the parks are over $100; The old standby XTs are $65, SLXs you can get as a free 'gift with purchase' if you look around a bit. Wouldn't you think there was more to clips than flats?
  • + 15
 Exactly what I think when I see prices of flats. I run the low end Shimano M-530's clipless trail pedals. Have 3 pairs, almost 5 years, over 2000 miles on each set. Zero bearing issues riding in mud, rain and dust. Retail for $65 and I think the most I spent is $35 maybe. Bought 2 pairs of fancy flat pedals with great reviews, $100+ retail and the cheapest was $65 on sale. I have had to rebuild both. Almost zero mud, mostly dust and maybe 750 miles total for both pedals. I feel a bit ripped off.

I think Shimano has the best pedals out there, for price and durability. By the way, I have an old set of DX bmx pedals from the 80's that I bought new, in the 80's and if I need to, can still use them. Those have miles on them, maybe 30,000. Seen halfpipes, skateparks, bmx tracks, street riding and hucks down 10 or more stairs. They out lived frames and rims and forks and cranks.. Best $29 I ever spent.
  • + 10
 Flats cost more because people will pay more. I'd happily run another company outside of 5.10 if they were as grippy but more durable. Also, Raceface chesters are $50 and they are awesome. I made the switch for fun from a high end alloy pedal and they are just as grippy but lighter and slide over rocks easier. Raceface nailed it...
  • + 2
 Unfortunately it's the old supply and demand, people will pay for the higher end product as that is what we have on offer. If there was a pedal with a ti axle and mag body, looked good and had a decent shape for £50 I'd bite your hand off.
  • + 10
 @Weens - not sure I buy that they "perfected" the flat pedal shoe. Yes, they are way better than anything else out there that's not using their rubber compound (being owned by Adidas, the Terrex presumably would be just as grippy), but the shoes themselves have some issues. I don't mind the short-ish life span of the rubber sole (that's the price of grippiness - and that's why I'm OK with my grippier tires being outlived by the less grippy alternative from the same maker), but the shoes themselves could gain. I'm on my fourth pair of Five Tens, and each one of them had issues with seams that should have been stouter, bits and pieces (like the loops for the laces) ripping prematurely, and separation between sole and upper. All of these are issues that other manufacturers seem to have solved without weight penalty both in bike shoes and in other outdoor shoes that get abused a lot (like trail runners, hiking boots, etc.).

And that's before you get to the part about fit - it sure would be great if there were more than one width (I'm a wide forefoot/duckfooted sort of person - that means I'm running a size 13 Five Ten, despite 12 being plenty long, which then leads to excess shoe flopping about and getting in the way in the front, the arch support being in the wrong place, and the heel slipping).

Do they make a better flat pedal shoe than any other competitor? Yes, because of the rubber compound. Have they improved their product over the years? Yes, of course (my first Five Tens easily doubled in weight on a wet day - they don't do that anymore). Have they perfected the flat pedal shoe? Nope, there's a lot of room for improvement.
  • + 2
 @g-42: nailed it. I've been in 5.10 Impacts since 2004. My impact VXi's exploded & 5.10 denied the warranty which was hard to swallow. I begrudgingly bought a new pair of Impacts this season. (The old "new" design.). They are working well, but I would happily support another company if they produced a viable product. I don't fee any kind of loyalty to Adidias, I mean 5.10, excuse me.
  • + 2
 @g-42: for the purpose of this conversation I would say that the rubber is all that really matters, and they have pretty much perfected that. I think thats what the other guy meant. That's the reason no one else wants to enter the market. Sure the shoes could use improvements, but another company could make the perfect shoe but without the rubber it's useless.
  • + 2
 @sino428: Sticky rubber for climbing shoes is a pretty well understood thing by now. Vibram makes it for several brands that compete with Five Ten in that market, and those do pretty well. I agree that the rubber is key - which is why I'm reluctantly coughing up for Five Tens even though I'm not happy with the product overall. The fit is bad enough for my foot where that almost overcomes the stickiness advantage - if the Specialized F2O shoe were available in widths, its reported slight disadvantage on stickiness would not deter me from giving that an honest try (I can always run slightly longer grub screws to compensate for that).

Saying the rubber is all that really matters oversimplifies things in my mind. Yes, it's really important. But so is fit. The quality BS is annoying (I really don't like these things disintegrating the way they do - if the sole wears out, that's fine - that's the price of stickiness - but seams and loops and such is just aggravating), but not an impact to function. Fit, however, is. So if I got a much better fitting shoe with slightly less friction, that would be a worthwhile tradeoff.
  • + 2
 @g-42: I agree that Five Ten has not perfected the flat pedal shoe, but they have certainly done better than anyone else. Five Ten started off by making rock climbing shoes years ago and there have always been durability and quality control issues with their products from what I have experienced. That seems to be true even now that they are owned by Adidas. Having said that, they continue to innovate and their rubber is sticky as hell although it doesn't last long. For comparison, there are other rock climbing shoe manufacturers that produce excellent climbing shoes that last much longer than Five Ten: Boreal, La Sportiva, Asolo, etc., but none of these are domestic and they don't seem to realize the big potential in the flat pedal market. I use Freeriders exclusively but would definitely try out a comparable shoe that was more bombproof. And you can get rock climbing shoes resoled for about 1/3 the cost of the original pair, and it extends their life considerably. Five Ten knows this but doesn't seem to have that feature available on their Freeriders. Maybe it is the way they are stitched or something.
  • - 3
 @g-42: I completely disagree about fit. I think thats probably the least important thing for me when it comes to bike shoes. It sounds like you may just have wide feet so it could be an issue for you, but for me if I can get it on my foot the fit is good enough. It's a bike shoe. It just sits there on the pedal. It's not like an athletic shoes where I'm running in it, or moving side to side or anything like that.
  • + 1
 @g-42: I suffer the same foot dimension problem. Solution is to buy some sticky felt pads designed to go on the legs of furniture to stop them scratching flooring. Stick these into the heel cup to push the foot forward in the shoe. Works for me. You can buy massive pads and cut them to size.
  • + 1
 I'm with @g-42. 5.10 may have perfected the rubber but the durability of the upper leaves a lot to be desired, and it would be really nice if they weren't so freaking ugly.
  • + 23
 pick a pedal, then be a dick about it.
  • + 1
 Haha, yeah, any sort of advice is basically someone peeing on other ways of doing things, but there's a reason everyone ties their shoes the same way.l
  • + 17
 When i sold my dh bike three years ago, for switching to a smaller bike (trail enduro), i began to ride with clicks, the shimano DX model for the pedals. And since then, I cant imagine myself without that! Its so much more comfortable, you dont have to worry about anything !! Lots of roots? Massive rocky section? Long jump? Just GO! I invite every rider to try !
  • + 6
 I am in agreement, I like the ability to not worry about having my foot slip of a pedal for any reason
  • + 10
 No more tattoo on your shin...
  • + 8
 @adirint: Ironically, my girlfriend has a scar on her shin from hitting herself with a shimano m520 clipless pedal.
  • + 7
 My foot coming off the pedal is not something I spend one second per ride worrying about. With good pedals and good shoes this is not an issue.
  • + 1
 @neologisticzand: both have pro's and con's it depend on what you're fit and confident to ride I used both no issue spank spike flat pedal + alpinestars Moab knee & shin guard on wet muddy ride/race, Shimano SPD DX + 5.10 cyclone with 661 kneeguard on dry dusty ride/race
  • + 6
 Dodgy tight steep switchback with huge drop to one side and may need an emergency "dab". Flats for the win!
  • + 13
 Flats are just more fun. You feel more comfortable taking risks plus you can ride anywhere and practise drop offs , trials skills etc and have a play much more easily.
(By the way who bothers practising trials skills these days - that was the Friday eve ride in the 90's everyone wanted some skills now everyone has a 160mm full on 'Enduro' no one bothers)
I'd rather have a fun ride than be arsed about how fast I can pedal up a climb.

Clips only on 'road' (converted cyclocross is as close as most mtbers can come) bike

Also +1 for Sombrio recommendation they weren't on list , £25 for some Shazams on CRC they are pretty good.
  • + 15
 No Teva any more? I love my Links and wear them all summer for trail riding and commuting ... what the hell am I going to replace them with?
  • + 1
 I went from links to 510 freeriders. The 510s are so much stickier then the links ever were
  • + 3
 Riding Sombrio and Teva for a couple of years already. Sombrio has better grip and is more durable, Teva looks and feels awesome, grip is ok. Don't like price, durability and look penalty of 510s for the grip so I'm on the same boat. Maybe back to skate shoes?
  • + 1
 @kanasasa: Tevas with good pedals are as stickier as I need. I dunno why they stop making 'em
  • + 1
 I just looked around recetly and couldn't find any online. Shame, really liked my Links. Not sure what I will replace mine with. They work great with DMR Vaults
  • + 11
 I have been a traditional flats guy for years. Clipped in for a full season and never got comfortable. Found wrecks to be harder and the power and climbing benefits to be marginally better. I also find it very taxing on joints and your body to be stuck in the same place. I intially I hit my shins a decent amount with flats but I learned how to keep that from happening and been very satisfied ever since. I love he art of flat pedals.
  • + 5
 You nailed it @darupp that flat pedaling is an art. I was in clips for at least 20 years and decided I wanted to get more into jumping and steeps so went flat. I am appreciating the art of getting the movements down. I feel it makes people better riders and more aware of lazy habits.
  • + 3
 Amen. Maybe if I was racing, but otherwise it's not worth the inconvenience to me.
  • + 9
 Is it just me that thinks most clipless shoes look awful. I wouldn't be seen dead wearing that sidi shoe in the picture. Why do they design them to look so different to normal shoes? FiveTen clipless shoes look like they're flat shoes which look like normal shoes. And what's with the over engineered fastening systems on clipless shoes?
  • + 4
 Those Five Tens looks just as awful. Some of the ugliest shoes I have ever seen in my life.
  • + 8
 I read these comments about people not being comfortable on clips, or switching to flats and not being able to keep feet on the pedals. I am left wondering if the pink bike audience is just a bunch of general hacks who can't ride. That should be the next poll I think.
  • + 7
 I've been riding clipped in since I was about 15 years old. Now I'm 31 and there is absolutely no going back. I've tried flats and it just ends up with me doing no footers off of even the smallest of bumps.
  • + 112
 Thats the lack of technique. No offence intended
  • + 4
 I had the same issue, so I purposefully switched to flats this year to work on technique. After a few footless landings and a bunch of off-balance tips I'm starting to get the hang of it! But no where near as quick. Totally worth trying for a few rides to work on technique.
  • + 7
 @mntbiker: a couple of weeks ago we had a 50m sprint race at a road bike barbecue (me on my road bike as well). The funny thing was that out of the 16 riders, I was the only one with flat pedals (due to a knee injury) and I still easily beat all the other 15 guys with SPD(-SL)s in the spring with my DCs and plastic BMX flat pedals.

Yes, your maximum power output is still higher with SPDs, but still nowhere near as big as the difference in leg power can make.


For MTB I always ride flat pedals. My goal is to get a riding style like Phil Atwill and I always try to go through corners a bit faster than I'd think is possible. Then it's very nice to be able to put my feet down even quicker if my front wheel washes out too.
  • + 11
 I've been ridding clipped in for the last 15 years ,4 years ago I switched to flat, there is no way I'm going back. True.
  • + 5
 I've been wanting to put more time on flats. I hear it's great training for bike skills that translate well to xc when you're locked in. For example, a lot of people rely on clips to bunny hop.
  • + 7
 I ride everything on flats and my feet pretty much never slip. I rode clipless for a while and when I came back to flat I was slipping left and right the first day so it is indeed about technique. I like to go out of my way to find the roughest climbs/descents so I don't feel like this is an half truth.

The main reason I ride flats though, is for the easy escapes. When you like riding stuff with consequences, it is one less thing on to worry about so you can focus on your biking and attack the section with a clear mind.

If I was racing I'd most likely go clipless but for everything else, I just find it is injury/bike damage waiting to happen. Not worth it.

Also, I always find it ridiculous to see people coming to the trails with a 500$ bike and 350$ worth of pedals/shoes. That money would have made a much bigger difference if spent on the bike.
  • + 3
 @mntbiker: it actually is as quick. It took me a couple of months to get there though. Adapting technique is key. I still ride both though. The nice thing about flats is you can vary foot position from mid-foot to traditional. That saves a good chunk of energy
  • + 3
 @mntbiker: I feel like I'm missing something but I don't get the technique argument. I ride flats but... Just because your feet fall off when you go back to flats, why does that mean you lack technique? Doesn't that just mean that the technique for riding clipless is different? Or are you really handicapped when you rely on your feet being attached to the pedal for bunny hops and other maneuvers? -Guy Who Has Ridden Clipless Maybe 3 or 4 Times in His Life.
  • + 6
 @bmar: Riding flats, you constantly have to adjust your weight so the pedals are perfectly weighted at all times. When your feet are glued to the pedals, you can be sloppy at this and get away with it. This is why riders who go back to flats usually complain that their feet slip all the time; their technique got rusty and they're struggling without the crutch of clipless pedal.

I'm not judging these guys or against clips. Like I said, I tried clips and found I got "rusty" myself. Both flats/clipless have their pros/cons and it is up to you to find out which makes most sense in your situation. You can compare it to suspension vs. hardtails. its easy to drop big stuff on a suspension bike but if you go back to a hardtail, it is possible to be smooth but for a while you'll most likely land extremely hard on the smallest of drops.
  • + 1
 @jack-sprogis: You're absolutely correct. I don't really care though, I'm too old to be switching to flat pedals and frankly, I'm very comfortable in clips for both general trail riding and DH.
  • + 3
 @Canadmos: With all due respect, age have nothing to do with it. I made the switch at 44 and still kick some serious asses. That being said if you choose clips that's fine with me.
  • + 0
 @freerabbit: I worded that wrong haha. Not that I'm too old, but I really have no reason to switch.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: thanks for the reply. It isn't my intention to put you in a defensive position. I was just curious if depending on clips is "sloppy" riding and effects your performance (with clips) or if it's just the way you ride when you have clips. The suspension argument makes sense to me though. You become more sensitive to the flow of the trail on a hard tail and rely more on technique where as a full suspension is forgiving. But if you combine the technique you learn from a hard tail with a full suspension bike, that's a winning combo. I guess I've answered my own question... but I'm still wondering if the sloppiness that lends itself to clips makes you a "slower" rider (or less able) even though your pedal efficiency is boosted, you know what I'm sayin? Maybe I'll just have to try it myself...
  • + 6
 @bmar: I wasn't in a defensive position, just talking about my observations, don't worry. I think one of the biggest perk of flats is easily identifying sloppy technique. Basically. if your feet slip, you're doing it wrong. You can't slip using clipless pedals so mistake consequences can be a little bit more subtle, like a rear wheel slip or losing speed/control or simply being unable to clear a particular section. Sometimes clipless can save your ass in a downhill rock garden but I feel it can also mute the subtleties of pedaling through a root infested section.

It seems people are being told massively to "start with clipless pedals, you'll get used to it faster". My advice goes against this. I say start with flats, it will make you more confident and it will teach you how to ride better. Once you got the technique down, you can switch to clipless to try to maximize pedaling efficiency, which is a more advanced technique.
  • + 2
 @bmar: Well said
  • + 1
 @freerabbit: me too. I rode clips for 15 years. Now I'm on my third year riding flats. I'm WAY faster in the turns with flat pedals than I was with clips, and I'm not any slower going uphill.
  • + 2
 @Canadmos: Yea, I am in the same boat. I know what good jumping technique is and I do that 98% of the time, but the remaining 2% of the time I would come off the pedals if I was running flats. But instead of ending up in a crumpled heap on the ground (with flats) I can get away with landing the jump and live another day to improve my technique.
  • + 6
 While Vans and DC don't make MTB shoes, they do make shoes for riding bikes and skateboards; and people wear them while riding a mountain bike because they work. Therefore they cannot be ignored. I rode Vans for a few years and thought they worked great. I have enjoyed both flats (for playful days) and clipless for longer rides. They both have their merits, and i generally agree that flats can make you a better rider when you are clipped in. I do not agree however that clipless make you lazy or lead to poor technique. Clipless adds different control surfaces. Using upward and sideways forces to control the bike is an advantage of being locked in and alllows you to do things that you wouldnt be able to do otherwise.
  • + 9
 @Moto4fun I agree with you to a certain extent. Both clipless and flats indeed have their merits. But let me assure you there is nothing you can do on clips that can't be done on flats with proper technique.
  • + 1
 @Rdot84: did you just mentioned Sam Hill in your last sentence?
  • - 1
 @Rdot84: I hear this sentiment often, implying that the technique used to say hop over a stick with flat pedals is "proper" while just tugging upward with your clipless is inferior. I don't believe in that. Im sure all flat guys will disagree. But I don't have to do any rocking back, heels down spring up and forward, absorb the bike upward to bunny-hop over small obstacles. While that technique can still be beneficial with clipless pedals, if it isn't required, then it wouldn't be less proper to use the control surface provided for the direction you are trying to move the bike.

I once strapped an intertube around my skateboard and shredded around my neighborhood. I was hopping up and down, over things, on to things, etc. No it wasn't a proper Ollie, but being strapped on, allowed me to do things I wouldn't have been able to do otherwise, even with "proper technique".
  • + 3
 @Moto4fun So I'll play Devils advocate. You are basically admitting in your statement that you are using the clipless pedals as a crutch to pull up on the pedals. (improper technique) Just as you strapped an inner tube to a skateboard because you couldn't properly do an Ollie. Now there are pros and cons to both systems I'll admit. But never say that one allows you to do things the other does not.
  • + 1
 @Rdot84: pulling your rear pedal up is not necessarily an improper technique. It is if you ride on normal speeds, but for steep climbs and/or sprints it can actually give you a higher power output.
  • + 1
 @Rdot84: Look, I ride both, so I am not some clipless advocate that doesn't understand the techniques and freedom provided by flat pedals. But they do add control surfaces that allow you to impart forces on your bike that flat pedals do not allow. I fully agree that there is a proper technique for launching an air and when executed, does not require the control surfaces provided by clipless pedals; just like various other ski, snow, skate type sports where you should not be imparting lateral or vertical forces on the binding system. But there are scenarios where using the up and side surfaces affords you control capabilites not available on flats, and flats would require a "work around". In essence, there are different techniques to executing similar movements depending on the type of machine you are on. What is proper for one, may not be proper for another. You wouldnt say the techniques used by a person riding a DH bike through a rock garden are improper compared to how someone would do it on a hardtail. They are just different machines with different capabilities and thus require different techniques to maximize their effectiveness. Thats all that i am saying.
  • + 6
 I am riding a pair of Sombrio X-Slats at the moment. High top, grippy, water repellent velcro strap to fix the laces and way lighter then Fivetens but also unavailable now :-( I will soon be back in Fivetens I reckon...
  • + 5
 In all fairness, Pinkbike is a very gravity oriented website, where most people ride downhill, freeride and/or enduro. Not your average mountainbiker. The xc racers and off-roadies are not being represented in this poll because they aren't on Pinkbike, but (over here) they do make a bigger group than us baggy clothed air-time catchers.
  • + 7
 Both, for normal mountainbiking (XC and trail) I prefer clipped, when I go to a bikepark (not often) I prefer flats.
  • + 2
 Same for me. For my commute, XC and normal trails, I ride Crank Bros Mallet Es. For DH/bike park or trails I don't know, I swap to flats.

I have some Time Roc Atac clipless on my CX bike.

(That being said, I do love my flats and my 5.10's for quiet rides when I just want to chill out...)
  • + 4
 Interesting regional assumption that "most people ride flat pedals...". Riding for the past 25 years in Colorado and SoCal, nearly everyone I see rides clipped in. It's very rare to see anyone riding flats - except at bike parks or shuttling DH trails. I use both - but never use flats when there is a reasonable amount of climbing. My 5.10s don't lend themselves to putting the power down uphill like a stiff-soled clip-in shoe.
  • + 6
 Five Ten flats all the way but need to improve the durability of their rubber soles.
  • + 2
 so true! i have just sent back a pair for a warranty claim. I have some impact vxi and after 6 months of daily use (riding 40mins to and from plus normal weekend riding) the shoes are done holes in the sole, laces broken and the outsole is coming off. Not really what I expect for a pair of shoe that cost over £100. I have had skate shoes last longer. The only plus I find the vxis have other a skate shoe is they are waterproof. If they dont come through with my claims im going to get some 2fos.
  • + 3
 Beating a dead horse The argument will never die Most often I find champions of flats have never used clipless pedals or refuse to try cause there to hard , And on the flip side some clipless riders don't have the proper technique to ride flats after being clipped in for so long . I can't ride flats all that well . That fastest riders in the world are mostly clipped in
  • + 8
 They are, but they are looking for any edge, even a miniscule one. Nino would do just fine in the xc world cup on flats, after an adjustment period. Every WC downhill rider just the same. Sam Hill can podium EWS on flats. It's just not worth that much time. Besides, you shouldn't be trying to mimic top pros, unless you are already threatening that level. Pedal choice didn't get them there. Most of these top guys in gravity disciplines will have spent significant parts of their formative years on flats. If you skip those steps, you'll never get close enough for pedal choice to matter.
  • + 1
 @AllMountin:
It's not skippin steps .
A clipped rider can go to flats .
But a flat rider has a much harder time switching to clips .

And you should absolutely mimic what the pros are doing . Why do you think every generation is getting faster cause they wanna be just like the guy on tv . This is true for every sport .

I love Sam Hill . But he's done to many injuries have kept him off the bike for to long and the the younger guys have stepped up. One fluke wekend doesn't mean it's the best choice

My statement stands fastest guys on the planet are clipped in .

And no there not riding flats on the weekend for fun . You train on what you race on
  • + 1
 I feel like we're talking about different things, really. The fastest guys are clipped in, but they'd be the fastest guys on flats, too. I'm talking about young, developing riders that see these guys on clipless and think it's the right choice for them. When they first start learning wheelies, manuals, progressing on jumps, nose bonks, etc, they'll realize they're better off on flats. Learning that stuff on clips is ****tarded. Nothing hampers progression like a busted tailbone cause you looped out and couldn't eject. Nobody can unclip fast enough to dab in that situation. You're going down with the ship.

Flats are the official pedal of trying new shit. Clipless are for the last 0.2% of efficiency. Decide which will make you a better/faster rider in the long run, and choose accordingly.
  • + 1
 @AllMountin:
if your talking about going out and messing around in a skate park ya sure flats . True most started on flats with bmx .

Some stick with it some don't .
  • + 3
 I wish they still made the Teva Pinner and Links, those were truly a 7-day shoe. Comfy around town or in the workshop, no need to swap shoes for the ride home. If anyone from Teva is reading, can you PLEASE send me some size 12s? My 4 pairs have all been laid to rest :'(
  • + 5
 Since lower back surgery I have no confidence clipping in. Really I'm just afraid I won't get unclipped fast enough. Ahh age....
  • + 4
 You need to get some Crank Brothers. Loosen them up and youll unclip. If by chance you arent unclipping while crashing, Crank Brithers has your back, they will break and unclip that way
  • + 4
 I ride a hell of a lot of BMX to so either Enties or Vans all the way .. last way longer than Five Tens and don't look like an idiot walking around town in them !
  • + 2
 Five Ten with Flats for DH and Trail but ride clipless on the road bike. (forgot what bike I was on one day (major brain fart) and went right over on the road bike, pulled a wheelie and couldn't get unclipped. LMAO, wasn't funny at the time though severely bruised pelvis and had a hell of a time walking for a week.
  • + 2
 After getting knee issues which started with shitty Shimano 520 SPD pedals (needed to put them super tight else my feet kept clipping out, causing the pedal to have no float, and my cleats were not aligned 100% perfectly), I did a lot of research about spd pedals and found that professional fysiotherapists actually recommend to stay away from SPDs if you're not a professional athlete. The limited amount of movement isn't healthy for your joints and if you have bad luck it can even cause tendinitis and keep you from riding for years.

They recommend to just use flats, even on road bikes. But that actually makes it cooler in my opinion: you become the underdog with flat pedals and sneakers who beats all the roadies in their SPDs and Lycra outfits.
  • + 2
 Do you have any of the references where you found physios were recommending flats? I ask because I know some Physios that would find them interesting.
  • + 1
 I got tendinitis from a winter of spd use, thought it was down to poor squat form, dont think ill ever go back to clips. Ride flats even for single speed now
  • + 6
 ride a clipless on one foot and platform on the other bc it's super enduro
  • + 1
 Ride real fast. TUUUURN TO DAH LEEEEEFFFFFT
  • + 2
 I just can't get comfortable going downhill on clips. I like the pedal right under the centre of my foot when I point down, and none of the clipless cleats go back that far. I swore off clips when I saw a friend take a huge crash and screw herself up. She hit a log hidden in long grass on the edge of the trail with her pedal, went straight up in the air, landed on her chin, and badly twisted her leg and hip coming down because her clips didn't release. No thanks. I'd rather slip a pedal occasionally.
  • + 1
 I'm the same. Never been able to find a shoe that lets me have the clip in point far enough back.
  • + 2
 My New Years resolution this year was to ride flats all year. So I have been. While my wheelies have gotten a bit better, I can't say that my overall technique is still about the same (sadly I was hoping my testes would grow and I'd be hitting all the jumps). Plus im ripping my giro shoe sole like no ones business. And have to say, most of the flat shoes are terrible looking.
  • + 2
 Flats Dudes! You know if you find a shoe you love except the sole isn's sticky enough you can resole them with a FIVE TEN 5.10 STEALTH C-4 RESOLE KIT! about 40 bucks.
You can do it yourself if you have a belt grinder and some clamps and don't mind a little work; or find a resoler.
You may need a larger size because they are size for rock shoes. We resole our climbing shoes all the time, if the uppers are still good it can be worth it. Its easier to resole a new shoe.

www.mtntools.com/cat/rclimb/rshoes/510resolekits.htm
  • + 2
 Nice! I have resoled tons of climbing shoes but never thought it would work with my Freeriders. I will have to try it out, thanks for the idea.
  • + 2
 It's important to note that until we had clipless shoes that allow you to move your cleats all the way back (far enough to approximate where a flat pedal might sit) clipless just wasn't an option. Wearing overstiff disco boots and pedalling on your toes was terrible for technical riding and even worse for dealing with logs, wet rocks/roots and mud. Now that we have amazing options from Shimano, Specialized, Giro, etc it's possible to get great pedalling efficiency and still be in a good technical riding position.
  • + 2
 I ride both. I race clips but do my daily rides on flats. All my shredding skills, came from riding flats. My buddies that started on flats and stay on them, they just pedal. Highly recommend to build your technique on flats. At least pumping and proper bunnyhops.
  • + 1
 I'm a clovenoped, I ride both. Street or park, flats. Long rides, downhill or lots of climbing, clipped in. I rode toeclips way way back when. Then moved to clipless. When I raced dual slalom, flats. Downhill, clipless. Just to keep my feet on the pedals. Ray's, flats. But I could ride the place clipped in, just need to set the tension right to avoid accidental releases. 20 years is a long time to get used to clipless and I did have my issues at the start, but after 6 months or so, all good. And I know a few tricks to make them work good. I'd say I'm clipped in 80% of the time, it's not an issue for me though.

Still don't get this poll, just ride in what makes you happy.
  • + 2
 What reallys f*cks me off is that a equivalent quality mtb clipless pedal is usually at least 50% cheaper than flats. How is it that the pedal that requires more technology and engineering seems to cost less!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I had a pair of 5-10s (sleuths) and they were in fact wayyy better than any vans I wore before that. (Half cabs are still the tits tho)

I went with that pair since I could wear them around unlike the rest of their catalog and not look like a goof or feel like I was walking with bricks on my feet.

I am now riding in Giro's jacket shoes and I actually prefer them. They're more comfortable and the big but not too big size feels a lot better to me.

(No dh for me, just some XC and some proper chunky stuff for the bikes most people ride around here)

5 inch hardtail FTW
  • + 1
 I have worn Vans old Skool slip ons for years, but found when mountain biking they don't provide a firm enough sole for me. So I tried numerous other "flat" pedal shoes and never really liked any of them. So on some advice from a fellow Flat Pedal Posse member I tried some Adidas shell toes (classics) and have not worn anything since. They grip my DMR Vaults perfectly and they have a stiff enough sole that walking over rough terrain doesn't hurt your feet like the Vans do.
  • + 1
 I switched back to flats several years ago do to the torch I was getting on my knees and ankles from wearing clips.(multiple knee surgeries, broken ankle, blah blah blah) For those saying that can't stay on their bike with flats ,wedge your feet.
  • + 1
 Back on flats this evening for the first time in years, just to see what way they feel, bike park this weekend so will always ride flats for that. To be honest i really want to stick with clips as i'm so used to them now. But wait and see i guess. Old 5.10's and a set of superstar flats this evening...from Crankbrothers Mallets and Specialized 2fo's
  • + 1
 I get 5:10 Free riders in the winter, rock them for casuals till spring then get out the impact vxi for the race season.
Vxi does look a bit fugly but they are slimmer than impact lows and still have the stiff grippy sole.
Plus I heard it's the same rubber as they use on hand gun handles?? If true how rad is that!
  • + 1
 More flat options? Vans, Etnies & DC are just 3 of a myriad of companies that already have it covered. A flat pedal shoe is a fvcking flat shoe & there are zillions of them out there. You can buy them anywhere from Wal-Mart to Foot Locker. There's nothing special about a flat pedal shoe & if you think there is, you're a weenie who blames shit like shoes for sucking ass while you ride. Blank Stare
  • + 1
 Maybe I'm a weirdo here but I'm from the East Coast, PA. 95% of the folks I ride with and see riding are using clipless. Getting your leg thrown off the pedal in a rock garden is almost always a crash. And yeah we have rock gardens whole trails of nothing but in some places. I like the secure feeling of being part of my bike. Trick is to set your pedal tension right and cleats way back. Now that being said I look like a fool on a bmx bike when I try to ride flats. I've ridden DH in flats just fine but I didn't try any of the big jumps. It's obvious that flats require a different technique than clipless. I think to be a well rounded rider you should know both.
  • + 1
 Would be helpful to see which kind of riding is represented here. Where i ride there equal parts climbing and decending and coming from road biking i found that focusing on foot postion was wasted energy when climbing. I also think being clipped in helps in slow rocky situations where pulling up on the pedal can help get you over things. I started on flats when getting back into mtb after being out of it for a while but once i regained my confidence i missed the feeling of being locked in. And whether the efficiency is in my head or is real i dont care.
  • + 2
 I'm so bummed. My pair of LAKE's just wore out on the bottom after NINE seasons. I checked their website and they only seem to make clipless? sooo bummed. best show i've ever owned for flats
  • + 2
 Loved my Schleys before I went fiveten. All I want for christmas is for them to bring them back with sticky rubber.
  • + 1
 Strangely, I have high arched feet, I can`t ride flats. This does not make me "fashionable", but who gives a phuque. I ride what I do, because I have to. If you don`t like that, you deal with it, I have no choice, think yourself lucky Smile
  • + 1
 I used to ride flats on DH. Slipped a pedal in a DH race and exploded my ACL. Since then I only ride clipped in (well...expect for my dirt jumper and bar bike). I think you can have just as good technique on clips and as long as you are having fun, who cares? Plus, I like that my AM9 look like space shoes.
  • + 1
 Rode clipless for a few years. Changed to flats to learn to jump correctly. I'm more efficient clipped in. I find in really rough sections I will slip off my flats (5 10s and Nukeproof Electrons) and getting my feet positioned a pain.
  • + 2
 I have a 29er fully rigid single speed with flats, built to ride like a big BMX/ Klunker, but on my 160mm travel bike through the really techy rough stuff, I'm clipped all the way
  • + 2
 who really cares what you ride as long as your riding and smiling surely thats the point,,, i ride both equally and have done for years
  • + 13
 the poll is to gain information for pinkbike to sell as a marketing device.
  • + 2
 @dvp8: I really hope mfgs pay attention, becase the contrast between how many flat pedals shoes most of them make, & the results of this poll(at least right now) could not be more stark. about 3/4s use flat pedals in some capacity, & flats only has a significant lead.
  • + 6
 I bet Sram is behind this, probly want to hit us with a new pedal standard!
  • + 2
 @passwordpinkbike: well along with handlebar grip diameter, the only thing that hasn't changed forever is the current pedal axle standard, which is probably the only real 'standard' on a mountain bike?

Maybe Flypaper pedals are going to make a comeback?
  • + 1
 @groghunter: true but polls can be misleading. would be interesting to see how it relates to sales.
  • + 1
 @dvp8: They can be, but that's mostly when we're talking about 55-45 or 60-40 or some fairly close split. Even accounting for lack of representation of some kinds of cyclist due to bias, this poll isn't even close. While in reality the market might not be quite so one sided, it's certainly clear enough to show that there's real demand for more flat pedal options.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Pinkbike is a very gravity oriented website. Mostly people in baggy clothes not scared to catch some airtime. Whereas over here the majority of the people on the XC trails are Lycra wearing XC racers and (off-)roadies.
  • + 1
 I just use whatever shoes I have and cheap pedals with high profile pins. Everyone I ride with has clipless and tries to talk me into it. But they ride 4000 dollar super bikes and I ride my 1200 dollar cobjob lol
  • + 1
 I am looking to switch to flats. I was considerings the giro jack with nuke proof electron (sam hill signature) combo because 5.10 seem to fragile (delaminating soles). Any other ideas ?
  • + 2
 FWIW, I used some of that AKA tire glue that Mark Weir goes on about & my shoes haven't peeled since, so the delaminating thing is a solvable problem.
  • + 3
 I think the delaminates get soles happened when adidas bought five ten and switched production factories. I just got my kestrels replaced for free because of this. They know this is/was a problem and are more than willing to make it right. At least with my experience.
  • + 1
 I'm using the Jackets with Chromag Contact pedals and they are plenty sticky. When I use them with my Spank Spikes not so sticky. But I highly recommend the Jackets.
  • + 2
 Clips are a must for those of us with rubbish ankle flexibility. Shimano SPD on the mountain bikes and Shimano SPD SL on the roadie. Only Shimano kit on my mtb.
  • + 1
 I'm not going to bother reading all the comments, so I don't know if someone has already said this: judging by the response manufacturers have completely missed the mark. Five Ten are winning this by a mile...
  • + 2
 I had 5.10 freerider and they wore off in a year, now I ride Etnies Rap CF for 2 years and they are the best shoes,perfect grip,they last long,comfortable..
  • + 1
 Wonder how many people have tried 510s and thought they needed to go back? Not many I'm guessing.

My knees and elbows (low speed foot stuck moment's) couldn't be happier plus my technical abilities are better for it to.
  • + 1
 Went to flats on my slack aggro HT for convenience and discovered it made me lose my issues with flats in DH....think I will just flip between the 2 from now on. Still clipping on my all mountain bike.
  • + 1
 So for mtb my 5.10s are dank ngl but best shoes I've ever rode have to be 6.0 hi tops. That being said I'll probably end up doing some laps in half cabs and skinnies to make myself feel better about my rising ability lmao
  • + 3
 I prefer Gaerne shoes which aren't an option. The list needs an "other" option.
  • + 1
 Hi, I ride a kona Process, I usually use Shimano 105 road pedals. They work GREAT! only trouble is walking in my road riding kit and road shoes around the terrain park. I'm also a male.
  • + 2
 Why are they called clipless, instead of clipped? Honest question. I'll take my licks if I'm stupidly missing something here.
  • + 2
 This drives me crazy too: I think it is from the days of toe-clips on pedals. When the SPD pedal was created, it didn't have a clip, so it was 'clip-less.'
  • + 2
 @paulaston: winna winna chikin dinna !! Yes fellas, riding 'clipless' means NO Toe-clips. Back in the day of stone knives and bear-skins...
  • + 1
 I mostly ride clips, but I've been havin fun riding flats (and running shoes) at the bike park, even though I'm a bit awkward with it. If I owned my own park bike, I'd have good pedals and a pair of FiveTens.
  • + 2
 I wear DC skate shoes myself. Surprised to not see em on the list. I've always ridden flats, but I'm curious about clips.
  • + 2
 They might be afraid that if the poll shows many people on Vans and DCs, people might not invest in MTB specific shoes anymore.
  • + 1
 Always ridden dmr v12 pedals (the mk2 is just great), wish I could still buy teva shoes but the shimano am have been great too.
  • + 1
 Five Ten - that's what I call 'sector dominance'. Easy to see why though, best MTB product I've ever bought apart from my dropper post...
  • + 1
 Five Ten Falcons with Time Mx4. Because the cleat is small and recessed I can use the same shoe on flat pedals (Hope F20) without removing the cleat. Neat, aye?
  • + 1
 I used to rock Lotek Aitkens when I was on flats. Those were great shoes for DH and DJ. They looked like skate shoes but a stiffer sole than any skate shoe I ever wore.
  • + 1
 I rarely ride flats. My riding style has evolved to where I'm as light on the bike as I can be, both with my hands and my feet.
  • + 1
 I'd rather not let 510 know they have their competiotrs on their heels... i'd like to see them kept on their toes and focus on quality.
  • + 3
 Defo clipped when on the road bike.
  • + 3
 Giro Terraduro/CB Mallet E or when out with my little girl 5.10 Freerider Contact/DMR Vault
  • - 1
 Switched from flats to clips, so have done about 3-4 years on each. I don't think the clips are much faster or even more power efficient, but I definitely ride much smoother and cleaner now, and seem to break significantly less parts!
  • + 1
 Both, flats for technical stuff, clipped for marathons and local xc. Clipped in gives more power on steep climbs because I can also pull on the pedals
  • + 8
 You don't actually generate power from pulling up. You've been listening to too many spin instructers. Hurts your wattage
  • + 2
 For me it's not about "the extra power on steep climbs" it's more about the "shit this is steep and rooty, if I don't make it to the top I'm going to bail hard when I try to clip out and stop half way up". That motivation alone seems to get me up a few more climbs than riding flats.
  • + 1
 It should have been polled as: When you ride flats which brand do you prefer? and when you ride clip less which do you prefer?
  • + 1
 Been using a set of teva flat shoes for over a year now and have been nothing but excellent.. not even a mention in the article.
  • + 1
 They left the shoe market 2 years ago. you're riding new old stock.
  • + 1
 Wow talk about market dominance for 5.10! But I do find that surprising. I ride 5.10s but I don't really notice that many others wearing them.
  • + 3
 Adidas Terrex, same as Five ten but so much lighter,prettier,betterer
  • + 2
 The 2016 model adidas Terrex trail cross SL's are really nice. They also have jagged toe and heal sections for hike a bike. Much better all around shoe than five ten and $30 cheaper MSRP. Not to mention you can actually find deals on adidas as opposed to five ten. I paid $95 for mine on wild sherpa dot com.
  • + 1
 Interesting observation about the significantly higher number of clip shoes vs flat. Perhaps part of the reason is that there is more demand for variability in clip shoes.
  • + 1
 If that's true, why does Fiveten make so many varieties of flat shoe?
  • + 2
 Flats on the d/h bike and trail bike, clipped in on the hardtail. Whatever floats your boat as long as your smiling!
  • + 2
 ... So many kids frightened to clip in and become one with their bikes...
  • + 2
 I selected "I ride both"- Meaning one foot is clipped the other is flat.
  • + 1
 Riding Fox skateboard shoes for over two years now and they are finally giving up the ghost.
  • + 1
 Never thought I'd say this, but the new adidas cross trail are brilliant. Not lost a footing yet using them.
  • + 2
 Next question should have been "do you ride xc or dh?"
  • + 2
 What a poll... Rock&Troll!
  • + 1
 This poll is like USD fork = here we go again. You should ride whatever you feel good on and stopped being dick about it.
  • + 3
 The point of this poll wasn't to find out what's 'best' but to see who rides what. If 80% of riders used USD forks with only two models on the market (Manitou Dorado and DVO) then I'm sure a lot more upside down forks would appear pretty quickly.
  • + 1
 @paulaston: If USD forks would be desirable there would be a lot more of them on the market. Just look at X-fusion's Rebel X - it looks great but it didn't past eu tests until last year so you couldn't buy it legally.

To be honest I like the idea of something different but I can't stop the feeling that USD forks aren't met for mountain bikes. There's always problem of some kind that doesn't occur with traditional forks.
  • + 2
 I only like Vans when I ride.
  • + 3
 Toe clips FTW
  • + 2
 You missed out Adidas! The Terrex Trail Crossl SL is excellent!
  • + 2
 I only ride in flip flops...My toes need the air to cool off.
  • + 1
 I ride with timbs, wear a checkered shirt, jeans, have a long beard, and drink craft beer. What kind of bike do I ride?
  • + 3
 recumbent
  • + 1
 @ICAS: LOL That'll work too, but so does a Fatbike. :p
  • + 1
 Rusty beach cruiser.
  • + 2
 ya'll are more creative than I, I just assumed from the hipster description it was a fixie with 6" total bar length.
  • + 2
 I prefer my lead foot to be clipped and my rear foot to be a flat.
  • + 2
 Sombrio shoes are the ones i like best on flats & yes ive tried 5tens
  • + 1
 @Mattin: Phil Atwill Always rides clipped in. just saying
  • + 1
 I have ALWAYS ridden clipped in....BUT, flats are on my wish list.
  • + 1
 i think sam hill can justify is choice on this poll!!
  • + 1
 Sombrio, an nofiveten matters!
  • + 1
 They stopped producing the Nike 6.0 Mogan Mids...
  • + 1
 Race Face Chester Pedals and Five Ten Impact VXI Shoes
  • + 1
 5ten flats! Bitches..haha but not flat chested.........
  • + 1
 well I think that's what you call market domination.
  • - 1
 Just switched to clipless on the DH rig. Holy balls is it nice!!! And I'd never ride a trail bike on flats, that's how you slip and lose a nut.
  • + 1
 What no Teva anymore? What happened to the Pinner?
  • + 2
 teva stopped making mtb shoes years ago.
  • + 1
 Does anyone know if Shimano is planning an updated flat pedal?
  • + 1
 Five ten has a good thing going.
  • + 1
 And...we see why Five Ten does so well haha
  • + 0
 Clips vrs Flats timing youtu.be/beEOi9H6PT8
  • + 0
 FiveTen Freerider flats for everything.
  • + 0
 Pure and simple, I you pedal, clip in.............just sayin"
  • + 0
 Flat pedals wins medals!!!
  • + 1
 Vans
  • + 0
 clip is for road bike
  • + 0
 HT AEO3 uryday #flatlife
  • - 1
 #FlatPedalsWinMedals
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